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Scott to lead Upstate University Hospital as interim CEO.

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CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL

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THE LIST: HOTE

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RENDERING CREDIT: VISIONS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

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CNYBJ Data & Details Next Week’s List: Advertising, Marketing, PR Firms

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Next Week's Special Report: Health Care Quarterly

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January 30 List: Property & Casualty Insurers January 30 Special Report: 2017 Lookahead/President Forecast Messages/SportsBiz February 6 List: Cultural & Performing-Arts Organizations February 6 Special Report: Banking & Credit Union Report

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CNYBJ Briefs

Pike Company names Tehan president The Pike Company, Inc., a Rochester–based construction firm with an office in Ithaca, has promoted William (Bill) Tehan to company president. The firm has also named Tehan COO of The Pike Companies, LTD, the holding company of The Pike Company, Inc. and LECESSE Construction Services, according to a company news release. He will continue to lead the financial and legal groups supporting both companies. Tehan had been serving as COO of the Pike Company, Inc. and CFO of the Pike Companies, LTD, the company said. The company’s board of directors approved the promotion during its December meeting. As president of the Pike Company, Tehan will direct its day-to-day operations, formulate plans and policies to reach corporate objectives, and

ensure profitable growth. In his new role as Pike Company president, Tehan assumes the duties that Rufus Judson previously held. Judson will continue to serve as CEO of The Pike Companies, LTD, leading business development Tehan for the Pike Company and LECESSE Construction Services. Tehan started his career with Pike in 2001 as treasurer and corporate secretary, and has held multiple leadership positions within Pike for more than 16 years. Established in 1873, the Pike Company provides commercial-building services that include construction management, general contracting, program management, design/build, and facility management. Besides Rochester and Ithaca, the company also operates offices in Clifton Park in the Capital Region; the Buffalo suburb of Williamsville; New

A handful of recent tweets that came across the @cnybj Twitter feed, offering various business, personal, and social-media tips: 22 Statistics That Prove the Value of Personal Branding http://bit.ly/2ibsyH1 @ryanerskineNY @Entrepreneur BrandYourself @Brandyourself How to Create a Target Company List for Your Job Search | @TopResume @JobSearchAmanda https://www.topresume.com/ career-advice/create-target-company-list-forjob-search Hannah Morgan @careersherpa Why Social Media Marketing Is Important For ANY Business - http://j.mp/2jikxC0 Mike Johansson @mikejny The 3 Words That Can Change Your Life: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/ living-forward/201603/the-3-words-canchange-your-life Mitch Mitchell @Mitch_M 11 ways you can repurpose content for maximum social reach: http://ow.ly/ H82O307LHWF Hootsuite @hootsuite

ADAM ROMBEL/BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

COMING UP:

CNY

OBG makes second acquisition in four months with purchase of Milwaukee–based engineering firm

City of Utica’s credit rating gets three-notch upgrade from Fitch

SYRACUSE — Syracuse engineering firm OBG (formerly known as O’Brien & Gere) announced that it has acquired Natural Resource Technology (NRT), an environmental engineering and consulting firm headquartered in Milwaukee. NRT, which has about 75 employees, also has regional offices in Chicago; East Lansing, Michigan; and Bloomington, Illinois. The firm’s business is focused on sediment and manufactured-gas plant waste remediation, coal-combustion residuals management, and ecotoxicology. OBG didn’t release any financial terms of the deal. This is the second acquisition for OBG in four months — it purchased Charlotte, North Carolina– based PENTA Engineering, P.A. in September — and is the third deal in the past two years. “This is the third strategic acquisition we have completed over the past two years, which combined, have brought more than 160 new employees to our company,” Jim Fox, OBG CEO, said in a news release. “These acquisitions represent our strong commitment to strengthening our brand, expanding our client relationships and market presence, and accelerating our growth.” The acquisition of NRT supports OBG’s growth

UTICA — Fitch Ratings has upgraded the City of Utica’s credit rating from “BBB” to “A,” Utica Mayor Robert Palmieri and Comptroller William Morehouse announced. Utica earned a three-notch upgrade, which is significant because “Fitch rarely increases credit ratings by more than one notch at a time,” the city contended in a news release. “Multiple” financial rating institutions, including Fitch, have upgraded the city’s financial outlook “over the past several years,” establishing a “consistent pattern and trend” for the city’s financial recovery, the City of Utica said. Fitch’s report says the credit-rating upgrade resulted from Utica’s “strong” budget management during its economic recovery and “conservative” budget practices which increased its reserves for a fourth consecutive year. The report also went on to say that even though Utica’s fund balance was “completely depleted” in fiscal years 2009 through 2012, Palmieri and Morehouse have “rapidly rebuilt” the reserves during their tenure to a level “in excess of the city’s mandated minimum fund balance.”

plans and “specifically, its focus on the remediation of complex sites for the energy utilities, industrial, and federal market sectors,” the company said. “One of our key strategic growth initiatives is to expand our sediment remediation capabilities across the country,”Thomas Nowlan, OBG senior VP and leader of the company’s environmental business, said in the release. “OBG has completed some of the nation’s largest, most complex remediation and redevelopment projects. NRT’s expertise in sediment and manufactured gas plant waste remediation, coal combustion residuals management, and ecotoxicology, together with OBG’s established remediation experience and presence in advanced manufacturing, energy, and wastewater engineering, will provide our clients a broader range of expertise to help complete their most challenging environmental and capital projects.” OBG is headquartered at 333 West Washington St. in Syracuse’s Armory Square area. It also has a manufacturing and technology-development center in Clay. With the acquisition of NRT, it now employs about 1,000 people.


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JANUARY 16, 2017 I BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

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BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com ENDWELL — Visions Federal Credit Union (FCU) plans to expand its headquarters and to nearly “double its local workforce of 250 over the next decade.” The credit union held a groundbreaking ceremony on Dec. 20 at Credit Union Center, Visions’ HQ at 3301 Country Club Road in Endwell. The construction project at Credit Union Center marks Visions’ first major upgrade to its headquarters in nearly 30 years, the nonprofit financial institution said in a news release. Visions FCU currently employs about 250 people in Endwell, says Mandy DeHate, assistant VP of marketing at the credit union. Visions FCU has 550 employees total, including those who work in its branch network. “We’re looking at [adding] about 200plus over the next 10 years … they would be added just to the 250 in Endwell,” DeHate explains. Visions FCU is expanding its home base and employee count because its membership continues to grow. “In the late 80s, we had about 112,000 members, and as of today, we have about 180,000,” says DeHate. The employees at Visions’ HQ in Endwell focus on areas that include finance, information technology (IT), human resources, and administration. “…the IT department will definitely need to expand,” says DeHate. “our e-commerce [functions] ...when you think about website, mobile app, online banking, those sorts of things … Those are areas that are continually growing.” “The Credit Union Center project is not only a step forward for Visions and its members, but a huge investment in the

RENDERING CREDIT: VISIONS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Visions FCU to expand Endwell HQ & add more than 200 jobs Binghamton community,” Ty Muse, president and CEO of Visions FCU, contended in the news release. “It was important to

us to stay right here in the Binghamton area and be a part of the positive energy as the community and economy reinvent

Spring 2017 Madden Lecture

PREVENTING CYBERSECURITY

ATTACKS: A CIO’s Perspective

WEDNESDAY

Feb.

1

6 p.m. Le Moyne College Grewen Auditorium Grewen Hall

Jerry Fralick ’68 Chief Security Officer at Lenovo

Cybersecurity has become one of the most critical issues facing society today, with wide-ranging ramifications for national, corporate and individual safety and well-being. Speaking on the topic will be Jerry Fralick ’68, who, over the past 40-plus years, has charted an impressive IT career in both the public and private sector. Prior to his current position at the Fortune Global 500 computer manufacturer Lenovo, Fralick was CIO for the state of North Carolina and, before that, served 15 years as CIO for the Office of the Justice Programs within the U.S. Department of Justice.

This event is sponsored by the Madden School of Business, the College of Arts & Sciences, the Purcell School of Professional Studies, the McDevitt Center, the Student Veteran’s Association, and the athletic department.

themselves.”

Project

It’s a two-phase process, according to DeHate, who spoke to CNYBJ on Jan. 4. The contractor will first build a new 91,000-square-foot structure near the existing headquarters, she says. Once completed, the Visions staff will then move into the newly constructed building. “The existing building can then be renovated and then we connect the two of them,” says DeHate. Visions anticipates the contractor will have the new structure built by this December, with the renovations in the existing building completed the following year, she adds. The existing 79,000-square-foot HQ building is the former Endwell Elementary School, which Visions acquired in 1988. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania–based PW Campbell, which has worked with Visions previously, is handling the construction work. The construction started with the Dec. 20 groundbreaking. “Some preliminary work was done ahead of that … some changes to the parking lot,” she says. DeHate says she cannot provide a firm figure for the construction project cost. “A lot of it is still being bid right now, so we don’t have those figures,” she adds. It’s a project that Visions has planned and budgeted for, so the financing arrangement is “all taken care of.” Visions FCU’s roots date back more than a half century when a group of eight employees of IBM founded the credit union in 1966, according to DeHate. “Originally we were a credit union that was just for that group of IBM employees and then over the years, we’ve expanded and our charter has changed … but that was where we got our start,” she notes. 

