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MARCH 21-27, 2014 | PoRtlAnd’s news + ARts + enteRtAinMent AutHoRity | FRee this just in

Meet Felix Yz

A NEW INTERNET PROTAGONIST _by Deirdre Fulton p4

portland vs. her people Fighting over the possible futures of Maine’s largest city _by Jeff Inglis | p 8

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4 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

Some of Maine’s small colleges (and their students) are leaders in the global movement to divest from fossil fuels.

this Just in

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_by Matt Bors

Maine’s leaders “just don’t believe scientifically what’s happening to us” in terms of climate change, said Laurie Lachance — a radical statement for the president of Waterville’s conservative, business-oriented Thomas College. Speaking at the Climate Solutions Expo and Summit at the Augusta Civic Center on March 12 — sponsored by a dozen organizations from 350 Maine to the Penobscot Nation — Lachance came across as one Maine leader who understands what needs to happen. It’s only practical for the state’s business leaders, she said, to pay attention to “sustainability” if they “want to attract young folks” to their companies. (The S-word resounded throughout the gathering.) She and four other Maine small-college presidents spoke on a panel that bucked the stereotype of higher-ed administrators focused more on raising money from the One Percent than on solving society’s problems. Two presidents of tiny, ecologically minded institutions told how they were leading the country in divesting their (relatively small) endowments from fossil-fuel companies. Darron Collins, the College of the Atlantic chief, credited the divestment impetus to students at his Bar Harbor campus. His counterpart at Unity College, Stephen Mulkey, was proud that his college was the first in the country to divest — and that its $15-million fund has since done well in the stock market. The campus CEOs also described how their institutions were trying to lead the state in climate-change activism. University of Maine at Farmington president Kathryn Foster proclaimed: “We can be a green leader in society.” “Our job is to be educators-in-chief,” which includes educating policy-makers, said Richard Hopper, of Kennebec Valley Community College, in Fairfield. KVCC recently expanded to the former Good Will-Hinckley School, inheriting an organic farm that prompted the creation of a sustainableagriculture curriculum. The conference was held in March despite the risk of a snowstorm because its organizers wanted “to reach the Legislature while it’s in session,” co-coordinator Fred Horch said. Legislators, however, weren’t reached; in fact, none of those alleged leaders was spotted. Two Democrats, Mark Eves, House speaker, and Justin Alfond, Senate president, were scheduled to speak at the conference’s final session, but the feared late-winter storm materialized and caused the afternoon to be cut short. Despite the storm, more than 750 people attended, organizers said. Horch, a Green Independent state Senate candidate in Brunswick, regretted that “we’re not making any progress” with green legislation. The “feed-in tariff” bill, which would have made electric utilities pay people who produce electrical energy at their homes or business (such as by solar cells), was defeated in this session; Horch suggested it may be resurrected as a citizens’-initiated referendum measure. One noteworthy politician did attend: Shenna Bellows, the Democratic candidate running against Republican United States Senator Susan Collins. Climate change is one of the three pillars of Bellows’s campaign, the others being economic inequality and civil liberties. Although the expo was free, 90 participants paid $25 each to draw up plans for the state to progress toward green goals by 2020. The plans will be found at climatesolutionsme.org. But unless the state’s non-leading leaders are reached or replaced, it’s hard to see how many goals will be achieved. Even divestment at more Maine colleges may be tough to accomplish. At one of state’s rich liberal-arts institutions, Colby, in Waterville, students who pushed the college to dump fossil-fuel stock were rebuffed by trustees in 2013. Colby’s board is full of corporate leaders.

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has been posted online will contain additional art and content. “One of the things I’ve always hated about writing is that it’s so solitary,” Bunker confesses. “This is delightfully multimedia. It’s not just me and my story anymore.”

Cy rus Bunker

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with the fears and hopes of a young boy than with gender issues; over the course of the month, readers will follow as Felix falls in love, grapples with family dynamics, copes with a bully at school, and invents a new life philosophy. “I find Felix effortless to write,” Bunker says, adding that she hopes “some lonely and confused kid somewhere will love and draw strength” from Felix’s adventures. Felix and a few of his friends (as well as his sister, at right) already have Facebook pages, which will help fans keep up to date with the latest postings. The penultimate — and most climactic — installment of the serial will be posted in audio drama format (thanks to a collaboration with local radiodramatist Fred Greenhalgh). The e-book that will be available once the entire novel

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6 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

_BY A L D I AM O N

one Cent’s worth

politics + other Mistakes

_BY zA cK Anch o rS

Friends from other planets According to a group called the Mutual UFO Network (motto: Sorta Like The Syfy Channel, Only Less Credible), Maine has more sightings of unidentified flying objects than any states except Washington (where marijuana is legal), Montana (where common loons and uncommon nuts both thrive), and Vermont (home of something called “snow golf,” which combines the worst aspects of two terrible ideas: winter and golf). Unlike residents of those states, Mainers who’ve spotted flying saucers are not necessarily stoned or weird. Many are normal people, who really did see something strange come out of the sky. Namely: Reporters from the national news media. I myself have had contact with these alien life forms. One autumn afternoon in 2002, I was busily observing the US Senate race between incumbent Republican Susan Collins and Democratic challenger Chellie Pingree by taking a nap on the couch. Suddenly I was interrupted by an unearthly ringing. It turned out to be the telephone. The caller was a journalist from a liberal magazine. He’d landed in Maine and set out to do a story on how Pingree had a good chance of upsetting Collins. “Why on earth – if you’ll pardon the expression – do you think that?” I asked. “I’ve seen the grassroots support for her candidacy,” he said. “It’s all over the state.” “Really?” I said. “Where in Maine have you been?” “Portland,” he said. “And North Haven.” Now I understood what planet he was coming from. North Haven is where Pingree lived. I tried to explain that Portland’s political makeup isn’t typical of

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_BY D AV ID KIS h

the rest of Maine. I noted that in the 2nd Congressional District, the Democrat’s campaign was almost nonexistent. I mentioned how Collins remained popular in rural parts of the state. I thought the visitor would be grateful for these insights, but that wasn’t the case. “No one else is telling me that,” he said. “I don’t think you have a good perspective.” He then vanished back through whatever space warp brought him here and wrote a story in which he claimed Pingree “has Collins looking over her shoulder” and that “a gust of Maine populism, merging with the corporate accountability zeitgeist, could catch Chellie’s sails and carry her to Washington.” A month later, Collins beat Pingree by 19 percentage points. The Democrat won in Portland and North Haven, but almost nowhere else. I mention this not to demonstrate how locked into the state’s political pulse I am (if I were, Ethan Strimling would be a congressman, and Mike Michaud would be driving a forklift). I bring it up because a dozen years after that alien invasion, it’s happening again. The night skies over Maine are alight with glowing objects bringing in big-shot reporters, this time to inform earthlings that Democrat Shenna Bellows has a real chance of knocking off Collins. Set your phasers to stun. “This year’s [Democratic Party] caucuses saw record turnout,” MSNBC reported, “with party members gathering in town halls and school gyms for a chance to meet Bellows and other members of the ticket.” Record turnout? Maybe in an alternate dimension. In this one, the showing was about average for an off-year election, which is far below attendance in presidential years. In arriving at her assessment that Bellows “makes waves,” the reporter

seems to have visited Portland and Brunswick. No mention of anyplace north of Augusta, where the candidate hasn’t caused a ripple. CNN and The Hill both made some effort to balance their stories, with the former saying that “conventional political wisdom” would argue for an easy Collins win and the latter noting the incumbent’s popularity before claiming, “in a small state like Maine, the grassroots engagement can make all the difference.” Nothing about how, in most of the 2nd District, Bellows has no engagement, grassroots or otherwise. Nevertheless, Daily Kos claims Bellows is “all over the news,” citing stories in magazines such as U.S. News and Time, neither of which makes it appear she has a real chance of winning. This media onslaught isn’t actually about beating Collins in 2014. It’s focused on the future. Democrats, who have a very thin bench (Pingree’s daughter Hannah and … um … is Joe Brennan still alive?), need Bellows to emerge from this race in passable shape, so she can, like Pingree, run for major office again. To make that possible, she’s got to avoid a landslide loss this year. The goal of the visiting ETs is to boost her within 20 points of her opponent. To date, Bellows has gotten light years worth of mileage from raising significant early money (without it being mentioned that early money is the easiest to raise) and for being dubbed by the Progressive Change Campaign Committee as the “Elizabeth Warren of civil liberties.” Which is probably a lot like being the Flash Gordon of positive soundbites. That stuff means something in the remote galaxy inside the Beltway. Around here, it’s just more crop circles. ^

Transmissions from you will be received at aldiamon@herniahill.net.

Celebrating 25 Years The Legend Continues

z a c k.a n c h o r s@ g m a i l .c o m

war on the poor outside of augusta, it’s become increasingly difficult to find anyone willing to rally behind the War on drugs. Forty three years after president richard nixon launched that war, it’s not hard to see that incarcerating millions and spending $50 billion a year has amounted to a failed crusade. But the mountains of evidence supporting that perspective don’t sway Governor paul lepage, who announced last week that he’s ramping up Maine’s War on drugs with an additional $2 million in state spending for drug enforcement (as opposed to prevention or addiction treatment). Meanwhile, lepage appears eager to surrender another battle: the War on poverty, launched 50 years ago by president lyndon Johnson with the creation of programs like Medicare, Medicaid, Job corps, and head Start. conservatives across the country have used the 50th anniversary of this “war” as a chance to declare it a failure, but it’s an undeniable fact that these programs have lifted millions of americans out of poverty every year since their creation, while sharply reducing infant mortality, vastly increasing access to health care, providing job training for millions, and generally giving poor people in america a chance at a decent life. Medicaid may be the most successful of these programs, and its current expansion under the affordable care act is essential to fighting one of the major causes of poverty: costly health care. But instead of rallying to the cause, lepage is battling to obstruct low-income Mainers from receiving health care through the expansion of Mainecare, Maine’s version of Medicaid. last week he called Medicaid expansion “sinful.” like his declaration of a war on drugs, though, lepage’s capitulation to poverty is behind the times. ronald reagan led the way long ago, telling reporters in 1987 that “in the sixties we waged a war on poverty, and poverty won.” the truth is that the War on poverty was undermined by other wars as soon as it began, first by the mounting costs of the conflict in Vietnam, then by the conservative assault on the role of government in public life that began in the 1970s, and later by a War on drugs that placed poor people in its crosshairs. considering that we essentially gave up on defeating poverty decades ago, it shouldn’t be surprising that the “total victory” Johnson called for in 1964 never came. about 46 million americans live in poverty today, including 148,000 Mainers and one in four Maine children younger than age six. newer anti-poverty programs like the earned income tax credit have lifted millions more out of poverty, but social safety-net programs (beyond health insurance) have accounted for just 12 percent of the federal budget in recent years, compared to 19 percent for national security alone. as these programs have become more focused on working families, they have gotten weaker for the poorest, causing an increase in extreme poverty. recent cuts to programs like food stamps are trimming the safety net even further. lepage, reagan, and countless other critics of that social safety net argue that War on poverty programs are intended to provide handouts to the poor as opposed to incentives to work. the truth is that the 1960s architects of the war were adamantly opposed to welfare and went to great lengths to design programs that incentivized poor people to pursue education and jobs. Since then, any approach perceived to depart from that focus or significantly expand anti-poverty measures hasn’t gotten far. take president nixon’s 1969 proposal to provide a guaranteed annual income to poor families. Such a program — then or now — really could strike a serious blow to economic distress, but nixon’s plan was shot down in the US Senate in 1970 after passing in the house and was soon forgotten. the case for a guaranteed annual income came to light again recently, though, due to a widely-discussed atlantic article last fall. the authors pointed out that poverty in the United States could be instantly reduced in half if the government cut a $3,000 check to every american and eliminated other social safety-net spending. if we actually were engaged in a fight against poverty, rather than a retreat, far-reaching anti-poverty proposals like on that would actually be taken seriously by policymakers — as they were in the 1960s. But as long as lots of americans are convinced our half-hearted attempts to fight poverty have failed, all that can be done is to defend and moderately expand the programs created 50 years ago, during a historical moment when poverty was the enemy — not poor people. ^

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8 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

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portland vs her people fighting over the possible futures of maine’s largest city _b y je f f i n g l i s Beneath the deep rifts of disagreement about how Portland should grow, change, and develop, there lies one underlying point of concord: The city is increasingly attractive to a wide range of people and businesses, and therefore is uniquely poised to have options about how its future will be built. And there’s another, related area of agreement: Nearly all the players in the ongoing land-use disputes in the city (including municipal leaders) share a list of goals, which include more housing that is more affordable, preservation of historic assets, celebration of unique attributes of the city’s landscape and architecture, and the pivotal importance of energizing the downtown — including but not just maximizing use of open space. But when faced with choices about how to achieve those

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goals, Maine’s largest city has of late sufings about these projects. fered a gigantic split, between City Hall It’s that the involvement comes too and the people themselves. And most of late in the process to really make a big these conflicts are similar in one root eledifference. Planning Board member Jack ment: This city, which all agree is lucky Soley puts it best: “At the eleventh hour to have so many options, has leaders who it’s difficult to give public testimony as do not behave as if they have any choice at much weight as it is earlier in the projall. To the frustration of the citzenry, the ect....Their voice will carry more weight City Council and the Planning Board often at the early stages.” run off with the first partProjects that come before ner who asks for a dance. the Planning Board have Sometimes there’s no already been reviewed by real controversy, as with city planning staff, and the new hotels sprouting often outside experts, such around the downtown, the as traffic engineers and $60-million renovation of stormwater engineers, but the Eastland Park Hotel, there’s still lots of time to or the $110-million redemake changes. Soley, a development of Thompson’s veloper himself (the hotel Point. But when there is on Fore Street is his) whose disagreement, a pattern father is notorious Old Port has emerged: citizen outcry landlord Joe Soley, says the builds, corporate interests Planning Board tries “to imflex their muscles, the city prove on what the developer stands its ground, lawsuits has brought to us,” within swirl, and the future of the standards set by the City Portland gets decided not _ch ristia n milneil Council’s ordinances. While citizen input is through a participatory proalways welcome, earlier cess ending with a majoris better. Projects can take ity vote, but in adversarial months to move through the Planning courtroom hearings before a judge who Board, during which time the board has will make a decision alone. typically requested — and received — The most notable issues exemplifying many changes from the developer. By the this pattern are the potential sale of Conend of the process, the members can find gress Square Plaza, the repurposing of themselves in a bind if new public objecthe former Williston-West Church, and tions arise, or if citizens ask for additional the massive Federated “Midtown” houschanges to aspects of the project the board ing development in Bayside (see sidebar, has already addressed. “Timelines”). All three have been sub“To a developer, it might cost a trejected to long, contentious hearings bemendous amount of time, money, and fore the City Council and the Planresources to make those changes,” after ning Board, as well as sevthe company has typically invested a eral lawsuits, which the great deal already. The end is “a really difcity has a track record ficult time to go backwards,” Soley says. of losing (see “Le“There’s a point at which it’s unfair.” gally Blind,” by Which leaves one last option, where Al Diamon, Febthe Midtown project has ended up: “At ruary 28). the eleventh hour the only way to stop [a The project] is litigation,” he says. projects Mayor Michael Brennan agrees with are differSoley about getting citizens involved up ent in their front, and notes his surprise at the antidetails, but Midtown outcry after more than a decade looking at of discussions about Bayside. “If there their prowere some type of opposition you would cesses is have expected it long before” the very end revealof the process, he says. ing, and worHowever, if the Planning Board’s rying. There are attitude in this regard seems to favor deinterdependent velopers over public concerns, that may problems, and be by design. Board members are appointeven if they are ed by the City Council, who are “very solved, the three developer-friendly,” says Frank Turek, projects at the center a leader of Friends of Congress Square of the current storms are Park, which leads him to ask (rhetoricallikely lost to litigation forever. That said, a closer look at what ails Portly) of the Planning Board “a basic philoland could help us avoid future maladies. sophical question: What do you do that’s best for the people?” Soley counters that the Planning Board Diagnosis #1: BaD timing works hard to fix, not kill, flawed projects, The first, and perhaps truly the bigbut ultimately when faced with imperfecgest, underlying problem is not a lack of tion, must “make our best judgement for citizen involvement. Ask anyone — board what makes sense for the city of Portland.” member, citizen, or reporter — who was at any of the multi-hour municipal meetContinued on p 10