AAA Western and Central New York announces new board members BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com SYRACUSE — The AAA Western and Central New York (WCNY) announced it has added M. Julieta Ross and Mark N. Wladis as new members to its board of directors. Ross is senior VP and chief technology officer at M&T Bank. She manages the M&T technology organization, which in-

cludes enterprise-wide information technology, applications development, architecture, engineering, and technology operations. Wladis is a Syracuse Ross attorney and founder of Wladis Law Firm, which specializes in business law and government

relations. He is responsible for all operations of the law firm, including corporate counsel for clients. The AAA WCNY board also announced its new officers. Kimberly A. Boynton, Wladis CEO of Crouse Hospital in Syracuse, was named board chair; Louis P. DiPalma, of Lakeshore

Savings Bank, was appointed vice chair; Michael S. Karnes, of Monroe Community College Public Safety, was named secretary; and Laura Saxby Lynch, of Paychex, was appointed treasurer. The AAA WCNY says it is upstate New York’s largest member services organization, providing nearly 860,000 members with travel, insurance, financial, and automotiverelated services. 


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BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I JANUARY 16, 2017

CNYBJ.COM

CAREER FAIR

hosted by the Syracuse Crunch

FRIDAY, FEB. 10, 2017

12 - 3 PM (set-up begins at 11 AM) WAR MEMORIAL ARENA The Local CNY Career Fair will help you fill open positions and network with CNY area professionals. Each participating business will receive the following: One six-foot table in Memorial Hall 10 tickets to Crunch vs. Senators (7 PM) Logo recognition on the scoreboard and/or ribbon lights during the game/intermission Registration: $200 by Friday, Feb. 3 ($150 for current Crunch partners and nonprofit 501c organizations) Contact Kristen Denick to register:

315-473-4444 x27 | kdenick@syracusecrunch.com

www.syracusecrunch.com @SyracuseCrunch

Starting a business while you’re still employed Steps you can take to minimize risk and maximize success

W

ith the New Year upon us, it is a time of reflection. We look back on our achievements and shortcomings from the past year. Most of us have a desire to make changes and set goals for the New Year. Many people will decide 2017 is the year to pursue their passion and turn it into a business. Before you take the plunge, quit your job, and dive into an entrepreneurial endeavor of Viewpoint any magnitude, take time to reflect on, and explore, key issues to make sure that your business idea is feasible and needed in the marketplace. Here are some important issues to consider and steps you can take. Minimize your risks. A great way to begin building a business is to do it while you still have the security of a steady paycheck, benefits, and paid time off. Create a schedule you can follow. Start by considering how much time you can devote to your business idea while still working. Then create a schedule. Starting a business will be difficult and time-consuming. Write down a list of all the activities and commitments you have in your life, with the amounts of time you devote to each during a week. This will help you to see if you truly have the time to devote to starting a business while working your current job. If you still want to move forward after reviewing this, see where you can feasibly cut out or change time within your current schedule to devote to further exploring and developing your business idea. Make an action plan with achievable goals for the day, week, or month. Without goals, milestones, and a plan to achieve your goals, it is very easy to slip into a very unproductive mode. That may create a sense of discouragement or defeat. Start saving money. Realistically, you are going to need some form of sustainable income before your business is able to be that sole source of income for you. One way to achieve this is by taking the time, while you still have a steady paycheck coming in, to do your research, evaluate your ideas and skills, and assess your personal finances. Obtain a personal credit report from any of the major credit-reporting agencies to get a current snapshot of where you stand. Check to be sure that everything on the report is valid and begin correcting anything that may be wrong, since this takes time to correct. Review your personal finances and budget. What can you cut in order to save? Be prepared. You will need money of your own to invest in your business. Most lenders like to see an owner’s investment of 10 percent to 20 percent in cash, assets, collateral, or a combination of all. So while you have the money coming in, start buckling down.

KEYONA KELLY

Create a budget to start saving. Get connected. Take the time to assess your skills and how they will be used in your business. You likely possess at least some of the necessary skills to make your business happen, but if you don’t, you’re faced with a tough decision. Spend time learning a new skill or outsource to someone else who can help. Obtain advice from industry experts, find mentors, join industry-related networking groups, and focus on getting connected with those in your industry. Research your competitors and the market. Decide what it is that will set you apart from the competition. Think about what the “need or problem” is that your business will solve. Fortune Magazine found that, “The No. 1 reason most businesses fail is a lack of market need for their product (this was cited by more than 42 percent of the failed companies). This really highlights the need to fully validate your idea and get honest feedback from potential customers before you start building, creating, and spending money. Get organized. To help you sort out all these areas and turn your idea into a reality, it’s helpful to use tools to organize your thoughts and plans. This could include calendars, timelines, research tools, and whatever else you can come up with to effectively manage your time and ideas. Develop a business plan. Business plans are “living documents,” which will continue to evolve as you develop your concept, start your business, analyze your growth, and work to achieve your goals. It’s about being prepared with a plan, planning for the unexpected, and developing your business concept and execution for both startup and beyond. Most people are overwhelmed by all they need for a business plan. Therefore, it’s best to break it down into sections to become much more manageable. Your plan is just one of many useful tools you can utilize to be sure you are considering and planning for the essential key areas within your business. Business plans provide a business “roadmap,” a way to convey your concepts to others, and are a “must-have” item to obtain almost any kind of funding from financial institutions, investors, or government/nonprofit grants. You can find a business-plan template on the U.S. Small Business Administration website at https:// www.sba.gov/tools/business-plan/1. Tap local resources. You can also feel confident in knowing that there is a bounty of resources and mentors available to you right here in Central New York. Most of them offer free and confidential counseling services to new or existing businesses. These resources include the Small Business Development Center (SBDC) at Onondaga Community College (OCC), SCORE, WISE Women’s Business Center, South Side Innovation Center (SSIC), CenterState CEO, the Tech Garden, and more. So, after considering the key issues laid out in this article, if you find your business is feasible, needed, and properly planned, take the leap and make your dream a reality in 2017.  Keyona Kelly is a business advisor at the SBDC, located at OCC. Contact her at k.r.kelly@sunyocc.edu


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PHOTO CREDIT: NEW YORK LT. GOV. KATHY HOCHUL’S TWITTER PAGE

McAlpin Industries opens new manufacturing plant in Wayne County Will create at least 24 new jobs BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com WALWORTH — McAlpin Industries, a family-owned metal-working company, in mid-December formally opened a new manufacturing plant in the town of Walworth in Wayne County. The new, 120,000-square-foot manufacturing and warehousing facility in Walworth will allow the company to create at least 24 new full-time jobs, according to a news release from Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s office. New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul attended a ribbon-cutting event at the new facility on Dec. 16. McAlpin Industries will also continue its operations in Rochester, where it has been headquartered for more than 50 years and

New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul (center) and other officials on Dec. 16 cut the ribbon at the new 120,000-square-foot McAlpin Industries manufacturing and warehousing facility in Walworth in Wayne County.

employs 148 workers. The Wayne County project received economic support and assistance from local and state-government agencies. Empire State Development will provide McAlpin Industries up to $400,000 in performancebased Excelsior Jobs Program tax credits in return for job-creation commitments. The investment from McAlpin Industries totals $5.85 million, the governor’s office said. “All of us at McAlpin Industries are thrilled that we are expanding our busi-

Cornell professor wins National Science Foundation grant BY JOURNAL STAFF news@cnybj.com ITHACA — A Cornell University professor who is working to make the financial system more stable in the future has just received a major funding award. The National Science Foundation has awarded Shawn Mankad — assistant professor of operations, technology, and information management in Cornell’s Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management — and his collaborators a grant of $525,000 over four years to create new tools to monitor the stability of the financial system. That’s according to a news release from Cornell posted on its website. The project is in response to the 2008 financial crisis, which “accentuated the need for effective monitoring, oversight, and regulation of financial markets and institutions,” the university said. “Complex market structures with intricate relationships among financial institutions can help propagate and amplify shocks, and so also can foster systemic risk,” Mankad said in the release. In his research work, he creates models of networks to study their evolution and their implications on systemic risk. With colleague George Michailidis of the University of Florida, and an advisory panel of economists from the Federal Reserve Board, Mankad will use the grant award

to develop an “integrative framework to identify and predict market participants that could endanger the financial system,” Cornell said. The framework, based on accounting principles, uses many “diMankad verse quantitative financial data streams, along with metadata and market announcements.” “The research builds on modern statistics and computer science, as well as recent financial and economic ideas aimed at assessing threats to financial stability and uncovering the complexity of financial systems in different market conditions,” Mankad added. Mankad said he hopes the project will contribute tools to support financial policymaking and decision-making. The project’s key tasks include developing a “rigorous accounting framework to integrate multiple financial and econometric data streams from many platforms and technologies,” the release stated. The research team will also create and customize new network models and analysis tools for use with multiple financial data streams. “An important idea will be to extend network and econometric tools in order to compare the structural evolution of different types of networks in response to external events and policy changes,” Mankad said. 

ness into Wayne County. This new building provides us with the opportunity to grow a product line through complete integration of robotic welding, powder coating, and assembly,” Ken McAlpin, company president and CEO, said. McAlpin Industries says it is an international, precision metal-working company that provides a variety of services to the telecommunications, computer, busi-

ness machine, office equipment, medical, transportation, voting equipment, electronic, warehouse management, and automotive sectors. The new plant will be home to metal stamping, robotic welding, and powder coating operations as the company expands its assembly and warehousing functions. It is located at 856 State Route 441 in Walworth. 

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Scott to lead Upstate University Hospital as interim CEO after McCabe steps down BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com SYRACUSE — Steven Scott, a hospital executive with more than 30 years of experience in academic medicine, will be the new leader of Upstate University Hospital on an interim basis after Dr. John McCabe, the hospital’s CEO since 2009, steps down on Jan. 17. Dr. Danielle Laraque-Arena, president of parent Upstate Medical University, named Scott interim CEO while the medical school conducts a national search for a permanent CEO of the hospital. Scott most recently was VP and CEO for Georgia Regents Medical Center, a 478-bed hospital center and a 154-bed Children’s Hospital,

according to an Upstate news release. Scott worked there from 2012 to 2015. Georgia Regents Medical Center is now known as Augusta University Medical Center. “I am pleased to have Steven Scott’s leadership during this transition as Upstate Medical University seeks greater integration of our educational, research and clinical missions to strengthen our future,” Laraque-Arena said in the release. “His success and experience in academic medicine will serve the university, our patients and students well.” Scott also served in administrative roles with Oregon Health and Science University; Wishard Health Services, (currently Eskenazi Health) in Indianapolis; University of Illinois

at Chicago Medical Center; Georgetown University Medical Center; Columbia University and Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. He holds a master’s degree in health-care administration from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor’s degree from Morehouse College, Upstate said. He is a fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives and the Healthcare Executive Study Society.

McCabe

McCabe will also resign from his posts as senior VP for clinical affairs and professor of emergency medicine, Upstate Medical University said. He plans to continue to live in Central New York, and pursue

other professional and personal interests, Upstate said. Laraque-Arena said she was “grateful” to McCabe for his many years of service to Upstate and the accomplishments he oversaw and guided at the institution. They included the acquisition of Community General Hospital in 2011, the opening of the Golisano Children’s Hospital and East Tower expansion, and the construction and opening of the new 90,000-square-foot Upstate Cancer Center. “Dr. McCabe has been an important part of Upstate for three decades. His contributions here and nationally are significant. I am grateful for his support during my first year as President. Upstate is proud of his accomplishments,” she said. 

SCOTT

MCCABE

When Preparing 2017 PR Plans, Know What’s Actually Newsworthy

L

ots of companies do or accomplish many good things every day. Some of them are nice internal efforts or achievements, some involve new initiatives for the organization, and some stuff has a real impact on the community that the organization serves. There is a time and place for all this news to be shared, but not all of it will make the cut for your daily or The Strategic weekly newspaper, or the evening television Minute newscast. So, when your public relations or marketing team is preparing a 2017 PR plan, make sure you know what’s really “newsworthy.”

CRYSTAL DESTEFANO

Certainly, be sure to share all your accomplishments — no matter how large or small — internally, within the organization. But being more selective with what you issue in news releases and media alerts will help to improve your media coverage. This is the skill that journalists, editors, and news directors love to see in the organizations they cover — knowing what’s newsworthy. If your company has hired or promoted someone, most publications have a “People News” or “Company News” section for which you can submit basic information (usually limited to 2-3 sentences) and a photo. Unless you have a new CEO, the media probably won’t run any more than this. If you’ve started doing something that’s new for your organization, but others in your industry already do it, too, then it’s not newsworthy to anyone other than your internal staff and your directly

affected audiences like customers. But if you have something new to announce (or a truly significant update on an annual or year-round initiative) that will impact the audience that the news outlet reaches, then you might have something newsworthy. It’s not always an “all-or-nothing” deal, either. If you have a major financial achievement or receive an industry award, for example, consider targeting your news toward local business media, as opposed to all the general news outlets. No matter which media outlets you’re contacting, it is basic etiquette to know what they’ve covered recently. If they just did a story on a similar topic, following up with your story isn’t helpful to them — in fact, that’s the worst time to share it. When you’re on the inside of an organization, it’s not always easy to be able to decipher what the outside world would con-

sider to be newsworthy. You believe in the mission of your company, and you’re proud of everything that your team accomplishes. That’s why it’s helpful to have an external, objective opinion when building your strategy for sharing good news. No matter how you get there, finding a way to deliver more of the newsworthy content that your local media wants — and less of what they don’t want — will have a big impact on your relationship with these journalists, and on the news coverage your company receives. Are you being heard?  Crystal DeStefano is president and director of public relations at Strategic Communications, LLC, which says it provides trusted counsel for public relations, including media relations, employee relations, and community relations. Contact DeStefano at Crystal@stratcomllc.com


JANUARY 16,WEEK'S 2017 I BUSINESSSPECIAL JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK THIS REPORT:

HIGHTECH & LOGISTICS I 7

CNYBJ.COM

MANUFACTURING Seen in this 2015 file photo, Jeffrey Pine, VP of strategy and product management at JADAK, LLC, says the company will acquire the assets of Woburn, Massachusetts–based ThingMagic in a $20 million deal that the company expects to close in the first quarter.

ERIC REINHARDT / BJNN FILE PHOTO

JADAK to acquire assets of Massachusetts firm BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com CICERO — JADAK LLC, a Cicero–based technology supplier, on Jan. 5 announced that it plans to acquire the assets of Woburn, Massachusetts–based ThingMagic. JADAK is paying $20 million in cash to purchase the company’s assets, says Jeffrey Pine, VP of strategy and product management at JADAK. He expects the transaction to close by the end of first quarter. Pine spoke to CNYBJ on Jan. 10. The Cicero firm, which operates at 7279 William Barry Blvd., specializes in machine vision, RFID, barcode, printing, and color and light measurement products and services for original-equipment manufacturers (OEMs). RFID, which is short for radio frequency identification, is a method of collecting and sharing data, much like a bar code, but it’s a wireless form of a barcode, according to Pine. The E-ZPass that drivers use on the New York State Thruway and other toll roads is a form of RFID technology, he notes. JADAK is a division of Bedford, Massachusetts–based Novanta Inc.

(NASDAQ: NOVT), a supplier of technology products for industrial and health-care OEMs. ThingMagic provides ultra-high frequency (UHF) RFID reader modules and finished RFID products for OEMs servicing the medical, retail, logistics, and airline industries, JADAK said. The company started discussions with ThingMagic in May of last year. ThingMagic has 13 full-time employees who Pine says will move to JADAK’s facility in Bedford, Massachusetts. Besides the firm’s employees, JADAK is also acquiring the ThingMagic product line, product design, patents, and intellectual property, he says.

Deal rationale

Pine says JADAK saw ThingMagic as a “leader” in the RFID industry. “They had a really good name, and that’s why we went after them,” he explains. JADAK pursued the asset acquisition to add to its product offerings, based on the different frequencies of RFID, says Pine. The frequencies include HF, or high frequency, and UHF. In late 2015, JADAK acquired SkyeTek, a Denver, Colorado–based provider of em-

bedded and standalone HF and UHF RFID products for OEM (original-equipment manufacturer) suppliers. SkyeTek’s product line primarily focuses on HF RFID frequencies. “ThingMagic has a wide range of UHF, by acquiring those assets and those products, we now have the widest range of HF and UHF-embedded modules to help our customers add RFID to their products,” says Pine. The pending transaction would mark JADAK’s second acquisition in the RFID market, following its 2015 purchase of SkyeTek the company noted in a news release. ThingMagic has been operating as a division of Sunnyvale, California–based Trimble, Inc. (NASDAQ: TRMB), a firm that “integrates a wide range of positioning technologies including GPS, laser, optical and inertial technologies with application software, wireless communications, and services,” according to its website. A group of Ph.D. graduates from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology founded ThingMagic in 2000, according to the JADAK release. “Combining ThingMagic’s products and services with the JADAK offerings enables

us to provide our customers with enhanced UHF and desktop reader products, while adding a line of finished reader products,” Janie Goddard, president of JADAK, said in the release. “JADAK is committed to providing our healthcare equipment manufacturer customers with market leadership, advanced technology and products, and engineering expertise in the embedded RFID and finished reader markets. Together we will continue to innovate and deliver industry-leading RFID solutions for our customers. With the combination of Skyetek HF products and ThingMagic UHF products, JADAK has the broadest range of RFID products in the market.”

About RFID

JADAK says RFID technology has “emerged over the last decade as an efficient means of detecting and tracking” retail products, medical consumables, airline baggage, and many other types of tangible goods. RFID can be used as an “alternative” to barcode technology in applications where line of sight to the object being tracked is not available or desired, or when data stored on the object requires modification by the reader. 


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PHOTO CREDIT: BARTELL MACHINERY SYSTEMS

Bartell Machinery makes sixfigure capital investment BY ADAM ROMBEL arombel@cnybj.com

Bartell Machinery Systems, LLC employees — Jonathan Mosley (left) and Justin Donai (right) — work on the initial set-up of a new advanced vertical CNC machining production cell that the manufacturer recently installed at its plant north of Rome.

industrial machinery systems for the tire, oil and gas, and wire industries. The company exports 80 percent of its products outside the U.S. To complement the capability of the machining centers, the CNC machining production cell includes multiple station vises and specially designed, dedicated fixtures for simultaneous production runs, a Parlec tool pre-setter for offline tool setup, and point-of-use tools and gages for in-process verification. Bartell says it has taken a “unique step to advance workflow processes” by rolling out a wireless computer system and large

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screen monitors that allow the entire workcell to be paperless. Andrew Longway, Bartell’s director of operations, said in a company news release that he believes this capability can be “transformational” for Bartell. “This production cell and the state of the art equipment within it not only allows us to be efficient and competitive in the production of the parts we currently manufacture but allows us to expand our capacity to develop more advanced and complex designs, having direct influence on the quality and lead-times, and providing our customers world class products,” Longway said. “Our goal with this investment is to support the development of our innovative designs and allow them to be produced efficiently and flawlessly. This capability will allow us to do that for years to come.” This vertical CNC machining production cell will also be part of Bartell’s efforts to “help build a future skilled workforce” by participating in the New York State Department of Labor Apprenticeship program, which provides a formal training program that combines hands-on work experience and classroom instruction. The goal is to build a skilled workforce to fill the widening gaps in available skilled labor in

the manufacturing and machining sector, Bartell said in its news release. “This program is new for Bartell and we are currently finalizing the details of the effort in concert with the Department of Labor, but this cell will be a key focus and the associated efforts are intended to be realized this year,” Lawlor tells CNYBJ. Bartell Machinery Systems, headquartered at 6321 Elmer Hill Road in the town of Lee, has 153 employees in Central New York and 160 companywide. Patrick J. Morocco is the company’s president. 