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Continued from p 8

Diagnosis #2: insecurity

But what city leaders think is best can differ significantly from what residents believe. Charles Remmel, one of the plaintiffs in the WillistonWest case, and the first president of the Western Prom Neighborhood Association when it was founded in the 1970s, says city leaders should “have a little more faith in how the city will develop,” rather than thinking “if they don’t do [a proposed project] right now, it’s the end and we’ll never get another chance.” “Portland has enough vibrancy” to attract good development, Remmel says, citing the city’s thriving food and entertainment scene, which he says has flourished “in spite of” city officials’ efforts. When faced with these developers’ ideas, “Portland’s insecurities come into play,” Remmel says. City leaders often are “so insecure” that they approve the first thing that comes along. “They don’t have enough faith in themselves.” Regarding Williston-West specifically, he says city officials were so worried about the future of the building if it lay dormant for too long that they eagerly embraced “the first guy who comes in,” even though that meant offices and a performance space in the middle of residences, and despite a lack of parking. (He says any parallels between fears for Williston-West and the St. Lawrence Church on Munjoy Hill, which did lay vacant and ultimately deteriorated until it needed to be demolished, are weak at best, because of different neighborhood environments.) With Congress Square, he says, the city was afraid it would never have the money or the civic interest to improve it, so when a developer proposed the idea that involved selling off public land in the heart of the Arts District, officials leapt at the chance. And with Midtown, the official thought line was, “We’re afraid if we don’t approve this, we’ll never get an opportunity like this ever again,” Remmel says. So the city raised the allowable building height in that area, and made other changes to accommodate the plan, rather than, for example, turning it down and waiting for one that made more sense for Portland. Housing advocate and urban-issues blogger Christian MilNeil says the Congress Square situation and the Williston-West proposal are similar: “Those were really developer-driven.

The developer came in with a proposal and that became the plan.” (Former councilor John Anton, who was the only person to vote against both the Williston-West and Congress Square decisions, declined to comment for this story, saying he left public office “to get my life back” and didn’t want to get involved in current issues, nor revisit old ones.) But MilNeil says the Midtown project was different, the result of a 15-year planning process. “You can’t really blame the developers for following the city’s plan,” he says. “The developers really were proposing something that was faithful to the city’s vision,” a development with an active street level, retail shops, and lots of housing.

Diagnosis #3: resistance to change

Brennan says those are the city’s goals — his particular focus is “initiatives and proposals that are going to bring people to the downtown, galvanize the downtown, revitalize the downtown” — and says officials are balancing “a number of competing objectives,” including the city’s historic feel and overall aesthetics. Citizens who have risen up to oppose some of these developments have “different objectives,” he says. When asked why some projects got a green light with barely a whisper, and others ignited firestorms, Brennan as much as throws up his hands. “You get to a point where you’ve tried to compromise,” he says. “You just get to a point where you fundamentally have disagreements.” Remmel agrees with that assessment: “Planning means to me you have a long-term idea” rather than being “focused on project approvals,” he says, arguing that city officials “are basically project-oriented. I don’t think they think in the same way the neighborhoods do.” “A lot of these arguments are really about disruptive effects in a neighborhood,” Remmel notes. He admits, though, that what might count as disruption for him is fine for others, and vice-versa. He is confident, for example, that the Williston-West building could easily be converted into high-end residences by a developer who would protect the building’s historic facade. But Portland Landmarks, which protects the city’s architectural heritage, is against splitting up the Continued on p 12

(in)DeCent propoSal? rockbridge capital’s rendering of the proposed congress square event center and open space.

Timelines

Williston-West church Summer 2011 Williston-West church merges with immanuel Baptist church and moves worship to high Street. the beautiful, historic Williston-West church is sold to Frank Monsour, an australian businessman who proposes converting the parish house into residential space and office space for up to 14 of his employees; a future concept is to convert the sanctuary into either a community hall or a performing-arts venue. may 2012 the planning Board hears nine hours of public testimony, and entered into the record 97 letters and a 140-signature petition opposing the idea, according to the Forecaster’s report of that meeting. objections relate to the city’s comprehensive plan, which protects the residential character of the West end neighborhood (and other parts of the city). putting a business in the middle of an upscale residential area seems to run counter to the overall plan. June 2012 Fifty people, about half in favor and half opposed, speak to the city council during a two-and-a-half-hour public hearing, the Portland Press Herald reports. the council votes 6-3 to approve the plan, which involves a zoning change to allow the business (opposing were John anton, John coyne, and cheryl leeman). July 2012 twelve neighbors sue Monsour and the city, asking a Superior court judge if the city went too far in changing the property’s zoning. DeCember 2013 the ruling is that the rezoning did violate the comprehensive plan, and that the building did not need a specially brokered deal to protect it, given the city’s strong historicpreservation ordinance. the city is planning to appeal that ruling to the Maine Supreme court.

FeDerateD’s miDtoWn project 2000 the city issues the Bayside Vision, calling for more housing and larger, taller buildings in the area, including the former railyard in the center of the neighborhood. the plan also recognizes a related need for a city-funded parking garage. July 2011 the city agrees to sell 3.25 acres, the former railyard, to the Federated companies for $2.3 million, with an agreement that any development would include a parking garage paid for in part with $9 million in federal money passed through the city. Fall 2012 Federated unveils a $150-million plan to build 675 apartments in four 15-story towers, plus two parking garages with more than 1000 spaces, and more than 90,000 square feet of retail space. Fall 2013 after nearly a year of hearings before the planning Board and city council, including ordinance changes allowing buildings to be as tall as 165 feet throughout the parcel, public opposition arose (see “curb appeal,” by deirdre Fulton, november 22, 2013). January 2014 the planning Board approves the project. two members of the board, Jack Soley and Bill hall, say they don’t like aspects of it, but vote in favor because it meets the city’s ordinance requirements. February 2014 Keep portland livable sues the city, saying the process did not properly respect the city’s own planning documents.

congress square plaza 2008 city council creates the congress Square redesign Study Group. after about three years of meetings, the 15-member body was no closer to an idea than they had been at the start. november 2011 rockBridge capital, the new owner of the eastland park hotel (now renovated and reopened as the Westin portland harborview) proposes buying the plaza to erect an event center (see, among other coverage, “congress Square’s controversial Facelift,” by deirdre Fulton, May 24, 2013). may 2013 the city parks commission says the council should consider not just the status quo and the frequently revised rockBridge proposal but other ideas “such as a re-designed park in the same space, a fully designed smaller plaza, and other building or architecture options.” (See “Getting (congress) Square to Work,” by Jeff inglis, august 16, 2013, and “reimagining portland,” by calvin dunwoody, august 24, 2012.) September 6, 2013 Friends of congress Square, which had objected to the proposed sale for months, asks the city to allow the circulation of a petition for a citizen initiative to amend the city’s land bank, making protected land harder to sell, and adding 35 parcels to the land Bank list, including congress Square. September 13, 2013 the city refused to issue petitions, arguing that the ordinance it proposed conflicted with city ordinance and state law barring initiatives and referenda on administrative and financial issues. September 16, 2013 the city council votes 6-3 (John anton, Kevin donoghue, and david Marshall opposed) to sell 9500 square feet, about two-thirds of congress Square plaza, to rockBridge capital for $524,000. September 25, 2013 Friends of congress Square park sues the city to force it to issue the petitions. november 2013 a judge orders the city to issue petitions, which were finally released for circulation the day before election day. While the city planned to appeal, the Friends collected signatures at the polls, ultimately turning in 4250, far more than the required 1500. marCh 2014 the city council approved the petition’s question for the June ballot, but also moved to enact a slightly different ordinance that would add almost exactly the same properties to the protected land Bank (with the notable exception of congress Square), but with more modest protections against their potential sale. april 2014 the Maine Supreme court will hear the city’s petition-issuing appeal in early april, and is expected to rule shortly thereafter, in time to allow or block the June election. _ji

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Diagnosis #4: class conFlict

While on the one hand, MilNeil says, “it’s great that we’ve become such a successful city,” with merchants, restaurants, and a vibe that’s attractive to wealthy people; on the other hand he wonders, “Where are we going to put all the rich people who are going to move here?” And with housing in short supply, and prices on the rise, where will the people the newcomers displace live? “The rich people are just going to crowd out the working-class and middle-class people,” MilNeil predicts, unless the city undertakes major efforts to “make room for the people who want to live here and need to live here.” Peter Monro, a landscape architect who is a leader of Keep Portland Livable, the group leading the opposition to Midtown (and suing to block it), says the city has it backwards. Rather than building downtown housing and an industrial park on the outskirts of the city, he says the city should have “good paying jobs at the heart of it,” which will in turn encourage spin-off developments to house those workers and cater to their shopping needs and desires. His perspective is, he readily admits, that of an urban designer who lives in a historic-landmark home in a historic neighborhood district in the West End. He has a specific vision for how development should occur in Portland, and says the city does too, in its zoning and planning ordinances. MilNeil, though, says Monro is looking

THURSDAY MARCH 20TH

MilNeil says, on top of the relatively fixed remediation costs for cleaning up the former railyard. With fewer tenants available to cover those costs, rents go higher — which is the opposite of MilNeil’s goal. For Brennan, the suits boil down to the city’s sovereignty. Particularly with regard to the Congress Square petition and upcoming vote, he asks, “Is everything that the City Council does subject to a petition drive or a referendum?” For Turek, it’s about taking on problems head-on. “All over the country cities are realizing that if we invest directly in public parks, we’ll get a lot more economic benefit” than selling the space and hoping development spreads, he says. And for Monro, the effort is about holding back City Hall’s eagerness to grow. “They want population and tax base,” he says. “They’re looking for as many Empire State Buildings as they can get.”

Continued from p 10

beautiful interior of the sanctuary. “It’s not a church anymore,” Remmel says. He’s right, but that statement alone doesn’t directly suggest any single course of action. And that’s where MilNeil, a commissioner of the Portland Housing Authority, comes in. First, he observes, “cities change. It’s pretty much the definition of a city.” And second, he posits a clear dichotomy: “If the city doesn’t change architecturally, we’re going to change demographically.” He’s speaking of the proposed Midtown towers, but the point is just as valid about putting a business in the residential West End: Either we have more and denser housing of all kinds, or the city prices out lower-income residents. For his part, MilNeil puts social values over aesthetic ones. “I’d much rather preserve our city’s egalitarianism and embrace changes to our skyline,” he says.

lying Dormant the future of the Williston-West church is up in the air. at the wrong problem. Observing Monro’s West End residence and the fact that other plaintiffs in the anti-Midtown suit live in upscale housing too, he is blunt: “They’re homeowners so they’re not really aware of Portland’s housing shortage . . . and they don’t see it in their neighborhoods.” As a result, he says, their opposition rises from a lack of an appropriate sense of urgency about an issue the city has been working on for more than a decade. “In their privilege they think they have the right to overturn 15 years of neighborhood-planning efforts,” he says. Now, he says, because of Monro and his allies — and their lawyers — “this whole Bayside Vision is on hold.”

Diagnosis #5: too many laWyers

Part of the conflict does boil down to lawyers, of course. “If you can hire enough lawyers and kill any project you want,” which makes it harder for all developers, MilNeil says — including the Portland Housing Authority and Avesta, a nonprofit developing affordable housing. In fact, MilNeil questions Monro’s claims of pure motives. “I don’t think they’re out to win the lawsuit, actually,” MilNeil says, citing a Press Herald opinion column from November 2013, in which Monro was quoted saying it didn’t matter if he won the case in the end. “We think the delay may be a deal breaker (for the developer),” the paper

quoted Monro saying. “The power to delay is the power to destroy.” Monro vigorously denies the charge, saying “we’re in it to change that project,” and rattling off several very specific changes he would like to see in the Midtown project (a lower parking garage allowing a wider, lower residential tower, for example). “This is not about delay.” Ensuring the city followed the proper legal process is indeed important; Monro observes that the recent court rulings suggest that’s not a strength at City Hall. Noting that the courts must weigh heavily the fact that the city has the right to govern itself, Monro sees Portland’s recent losses as evidence something is very wrong: “Even with a bias in their favor they can’t win.” What some — including Monro and Brennan — see as part of the checks-andbalances system, others, such as MilNeil, see as elitist. “As a city we should not be resolving all these contentious debates by lawsuit,” he says. ���It’s not democratic.” The only people who get to sue if they see an outcome they don’t like are rich people who can afford to hire lawyers, he says. “A courtroom is not a public process. It’s rich people fighting against each other.” In the balance hang more than a few important questions. For MilNeil, the key is renters’ futures. If Midtown’s developers have to modify their project to make it smaller or shorter, those changes will cost money,

a viSion For baySiDe federated’s controversial midtown proposal includes street-level dining and retail space, as illustrated here.

Diagnosis #6: Being overWhelmeD

It is possible that at least some of the popular resistance is because many areas of Portland are changing rapidly at the same time. Brennan calls this period in Portland’s history one of “unprecedented development and development opportunities in the city,” saying there is “a lot of pent-up demand due to the recession” that started in 2008 and kept bankers and builders laying low, waiting for better times. Now, he observes, projects are being proposed throughout the city, including on High Street and India Street, as well as the working waterfront. “There seems to be development every place we turn,” he says. Listing off nearly a dozen active projects, Soley echoes that sentiment: “If you look at almost every corner of the city, there is substantial development going on.” With a tone of wonder audible in his voice, he says, “this is one of the most spectacular periods of development in the history of Portland.” And that era is only continuing. The redevelopment of Franklin Street could open many acres of developable land in the heart of the city, which could be worth as much as $1 million per acre, a real-estate analyst told the Portland Press Herald. As we plot that area’s future, we hope these lessons help Portlanders — both in and out of City Hall — reflect on one question, as Brennan posed it: “Is this development reflective of where we want to go as a city?” ^

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based duo ALTERNATIVA has described aPParition as “a dance of, with, for and by ghosts, in possession and transmission.” Dancer Kathleen Hermesdorf and musician Albert Mathias will present this as well as a world premiere commission, developed earlier this month at Bates College and featuring 10 New England-based dancers, this Friday night. Tickets $10. Show at 8 pm at SPACE Gallery. 538 Congress St.

saturday 22 SAVE THE BEER | Two Portland institutions, One Longfellow Square and Portland Greendrinks, are teaming up to launch a new local music series: live & local at olS. The inaugural event, MC’d by about-towners Holly Nunan and Sean Wilkinson, features the soul-pop band Sha Sha Sha, indie group Forget, Forget, and the spirited

theodore treehouSe. Plus, to add to the celebration of everything local, beer on tap from Funky Bow in Lyman. 8 pm at One Longfellow Square, $10. 207.761.1757. BEER BARONS | baxter brewing celebrates the release of its new year-round beer Tarnation, a lager brewed in the style of the “steam” beers born in 19thcentury California, with a big ol’ party at the Asylum. Music will be provided by the funk groups Doubting Gravity and Kenya Hall Band, as well as Welterweight, an eclectic pop band. It’s also safe to assume that there will be beer…lots and lots of beer. 8:30 pm; $5-8 at 121 Center St. VHS LIVES ON! | From a production team whose writing credits include the Onion and the Late Show with David Letterman comes the Found Footage FeStival tonight at SPACE Gallery. It’s really one of the cooler events you can attend this weekend if you’re a film buff (or just a person who likes stuff), as it is an extremely well curated collection of videos that were found across the Unit-

ed States in places like garage sales, thrift stores, warehouses, and the occasional dumpster. $12, 7:30 pm, 538 Congress St. GRAND OPENING | More beer, if you can believe it. Novare Res’s latest endeavor, In’Finiti, has been open for a year or so now. They didn’t get a chance to really celebrate the opening of the restaurant last year, so they are hosting a grand oPening baSh this Saturday to make up for it. There will be tours, tastings, and, of course, beer. Couldn’t really ask for more out of a Saturday afternoon, right? Noon at 250 Commercial St, Portland.

sunday 23 GIRL POWER | Fifty years

after the passage of the Civil Rights Act, the Maine Jewish Film Festival is participating in a statewide effort to promote awareness around issues of equality, non-discrimination, and human rights. To that end,

f Jake Shimabukuro, at the State Theatre, in Portland on March 25 thursday 20 BANG BANG | This being my

first 8 Days a Week, I thought I’d start out with a bang—a head bang, that is. This Thursday, head out to Geno’s Rock Club where Portland thrash groups Stone toolS and heSSian play with Bangor’s holy Filth, joined by doom groups blackout and throaat from New York City. It’s going to be some serious head-banging, hardcore fun. Show starts at 9 pm. $5 at 625 Congress Street. 207.221.2382. FUNNY HA HA | If you’re looking for a night full of giggles, check out the comedyPalooza ShowcaSe at the Big Easy, hosted by Tim Hofmann. This week they’ve got a handful of local talent including Josh Day, Mike Howlett, Matt Barry, Francis Birch, Bill Gray, Connor McGrath, Stephanie Anne Doyle, and Kyron Hobdy. Show starts

at 8 pm. $3 at 55 Market St. 207.775.2266. DEATH SNACKS | The Portland worker-space Peloton Lab often hosts interesting and informative events. This week’s “death and taxeS” may sound like the opposite of what I just stated, at least the interesting part. But those pesky taxes have to get done at some point, and how better to build up the motivation than by commiserating with others? You can even do them on location. Plus there will be snacks. Snacks!?! They should have called it “Snacks and Taxes.” Starts at 6 pm. $20 for non-members. 795 Congress St., 207.210.6595

friday 21 I’M BEYONCE | Do you wake up

every morning wishing you were Beyonce? Me too. Life is hard when you’re not a billionaire pop star. Thankfully, the Brunswick

Downtown Association gives you a chance tonight to “celebrate your inner diva,” with food, cocktails, nail and hair services, a fashion show, and probably a lot of girl talk. 6 pm. $25. Maine State Music Theater rehearsal space, 22 Elm St., Brunswick. 207.729.9131.

in association with the Maine Media Workshops + College and the Maine Film and Video Association, the MJFF presents a brunch-time panel discussion: “title ix behind the camera: women in media.” Hosted by the Portland Museum of Art, the panel features female filmmakers from all over the world speaking on their work as women in the film industry. 10 am to noon and free — but tickets are required — at 7 Congress Sq. See the schedule for the week’s Maine Jewish Film Festival on page 28 and visit mjff.org for more details. MAGIC BALL | Is it a magic show? Is it a basketball show? Well, whatever it is the harlem globetrotterS do, it looks like lots of fun. Especially for kids. So bring them. 2 pm; $18-83 at the Cumberland County Civic Center. Call 207.775.3458 for tickets. SHAKESPEARE’S BALLET | Looking to get a little ballet in this weekend? Maybe a little Shakespeare as well? Here’s your chance to get both. The Bangor Ballet presents “titania’S dream,” which is a creative interpretation of Shakespeare’s Midsummer Night’s Dream mixed with variations from the classic 19th-century ballet Paquita. Husson University, Gracie Theatre, 1 College Circle, Bangor. 3 pm; $12 adults, $8 kids. 207.941.7051.

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NO LONGER HUNGRY ARTISTS | If, as some have started

to claim, Lewiston is poised to become a creative hub in Maine, it might take some cues from the city of Portland, which has said a focus on building the creative economy is a central priority of its 2013-14 Economic Plan & Vision. In “art & the human ecoSyStem” Creative Portland executive director Jennifer Hutchins will talk about how that non-profit arts agency’s goal of attracting 10,000 creativeminded people to Portland within the next 10 years will help artists and the economy at-large. Noon at the Lewiston Public Library, 200 Lisbon St. in Lewiston. 207.784.0135

f Found Footage Film FeStival, at SPACE Gallery, in Portland on March 22.

f walter kirn, at the Music Hall, in Portsmouth on March 26.

weirdo/cult rock group Taboo. They play with FountainSun, an experimental/spoken word incarnation of Daniel Higgs, the enigmatic former singer of D.C. punk band Lungfish. They play with locals video naStieS and colby nathan at 8 pm. $8 at 140 Main St. Visit theoakandtheax. com. HONEY I’M HOME | She’s back from Brooklyn (if only for a visit)! Head over to Port City Music Hall this Monday and get serenaded by the soft fury of Maine native lady lamb the beekeePer, currently on tour with a full band. She takes the stage with the indie-rock groups tyPhoon and wild oneS at 8 pm. $12-14 at 499 Congress St., 207.899.4990.

tuEsday 25 GET HOT | Nothing quite completes a Tuesday evening like erotic wordplay, amirite? Join the USM Center for Sexualities and Gender Diversity tonight at Slainte for melt: a SPringtime erotic reading. There will be smokin’ hot word games, an open mic, and work from featured poets Gaelle Robin and Jenn Carter. 7 pm, no cover — but donations are welcome. 24 Preble St. WHODUNIT | It’s no mystery, given our snowy winters, eerie forests, remote locales, and historical settings, that Maine is home to some accomplished mystery authors. Head over to the York Public Library next Tuesday and hear a few of them chat at a “myStery writerS Panel diScuSSion” where writers such as Gerry Boyle, James Hayman, Al Lamanda, and Lea Wait will be discussing the genre and their craft. 7 pm at 15 Long Sands Road, York. 207.363.2818 UKULELE TUNES | Hawaiian musician Jake Shimabukuro was handed a ukulele when he was only four years old; in 2006, at age 30, a video of him playing “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” went viral and he’s been renowned as a master of the instrument ever since. Watch him play his wide repertoire of jazz, classical, folk, and bluegrass this Tuesday at the State Theatre, 609 Congress St. Tickets are $25-35, show starts at 7:30pm. 207.956.6000.

WEdnEsday 26 SHARP DRESSED MEN | The claSh oF the titanS returns

once again to pit Portland’s best musicians against one another in glorious cover show. This week it’s the classic rock groups zz toP and Queen, which will surely be one crazy pop-phenomenon. $6, 10 pm at Empire, 575 Congress St. 207.879.8988. PETER & ALICE | Tonight, see two of our most beloved children’s stories, “Peter and the Wolf” and “Alice in Wonderland,” brought to life by univerSity oF

new hamPShire dance comPany

performers. The former will be

an abstract contemporary ballet piece and the latter will be a jazz/tap/aerial interpretation of the story of Alice. Running through the 30th; $7, 7 pm at the Johnson Theatre in Durham, NH. 603.862.2404. SCARY STUFF | Author walter kirn comes to Portsmouth next Wednesday to read from his new novel Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery and a Masquerade as a part of the Music Hall’s “Writers in the Loft” program. The novel, which the New York Times describes as a “smart, real-life psychological thriller,” explores the author’s 10-year relationship with the imposter and murderer who called himself Clark Rockefeller. Tickets are $40. Music Hall, 131 Congress St. in Portsmouth, NH. 603.436.2400.

JULY 24 ON SALE FRI 10AM

MARCH 21

MARCH 23

thursday 27 BOOKS & GLITTER | Next week, the Telling Room puts on its yearly gala, glitterati: a SParkling literary ball, which raises money for the writing center’s extensive programming (which may help you swallow the hefty $75 price tag); This year the party will be filled with music, food, and (of course) loads of glitter! All purchased tickets directly support the Telling Room’s programs. 6 pm. Grace, 15 Chestnut St, Portland. Visit thetellingroom.org for more details. SLIGHTLY-LATIN | If you’re in the mood for some reggae-folkrock music, the very popular band Slightly StooPid returns to the State Theatre next Thursday. Performing with them is the punk-band-gone-mariachi-group (I’m confused too, it’s ok) Mariachi El Bronx. Tickets run $22.5025. 8 pm, 609 Congress St. ROCK LEGEND | Celebrate the music and legend of Jimi Hendrix next Thursday at the “exPerience hendrix” show at the Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom. Playing will be the notable musicians Billy Cox, Buddy Guy, Jonny Lang, Dweezil Zappa and Kenny Wayne Shepard, playing blues, country and rock styles influenced by Jimi. Tickets are $36; show starts at 8 pm. Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom, 169 Ocean Blvd, Hampton, NH. 603.929.4100.

with Dirty Phonics, ILL Gates

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PURE PRAIRIE LEAGUE, LIVINGSTON TAYLOR and JONATHAN EDWARDS A benefit for Maine People’s Alliance

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16 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

$5 surcharge; free for PMA members

(207) 775-6148 | portlandmuseum.org The exhibition is organized by the Brooklyn Museum. Generously supported by Lila Hunt, The Roy A. Hunt Foundation. Foundation support: Morton-Kelly Charitable Trust. Media sponsors: WCSH 6, Maine magazine, and Maine Home+Design. J. Carroll Beckwith (United States, 1852-1917), Portrait of Minnie Clark (detail), circa 1890s, charcoal and pastel on blue-fibered, medium-weight, moderately textured laid paper, 22 3/8 x 18 1/4 inches (sheet). Brooklyn Museum, Gift of J. Carroll Beckwith, 17.127

Portland location 865 Forest avenue 207.747.5068 And in Biddeford 500 MAriners WAy 207.282.6324

art

theater

PRIME MERIDIAN MusINgs

harnessing the tides

_BY MAR IAH BER GER ON

_BY deirdre f ulto n

KENTRIDGE COLLABORATES ON CONCEPT OF TIME The British Empire’s creation and subsequent implementation of standard time zones crowned Greenwich the true noon, then dictated that the rest of the world’s longitudes take note and reset their late-19th-century watches. The pulse of England was then pumped into its distant colonies, restructuring cultures and climates for the sake of convenience and control. South African artist William Kentridge’s draws from this historical imperialism and expands into a wide-reaching ode to time and our inability to harness its power, in an exhibit at the Institute for Contemporary Art in Boston. The Refusal of Time is a collab‘ThE REFUSAL OF TIME’ by William Kentridge with orative audio-video-sculptural Philip Miller, Catherine Meyburgh, and Peter Galison. installation confronting the hisFive-channel video with sound; 2012. torical standardization of time by way of British colonization, the invention of cinema, astrophysics, aparttime: celestial observations, methods of heid, and the theory of relativity. Working time calibration, even the making of a bomb with two fellow South Africans, filmmaker purportedly meant to destroy Royal ObservaCatherine Meyburgh and composer Philip tory. These pastiches, reminiscent of films by Miller, as well as Harvard University history Méliès or Gondry, mimic the hand-cranked of science professor Peter Galison, Kentridge speed of early silent films, a choice both hisgrapples with a variety of relationships to torical and thematically in homage to a more time, both scientific and subjective, and the biorhythmic sense of speed. The work as collaboration and collage is elastic perceptions therein. The deft and dein keeping with Kentridge’s aim: to reject liberate tornado of those sentiments whirled any entity’s oppressive manipulation of time into one mesmerizing 30-minute experience is absolutely a staggering achievement. by dismantling a single proprietary voice. Viewing The Refusal of Time requires enterApartheid is presented in this same tone. ing the darkest back room of Boston’s ICA. A Kentridge casts himself as the sole white acscattering of simple chairs surround a large tor in a cast of black performers, a self-aware and quietly churning kinetic machine, an characterization of the effects of his colonial eight-foot Shaker-esque wooden contraption bloodline. In one of the work’s most empacranking a steady loom-like motion under thetically engrossing vignettes, a parade of stygian low-wattage light. The installation dancing musicians in life-sized silhouette begins as five projectors transform three full festively circle around and around the room. museum walls into a panoramic wide screen The celebration builds with people, but intentionally too large to take in from any also with domestic objects. The procession one vantage point. The massive videos begin becomes a migration, the music turns a with five metronomes slowly ticking out of dirge, as the characters slouch under these sync to the strident surround-sound blare of weights strapped burdensomely to their percussive brass horns, bass drums, vocal backs. When the final lap shows the crowd wailing, and unintelligible whispers. This bound in shackles, it leaves the viewer wondering “how did that happen?” hynoptic introduction gives a mild warning The Refusal of Time creates a narrative unof the erratic sensory blitz about to unfold. able to be observed from a single vantage Edited at a dizzying tempo, viewers point, or understood from a single screenmust rubberneck in oscillating fits, craning. Precisely this impossibility is the esing to catch what has already come and sential victory of the piece — a favoring of gone from the screens just in periphery. the subjective empirical over the theoretic Engineers’ drawings turn to constellations, imperial. Take that one step further and which turn to player piano scrolls that swirl consider that this very installation is not into black holes. Even from the cool back of the sovereign article — three other identical the room, no single viewing can absorb the museum editions are currently on exhibit onslaught of disparate plot trajectories or in New York, Kyoto, and Perth. No indihear each percussive layer. vidual experience can claim authority on Kentridge employs both his recognizable the perception of time and its measurement animation drawing style as well as his back— Kentridge’s included. ^ ground in theater and mime, blending stopmotion with live-action. His smudgy charcoal and scribbled handwriting turn texts on ‘REFUSAL OF TIME’ through May 4 | at the history and physics into palimpsests, black Boston ICA, 100 Northern Ave, Boston | and white academia corrected in anarchic 617.478.3100 | icaboston.org reds. Another chapter crafts diorama-like vaudevilles of various moments in the British Mariah Bergeron can be reached at Empire’s acquisition of global standardized mariahbergeron@gmail.com.