Our goal with this investment is to support the development of our innovative designs and allow them to be produced efficiently and flawlessly. — Andrew Longway, Bartell’s director of operations

ROME — Bartell Machinery Systems, LLC, based north of Rome, announced that it recently made a significant capital investment in an advanced vertical CNC machining production cell. The cell features two new Vertical Center Universal 500C machines made by Florence, Kentucky–based Mazak Corp. and is primarily used for plunge cutting, drilling, and material shaping. Bartell didn’t provide a specific amount for the investment, but Shawn Lawlor, a sales and marketing manager with the company, tells CNYBJ it was in “the six-figure range.” The firm took delivery of the machines, installed them, and made them operational during the fourth quarter, he adds. No new hires will result from this investment at this time. However, Bartell “is always evaluating the need for talented individuals based on the capacity and skill sets needed to grow our business,” Lawlor says. Bartell Machinery Systems, which was founded in 1940, makes highly engineered

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BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com SYRACUSE — The majority owner of Euphony, Inc., the software company that won CenterState CEO’s Germinator competition, says the startup is “going to need investors” to grow. “We’ve started speaking with several investors already, so we’re just starting those conversations,” says Fuz Eller, majority owner of Euphony, Inc. Euphony won the $100,000 grand prize in the Germinator business competition but will need more resources if it wants to expand, he says. Eller spoke with CNYBJ on Jan. 6 at the Syracuse Technology Garden where the startup is currently based. “Pretty much all here,” says Eller, when asked if Euphony has any of its operations outside the Tech Garden. He works from his home a lot, too. Euphony is a company that provides text-to-speech [TTS] synthesis that can work with different emotions. The company website describes its work as a “platform for generating authentic text-tospeech voices” for augmentative and alternative communication applications (ACA). “You express different emotions when

you input text and allow someone to sound happy or sad or angry or sound like an air-traffic controller in a simulation,” says Eller. The firm’s product line is called EuphoniumTTS. Winning the Germinator competition felt “really good,” but Eller says the victory represented even more. “It was a big relief to show that through a business-model program that demonstrates that we understand our markets, that we can sell a product, that we can identify customers and communicate with them and validate the need for our product,” says Eller. Eller has one employee at Euphony, but hopes to add between five and seven fulltime workers in 2017. Besides Eller, SRC Inc. and CenterState CEO are minority owners in the Euphony firm. The business generated about $80,000 in revenue during 2016, Eller says, and he is projecting that total will jump to about $1 million in 2017. The company will pursue customers who are interested in assistive-speech technology, such as companies that develop devices and apps that help people who have problems communicating.

ERIC REINHARDT/BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

Germinator winner, Euphony, seeks additional investors

Fuz Eller, majority owner of Euphony, Inc., works on his computers at the Syracuse Technology Garden, where the startup currently operates. Euphony won $100,000 in the CenterState CEO’s Germinator business contest back in December.

“ACA developers … already use voices. They all sound the same today. None of them can sound happy or sad or angry, so we anticipate being the go-to for ACA developers to add emotion to their product lines,” says Eller. Once Euphony is able to expand into the simulation market, it hopes to sell to developers and producers of air-traffic control and cockpit simulators to help pilots in their training.

Eller founded the company in November 2013 as he was working on the legal process to transition the technology away from Cicero–based SRC Inc., the former Syracuse Research Corporation, where he previously worked.

New start

Eller, who hails from England, joined the SEE GERMINATOR, PAGE 10

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BY ERIC REINHARDT ereinhardt@cnybj.com

S

yracuse–based MedTech says it “applauds” what it says is Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s “bold” proposal to spend $650 million to grow New York’s lifesciences research cluster including publicprivate partnerships. Jessica Crawford, president of MedTech, made the comments in a statement posted Dec. 29 on the MedTech website. More than a week later, Cuomo provided details of the $650 million life-sciences initiative in one of more than 30 proposals in his State of the State agenda that his office released as he delivered regional speeches on the proposals that started in New York City. The life-sciences initiative includes $250 million in tax incentives for new and existing life-science companies, Cuomo’s office said in a news release issued Jan. 9. MedTech, which operates at Syracuse Technology Garden, “connects New York State’s bio/med industry through collaboration, education and advocacy,” according to its website. It describes itself as an “active association of pharmaceutical, biotech and medical technology companies, their suppliers and service providers, and research universities.” Besides the tax incentives, Cuomo’s proposal also involves $200 million in state capital grants to support investment in wet-lab and innovation space; and $100 million in investment capital for early-stage, life-science initiatives, with an additional match of at least $100 million for operating support from private-sector partnerships. In addition, the state will provide $17 million in capital funding to launch JLABS @ NYC, which Cuomo’s office describes as a “collaboration” between Johnson & Johnson Innovation and the New York Genome Center to build a 30,000-square-foot incubator with capacity for up to 30 life-science startups. The New York Genome Center, located in New York City, is an “independent nonprofit at the forefront of transforming biomedical research and clinical care,” the

governor’s release stated. Cuomo discussed the life-sciences initiative during the first of his regional State of the State addresses held Jan. 9 in New York City. The life-sciences sector includes the fields of biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, biomedical technologies, life-systems technologies, and includes organizations and institutions that “devote the majority of their efforts to the various stages” of research, development, technology transfer, and commercialization. These firms are also making “significant advancements” in agricultural and environmental biotechnologies. “The ever-evolving life science sector is discovering solutions to the most pressing problems of our time, helping to cure disease and save lives around the world,” Cuomo said in the news release. “New York is poised to be a global leader in this industry, and the new, vital incubator JLABS will be the catalyst that pushes our state into the forefront of this exciting field. I look forward to working with Johnson & Johnson and the New York Genome Center to build momentum in the life science industry and establish New York as the home of discoveries that will drive the economy and create a better future for all.”

MedTech support

MedTech, which operates at the Syracuse Technology Garden, “has long advocated for a comprehensive life sciences initiative and the governor’s initiative answers that call,” according to Crawford’s statement on the MedTech website. Crawford cited a 2014 study that the association commissioned which estimated that the bioscience industry generates a total revenue impact of $62.6 billion in New York, including about $20.2 billion in upstate New York. The bioscience industry employs more than 205,000 people, including 77,000 in upstate New York, according to the MedTech statement. The average annual bioscience wage in 2012 was $71,900, which is about $30,000 more per year than the total private-sector average for our region.

PHOTO CREDIT: CUOMO FLICKR ACCOUNT

MedTech supports Cuomo’s proposal to spend $650M on N.Y.’s life-sciences sector

Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Jan. 9 held the first of his regional State of the State addresses at 1 World Trade Center in New York City. His proposals include spending $650 million on New York’s life-science sector, an initiative that includes tax incentives and capital grants.

MedTech calls them “highly skilled, highly prized jobs that contribute to the total economy of upstate New York.” But Crawford notes that the Empire State faces threats from other states seeking to attract some of New York’s companies in the sector. “New York ... faces stiff competition to retain and grow the life-sciences industry here in New York from states which have advanced comprehensive life-science initiatives including Massachusetts, North Carolina and California, as well as from other countries. Competing states have poached researchers from our leading academic institutions and companies, offered generous tax benefits and created workforce development programs targeted to the needs of life sciences companies. A survey commissioned by MedTech of 21 bioscience and medical-technology executives indicated that for growth in this important industry, New York needed a more formalized statewide system of academic partnerships, greater access to capital for startup companies and access to a skilled work force and key job skills such as research engineers and scientists, quality assurance/control/validation positions and product development,” Crawford’s statement said. Crawford contends that Cuomo’s plan addresses these needs and others, including the tax credits, capital, additional land, and the university partnerships involved.

Additional details

Cuomo’s proposal would include $250 million in tax incentives for new and existing life-sciences companies that are expanding research and development. His office contends the state “must draw

more capital to this sector” from early stage and angel investors “to better compete with other states actively poaching New York’s top life-science research talent.” The additional capital would “make it more attractive” for existing and new firms in life sciences to “locate, invent, commercialize and produce” in New York. Under Cuomo’s program, existing lifescience businesses would be eligible for an annual allocation of $10 million in Excelsior tax credits. New life-science businesses would also receive a 15 percent refundable tax credit on all new qualifying research and development expenditures. Small businesses in the life-sciences industry could be eligible for a 20 percent credit. Additionally, angel investors would receive a credit of 25 percent of their investment, with a maximum of $250,000 per investor. The proposal also includes spending $200 million in state capital grants over 10 years and offering more than 4.2 million square feet of space and 2,038 acres of developable land tax-free to “accelerate life-science innovation” at 62 colleges and universities statewide. Cuomo’s proposal also has the state pledging $100 million for additional investment capital for early stage, life-science firms. In addition, private-sector partnerships are also pledging matching funds for investment and operational support, bringing the total commitment to $200 million. Part of the investment would include a new life-science launch competition, modeled on Buffalo’s 43North competition, which would “further support the growth of this sector,” according to the state. 