f

J OHN K E NNARD

January 30 - April 27, 2014 Explore exceptional drawings and sketchbooks from the Brooklyn Museum’s world-renowned collection of American art, including rarely seen works by Marsden Hartley, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, and John Singer Sargent.

portland.thephoenix.com | the portland phoenix | march 21, 2014 17

at good theater, an honest look at dementia For the first few moments of The Outgoing Tide, Bruce Graham’s deceptively simple play on stage now at Good Theater, it is easy to think you’re observing two strangers interacting for the first (and probably last) time. The younger man, straight from the suburbs with his rumpled dress shirt and cell phone, doesn’t fish, he doesn’t have a boat — he doesn’t fit in on this Chesapeake Bay beach, where the older man has clearly settled in for the long haul. But then, just before their small-talk comes to its seemingly inevitable conclusion, we learn that these men are not strangers at all. Far from it; they are father and son, one fast losing his grip on reality, the other forced to recognize the mental decline of a man he always sought to please. Under the smooth direction of Brian P. Allen, three Equity actors delicately tackle the terrors of dementia, aging, and loss in this New England premiere. While the play deals in particular with the end of life, its underlying questions address everything leading up to that universal conclusion: How well do we know those who are closest to us? What are our obligations to family, both emotionally and financially? And maybe, even, what is worth remembering? In short scenes set in and around the beachfront cottage of Gunner and Peg Concannon (set designer Stephen Underwood and scenic artist Cheryl Dolan have successfully recreated the casual dune-side beauty of such a property, complemented by Iain Odlin’s subtly shifting light scheme, all sunset pinks and seaside purples), we learn that Gunner’s illness is getting increasingly worse. He tries to use a remote control to turn on the microwave; he often forgets basic words. Peg (the lovely Florence Lacey, primarily known for her musical theater roles but doing a fine job with this meaty material) wants to move Gunner into a retirement facility. She has finally acknowledged that she needs help, and she wants her visiting son, Jack (a troubled JP Guimont), to help her make the case to Gunner. Gunner is strongly opposed to such a move, and

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Jack isn’t too keen on it either — they’re both upset by the depressing assisted-care wing. Ultimately, the family will have to grapple with past wounds and future uncertainties before considering an unorthodox resolution. As Gunner Concannon, dwindling yet intractable patriarch, Will Rhys employs malleable facial muscles and energetic gesticulations to suggest that cruel joke of time — that as people age, they often revert back to childhood either by choice or necessity. Whether he’s throwing a tantrum, charming his wife of 50 years, or struggling to maintain his mental faculties, Rhys channels the raw sentiment of youth by, at different points, pounding his fists against his head in frustration, smiling impishly, or coming up with outlandish solutions to family problems. As with a child, it makes his character simultaneously infuriating and vulnerable. Lacey’s Peg is every bit the practical wife, complete with boxy jacket and errand-running purse and no-nonsense ponytail. In fact, her level-headedness can be disarming, which serves to underscore how even the scariest reality can become routine. We see her take Gunner’s gaffes in stride, even though we know she’s silently tallying them. When she finally offers an impassioned avowal — “I’m not ready to lose my husband” — one feels grateful that Peg has permitted herself a moment of honest emotion, and that she’s done so in front of her son. “Don’t tell your mother,” Gunner tells Jack again and again, both in flashbacks that serve to flesh out the family’s relationships, and in present time. “Don’t tell your father,” Peg says, equally eager to do things her own way. In this way, the audience is shown a source of Jack’s inner conflicts, which Guimont manifests physically — in contrast with Rhys, he is quite tightly wound — and behaviorally. As an only child grappling with his father’s illness and the fallout from his own divorce, Jack feels wholly, totally alone. The metaphor here is that of tides, and how their ebb and flow mimics the pull of memory. But perhaps as apt a comparison would be to islands, and how each of us is our own. ^

THE OUTGOING TIDE | by Bruce Graham | Directed by Brian P. Allen | Produced by Good Theater | at the St. Lawrence Arts Center, 76 Congress St, Portland | through March 30 | 207.885.5883 | goodtheater.com AS DEEP AS THE OCEANS the love between gunner (Will rhys) and Peg (florence lacey) is as complex as it is abiding.

Deirdre Fulton can be reached at dfulton@ phx.com.


18 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

if le _b y S a m P fe

portLand.thephoenix.com | the portLand phoenix | march 21, 2014 19

@yahoo.com

sam_pfeifle

LfCAL MUSIC

The album is dynamic, engaging, and thought-provoking — even, at times, a whole lot of fun.

Listings GREATER PORTLAND THURSDAY 20

51 WHARF | Portland | DJ Revolve |

9 pm

ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland | Pretty Girls Sing Soprano

ASYLUM | Portland | upstairs: Los

kgfreeze returnS with Plenty of hand-raiSerS

Because Kyle Gervais is constitutionally unable to be in a band, we are left with his solo project, KGFREEZE. While that may be frustrating for fans (and members) of great bands like Cosades and Grand Hotel, it isn’t bad consolation for those interested in hearing truly interesting and exploratory music. And because Gervais has decided the classic “band” music-making structure is not for him, it’s even easier for him to pivot with his songwriting whims. On his first KGFREEZE album, Sociopath, that meant he played all the instruments himself and created a grimy, inward-looking piece, as the title implied. On the brand-new Volunteer he has enlisted a Brady Bunch of collaborators, who share songwriting credits and contribute vocals, musicianship, and production. The results are among the best in an already-impressive catalog of recorded works. The album is dynamic, engaging, and thought-provoking — even, at times, a whole lot of fun. “Better Falsetto” is the highlight, which you know already if you’ve seen the video charging about social media. It is Gervais aping Justin Timberlake, a recalcitrant crooner who doesn’t have to worry about what the radio edit might sound like, with Jared Burst filling in for Jay-Z in the rapped bridge. Almost as a throwaway, it has a hook like Seal’s “Kissed by a Rose” (I had forgotten the Batman connection to that song) that will have you belting out the chorus in random places before you know you’re doing it. Burst, too, does great work. He merges

f

FWAX TABLeT

with the verse in a half-time slur, then slaps you out of your reverie: “Who gives a fuck about whatever his name is?” And Sean Morin (Daro, Cambiata, etc.) sets the mood with a range of synths and beats. This unnamed rival is often a topic of conversation. In “Talk About Love,” Gervais wonders, “How would he feel if he knew what I was doing to you.” But then he changes the pronouns, turns the song on its head, makes the finish of the six-and-ahalf-minute piece into an entreaty: “Let’s talk about love ... whatever that means.” And the last minute-plus is a distorted fadeout, like being forcibly dragged, which teases at speeding back up but ultimately sputters out in Derek Gierhan’s drums. In the strutting and spare “Top Secret,” we get the other side of the story, in the form of Sara Hallie Richardson’s dark evanescence, peppered with laughter and chatting: “I’ve met you many times before/ You give nothing and keep asking for more ... Gotta make sure that you meet your needs before you meet mine/ I can’t begin to explain to you, how useless you are.” And, yet, you get the sense they’re sleeping together. (The couple in the song. Not Gervais and Richardson.) Gervais and company love contradictions — changes of tempo, of mood and setting. The opening and title track is nothing but moody synths, slightly industrial, with muted vocals that mimic the lyrics: “I don’t really care.” Then, after three minutes, it gets awesome, with guitar melody and chords in opposing channels, and downright danceable.

WAXtABlet@phX.COm

Everyone hold up F You really can’t go long in this town without getting lured into some tangled argument about the ethics of portland cover nights and the relative dire state of original music. Such debates are valid, yeah, but they’re also rabbit holes, spiraling easily into any number of bottomless conversations about the free market, personal taste, intellectual property, music production technology, and the so-called creative economy. And friends, such talk can seriously kill your buzz! But we wonder, though, if there isn’t a simple bridge between the two camps. We almost hate to put it into words, but what if Maine bands just covered each other? this thought occurred to us while spending time with a seveRe Joy’s dreamily anticipatory cover of “i hold her Up,” the disarming, melancholic lovers’ ballad off Metal FeatHeRs’

handful of Fog album from last year. one song; two different contexts. totally sexy! look, no one doubts there’s enough diversity in this town to make it interesting, and it might even get local fans to spend time with Maine music that isn’t contemporary, which let’s face it, can be pretty rare in an era so obsessed with the new. there’s no substitute for making original stuff, but genius is a fallacy, and artists needn’t feel bound to having a proprietary relationship with the music they make. Besides, wouldn’t collaboration be more interesting to fans than just endlessly shouting your band’s upcoming projects into a fathomless social media void?

Suddenly, that extended, all-instrumental jam crashes into “Power + Status,” declaring immediately that, “I still get fucked up on week nights/ With people I don’t know/ When you’re not around” in traditional guitar-bassdrums structure. This is the Gervais you know best, full-throated and doubled delivery: “I talk a lotta shit about/ people I shouldn’t talk shit about.” And he’s right. No one cares about that. i’ll VOLUNTEER a great new album from kgfreeze, the solo Especially if he can comproject of kyle gervais. bine with the likes of Mike Rodrigue to elicit soundtrack, with Pretenders licks and a pointed guitar solos and Jacob Battick’s Men Without Hats keyboard line. Plus alter-ego, AFRAID, to create the Moby-like lyrics like, “I just want to hold you/ Some“Good Times Roll,” a repeating and cycling times/ I think I’d like to get to know you.” mash-up of early rock and contemporary Is that you, Ducky? digitization. The piano is like a skipping The whole thing is just ducky by me, I’ll CD at the open, pounding and insistent, say that. KGFREEZE doesn’t make easy pop but AFRAID is warm and inviting, careful fare, but you can see the wheels turning bein his delivery, not unlike Damon Albarn hind every track and you can listen to them in “Tender,” which similarly rolls the same for days on end. ^ words around to see how they sound. Then we get a deep bass, a flute-like lilt, and some snare. Like the 7:18-long “Song 9,” VOLUNTEER | Released by KGFReeZe | with it’s the kind of work you can listen to on resara Hallie Richardson + aFRaiD | at Port peat for hours if need be, though “Song 9” City Music Hall, in Portland | March 21 | is more like something off the Sixteen Candles facebook.com/KGFReeZemusic

ordinaire, by June Politano

But hey, what do we know! hear the revamped “i hold her Up” at soundcloud.com/aseverejoy. F Speaking of covers, the portland alt-folk songwriter June Politano let a couple of real thoughtful ones fly last week via her bandcamp page. on a record aptly titled Covers, she thoughtfully re-arranges songs by Scottish indie-pop group camera obscura and Southern folk artist a.a. Bundy, helping to contextualize the dreamy, lovely, kinda-sad, and eerily catchy beach-pop of her brand new full length album Ordinaire. Worth visiting junepolitano.bandcamp. com to hear it. F like the long-lusted-after dream of america’s deep South, the basement of Binga’s Stadium

has finally seceded from the union. the room’s now called Basslines, a fitting title for the spectacle of their oonce-oonce dJ nights, and one which cleaves a bit of distance from their wingtoting, sports-watching, sedentary neighbors above. it also brings some distinction to their seasonal “chaos” parties, a kind of rave-lite for the 18+ crowd at which everybody gets wild with paint and foam and silly string and glow sticks while listening to hi-energy, unsubtle club music. We’re in full support of all ages dance nights (provided everyone’s made to feel safe), and so are optimistic about this move by default — even if music like this can feel a little one-dimensional after awhile. But if you’re young, can get down to anything, and wanna explore some new terrain, see what Basslines has to offer.

Send an e-mail to submit@phx.com

STYXX | Portland | back room: DJ

CLUBS

SIgn Me Up

!GET LISTED

Lonely Boys | 9 pm | $25 | downstairs: “Retro Night,” with DJ King Alberto | 9 pm BLUE | Portland | Welterweight | 7 pm | Heather Styka: “Truth or Dare” | 9 pm BULL FEENEY’S | Portland | Hello Newman | 9 pm EMPIRE | Portland | Toughcats | 9 pm FLASK LOUNGE | Portland | karaoke with DJ Cougar | 9 pm GENO’S ROCK CLUB | Portland | Stone Tools + Holy Filth + Blackout + Throaat + Hessian | 9 pm | $5 GINGKO BLUE | Portland | Mike James Blue Lions | 8-11 pm LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE | Portland | open mic | 7 pm MAMA’S CROWBAR | Portland | bluegrass night & open mic MARK’S PLACE | Portland | DJ Tinydancer OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | karaoke with DJ Mike Mahoney | 9 pm PEARL | Portland | DJ Braulio | 9 pm | $5 PORT CITY MUSIC HALL | Portland | Assembly of Dust | 8 pm | $18-20 PORTLAND EAGLES | Portland | karaoke | 6 pm RI RA/PORTLAND | Portland | Kilcollins | 7 pm

SEA DOG BREWING/SOUTH PORTLAND | South Portland | karaoke | 10 pm SEASONS GRILLE | Portland | DJ Colin

| 7 pm

SILVER HOUSE TAVERN | Portland |

karaoke | 9 pm STYXX | Portland | DJ Tubbz | 9 pm

FRIDAY 21

51 WHARF | Portland | DJ Revolve |

9 pm

ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland | Joel Cage

ASYLUM | Portland | Slaine + Rite Hook

& Moroney + Trails + Ryan Augustus + Northern Lights Nation + Jon Haze + Frontline + DJ 2 Phat | 8 pm BLUE | Portland | Potato Pickers | 8 pm | Gunther Brown | 10 pm BUBBA’S SULKY LOUNGE | Portland | “’80s Night,” with DJ Jon | 7 pm | $5 BUCK’S NAKED BBQ/PORTLAND | Portland | Frank McDaniel | 4 pm BULL FEENEY’S | Portland | Kilcollins | 9:30 pm THE DOGFISH BAR AND GRILLE | Portland | Travis James Humphrey | 5 pm EMPIRE | Portland | Aloud + When Particles Collide + Worried Well + Ghost of Paul Revere | 10 pm | $7 FLASK LOUNGE | Portland | “Friction Friday,” drum & bass night with Red Shift + Bit Crusher + Josiah Scribes | 9 pm GENO’S ROCK CLUB | Portland | Shane Reis + Alyssa Marie + Miles Grimez + Ock Cousteau | 9:30 pm | $5 GINGKO BLUE | Portland | Poke Chop & The Other White Meat | 9 pm GINZA TOWN | Portland | karaoke | 8:30 pm OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | DJ Mike Mahoney | 9 pm PORT CITY MUSIC HALL | Portland | KGFreeze + Sara Hallie Richardson + Afraid | 9 pm | $8 PORTLAND EAGLES | Portland | Bill Young Jr. | 7 pm PROFENNO’S | Westbrook | karaoke with DJ Bob Libby | 9 pm SEASONS GRILLE | Portland | DJ Chuck Igo | 5 pm SILVER HOUSE TAVERN | Portland | karaoke | 9 pm

Cherry Lemonade | 9 pm | front room: DJ Tony B | 9 pm UNION STATION BILLIARDS | Portland | karaoke with TJ the DJ | 9 pm

SATURDAY 22

51 WHARF | Portland | lounge: DJ Tony B | 9 pm | main floor: DJ Jay-C | 9 pm ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland | John Hasnip ASYLUM | Portland | “Tarnation,” Baxter Brewing Company release party with Doubting Gravity + Kenya Hall Band + Welterweight | 8 pm | $5-8 BASSLINES | Portland | Ya Favorite Homie JR | 8 pm | $10-15 BAYSIDE BOWL | Portland | “Lux Lives,” Cramps tribute with Icepicks + Gamma Goochies + Kogar the Swinging Ape | 8 pm BLUE | Portland | Ehud Ettun | 8 pm | Hardy Brothers Jazz Jam | 10 pm BUBBA’S SULKY LOUNGE | Portland | “Everything Dance Party,” with DJ Jon | 7 pm BUCK’S NAKED BBQ/PORTLAND | Portland | Travis James Humphrey | 9 pm CREMA COFFEE COMPANY | Portland | Dave Bullard | 11 am EMPIRE | Portland | Lord Fowl + Murcielago + Whale Oil | 10 pm | $7 GENO’S ROCK CLUB | Portland | Antique Scream GINGKO BLUE | Portland | Tommy O’Connell & the Juke Joint Devils | 9 pm GINZA TOWN | Portland | karaoke | 8:30 pm LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE | Portland | Hadocol Bouncers | 8 am MARK’S PLACE | Portland | Ya Favorite Homie JR | 10 pm OASIS | Portland | upstairs: DJ Lenza | 9 pm OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | DJ Tubbs | 9 pm PORTLAND EAGLES | Portland | Bill Young Jr. | 5 pm PROFENNO’S | Westbrook | DJ Jim Fahey | 9 pm RI RA/PORTLAND | Portland | Highland Rovers SALVAGE BBQ & SMOKEHOUSE | Portland | “American Music Night,” performers TBA | 10 pm SEASONS GRILLE | Portland | karaoke with Long Island Larry | 8:30 pm SILVER HOUSE TAVERN | Portland | karaoke | 9 pm SKYBOX BAR AND GRILL | Westbrook | DJ Kerry | 9 pm SLAINTE | Portland | Nippin’ the Nub | 9 pm SPARE TIME | Portland | “Karaoke Idol,” competition | 7 pm STYXX | Portland | back room: DJ Chris O | 9 pm | front room: DJ Duran | 9 pm

OTTO | Portland | Joe Walsh & Friends PORT CITY MUSIC HALL | Portland |

TUESDAY 25

pher,” poetry open mic | 6:30 pm

LFK | Portland | Dave Connolly | 2 pm LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE | Portland | Sean Mencher & Friends | 11 am

OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | karaoke with DJ Mike Mahoney | 9 pm PORT CITY MUSIC HALL | Portland | Ed Kowalczyk + Anna Rose | 8 pm | $20-30 PROFENNO’S | Westbrook | open mic | 6 pm ROYAL BEAN | Yarmouth | Day For Night | 1 pm SKYBOX BAR AND GRILL | Westbrook | DJ Kerry | 9 pm STYXX | Portland | karaoke with Cherry Lemonade | 7 pm

MONDAY 24

ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland |

Winchester Local & Carley Howard MJ’S WINE BAR | Portland | open jazz jam | 7 pm

Quality Food

Reasonable PRices

64 Lewiston Rd, Gray, ME 04039 • (207) 657-4714 • Credit Cards Accepted

Brian Callaghan

acoustic jam session | 8:30 pm GRITTY MCDUFF’S | Portland | Travis James Humphrey | 10 pm LOCAL 188 | Portland | Jaw Gems | 10 pm MAMA’S CROWBAR | Portland | “Piano Night,” with Jimmy Dority | 9 pm MARK’S PLACE | Portland | DJ Roy OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | karaoke with DJ Mike Mahoney | 9 pm SLAINTE | Portland | karaoke with DJ Ponyfarm | 9 pm THE THIRSTY PIG | Portland | open mic

WEDNESDAY 26

51 WHARF | Portland | DJ Ryan Deelon

| 9 pm

ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland | David Beam & the Custom House Gang

ASYLUM | Portland | downstairs:

karaoke with DJ Johnny Red | 9 pm | upstairs: “Rap Night,” with Shupe & Ill By Instinct | 9 pm | $0-3 BIG EASY | Portland | blues jam BLUE | Portland | Irish Seisún | Irish session | 9 pm BULL FEENEY’S | Portland | Squid Jiggers | 8 pm THE DOGFISH BAR AND GRILLE | Portland | acoustic open mic | 7 pm EMPIRE | Portland | “Clash of the Titans: ZZ Top vs. Queen,” cover night | 10 pm | $6 FROG AND TURTLE | Westbrook | open mic | 8 pm GATHER | Yarmouth | Zach Ovington | 8 pm GINGKO BLUE | Portland | Jason St. Pierre Trio | 7 pm LITTLE TAP HOUSE | Portland | Adam Waxman | 8 pm LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE | Portland | open fiddle jam | 10 am | Maxwell Aranson | 7 pm MAMA’S CROWBAR | Portland | “Local Lady Singer Songwriters,” performers TBA MARK’S PLACE | Portland | DJ Kevin Duran | 9 pm OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | DJ Marc Beatham | 9 pm PROFENNO’S | Westbrook | karaoke with Lil’ Man Music | 9 pm SLAINTE | Portland | open mic with Nick Poulin | 8 pm

9 pm

DOBRA TEA | Portland | “Rhythmic Cy-

Good dRinks

BLUE | Portland | Connor Garvey |

Poor Howard

BRIAN BORU | Portland | Irish session

live Music

ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland |

THURSDAY 27

| 3 pm

14 Beers on Draught • Full Bar Happy Hour 3-6 Daily Wednesdays Open Mic Night .50¢ Wings & $5.00 Margaritas After 4pm. Additional Drink Specials Live Music Friday & Saturday

Lady Lamb the Beekeeper + Typhoon + Wild Ones | 8 pm | $12-14 RI RA/PORTLAND | Portland | open mic with Ev Guy | 8 pm STYXX | Portland | “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” with Taffy Pulls

SUNDAY 23

ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland |

ur Not Just Yeor’s Grandfath s Cole Farm

Board of direcTors

Gavels & Gavel Plaques to honor Past term of service or welcome the new board! Trophy Warehouse 1021 ocean ave, porTland • (207) 773-4062 WWW.TrophyWarehousene.com

51 WHARF | Portland | DJ Revolve | ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | Portland | Heather Pierson

ASYLUM | Portland | upstairs: Justin

Levinson + Teddy Geiger + Dean Ford | 8 pm | $10 | downstairs: “Retro Night,” with DJ King Alberto | 9 pm BLUE | Portland | Muddy Ruckus | 7 pm | Samuel James & Dana Gross | 9 pm BULL FEENEY’S | Portland | Hello Newman | 9 pm FLASK LOUNGE | Portland | Harlock + Moses & Nocturnal + Mr. Dereloid | 9 pm GENO’S ROCK CLUB | Portland | Erroraeon + Gimme Goldar + Ode + Scrotal Tear | 9 pm | $5 GINGKO BLUE | Portland | Mike Stockbridge | 8 pm LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE | Portland | Swaggering Swing Billies | 7 pm MAMA’S CROWBAR | Portland | bluegrass night & open mic MARK’S PLACE | Portland | DJ Tinydancer

Continued on p 20

Proudly Featuring Head Chef John Dugans and Head Brewer Rob Prindall Guest tap

Bray’s ale

QuakeR ridGe oatmeal stout

funky Bow Panama red

Hand-Crafted ales • Great food • eCleCtiC Beer seleCtion

MARCH 20TH: BRAY’S SPRING EQUINOX BEER DINNER! OUR 70TH! LIMITED SEATING, RESERVATION REQUIRED, CALL 693-6806. FMI: www.braysbrewpub.com APRIL 3RD: SEBAGO BREWING CO. SHOWCASE, 5-8PM 678 Roosevelt Trail, At the Light in Naples, ME • (207) 693-6806 • www.braysbrewpub.com


20 march 21, 2014 | the portLand phoenix | portLand.thephoenix.com

portLand.thephoenix.com | the portLand phoenix | march 21, 2014 21

OLD MILL PUB | Skowhegan | Joey

Continued from p 19 MATHEW’S PUB | Portland | Raindance + Balam + Never Relaxed + Field of Spears | 9 pm | $4 OLD PORT TAVERN | Portland | karaoke with DJ Mike Mahoney | 9 pm PEARL | Portland | DJ Braulio | 9 pm | $5 PORT CITY MUSIC HALL | Portland | Mason Jennings + Sera Cahoone | 8 pm | $16-20 PORTLAND EAGLES | Portland | karaoke | 6 pm RI RA/PORTLAND | Portland | Kilcollins | 7 pm

SEA DOG BREWING/SOUTH PORTLAND | South Portland | karaoke | 10 pm SEASONS GRILLE | Portland | DJ Colin

| 7 pm

SILVER HOUSE TAVERN | Portland | karaoke | 9 pm STYXX | Portland | DJ Tubbz | 9 pm

FRIDAY 21

ADAMS STREET PUB | Biddeford |

karaoke

BEAR’S DEN TAVERN | Dover Foxcroft

| Octavia

BENCHWARMERS | Brunswick | DJ

302 SMOKEHOUSE & TAVERN | Frye-

Luckypenny | 9 pm

burg | open mic | 8:30 pm

BLACK BEAR CAFE | Naples | Paddy

| karaoke

BRAY’S BREWPUB | Naples | S.F.

with DJ Billy Adams | 9:30 pm

THE BRUNSWICK OCEANSIDE GRILLE | Old Orchard Beach | Tickle BULL MOOSE LOUNGE | Dexter | Dee-

BEAR’S DEN TAVERN | Dover Foxcroft BRAY’S BREWPUB | Naples | karaoke

Mills

Jones | 9:30 pm

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BRUNSWICK |

Brunswick | karaoke | 8:30 pm THE CAGE | Lewiston | open blues jam

jay Relykz

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BATH | Bath |

| 7 pm

CAPTAIN BLY’S TAVERN | Buckfield |

karaoke with DJ Joe | 8:30 pm

open mic | 7 pm

CAPTAIN BLY’S TAVERN | Buckfield

CAPTAIN DANIEL STONE INN | Brunswick | open mic | 6 pm CASA DEL LUNA | Lewiston | open mic

| karaoke

CHAMPIONS SPORTS BAR | Biddeford |

| DJ Caleb Biggers

| 7 pm

karaoke with DJ Caleb Biggers | 9:30 pm

CARMEN VERANDAH | Bar Harbor | DJ Jeff Buffington | 9 pm

CHAMPIONS SPORTS BAR | Biddeford CHAPS SALOON | Buxton | DJ Marky

CLUB TEXAS | Auburn | DJ B-Set | 9:30

Mark

GFB SCOTTISH PUB | Old Orchard Beach

Whitefields | 9 pm

HIGHLANDS COFFEE HOUSE | Thomaston | open mic | 6 pm THE LIBERAL CUP | Hallowell | Dave

oke | 9 pm

| Biddeford | Dana Pearson & Monica Grabin | 7 pm FATBOY’S SALOON | Biddeford | karaoke with Dennis the Lil’ Musicman | 9 pm FEDERAL JACK’S | Kennebunk | Travis James Humphrey + the RetroRockets

wich | Mitch Alden | 6 pm

| Wells | karaoke | 8 pm

pm

| Robert Johnson Project

Mello | 7 pm

LOMPOC CAFE | Bar Harbor | open mic MAINELY BREWS | Waterville | karaMONTSWEAG ROADHOUSE | WoolAuburn | open mic with Johnny Rock

| 8 pm

NEWCASTLE PUBLICK HOUSE | New-

castle | Paul Mellyn

NOCTURNEM DRAFT HAUS | Bangor | DJ Baby Bok Choy + DJ T-Coz | 8 pm OLD GOAT | Richmond | open mic | 8 pm

EASY STREET LOUNGE | Hallowell | ELEMENTS: BOOKS COFFEE BEER

FEILE IRISH RESTAURANT AND PUB

NARAL’S EXPERIENCE ARABIA |

THE BRUNSWICK OCEANSIDE GRILLE | Old Orchard Beach | Kilcollins CLUB 737 | Bath | 220s | 10 pm CLUB TEXAS | Auburn | Poc Nation +