GERMINATOR: Euphony is a company that provides text-to-speech [TTS] synthesis that can work with different emotions U.S. Air Force in 1983 and served through 2004 before joining SRC in Cicero, where he led various research and development projects. He is a trained cryptologic linguist. The position is described as someone who can identify “foreign communications using signals equipment,” according to goarmy. com, the website of the U.S. Army.

Eller’s work included serving as the principal investigator for audio exploitation, which involved building a system that could express different emotions. He described the technology as that which could imitate the sound of a human being in a particular environment. “We could simulate humans in a controlled environment and allow the real hu-

mans working in the simulation to respond to these voices as if they were real to make the simulations more realistic for them,” says Eller. The federal-government sequestration, or automatic spending cuts, in 2013 eliminated the funding for the work that Eller and his colleagues were doing. But Eller didn’t want to give up on the

Continued from page 9

technology. “I asked SRC if I could take the technology and at least give it a chance, and they said yes. They gave me access to all of the inventions, intellectual property, and equipment,” he explains. Eller spent the next year trying to figure out how to “simplify everything” to pursue the idea as a startup business. 


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Name Address Phone/Website Turning Stone Resort Casino 5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 (315) 361-7711/turningstone.com Crowne Plaza Hotel & Conference Center 701 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 479-7000/cpsyracuse.com Marriott Syracuse Downtown 100 E. Onondaga St. Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 474-2424/marriottsyracusedowntown.com

Toll-Free Reservation Number (800) 771-7711

DoubleTree by Hilton Syracuse 6301 State Route 298 E. East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 432-0200/syracuse.doubletree.com Holiday Inn Binghamton 2-8 Hawley St. Binghamton, NY 13901 (607) 722-1212/ holidayinnbinghamton.com Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel & Conference Center 801 University Ave. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 475-3000/sheratonsyracuse.com Embassy Suites Syracuse 6646 Old Collamer Road S. East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 446-3200/syracuse.embassysuites.com DoubleTree by Hilton Binghamton 225 Water St. Binghamton, NY 13901 (607) 722-7575/binghamton.doubletree.com Holiday Inn Syracuse/Liverpool 441 Electronics Parkway Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 457-1122/staysyracuse.com Quality Inn & Suites Vestal 4105 Vestal Parkway E. Vestal, NY 13850 (607) 729-6371/choicehotels.com Hotel Ithaca 222 S. Cayuga St. Ithaca, NY 14850 (607) 288-2096/thehotelithaca.com Vernon Downs Casino and Hotel 4229 Stuhlman Road Vernon, NY 13476 (315) 829-3400/vernondowns.com Comfort Inn & Suites Syracuse Airport 6701 Buckley Road Syracuse, NY 13212 (315) 457-4000/syrhotel.com/comfort-inn-airport Holiday Inn Auburn-Finger Lakes Region 75 North St. Auburn, NY 13021 (315) 253-4531/hiauburn.com Radisson Hotel Utica Centre 200 Genesee St. Utica, NY 13502 (315) 797-8010/radisson.com/uticany Best Western Watertown/Fort Drum 300 Washington St. Watertown, NY 13601 (315) 782-8000/bestwestern.com Genesee Grande Hotel 1060 E. Genesee St. Syracuse, NY 13210 (315) 476-4212/geneseegrande.com The Statler Hotel at Cornell University 130 Statler Drive Ithaca, NY 14853 (607) 254-2500/statlerhotel.cornell.edu Greek Peak Mountain Resort 2000 NYS Route 392 Cortland, NY 13045 (800) 955-2754/greekpeakmtnresort.com Holiday Inn Elmira Riverview 760 E. Water St. Elmira, NY 14901 (607) 734-4211/FingerLakesHotels.com Courtyard Syracuse 6415 Yorktown Circle East Syracuse, NY 13057 (315) 432-0300/syracusecourtyard.com Ramada Inn Geneva Lakefront 41 Lakefront Drive Geneva, NY 14456 (315) 789-0400/genevaramada.com Holiday Inn Waterloo-Seneca Falls 2468 State Route 414 Waterloo, NY 13165 (315) 539-5011/hiwaterloo.com Clarion Inn & Suites Fairgrounds 100 Farrell Road Syracuse, NY 13209 (315) 457-8700/choicehotels.com Maplewood Suites Extended Stay 400 7th North St. Liverpool, NY 13088 (315) 451-1511/mwsyracuse.com Hilton Garden Inn Watertown/Thousand Islands 1290 Arsenal St., Suite 8 Watertown, NY 13601 (315) 788-1234 /watertown.hgi.com

Rooms Suites 709 143

Guest Amenities wireless Internet, cable TV, business center, inroom safes, coffeemaker

General Manager or Key Management Ray Halbritter, CEO

Year Estab. 1993

(866) 305-4134

279 3

high-speed Internet, room service, business center, Tiffany Gallagher, General 1969 shuttle to airport and Destiny USA, conference Manager center, covered parking Kyle Hares, Director of Sales and Marketing suites with separate living room, accessible guest Paul McNeil, General Manager 1924 rooms, 49" screen LCD HDTVs, complimentary Jerry Keohane, Director of Sales WiFi, wired and wireless access in guest rooms, and Marketing suites, and meeting rooms, business center, fitness Alexis Cohen, Director of Catering center, concierge level, local shuttle service, pet friendly business center, shuttle service, high-speed Thomas Olsen, General Manager 1977 Internet, indoor & outdoor pools, video Bill Williams, Director of Sales and conferencing, ATM, fitness center Marketing

844-STAY-SYR

261 16

(800) 782-9847

250 7

(888) HOLIDAY

237 14

executive floors, business center, high-speed Internet, fitness facilities, valet laundry service, room service

Paul Lawrence, General Manager

(800) 395-2105

235 23

fitness center, indoor pool, sauna, full staging and A/V equipment

David H. Heymann, General Manager

1985

(800) EMBASSY

215 215

business center, 42" flat-screen HD TVs, desk, wet bar, refrigerator, microwave, coffeemakers, complimentary full cooked-to-order breakfast

Randy Player, General Manager

1990

(800) 723-7676

207 9

wireless, high-speed Internet access, on-site athletic club with salt water indoor pool, room service, complimentary parking, airport shuttle

Michael Pemberton, General Manager Patty Weist, Director of Sales

1987

(888) HOLIDAY

197 2

Rachael Bliss, Director of Sales and Marketing

1962

(877) 424-6463

195 -

free parking, high-speed Internet, 24/7 shuttle service including airport, full-service with lounge, business center, fitness center, indoor pool and patio complimentary full hot breakfast buffet, Wi-Fi, nonsmoking, pet friendly, outdoor seasonal heated pool, exercise room

Ray Crouse, General Manager

1970

-

177 2

free parking, free Wi-Fi

Sonny Karimi, General Manager

-

(877) 888-3766

173 NA

business center, wireless Internet, boardroom and meeting facilities, weekday continental breakfast

Scott Freeman , President and General Manager Tioga and Vernon Downs Casino

1994

1-888-857-4298

166 21

Mark Goodfellow, General Manager Tanya Gleason, Sales Manager

2006

(888) HOLIDAY

165 2

complimentary hot breakfast buffet, complimentary WiFi, coin-operated laundry & valet, complimentary shuttle servicing airport, Regional Transportation Center and mall, game room mini-fridge in all guestrooms, free Wi-Fi, new business center, exercise room, and guest washer & dryer

Nasir Zahir, General Manager

1980

(800) 333-3333

162 3

business center, complimentary wireless Internet

Michael Fults, General Manager

1980

(800) 780-7234

161 -

high-speed Internet, free hot breakfast, 42" LCD TVs, DVD library

Jeri Fedora, General Manager

1960

(800) 365-HOME

159 80

fitness center, complimentary Wi-Fi, complimentary shuttle and parking

Robert Benetti, Area General Manager

2004

(800) 541-2501

153 15

complimentary Internet

Richard Adie, General Manager

1989

(800) 955-2754

150 106

each unit features a full kitchen and fireplace

Wes Kryger, President Jessica L. Sloma, VP Sales & Marketing

1958

(888) HOLIDAY

149 3

(800) 321-2211

149 12

(800) 990-0907

148 9

(888) HOLIDAY

148 4

business services, high-speed Internet, guest laundry, room service, free parking, full-service restaurant

Linda Knight, General Manager

1975

(800) 4-CHOICE

144 20

complimentary parking, continental hot breakfast and coffee, wireless high-speed Internet, business center, pet-friendly hotel

Harry Patel, General Manager

1963

(866) 318-9937

137 5

-

136 15

wireless Internet, bath & body toiletries, Christie Buczek, Director of Sales complimentary deluxe continental breakfast, daily shuttle service, & wet bars in every room featuring cook tops, refrigerators, & microwaves fitness room, swimming pool, hot tub, whirlpool Jody Pettit, General Manager suites, business center, full-service restaurant Shawn McCormick, Director of serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily, room Sales and Marketing service available during evening hours, lounge

1968

Research by Vance Marriner vmarriner@cnybj.com (315) 579-3911 Twitter: @cnybjresearch

Just Missed the List Bonnie Castle Resort and Marina

129

Ramada Carrier Circle

128

Riveredge Resort

128

Quality Inn East Syracuse

125

Candlewood Suites Syracuse Airport

124

Upcoming Lists January 23 Advertising, Marketing, PR firms January 30 Property & Casualty Insurers

ABOUT THE LIST

high-speed wired/wireless Internet, refrigerator, Sheila Thomas, General Manager 1973 microwave, coffeemaker, flat panel LCD TV, spacious work areas and telephones w/ voicemail, Anthony's Restaurant & Lounge, indoor pool, fitness center business center, exercise facility, Bistro serving Thomas Caracci, General Manager 1988 breakfast & dinner daily Mel Lemm, Assistant General Manager business center, coffeemakers, hairdryers, data Donna Yudin, General Manager port, voicemail, fitness center, high-speed Internet, ATM

1997

2006

2011

Information was provided by representatives of listed organizations and their websites. Other groups may have been eligible but did not respond to our requests for information. Organizations had to complete the survey by the deadline to be included on the list. While The Business Journal strives to print accurate information, it is not possible to independently verify all data submitted. We reserve the right to edit entries or delete categories for space considerations. Central New York includes Broome, Cayuga, Chemung, Chenango, Cortland, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, St. Lawrence, Seneca, Tioga, and Tompkins counties.