SUNDAY 23

FATBOY’S SALOON | Biddeford | DJ

BLOOMFIELD’S CAFE AND BAR |

Trevor Brown | 8 pm

karaoke | 8 pm

THURSDAY 20

IRON TAILS SALOON | Acton | DJ

drigue | 6 pm ROOSTER’S | Augusta | Steve Jones RUN OF THE MILL BREWPUB | Saco | Walkenhorse | 8 pm SEA DOG BREWING/BANGOR | Bangor | karaoke | 9 pm SILVER STREET TAVERN | Waterville | Jim Pryor SKIP’S LOUNGE | Buxton | open mic | 7 pm SUDS PUB | Bethel | Denny Breau | 9 pm TAILGATE BAR & GRILL | Gray | open mic | 8 pm TORCHES GRILL HOUSE | Kennebunk | open mic | 7 pm TRAIN’S TAVERN | Lebanon | karaoke with DJ Dick WATER STREET GRILL | Gardiner | DJ Roger Collins

ALISSON’S RESTAURANT | Kennebunkport | karaoke | 8:30 pm AMERICAN LEGION POST 56 | York |

MAINE

BRAY’S BREWPUB | Naples | Wayouts

catado | 9 pm

THE RACK | Carabassett | Mike Ro-

Listings

HOLLYWOOD SLOTS | Bangor | En-

Charles

FRONT STREET PUBLIC HOUSE | Bath | John Hasnip | 9 pm FUSION | Lewiston | DJ Hanzo | 9 pm THE GREEN ROOM | Sanford | DJ Bounce | 9 pm GUTHRIE’S | Lewiston | Jenny Jumpstart & the Cap Guns | 8 pm THE HIVE | Kennebunk | Jerks of Grass | 8 pm | $5

JIMMY THE GREEK’S/OLD ORCHARD BEACH | Old Orchard Beach | Dueling

| 9:30 pm

Pianos | 7 pm

Throttle | $10-12

Step + Devonsquare | 8 pm | $41.50 THE KENNEBEC WHARF | Hallowell | Happy Hour Band | 5:30 pm KERRYMEN PUB | Saco | Night Rockers | 8 pm LAST CALL | Old Orchard Beach | DJ Jimmy D LION’S PRIDE | Brunswick | Max Garcia Conover | 9 pm MAINE STREET | Ogunquit | DJ Aga | 9 pm MAINELY BREWS | Waterville | Dirigo | 9 pm | $5 MEMORY LANE MUSIC HALL | Standish | Tattoo Cowboy MILLBROOK TAVERN & GRILLE | Bethel | Brad Hooper | 6 pm MONTSWEAG ROADHOUSE | Woolwich | Pitch Black Ribbons | 6 pm MYRTLE STREET TAVERN | Rockland | karaoke | 9 pm THE OAK AND THE AX | Biddeford | Blood Warrior + If & It + Baroses | 8 pm | $8 PENOBSCOT POUR HOUSE | Bangor | DJ Bill Lyons THE RACK | Carabassett | North of Nashville | 7:30 pm ROOSTER’S | Augusta | Steve Vellani SHEEPSCOT GENERAL | Whitefield | open mic | 7 pm SHENANIGANS | Augusta | DJ Doze SILVER SPUR | Mechanic Falls | Debbie Morin & Forefront SILVER STREET TAVERN | Waterville | Scott & Rick SOLO BISTRO | Bath | Liz Matta & Rebecca Wing | 6:30 pm SPEAKEASY | Rockland | Wayne DeLano Quartet | 7 pm SUDS PUB | Bethel | Jim Gallant TANTRUM | Bangor | Render + Fifth Freedom | 9 pm TIME OUT PUB | Rockland | open mic | 9 pm TOWNHOUSE PUB | Saco | karaoke | 8:30 pm TRAIN’S TAVERN | Lebanon | Red Sky Mary | 8 pm TUCKER’S PUB | Norway | open mic | 7 pm TUG’S PUB | Southport | Sharon Buck & the Dixon Road Band | 5:30 pm YORK HARBOR INN | York Harbor | pub: Dan Walker | 5 pm | cabin room: Woody Allen | 6 pm

Dennis the Lil’ Musicman THE FOGGY GOGGLE | Newry | Dead Sessions [Grateful Dead tribute] | 9:30 pm FUSION | Lewiston | DJ Kool V | 9 pm THE GREEN ROOM | Sanford | DJ Tish | 9 pm

JONATHAN’S | Ogunquit | Aztec Two-

SATURDAY 22

AMERICAN LEGION POST 56 | York |

Bad Kitty & the Phat Cats Band | 7 pm BEAR’S DEN TAVERN | Dover Foxcroft | Oversoul BLACK BEAR CAFE | Naples | Paddy Mills BLUE MOON LOUNGE | Skowhegan | DJ Montana Green

HIGHER GROUNDS COFFEEHOUSE AND TAVERN | Hallowell | Shizzle THE HIVE | Kennebunk | Sock Puppets | 8 pm | $5

HOLLYWOOD SLOTS | Bangor | Allison

Ames Band | 9 pm

IRON TAILS SALOON | Acton | Conta-

gious | 8 pm

KERRYMEN PUB | Saco | Stripped |

8 pm

THE LIBERAL CUP | Hallowell | LQH

| 9 pm

LOMPOC CAFE | Bar Harbor | Blood Warrior | 9:30 pm MAINE STREET | Ogunquit | DJ Ken | 9 pm MAINELY BREWS | Waterville | Michael Reny + Marcela Landaeta + Aaron Sanchez MEMORY LANE MUSIC HALL | Standish | Ben Cesare Band + Whiskey Militia MILLBROOK TAVERN & GRILLE | Bethel | Peter Prince & Moon Boot Lover | 9 pm MONTSWEAG ROADHOUSE | Woolwich | Married With Chitlins | 6 pm MOOSE ALLEY | Rangeley | Dean Machine | 9 pm OLD MILL PUB | Skowhegan | Mike Rodrigue PENOBSCOT POUR HOUSE | Bangor | Hello Newman THE RACK | Carabassett | Jay McClure | 4:30 pm | Dirigo | 9 pm ROOSTER’S | Augusta | Lee Sykes RUN OF THE MILL BREWPUB | Saco | Northern Groove | 8 pm SEA DOG BREWING/TOPSHAM | Topsham | karaoke with DJ Stormin Norman | 10 pm SILVER SPUR | Mechanic Falls | Cowboy Billy SILVER STREET TAVERN | Waterville | Riff Johnson SLIDERS RESTAURANT | Newry | Eric Green | 7 pm SPEAKEASY | Rockland | Old Blues Kats | 8 pm STUDIO BISTRO AND BAR | Bethel | Sorcha Cribben-Merrill & Jo Sorrell | 7:30 pm SWIG ‘N SMELT PUB | Rangeley | North of Nashville TAILGATE BAR & GRILL | Gray | karaoke with TJ the DJ TRACKSIDE STATION | Rockland | DJ VJ TRAIN’S TAVERN | Lebanon | American Made | 8 pm

YORK HARBOR INN | York Harbor |

pub: Peter Black | 5 pm | cabin room: Woody Allen | 6 pm

Irish-American sing-along | 5 pm CHAMPIONS SPORTS BAR | Biddeford | karaoke with DJ Don Corman | 9:30 pm HOLLYWOOD SLOTS | Bangor | karaoke | 6 pm IRON TAILS SALOON | Acton | Gary Boisse | 1 pm THE KENNEBEC WHARF | Hallowell | open jam with Chris Poulson | 5 pm THE LIBERAL CUP | Hallowell | St. Huckleberry | 5 pm MAINE STREET | Ogunquit | karaoke | 9 pm NARAL’S EXPERIENCE ARABIA | Auburn | open mic with Johnny Rock | 8 pm THE OLDE MILL TAVERN | Harrison | open mic | 5 pm THE RACK | Carabassett | North of Nashville | 6 pm RAVEN’S ROOST | Brunswick | open mic with Yankee Wailer | 3 pm TAILGATE BAR & GRILL | Gray | open mic blues jam | 4 pm

Britches | 8 pm FUSION | Lewiston | open mic & karaoke GFB SCOTTISH PUB | Old Orchard Beach | karaoke THE GIN MILL | Augusta | open mic | 7:30 pm THE GREEN ROOM | Sanford | DJ Dubruso | 9 pm THE KENNEBEC WHARF | Hallowell | open jam with Yikes It’s Josh | 9 pm NARAL’S EXPERIENCE ARABIA | Auburn | open mic blues jam | 7 pm NEWCASTLE PUBLICK HOUSE | Newcastle | Arthur Webster & Mark Stover | 6:30 pm THE RACK | Carabassett | open mic | 6 pm READFIELD EMPORIUM | Readfield | open mic | 6 pm ROOSTER’S | Augusta | Scott & Rick SEA DOG BREWING/TOPSHAM | Topsham | open mic | 9:30 pm SEA40 | Lewiston | open mic with Nick Racioppi | 7 pm SILVER STREET TAVERN | Waterville | open mic SPEAKEASY | Rockland | open mic | 8 pm TANTRUM | Bangor | karaoke UNION HOUSE PUB & PIZZA | Biddeford | open mic | 6 pm WATER STREET GRILL | Gardiner | DJ Roger Collins WOODMAN’S BAR & GRILL | Orono | open mic | 10 pm

MONDAY 24

THURSDAY 27

Irish session | 7 pm FOG BAR & CAFE | Rockland | open mic | 8 pm KERRYMEN PUB | Saco | open mic | 7 pm MAINELY BREWS | Waterville | open mic with Mike Rodrigue | 9 pm THE OAK AND THE AX | Biddeford | Enchanted + Fountainsun + Video Nasties + Colby Nathan | 8 pm | $8 PADDY MURPHY’S | Bangor | karaoke | 9:30 pm PEDRO O’HARA’S/LEWISTON | Lewiston | open mic with Mike Krapovicky | 6:30 pm

302 SMOKEHOUSE & TAVERN | Fryeburg | Tom Rebmann | 11 am

Skowhegan | open mic jam | 5 pm BRAY’S BREWPUB | Naples | jam session | 8 pm

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BATH | Bath |

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BATH | Bath |

SLATES RESTAURANT AND BAKERY | Hallowell | JT Lockwood | 8:15 pm | $15

TIME OUT PUB | Rockland | Samantha

Fish | 7 pm | $15

TUESDAY 25

AMERICAN LEGION POST 56 | York |

open mic | 6 pm

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BRUNSWICK | Brunswick | Irish session | 7 pm

CAPTAIN & PATTY’S RESTAURANT | Kittery Point | open mic | 7 pm CARMEN VERANDAH | Bar Harbor | open mic | 9 pm

CLUB 737 | Bath | open mic with Yan-

kee Wailer | 9 pm

DOWN UNDER CLUB | Bangor | kara-

oke | 7:30 pm

IRISH TWINS PUB | Lewiston | open mic | 7 pm

LION’S PRIDE | Brunswick | open mic

| 7 pm

MAIN TAVERN | Bangor | open mic | 9 pm

MAINELY BREWS | Waterville | Dave

Take summer classes

Mello | 6 pm | open blues jam | 9 pm

MONTSWEAG ROADHOUSE | Wool-

wich | open mic | 7 pm PADDY MURPHY’S | Bangor | open mic

@ SMCC

| 9:30 pm

ROOSTER’S | Augusta | Christine Poul-

son & Steve Jones

RUN OF THE MILL BREWPUB | Saco |

Why?

open mic | 8 pm

SILVER STREET TAVERN | Waterville

Classes start May 27

| karaoke

TRAIN’S TAVERN | Lebanon | open mic | 7 pm

WATER STREET GRILL | Gardiner |

open mic

WEDNESDAY 26

BLUE MOON LOUNGE | Skowhegan | karaoke | 8 pm

THE BRUNSWICK OCEANSIDE GRILLE

Get ahead

Study on the beach

Learn something new

For more information and to

register now

visit

www.smccME.edu/summer

FRONTIER CAFE | Brunswick | Tricky

| Old Orchard Beach | open mic | 7 pm CHAMPIONS SPORTS BAR | Biddeford | Travis James Humphrey | 9 pm CHARLAMAGNE’S | Augusta | open mic with John Hasnip | 7:30 pm COLE FARMS | Gray | open mic EASY STREET LOUNGE | Hallowell | open mic | 8 pm FATBOY’S SALOON | Biddeford | acoustic open mic | 8 pm FREEDOM CAFE | Naples | karaoke FRONT STREET PUBLIC HOUSE | Bath | open mic

CHOP SHOP PUB | Seabrook | karaoke

RUDI’S | Portsmouth | PJ Donahue

DOVER BRICK HOUSE | Dover | John

SAVORY SQUARE BISTRO | Hampton

GARY’S RESTAURANT & SPORTS LOUNGE | Rochester | Ron Jones | 8 pm THE HOLY GRAIL | Epping | Dan

SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | Soft Eyes +

Rick Rude | 9 pm

MARTINGALE WHARF | Portsmouth |

THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | Ports-

| 8 pm

Murphy | 9 pm

Walker

Trio | 6 pm

| Judith Murray

THE SPAGHETTI STAIN | Dover | DJ Shawny O & DJ MK3 | 9:30 pm

MILLIE’S TAVERN | Hampton | Nor-

mouth | Baam! | 8 pm WALLY’S PUB | Hampton | Bailout

PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | “Beat

SUNDAY 23

Peter Black | 9 pm

man Bishop

Night,” music & poetry | 7 pm THE RED DOOR | Portsmouth | Karl Marks + Rick Rude + Notches | 9 pm RI RA/PORTSMOUTH | Portsmouth | Josh Cramoy | 9:30 pm RUDI’S | Portsmouth | Kelly Muse & Rob Gerry | 6 pm SERENITY MARKET & CAFE | Rye | drumming circle | 7 pm | $8 SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | Wheel of Awesome | 9 pm SPRING HILL TAVERN | Portsmouth | Tim Theriault & Jamie DeCato | 9 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | Jordan Tirrell Wysocki & Jim Predergast | 6 pm | Tauk | 8 pm | $5-8 THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | Portsmouth | Sunwolf | 8 pm

BRITISH BEER COMPANY | Portsmouth | Workingman’s Blues | 1 pm

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT | Dover | Irish session | 5 pm

DANIEL STREET TAVERN | Ports-

mouth | karaoke

DOLPHIN STRIKER | Portsmouth | Steve Roy & Dave Surette | 7 pm

DOVER BRICK HOUSE | Dover | Jim

Dover | Peter Prince

Dozet Trio | 10 am | karaoke with DJ Erich Kruger | 10 pm PORTSMOUTH BOOK AND BAR | Portsmouth | “William Shatner Beat Night” | 8 pm PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | Jason Palmer Quartet | 6 pm | $10 RI RA/PORTSMOUTH | Portsmouth | Irish session | 5 pm | Oran Mor | 7 pm RUDI’S | Portsmouth | Chris Klaxton | 10 am SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | Steve Carter | 7 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | open mic with Dave Ogden | 7 pm