NEED A COPY OF A LIST?

Electronic versions of all our lists, with additional fields of information and survey contacts, are available for purchase at our website: cnybj.com/ListsResearch.aspx

WANT TO BE ON THE LIST?

If your company would like to be considered for next year’s list, or another list, please email vmarriner@cnybj.com


JANUARY 16, 2017 I BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

Business Journal

News Network JANUARY 16, 2017 VOL. XXXI, NO. 2

NEWS EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Adam Rombel arombel@cnybj.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Maria J. Carbonaro mcarbonaro@cnybj.com STAFF WRITERS Eric Reinhardt ereinhardt@cnybj.com Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Erin Zehr ewebb@cnybj.com RESEARCH DIRECTOR Vance Marriner vmarriner@cnybj.com COLUMNISTS Crystal DeStefano Lee Hamilton Tom Morgan

SALES Mary LaMacchia mlamacchia@cnybj.com Dony Kuriakose dkuriakose@cnybj.com MARKETING BBB Marketing Inc.

CIRCULATION Circulation Management (315) 579-3927

ADMINISTRATIVE PUBLISHER Marny Nesher mnesher@cnybj.com PUBLISHER EMERITUS Norman Poltenson npoltenson@cnybj.com BUSINESS MANAGER Kurt Bramer kbramer@cnybj.com

Cover Price $2.50 Subscription Rate $89 per year Call (800) 836-3539

I 13 CNYBJ.COM

It’s time for Term Limits in Congress

P

resident-elect Donald Trump and others say we need term limits for Congressmen and Congresswomen. Do we ever, for dozens of good reasons. One is that we would get more citizen legislators. That is, people who had successful careers outside of politics. These people would be more likely to be in touch with the likes of you and your neighbors. Hooray for that. There is no question that Congress is covMoney Talk ered by a bubble. For me the biggest reason for term limits is regulations. We simply choke on them. If we had more ordinary common-sense folks in Congress, they would not allow the choking. Anybody who ever got near the auto industry would not allow the wad of senseless forms you have to sign to buy a car. Anyone who ever worked in the investment business would burn the mountain of regulations that inflict that industry. When you open a simple account your financial advisor spends half an hour on the paperwork. Anybody who knew anything about community banks would shoot the guys who wrote the Dodd-Frank [Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010]. That is the monster bill Congress created after our financial crisis. But politicians caused the financial crisis with policies that encouraged home ownership at any price — setting the stage for the housing bubble. Then they wrote a bill that crushes community banks. Then, while claiming to save banking from future calamities, Congress got things the

TOM MORGAN

wrong way around. The Dodd-Frank law is the calamity. Even the janitors in community banks know better. They know that 22,000 pages of new regulations are stupid and sinful. They know small banks could never cope with so many nits to pick. The folks in Congress should have talked with the janitors before they created the monstrosity. They should have talked with businesses that rely on these banks. Should have talked with folks who run these banks — the folks who lend to the people who run the businesses. The businesses that create the jobs the politicians assured us they wanted to “create.” Idiots. Am I harsh? You be the judge. One in five of our community banks has disappeared since Dodd-Frank. Almost no new banks have formed since Dodd-Frank. Entrepreneurs have formed fewer and fewer small businesses. Ask five small-business owners if these banking regulations have hurt them. My guess is that four will say yes, we can’t get the financing we used to obtain. Our bank is handcuffed. What a wonderful gift our out-of-touch Congressmen gave to us. Poison for our community banking system. Think about how many millions of businesses were stillborn because of Dodd-Frank. Imagine how many never expanded. Imagine how many jobs never saw the light of day. Thanks to Dodd-Frank. It’s really Dodd-Frankenstein. How could politicians be so stupid? Simple. Too few of them have worked in or owned a business. Too few know the slightest thing about how small businesses operate. So, we need to bring on term limits. They might bring more people to Washington who do know such stuff.

Our System Comes With No Guarantees

T

here are a lot of dire predictions about our representative democracy out there. They include complaints about a rigged political system and commentators worrying about the imminent failure of the American experiment. I don’t agree with these predictions of calamity. Our representative democracy is not on the verge of collapse. But I do see stresses and tenOpinion sions that should concern anyone who cares about our system of self-government. The mere fact that this nation is filled with so many citizens who have lost confidence in key institutions is worrisome. The Gallup organization’s ongoing polling has found a pervasive drop in public regard for the institutions that undergird American

LEE HAMILTON

THE CENTRAL NEW YORK BUSINESS JOURNAL (ISSN #1050-3005) is published every week by CNY Business Review, Inc. All contents copyrighted 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher.

OPINION

life. The reasons stem in part from a declining willingness among the people who inhabit those institutions to observe the norms of behavior that evoke public confidence. This is notable especially on Capitol Hill and in political life, where the parties seem to have abandoned fair play and use institutions to maximize partisan advantage. Politicians attack opposing politicians’ patriotism, accuse them of criminal activity, question the fairness of the election process itself — with virtually no evidence — and seek to undermine their effectiveness in office. Small wonder that the public questions elected officials’ legitimacy. Too many politicians seem fine with dysfunction. They appear more interested in holding power than in using it to solve problems. They reject the norms of behavior in a civil society. They sidestep accountability and transparency. So, what might be done to restore public faith in the system’s fairness, justness, and

Senator George McGovern was in Congress for decades and had a hand in all kinds of legislation. The man also ran for the White House but lost. When he retired, McGovern and his wife bought a small hotel in Connecticut. Within two years, the business was bankrupt. George put some of the blame on the recession of that time. But he placed much of the blame on the regulations that his small hotel faced. The government rules allowed people to file frivolous lawsuits that cost the hotel big money. They forced the hotel to pay people to fill out forms galore. They sucked too many resources from the business of running a hotel. McGovern, bless him, made a confession in the Wall Street Journal. He confessed that his business was whacked by the sorts of regulations he had helped create in Washington. His confession ought to be stenciled on the desks of every person in Congress. “I…wish that during the years I was in public office I had this firsthand experience about the difficulties business people face every day. That knowledge would have made me a better U.S. senator and a more understanding presidential contender.” The headline for his confession was perfect: “A politician’s dream is a businessman’s nightmare.” Here’s to more common sense in Washington. Here’s to term limits. From Tom…as in Morgan.  Tom Morgan writes about political, financial, and other subjects from his home near Oneonta. Several upstate radio stations carry his daily commentary, Tom Morgan’s Money Talk. Contact him at tomasinmorgan@yahoo. com decency? Paul Light of New York University recently proposed a list of fixes that would enjoy support among ordinary Americans in both parties: reducing the role of money in elections, boosting ethical constraints on elected officials, reducing waste and inefficiency, and ensuring that civil servants and political appointees are qualified and competent. Americans don’t expect miracles. They just want the basic features of government to work. But making this happen is up to us. Politicians may be directly responsible for the problems above, but you and I as voters allow them to get away with it. The first words of the Constitution read, “We the People,” not “We the Government.” It’s up to us to strive for a more perfect union, and to be vigilant about these adverse tendencies that threaten to undermine our representative democracy.  Lee Hamilton is a senior advisor for the Indiana University (IU) Center on Representative Government, distinguished scholar at the IU School of Global and International Studies, and professor of practice at the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Hamilton, a Democrat, was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years, representing a district in south central Indiana.


14 I

BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I JANUARY 16, 2017

CNYBJ.COM

Business Calendar JANUARY 19  Business After Hours and Showcase — Meet the Finalists from 5 to 7 p.m. at 246 Willow St. in Syracuse. Meet the six teams recently selected as GENIUS NY finalists. To register, visit www.centerstateceo.com or email: kdejoseph@centerstateceo.com  Bite-Sized Pursuits (Lunchtime Edition): CyberSecurity – the Do’s and Don’ts! from Noon to 1:15 p.m. at Owego Treadway Banquet and Conference Center, 1100 State Route 17C, Owego. Recovering from a cyber breach on average costs businesses up to hundreds of thousands to potentially millions of dollars. Sixty percent of small businesses that experience a breach will be out of business in six months. All this can start with just one person in an organization clicking on the wrong link on a web page or email. Come join A&P Technologies’ cybersecurity experts as they cover some basic do’s and don’ts to help business owners understand and reduce their cybersecurity risk. The program cost including lunch is $18 ($15 for Tioga County Chamber of Commerce members) if reservations are made by Jan. 16. After Jan. 16, the cost will be $20. Please call the Tioga County Chamber at (607) 687-2020 for information or reservations.  NAFTA Roadshow 2017 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Homewood Suites, 6006 Fair Lakes Road, DeWitt. This expert panel discussion, sponsored jointly by the Global Chamber Buffalo and Welke Customs Brokers USA, will discuss the 20-year history of NAFTA, what its future may look like, and what it means for U.S., Canadian, and Mexican importers and exporters. The moderator will be Chris Scalisi, executive director of the Global Chamber Buffalo. The event is free to CNYIBA member companies and staff; it’s $15 for nonmembers. To register, email: info@cnyiba.net for a promotional code before you register. Then use the code to register as “special guest.”

JANUARY 20  Women & STEAM Speakers Series: Margot Lee Shetterly presented by Project Fibonacci Foundation, Inc. from 7 to 10 p.m. at The Stanley Theatre in Utica. The speaker, Margot Lee Shetterly is author of the book “Hidden Figures,” the true story of the AfricanAmerican women mathematicians at NASA who helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Event tickets cost $25. To buy tickets, visit: http://bit.ly/2iIXLiz. For more information, email: info@projectfibonacci.org

JANUARY 24, 31 & FEBRUARY 7, 14  QuickBooks for Small Business series of workshops presented by SCORE from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at SUNY Oswego Metro Center, 100 S. Salina St., #105, Syracuse. The cost is $95, but it’s free to veterans. Call (315) 471-9393, X245 for questions or to sign up. Subtitled “Keep the Books,” topics include keeping track of sales, expenses, inventory, accounts receivable and payables. Computers and software will be provided. No cloud users, please.

JANUARY 24  Chemung County Chamber Annual Meeting of Members at the Holiday Inn Riverview at 760 E. Water St. in Elmira from

5-8:30 p.m. Former Buffalo Bills star Steve Tasker is the keynote speaker. Cost to attend is $75 per member individual attendee. For more information, contact Ann Cady at (607) 734-5137.

JANUARY 25  Change is Hard! interactive workshop conducted by CNY ATD to help develop a plan for implementing change in your personal and professional life from 8 to 10:30 a.m. at WCNY, 416 W Fayette St, Syracuse. Cost is $25 for CNY ATD members; non-members pay $40. For more information, email: info@cnyastd.org, call (315) 546-2783, or visit www.cnyastd.org.

JANUARY 26  2017 Annual Tompkins County Chamber Dinner & Awards from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at Emerson Suites, Ithaca College. Join the chamber for a celebratory toast in making Tompkins County the best place to live, work, and grow a business in CNY. This event is the place to see and be seen in Tompkins County’s government, civic, and business communities, the chamber contends. Event tickets are $75 each with registration and payment due by 5 p.m. on Jan. 20. For more information, contact Marilyn Mazza, office manager, at marilyn@ tompkinschamber.org  Labor & Employment Law Update: Navigating Change in 2017 from 8 to 10:30 a.m. at Bella Domani, 5988 E. Taft Road, Cicero. Presented by Kristen E. Smith, labor & employment attorney at Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC. The change in administration is sure to bring changes to the world of labor and employment law that will directly impact the work of human-resource managers. This event will cover those prospective changes. The cost is $45 for CNY SHRM members and $55 for nonmembers. For more information, visit www.cnyshrm.org

JANUARY 27  Believe in Syracuse Birthday Party from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at the MOST in Armory Square. Free food and beverage samples, and birthday cake; networking opportunities; live entertainment; and presentation of the 3rd Annual Believe in Syracuse Awards. This event is free to attend for members of Believe in Syracuse. Learn more at its website: believeinsyracuse. org/birthday

FEBRUARY 1  Spring 2017 Madden Lecture – Preventing Cyber Security Attacks: A CIO’s Perspective. VIP Reception from 5-6 p.m. at Simon’s Pub, Campus Center; Lecture at 6 p.m. at Grewen Auditorium, Grewen Hall. The speaker will be Jerry Fralick, chief security officer at Lenovo. RSVP for reception by Jan. 23 to (315) 445-4280, or email: bakerjim@lemoyne. edu

FEBRUARY 16  Onboarding: Going Beyond Orientation from 8 to 10 a.m. at WCNY, 416 W. Fayette St., Syracuse. CNY ATD will discuss employee onboarding as a process that goes beyond an orientation. The cost for members is $25; it costs $40 for nonmembers. To register, visit www.cnyastd.org. For more information,

email: info@cnyastd.org or call (315) 546-2783.

FEBRUARY 28  Shop Talk from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at Wolff’s Biergarten, 106 Montgomery St., Syracuse. CNY ATD hosts an informal gathering with group discussions on varied talent-development topics. This is a complimentary event. Register at www.cnyastd.org. For more information, email: info@cnyastd.org or call (315) 546-2783.

MARCH 7  CNY ATD Orientation from 8 to 9:15 a.m. at CXtec, 5404 South Bay Road, North Syracuse. Learn about CNY ATD, the local affiliate chapter of Association for Talent Development and how to make the most of a membership. Complimentary attendance. Register at www. cnyastd.org. For more information, email: info@cnyastd.org or call (315) 546-2783.

ONGOING EVENTS  Every Tuesday, Cayuga Toastmasters Club from 6 to 7 p.m., at Cornell University, Ithaca, Rhodes Hall, Hoy Road, 6th Floor Conference Room #655. Free parking is available on first floor of parking garage across from Rhodes Hall. For more information, visit the website at 4998.toastmastersclubs.org and select “Contact Us,” or email: Jeff at jefurst52@ gmail.com  Every Tuesday Gung Ho Referrals Group, the premier networking group in CNY since 1999, from noon to 1:30 p.m. at The Gem Diner, 832 Spencer St., Syracuse. The cost is $10 and includes lunch. No reservation required. Please bring 30 business cards. For more information contact Paul Ellis at (315) 475-0392 or email Paul.Ellis@ ComfortSystemsUSA.com or go to www. GungHoReferrals.com  Every Tuesday, CNY Referral Group from 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 201 Lawrence Road, North Syracuse. Looking to expand your network and increase referral business? For more information, call Matthew Hunt at (315) 416-8881, or email: huntm24@ nationwide.com  Every Tuesday, Syracuse Executives Association luncheon meeting, beginning at 11:45 a.m. at Bella Domani Banquet Facility, 5988 East Taft Road, North Syracuse. For more information, contact Linda Bennett, executive director, by email at: director@syrexecs.com  Every Tuesday, Syracuse Networking Connections at 8 a.m. at Dunkin Donuts, 7th North St. (Conference Room). No charge to attend. Contact Kim at (315) 414-8223.  Every Wednesday, 1 Million Cups at 9 a.m. at Syracuse CoWorks, 201 E. Jefferson St., 2nd floor, Syracuse. 1 Million Cups is a weekly educational program designed to engage, educate, and accelerate local startups/unique businesses. No cost to attend. For more information, visit www.1millioncups.com/syracuse  Every Wednesday, Syracuse Business Networking from 6 to 7 p.m. at Barbieri’s Restaurant (upstairs level) located on Main Street in the village of North Syracuse. For more information, call Kim Bachstein at (315) 414-8223 or email: info@ SyracuseBusinessNetworking.com  Every Wednesday, The Orange Network

Business Luncheon from noon to 1 p.m. at AXA Tower, 19th Floor, Syracuse. Call or email Tim Martin for more information at tmartin@ esssecurity.net or (315) 380-3032.  First and third Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at Golden Artist Colors, 188 Bell Road, New Berlin. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217.  Fourth Wednesday of each month, Preferred Toastmasters from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at Chenango County Council of the Arts, 27 W. Main St., Norwich. Contact Jonie Bassett at (607) 847-6154, x1217.  Every Thursday, Empire Statesmen Toastmasters meet at 6:30 p.m. at Ruby Tuesday on Erie Boulevard in DeWitt. For more information, visit http://1427. toastmastersclubs.org or email: contact-1427@toastmastersclubs.org  Every Thursday, Free Business Counseling with SCORE from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Tioga County Chamber of Commerce, 80 North Ave., Owego. Contact the Tioga County Chamber of Commerce to make an appointment at (607) 687-2020.  Every Thursday, Syracuse Business Connections meets from 8am - 9 am in E. Syracuse. The group’s purpose is to network, exchange referrals, leads and share community news. For more information, contact Deb Angarano at dangarano@tsys.com  Every second and fourth Thursday of the month, The North Star Toastmasters from noon to 1 p.m. at Northland Communications One Dupli Park Drive in Franklin Square. For more information, contact Sandy Jurkiewicz at sjurkiewicz@centerstateceo.com or call (315) 470-1802.  Every Friday, 40 Above: Workers in Transition from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the library in North Syracuse (NOPL) at 100 Trolleybarn Lane, North Syracuse. Helping workers/job seekers aged 40 and above in search of work. Contact John A. Cruty at (315) 569-3964, or at crutij@yahoo.com  Every Friday, Tip Club of Syracuse, at the Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave., Syracuse, 8 to 9 a.m. Call Bernie Bregman at (315) 430-5249 or email: bbregman@cnybj.com  First Friday of each month, Toolkit Day with SCORE by appointment at The Tech Garden. Counselors provide free, confidential, individual business mentoring to prospective or current business owners. For more information or to make an appointment, contact Lynn Hughes at (315) 579-2862 or email Lynn@ TheTechGarden.com  Every second Friday, The Professional Consultants Association (PCA) of Central New York at 8:15 a.m. from September to June at OneGroup Center, 706 N. Clinton St., Syracuse. PCA helps businesses and organizations locate professional consulting services based in CNY. The first visit is free. For a full schedule and to register, visit, www.pcaofcny. com  Every second and fourth Friday of each month, The SUN Group (Sustainable Upstate Network) meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Tony’s Family Restaurant, 3004 Burnet Ave., Syracuse. For more information, contact Andy Picco at (315) 657-0135 or email: andrewpicco@gmail. com