Dave Nappi | 5 pm

MONDAY 24

burg | open mic | 8:30 pm BEAR’S DEN TAVERN | Dover Foxcroft

Squad DJs

Dover | karaoke

BRAY’S BREWPUB | Naples | karaoke

DANIEL STREET TAVERN | Ports-

302 SMOKEHOUSE & TAVERN | Frye-

FRIDAY 21

BRITISH BEER COMPANY | Ports-

mouth | DJ Jonny Friday

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT | CARTELLI’S BAR AND GRILL | Dover | CENTRAL WAVE | Dover | Drama CHOP SHOP PUB | Seabrook | Double-

| karaoke

shot Boston

with DJ Billy Adams | 9:30 pm

mouth | karaoke

Brunswick | karaoke | 8:30 pm THE CAGE | Lewiston | open blues jam

FURY’S PUBLICK HOUSE | Dover |

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BRUNSWICK | | 7 pm

CAPTAIN BLY’S TAVERN | Buckfield | open mic | 7 pm

CAPTAIN DANIEL STONE INN | Brunswick | open mic | 6 pm CASA DEL LUNA | Lewiston | open mic | 7 pm

CHAMPIONS SPORTS BAR | Biddeford

| karaoke with DJ Caleb Biggers | 9:30 pm CLUB TEXAS | Auburn | DJ B-Set | 9:30 pm GFB SCOTTISH PUB | Old Orchard Beach | Robert Johnson Project HIGHLANDS COFFEE HOUSE | Thomaston | open mic | 6 pm THE LIBERAL CUP | Hallowell | Steve Jones | 7 pm LOMPOC CAFE | Bar Harbor | open mic MAINELY BREWS | Waterville | karaoke | 9 pm MONTSWEAG ROADHOUSE | Woolwich | Keg Killers | 6 pm NARAL’S EXPERIENCE ARABIA | Auburn | open mic with Johnny Rock | 8 pm NEWCASTLE PUBLICK HOUSE | Newcastle | Tom Rota & Friends NOCTURNEM DRAFT HAUS | Bangor | DJ Baby Bok Choy + DJ T-Coz | 8 pm OLD GOAT | Richmond | open mic | 8 pm OLD MILL PUB | Skowhegan | Jim Whitman THE RACK | Carabassett | Turner Templeton | 6 pm ROOSTER’S | Augusta | Mike Krapovicky RUN OF THE MILL BREWPUB | Saco | Hotel Cocktails | 8 pm SEA DOG BREWING/BANGOR | Bangor | karaoke | 9 pm SILVER STREET TAVERN | Waterville | Travis James Humphrey | 7 pm SKIP’S LOUNGE | Buxton | open mic | 7 pm SUDS PUB | Bethel | Denny Breau | 9 pm TAILGATE BAR & GRILL | Gray | open mic | 8 pm TORCHES GRILL HOUSE | Kennebunk | open mic | 7 pm TRAIN’S TAVERN | Lebanon | karaoke with DJ Dick WATER STREET GRILL | Gardiner | DJ Roger Collins

NEW HAMPSHIRE THURSDAY 20

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT |

Dover | bluegrass jam with Steve Roy | 9 pm

CENTRAL WAVE | Dover | Ken Ormes

Trio

DOLPHIN STRIKER | Portsmouth | Brickyard Blues

Outer Stylie

HARLOW’S PUB | Peterborough | Hayley Jane & the Primates | $8 THE HOLY GRAIL | Epping | Will Schmitt | 8 pm KJ’S SPORTS BAR | Newmarket | karaoke | 9 pm THE LOFT AT STRAFFORD FARMS | Dover | Driving Force MARTINGALE WHARF | Portsmouth | Los Sugar Kings | 9 pm MILLIE’S TAVERN | Hampton | karaoke PORTSMOUTH GAS LIGHT | Portsmouth | Steve Tolley | 9:30 pm PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | Matthew Stubbs | 9 pm | $6 THE RED DOOR | Portsmouth | Datacet | 9 pm RUDI’S | Portsmouth | Mike Stockbridge Trio | 6 pm SAVORY SQUARE BISTRO | Hampton | Chris Hayes THE SPAGHETTI STAIN | Dover | DJ Jett | 9:30 pm SPRING HILL TAVERN | Portsmouth | Brickyard Blues | 9:30 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | Richard James & the Name Changers + Frank Viele | 9 pm THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | Portsmouth | Bearfight | 9 pm WALLY’S PUB | Hampton | Hemenways | 9 pm

SATURDAY 22

Combs Combo

THE RED DOOR | Portsmouth | Darrin Bradbury + Ian Fitzgerald | 8 pm SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | punk/ metal DJ night | 10 pm SPRING HILL TAVERN | Portsmouth | Old School | 9 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | open blues jam | 7 pm

TUESDAY 25

BLUE MERMAID | Portsmouth |

“Honky Tonk Night,” with Seldom Playwrights BRAMBER VALLEY BAR-B-BAR | Greenland | open mic | 7 pm

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT |

Dover | Celtic bluegrass open session | 7 pm CENTRAL WAVE | Dover | karaoke DOLPHIN STRIKER | Portsmouth | Dave Gerard | 8 pm FURY’S PUBLICK HOUSE | Dover | Tim Theriault | 9 pm

GARY’S RESTAURANT & SPORTS LOUNGE | Rochester | karaoke | 7 pm MILLIE’S TAVERN | Hampton | karaoke

PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | jazz jam

with Larry Garland | 6 pm SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | Soggy Po’ Boys | 9 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | bluegrass jam | 9 pm THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | Portsmouth | open mic | 8 pm

BLUE MERMAID | Portsmouth | open CENTRAL WAVE | Dover | karaoke DANIEL STREET TAVERN | Ports-

mouth | open mic | 8 pm DOLPHIN STRIKER | Portsmouth | Jim

Power Money Cake

FURY’S PUBLICK HOUSE | Dover |

When Particles Collide + Aloud | 9 pm

HARLOW’S PUB | Peterborough | open

Dozet | 8 pm

Harsh Armadillo

GARY’S RESTAURANT & SPORTS LOUNGE | Rochester | Saxx Roxx HARLOW’S PUB | Peterborough | Z3 | $8 THE HOLY GRAIL | Epping | Dr. Pepper KELLEY’S ROW | Dover | Third Man

mic | 8 pm

MARTINGALE WHARF | Portsmouth |

RI RA/PORTSMOUTH | Portsmouth | Great Bay Sailor | 7 pm RUDI’S | Portsmouth | Dimitri Yiannicopulus | 6 pm SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | Comma | 9 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | “Wormtown 2014 Battle of the Bands” THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | Portsmouth | Turbine | 8 pm WALLY’S PUB | Hampton | DJ Provo | 7 pm

High

Wingnuts | 9 pm

THE OAR HOUSE | Portsmouth | Don Severance | 7 pm

PORTSMOUTH BOOK AND BAR |

Portsmouth | Session Americana | 9 pm | $10

PORTSMOUTH GAS LIGHT | Ports-

mouth | Corey Brackett PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | Dubbest | 9 pm | $5

RI RA/PORTSMOUTH | Portsmouth |

Complaints | 10 pm

207.465.5569 marcchadbourne.com Ocean Gate Realty 151 Newbury St. Portland

ver | open mic with Dave Ogden | 8 pm PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | Paul

mouth | karaoke

FURY’S PUBLICK HOUSE | Dover |

20 Years Experience 100’s of Homes Sold

Dias + Taylor O’Donnell

mic | 8:30 pm

DOLPHIN STRIKER | Portsmouth |

Marc Chadbourne

ORCHARD STREET CHOP SHOP | Do-

CENTRAL WAVE | Dover | Drama CHOP SHOP PUB | Seabrook | Guzzle DANIEL STREET TAVERN | Ports-

Buying or Selling, there is NO substitute for experience!

FURY’S PUBLICK HOUSE | Dover | Stu

WEDNESDAY 26

Squad DJs

Own a piece of it!

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT |

BRITISH BEER COMPANY | Ports-

mouth | Mugsy

Love the city?

PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | B-Cap RADLOFF’S ON THE ROX LOUNGE |

Rochester | Tony Santesse | 8 pm THE RED DOOR | Portsmouth | Evaredy

| 9 pm

Continued on p 22

Nominate your favorite

PORTLAND Business

BEST THE

2014

THEPHOENIX.COM/THEBEST

#PORTPHX #TheBestMaine


22 march 21, 2014 | the portLand phoenix | portLand.thephoenix.com

portLand.thephoenix.com | the portLand phoenix | march 21, 2014 23

thephoenix.com

OPEN MIC | 9 pm | Mama’s Crow-

Listings

bar, 189 Congress St, Portland | 207.773.9230

WEDNESDAY 26

”COMEDY NIGHT,” WITH JAY GROVE | 9 pm | Cara Irish Pub &

”PORTLAND COMEDY SHOWCASE,” PERFORMERS TBA | 8 pm | Bull

Dover | Andrea Szirbik | 7 pm | bluegrass

Feeney’s, 375 Fore St, Portland | $5 | 207.773.7210

of New Hampshire, Johnson Theatre, 30 College Rd, Durham, NH | $7 | 603.862.2404 | www.unh.edu/theatredance/productions.html

CENTRAL WAVE | Dover | Ken Ormes

THURSDAY 27

MONDAY 24

THURSDAY 27

listing for Thurs

609 Congress St, Portland | $25-30 | 207.956.6000 or statetheatreportland. com LUISA MAITA | 8 pm | One Longfellow Square, 181 State St, Portland | $15-20 | 207.761.1757 PIANO GUYS | Music Hall, 131 Congress St, Portsmouth, NH | $68, $60, $35 | 603.436.2400 or themusichall. org/tickets/index.asp

mouth | Drew Yount | 9 pm

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT | jam with Steve Roy | 9 pm

Trio

CHOP SHOP PUB | Seabrook | karaoke

| 8 pm

DOLPHIN STRIKER | Portsmouth | Mi-

Restaurant, 11 Fourth St, Dover, NH | 603.343.4390 OPEN MIC | 6 pm | Union House Pub & Pizza, North Dam Mill, 2 Main St, 18230, Biddeford | 207.590.4825

”COMEDYPALOOZA SHOWCASE” WITH TIM HOFMANN, ET AL | See

chael Troy & Craig Tramack | 9 pm

DOVER BRICK HOUSE | Dover | Dan

Walker | 9 pm

FURY’S PUBLICK HOUSE | Dover | Erin’s Guild

GARY’S RESTAURANT & SPORTS LOUNGE | Rochester | Ron Jones | 8 pm GOVERNOR’S INN | Rochester | Wellfleet

MARTINGALE WHARF | Portsmouth |

We Specialize in Weddings Amazing Packages Rooms Accommodate Groups From 50 to 500

Corporate - Social - Wedding Italian Heritage Center 40 Westland Avenue Portland, ME 04102 Tel. (207) 772 2500 Fax (207) 780-8505

PORTLAND YOUTH DANCE: “THE HIP HOP PROJECT” | 3:15 pm | Casco Bay

Hall, 2 Young Rd, Londonderry, NH | $22 | 603.437.5100 or tupelohalllondonderry.com KEB’ MO’ | 7:30 pm | Waterville Opera House, 1 Common St, Waterville | $4050 | 207.873.7000

BRITISH BEER COMPANY | Ports-

Portland’s Finest Event Center

WEDNESDAY 26

SUNDAY 23

THURSDAY 27

40 Westland Avenue Portland, ME 04102-2418

Hall, 205 Main Street, Biddeford | $10 | 207.284.9313 WHITE HINTERLAND | 8:30 pm | Buoy Gallery, 2 Government St, Kittery | by donation | 207.450.2402

Circle, Bangor | $12 adults, $8 kids | 207.941.7051

Movers Dance Studio, 517 Forest Ave, Portland | 207.871.1013 | www.cascobaymovers.com

Continued from p 21

Italian Heritage Center

TRICKY BRITCHES + MOONSHINE RAMBLERS | 8 pm | Biddeford City

Josh Cramoy | 9 pm MILLIE’S TAVERN | Hampton | Norman Bishop PRESS ROOM | Portsmouth | Natalie Cressman | 9 pm | $10 RADLOFF’S ON THE ROX LOUNGE | Rochester | Brian McDewell THE RED DOOR | Portsmouth | Bedroom Eyes + Super Dude + Flatswamp RUDI’S | Portsmouth | Dimitri & the Wolfe | 6 pm SONNY’S TAVERN | Dover | Koffin Kats | 9 pm STONE CHURCH | Newmarket | Jordan Tirrell Wysocki & Jim Predergast | 6 pm THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | Portsmouth | Aqueous + String Theory | 7 pm

CONCERTS CLASSICAL THURSDAY 20

DAPONTE STRING QUARTET: “WINTER VOICES III” | 7:30 pm | St John’s

Episcopal Church, 200 Main St, Thomaston | $20 | 207.354.8734

FRIDAY 21

ALESSIO BAX | 7 pm | University of

Maine - Orono, Collins Center for the Arts, 5746 Collins Center for the Arts, Orono | $30 | 207.581.1755

DAPONTE STRING QUARTET: “WINTER VOICES III” | 7:30 pm | Lincoln

Theater, 2 Theater St, Damariscotta | $20 | 207.563.3424

USM SCHOOL OF MUSIC: “GRADUATE SHOWCASE CONCERT” | 8 pm |

University of Southern Maine - Gorham, Corthell Concert Hall, 37 College Ave, Gorham | 207.780.5256

SATURDAY 22

COMEDY THURSDAY 20

”A NIGHT OF STAND UP COMEDY,” WITH SAMUEL BENNETT, ET AL. |

7:30 pm | Players’ Ring, 105 Marcy St, Portsmouth, NH | $12, $10 seniors | 603.436.8123 or www.playersring.org

”COMEDY ON THE SQUARE,” WITH IAN STUART + MARK TURCOTTE + LUKE HANBURY + PAUL HUNT + BRIAN BRINEGAR | 7:30 pm |

Spire 29, 29 School St, Gorham | $5 | 207.222.2068

”COMEDYPALOOZA SHOWCASE,” WITH TIM HOFMANN + JOSH DAY + MIKE HOWLETT + MATT BARRY + FRANCIS BIRCH + BILL GRAY + CONNOR MCGRATH + STEPHANIE ANNE DOYLE + KYRON HOBDY | 8 pm

| Big Easy, 55 Market St, Portland | $3 | 207.894.0633 or www.bigeasyportland.com BOB MARLEY | 7 pm | Fryeburg Academy, Eastman Performing Arts Center, 745 Main St, Fryeburg | $20 | 207.935.9232 or fryeburgacademy.org OPEN MIC | 8 pm | Flask Lounge, 117 Spring St, Portland | 207.772.3122