I 15

JANUARY 16, 2017 I BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK

People on the Move NEWS ACCOUNTING

ADVERTISING, MARKETING & PR

The Bonadio Group announced that DARCY BUCKINGHAM and JAMES KORDZIEL have joined the accounting firm. Buckingham will serve as a senior accountant on the firm’s Buckingham Government team. Kordziel will be a senior accountant on the Healthcare/Tax Exempt team. Buckingham received her bachelor’s degree from St. Lawrence University, master’s degree in accounting, and MBA from Northeastern Kordziel University. Kordziel earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting and MBA from Le Moyne College. Sciarabba Walker & Co., LLP recently hired KIMBERLY MILLER as a staff accountant. She graduated from Houghton College with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and acMiller counting, and from Rochester Institute of Technology with an MBA with a concentration in accounting. Miller previously worked for Larson Ford as the assistant controller. CAITLIN BANGS has joined DiMarco, Abiusi & Pascarella, CPAs P.C. as a senior auditor, and SONIA RAINBOW has joined the firm as a staff accountant. Bangs holds a bachelor’s degree in accounting Bangs from Alfred University and specializes in audits of small businesses and real-estate entities. She brings eight years of audit experience to her position. Rainbow holds an MBA and a bachelor’s degree in business accounting and Rainbow information systems from Le Moyne College. She previously completed her internship at DiMarco. She works in the audit and tax departments.

Pinckney Hugo Group has promoted JEREMY WALKER to motion graphics designer. He was previously a junior motion graphics designer and has been with the agency for nearly two years. Walker Walker earned his bachelor’s degree in communication studies with a concentration in media production from SUNY Cortland.

BANKING NBT Bank has promoted ADAM BURBACK, commercial banking relationship manager, to assistant VP. He is responsible for developing and managing business relationships with the bank’s Burback commercial customers in the Mohawk Valley. Burback has worked in the financial-services industry since 2004. Before joining NBT Bank, he was an underwriter with Medical Liability Mutual Insurance Company in Syracuse. Burback earned his master’s degree from the iSchool at Syracuse University and his bachelor’s degree from Siena College. Community Bank N.A. has promoted STEPHEN RICH to senior VP of commercial banking. He joined the Community Bank N.A. team in 2005 as a commercial banker. Most recently, Rich he served as commercial banking team leader. Rich received his associate degree in business administration from Cayuga Community College. Generations Bank has hired A.G. CUTRONA as VP – director of growth and profitability at its Seneca Falls headquarters. He brings more than 30 years of banking experience to the posiCutrona tion. Cutrona is a graduate

CNYBJ.COM of the Wharton School with a an executive leadership certificate from the ABA Stonier Graduate School of Banking at the University of Pennsylvania and holds a bachelor’s degree in communication from St. John Fisher College.

New York Life, Inc. & NYLIAC Securities Corp. Roper previously served in management roles at Welch Allyn.

CREDIT UNIONS

ROMAN BATYUK has joined St. Joseph’s Physicians Family Medicine at Northeast Medical Center in Fayetteville as a family nurse practitioner. He Batyuk earned his master’s family nurse practitioner degree from SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Utica and bachelor’s degree in nursing from Keuka College. Batyuk most recently worked as a critical care registered nurse at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center in Syracuse, where he continues to be an active member of the clinical faculty for the St. Joseph’s College of Nursing.

First Source Federal Credit Union has promoted two senior executives to the leadership team as part of its five-year plan. MIKE PARSONS, current president/CEO, while retaining Parsons the title of CEO, will move into a long-term strategic planning role. He will also be chief strategist, membership & community relations ambassador, and continue as First Source’s chief political advocate in Albany Neumann and Washington, D.C. TOM NEUMANN, currently executive VP/COO, will assume the role of president/COO of First Source Federal Credit Union. He will report to the board of directors and continue to work closely with the CEO on long-term strategic issues. During his 23-year tenure at the credit union, 16 years as president/CEO, Parsons has steered the credit union through “tremendous growth,” the credit union said.

ENVIRONMENTAL ANN FORDOCK has been promoted by the Onondaga County Resource Recovery Agency (OCRRA) of Syracuse to recycling operations manager. She joined OCRRA in 2008 as a recycling specialist. Fordock holds a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies from SUNY-ESF.

Michael Roberts Associates has hired ERIC ROPER, financial-services professional, to its staff. He is an experienced management professional who began his financial career in 2014 with

DEC. 2127, 2016 DECEMBER 21 DESTINY COURIER SERVICE 375 MARSDEN RD SYRACUSE, NY 13208 MAHAN, CAROL D DESTINY USA HOTEL & INN (THE) 375 MARSDEN RD SYRACUSE, NY 13208 MAHAN, CAROL D HARBOUR COURIER (THE) 375 MARSDEN

SYRACUSE, NY 13208 MAHAN, CAROL D MAMA’S SNACK SHACK 8028 PLAINVILLE RD PLAINVILLE, NY 13137 MULFORD, CATHERINE C PEDAGOGEO 870 WESTMORELAND AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13210 WHEELER, MICHAEL T TOP FLIGHT AUTO 201 S GEDDES ST SYRACUSE, NY 13204 DAVIS, SHAKEESHA NAKEIA DECEMBER 22 AUTONOMOUS INK 326 HIAWATHA BLVD E SYRACUSE, NY 13208 SESSA, ALEC

DONOFRIO, NICHOLAS INSTITUTE OF SOUND & STYLE (THE) 501 W FAYETTE ST SYRACUSE, NY 13204 WEEMS, CARRIE MAE TADROS PASTRIES 4223 BARKER HILL RD JAMESVILLE, NY 13078 AKL, WAHID J TADROS, MICHAEL J TADROS, DAVIS S WEST SIDE KUSTOMZ 3207 BURNET AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13206 SANTOS, ALEXANDRO D DECEMBER 23 ALL SEALED UP CONSTRUCTION 1741 CHURCH RD

TULLY, NY 13159 PELLETTIERE, JOSEPH, JR.

ELEGANT MOBILE CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY AND DECORATION 175 RUTH AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13210 BOULAKSOUT, RIDGE ABDOU

PROFESSIONAL CNY CLEANERS 1518 COURT ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 BEAUDION, BERNARD MAIN, SAMANTHA L

MARINE CANVAS & UPHOLSTERY 1000 MILTON AVE #1 SYRACUSE, NY 13204 SIRAAJ, BILAL ROXBORO TAXI 110 ROXBORO CIR APT 1 MATTYDALE, NY 13211 MACUT, ALAM PEAK SERVICES 7207 KETTLEBAIL RD

Roper

Information to build your business

BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 NEEDLE, JOEL DOUGLAS

UNDERGROUND POETRY SPOT 424 LODI ST, SUITE 1 SYRACUSE, NY 13203 ANGRAND, RUTHNIE WEDGEWOOD PROPERTIES 935 JAMES ST SYRACUSE, NY 13203 SMITH DAVID B EXECUTOR OF ESTATE OF E CARLYLE SMITH

LAW Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC recently added two registered patent attorneys and two registered patent agents to its intellectual property and technology practice. Patent attorneys JEFFREY POWERS and AMANDA ROSENFIELD LIPPES have joined the law firm as senior counsel and associate, respectively, while AMBER KLECKNER, Ph.D., and SRIVIDYA REVURU, Ph.D., joined the firm as patent agents.

Powers

Lippes

WEB DESIGN

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Central New York LEADS BUSINESS CERTIFICATES ONONDAGA COUNTY

Fordock

HEALTH CARE

WEDGEWOOD WEST PROPERTIES 935 JAMES ST SYRACUSE, NY 13203 SMITH, DAVID B EXECUTOR OF ESTATE OF E CARLYLE SMITH DECEMBER 27 ABU ADAMZ PROPERTY CARE 6106 JEMOLA RUNNE CICERO, NY 13039 HUSSEIN, ZIAD AMIDON HOME SERVICES 141 RIVERDALE RD LIVERPOOL, NY 13090 AMIDON, JOSHUA JEWELS PALACE 212 WOLF ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 GRANT, POGUAL M

LAURA STILWELL has joined FreshySites as Syracuse account manager. She recently relocated to Central New York from Phoenix, Arizona, where she worked as an executive assistant / acquisition and disposition coordinator. 

Stilwell

What is the LEADS page? Leads is a collection of information, primarily business certificates, that we have gathered from county clerks’ offices in some of Central New York’s largest counties. We gather these public records so you can gain a competitive edge by finding new and expanding businesses and new customers. JEWELS & MUSIC 212 WOLF ST SYRACUSE, NY 13208 GRANT, POGUAL M

TRINITY TRIO SERVICES 8121 NAVONA LN CLAY, NY 13041 GRIFFIN, CYNTHIA L

JUMPSTART SUB CONTRACTING 203 WALL ST #3 SYRACUSE, NY 13204 SANTIAGO, OCASIO JOSEPH A

WALIKIS SOFTWARE 3764 LOTUS CIR BALDWINSVILLE, NY 13027 WALIKIS, RICHARD J

LIBERTY TRANSPORTATION & TAXI SERVICES 202 BURDICK AVE SYRACUSE, NY 13208 MANZI, PAUL J


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BUSINESS JOURNAL NEWS NETWORK I JANUARY 16, 2017

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