FRIDAY 21

ANTHONY JESELNIK | 8 pm | State

Theatre, 609 Congress St, Portland | $20-30 | 207.956.6000 or statetheatreportland.com

”COMEDY AT CAMELOT,” WITH CHRIS PENNIE + MARK SCALIA | The

Holy Grail, 64 Main St, Epping, NH | 603.679.9559 GEORGE HAMM + MIKE PRIOR | 8 pm | The Portsmouth Pearl, 45 Pearl St, Portsmouth, NH | $15 | 603.431.0148 or portsmouthpearl.com BOB MARLEY | 8:30 pm | Taste of Maine, 161 Main St, Woolwich | call for tickets | 207.443.4554 HARRISON STEBBINS | Gold Room, 510 Warren Ave, Portland | $10 | 207.221.2343

SATURDAY 22

BOB MARLEY | 8 pm | Skowhegan Op-

era House, 225 Water St, Skowhegan | $24 | 207.756.0196

SUNDAY 23

CRAIG FERGUSON | 8 pm | State

Theatre, 609 Congress St, Portland | $30-55 | 207.956.6000 or statetheatreportland.com

DAPONTE STRING QUARTET: “WINTER VOICES III” | 7:30 pm | Portland

Public Library, 5 Monument Sq, Portland | 207.871.1700

”PIANO SERIES” WITH DUNCAN CUMMING + HILARIO DURAN |

7:30 pm | Franco-American Heritage Center, 46 Cedar St, Lewiston | $16 | 207.689.2000

SUNDAY 23

DAPONTE STRING QUARTET: “WINTER VOICES III” | 3 pm | Midcoast

Presbyterian Church, 84 Main St, Topsham | $20 | 207.729.3193 or mcpconline.org

PORTSMOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA | 3 pm | Music Hall, 131 Con-

gress St, Portsmouth, NH | $24, $20 seniors, $16 students | 603.436.2400

POPULAR THURSDAY 20

JOE HEDGLIN + FAREWELL DRUGS | with art by Cole Gove | 7 pm | Ghost Mill Studio, 1 Washington St, 4th Floor, Portland | 207.252.0385 PORTLAND JAZZ ORCHESTRA | 8 pm | One Longfellow Square, 181 State St, Portland | $9, $5 seniors/students | 207.761.1757

”TURNSTILE THURSDAY,” FREEFORM OPEN MIC | 7 pm | Community

Television Network Theater, 516 Congress St, Portland | 207.775.2900

FRIDAY 21

JOHN EDDIE | 8 pm | Tupelo Music

Hall, 2 Young Rd, Londonderry, NH | $25 | 603.437.5100 or tupelohalllondonderry.com GRAND SLAMBOVIANS | 8 pm | One Longfellow Square, 181 State St, Portland | $20-25 | 207.761.1757

SATURDAY 22

FUGUE MILL | 7:30 pm | The Dance

Hall, 7 Walker St, Kittery | $15 | 207.439.0114 ED KOWALCZYK | Tupelo Music Hall, 2 Young Rd, Londonderry, NH | sold out | 603.437.5100 or tupelohalllondonderry.com KOBO TOWN | Music Hall, 131 Congress St, Portsmouth, NH | $16 | 603.436.2400 or themusichall.org/ tickets/index.asp

SHASHASHA + FORGET, FORGET + THEODORE TREEHOUSE | 8 pm | One

Longfellow Square, 181 State St, Portland | 207.761.1757

ENTER THE HAGGIS | Tupelo Music

EXCISION + DIRTY PHONICS + ILL GATES | 8 pm | State Theatre,

TUESDAY 25

ARBOREA + CHRISTOPHER PAUL STELLING | 8 pm | One Longfellow

Square, 181 State St, Portland | $10-12 | 207.761.1757

CAPTAIN HOLLOW + AFRAID + SWERLY BIRD | 7:30 pm | Bangor

UNH DANCE COMPANY: “PETER & THE WOLF” + “ALICE IN WONDERLAND” | Wed-Thurs 7 pm | University

UNH DANCE COMPANY: “PETER & THE WOLF” + “ALICE IN WONDERLAND” | See listing for Wed

EVENTS THURSDAY 20

”BIZ AFTER HOURS”

| a discussion on how cultural tourism economically benefits Western Maine | 5 pm | Mahoosuc Arts, 45 Church St, Bethel | 207.824.3575 ”DEATH & TAXES 2014” | freelancers’ tax-prep event | 6 pm | Peloton Labs, 795 Congress St, Portland | 207.210.6595

FRIDAY 21

Opera House, 131 Main St, Bangor | $5 | 207.942.3333 JAKE SHIMABUKURO | 7:30 pm | State Theatre, 609 Congress St, Portland | $25-35 | 207.956.6000 or statetheatreportland.com

”CELEBRATE YOUR INNER DIVA” | gala with food, cocktails, & door prizes | 6 pm | Maine State Music Theater Dance Studio, 22 Elm St, Brunswick | $25 | 207.729.9131

WEDNESDAY 26

SATURDAY 22

PAUL MCKENNA BAND | 7 pm | Skye

Theatre, 2 Highland Dr, Carthage | $15 | 207.562.4445

THURSDAY 27

”EXPERIENCE HENDRIX,” WITH BILLY COX + BUDDY GUY + JONNY LANG + DWEEZIL ZAPPA + KENNY WAYNE SHEPHERD | 8 pm | Hampton Beach Casino Ballroom, 169 Ocean Blvd, Hampton, NH | call for tickets | 603.929.4100

SLIGHTLY STOOPID + MARIACHI EL BRONX | 8 pm | State Theatre, 609

Congress St, Portland | $22.50-25 | 207.956.6000 or statetheatreportland. com PETER WOLF | 8 pm | Tupelo Music Hall, 2 Young Rd, Londonderry, NH | sold out | 603.437.5100 or tupelohalllondonderry.com

”CIVIC CENTER PUBLIC GRAND OPENING” | tours with live music

provided by area college & high school bands | 10 am | Cumberland County Civic Center, 48 Free St, 1st Floor, Portland | 207.775.3458 or | theciviccenter.com

SUNDAY 23

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS | Cum-

berland County Civic Center, 48 Free St, 1st Floor, Portland | $18-$83 | 207.775.3458 or | theciviccenter.com

THURSDAY 27

”GLITTERATI: A SPARKLING LITERARY BALL” with the Telling Room | 6 pm | Grace, 15 Chestnut St, Portland | $75 | 207.828.4422

FOOD DANCE PARTICIPATORY THURSDAY 20

SALSA DANCING WITH DJ BRAULIO |

8 pm | Pearl, 444 Fore St, Portland | $5 | 207.653.8486

FRIDAY 21

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE | 6:30

pm | People Plus/Brunswick, 35 Union St, Brunswick | $8, $5 seniors/students | 207.700.7577

WEDNESDAY 26

WEDNESDAY NIGHT STOMP WITH PORTLAND SWING PROJECT | 7:30

pm | Acoustic Artisans, 594 Congress St, Portland | $5-10 sugg. donation | 207.671.6029 | acousticartisans.com

PERFORMANCE

SATURDAY 22

”GRAND OPENING BASH” | with

tours and tastings | noon | In’Finiti, 250 Commercial St, Portland | 207.221.8889 or infinitimaine.com SACO RIVER MARKET | 9 am | Mills at Saco Island, Saco Island, 110 Main St, Saco | 207.229.3560 or sacorivermarket. com WINTER FARMERS’ MARKET | 9 am | Urban Farm Fermentory, 200 Anderson St, Bay 1, Portland | 207.773.8331 or urbanfarmfermentory.com

WEDNESDAY 26

PORTLAND FARMERS’ MARKET | 7

am | Monument Square, Congress St, Portland | 207.774.9979

POETRY & PROSE

FRIDAY 21

THURSDAY 20

forming a piece by La Alternativa | 8 pm | SPACE Gallery, 538 Congress St, Portland | $8-10 | 207.828.5600 | space538.org

pm | Press Room, 77 Daniel St, Portsmouth, NH | 603.431.5186

APPARITION | Maine dancers per-

DOWNEAST COUNTRY DANCE FESTIVAL | Fri 5 pm; Sat 10 am | Orion

Performing Arts Center, 66 Republic Ave, Topsham | 207.729.3891

SATURDAY 22

DOWNEAST COUNTRY DANCE FESTIVAL | See listing for Fri

SUNDAY 23

”TITANIA’S DREAM” | ballet | Husson University, Gracie Theatre, 1 College

”BEAT NIGHT,” MUSIC & POETRY | 7 CAROLYN GELLAND + CHANDLER KANOZAK | 6:30 pm | Lithgow Public

Library, 45 Winthrop St, Augusta | 207.626.2415 or lib.me.us CARL HOFFMAN | Discusses Savage Harvest | 7 pm | Longfellow Books, 1 Monument Way, Portland | 207.772.4045 or longfellowbooks.com

FRIDAY 21

JOANNE CONMAN | reads & discusses

her novel Ancient Egyptian Sky Lore: Rethinking the Conventional Wisdom

Continued on p 24

CLUB DIRECTORY 302 SMOKEHOUSE & TAVERN |

207.935.3021 | 636 Main St, Fryeburg

317 MAIN ST MUSIC CENTER CAFE | 207.846.9559 | 317 Main St,

Yarmouth

51 WHARF | 207.774.1151 | 51 Wharf St, Portland ACOUSTIC ARTISANS | 207.671.6029 | 594 Congress St, Portland ADAMS STREET PUB | 207.283.4992 | 5 Adams St, Biddeford ALISSON’S RESTAURANT | 207.967.4841 | 5 Dock Sq, Kennebunkport ANDY’S OLD PORT PUB | 207.874.2639 | 94 Commercial St, Portland ANNIE’S IRISH PUB | 207.251.4335 | 369 Main St, Ogunquit ASYLUM | 207.772.8274 | 121 Center St, Portland BACK BURNER TAVERN | 207.935.4444 | 109 Main St, Brownfield BACKSTREET GRILL | 207.324.1011 | 16 School St, Sanford BASSLINES | 207.347.6072 | Binga’s Stadium, 77 Free St, Portland BAYSIDE BOWL | 207.791.2695 | 58 Alder St, Portland BEACHFIRE BAR AND GRILLE

| 207.646.8998 | 658 Main St., Ogunquit BEBE’S BURRITOS | 207.283.4222 | 140 Main St, Biddeford BENCHWARMERS | 207.729.4800 | 212 Maine St, Brunswick BIG EASY | 207.894.0633 | 55 Market St, Portland BILLY’S TAVERN | 207.354.1177 | 1 Starr St, Thomaston BLACK ANCHOR VILLAGE PUB | 207.374.7012 | 50 Main St, Blue Hill BLACK BEAR CAFE | 207.693.4770 | 215 Roosevelt Trail, Naples BLOOMFIELD’S CAFE AND BAR | 207.474.8844 | 40 Water St, Skowhegan BLUE | 207.774.4111 | 650A Congress St, Portland BRAY’S BREWPUB | 207.693.6806 | Rte 302 and Rte 35, Naples BRIAN BORU | 207.780.1506 | 57 Center St, Portland BRIDGE STREET TAVERN | 207.623.8561 | 18 Bridge St, Augusta

THE BRUNSWICK OCEANSIDE GRILLE | 207.934.2171 | 39 West

Grand Ave, Old Orchard Beach BUBBA’S SULKY LOUNGE | 207.828.0549 | 92 Portland St, Portland

BUCK’S NAKED BBQ/FREEPORT |

207.865.0600 | 581 Rte 1, Freeport

BUCK’S NAKED BBQ/PORTLAND | | 50 Wharf St, Portland

BULL FEENEY’S | 207.773.7210 | 375 Fore St, Portland

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BATH |

207.443.6776 | 98 Center St, Bath

BYRNES IRISH PUB/BRUNSWICK

| 207.729.9400 | 16 Station Ave, Brunswick THE CAGE | 207.783.0668 | 97 Ash St, Lewiston CAMPFIRE GRILLE | 207.803.2255 | 656 North High St, Bridgton

CAPTAIN & PATTY’S RESTAURANT | 207.439.3655 | 90 Pepperrell Rd, Kittery Point

CAPTAIN BLY’S TAVERN |

207.336.2126 | 371 Turner St, Buckfield CAPTAIN DANIEL STONE INN | 207.373.1824 | 10 Water St, Brunswick

CARA IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT | 603.343.4390 | 11 Fourth St, Dover, NH CARMEN VERANDAH | 207.288.2766 | 119 Main St, Bar Harbor CARTELLI’S BAR AND GRILL | 603.750.4002 | 446 Central Ave, Dover, NH CASA DEL LUNA | 207.241.0711 | Lewiston Mall, Lewiston CENTRAL WAVE | 603.742.9283 | 368 Central Ave, Dover, NH CHAMPIONS SPORTS BAR | 207.282.7900 | 15 Thornton St, Biddeford CHAPS SALOON | 207.347.1101 | 1301 Long Plains Rd, Buxton

CHARLAMAGNE’S | 207.242.2711 | 228 Water St, Augusta CHOP SHOP PUB | 603.760.7706 | 920 Lafayette Rd, Seabrook, NH CLUB 737 | 207.442.0748 | 737 Washington St, Bath CLUB TEXAS | 207.784.7785 | 150 Center St, Auburn COLE FARMS | 207.657.4714 | 64 Lewiston Rd, Gray CREMA COFFEE COMPANY | | 9 Commercial St, Portland DANIEL STREET TAVERN | 603.430. 1011 | 111 Daniel St, Portsmouth, NH DAVIS ISLAND GRILL | 207.687.2190 | 318 Eddy Rd, Edgecomb DOBRA TEA | 207.370.1890 | 151 Middle St, Portland THE DOGFISH BAR AND GRILLE | 207.772.5483 | 128 Free St, Portland DOGFISH CAFE | 207.253.5400 | 953 Congress St, Portland EASY DAY | 207.200.2226 | 725 Broadway, South Portland EASY STREET LOUNGE | 207.622.3360 | 7 Front St, Hallowell ELEMENTS: BOOKS COFFEE BEER | 207.710.2011 | 265 Main St, Biddeford EMPIRE | 207.879.8988 | 575 Congress St, Portland FATBOY’S SALOON | 207.766.8862 | 65 Main St, Biddeford FEDERAL JACK’S | 207.967.4322 | 8 Western Ave, Kennebunk FEILE IRISH RESTAURANT AND PUB | 207.251.4065 | 1619 Post Rd, Wells

FLASK LOUNGE | 207.772.3122 | 117

Spring St, Portland FOG BAR & CAFE | 207.593.9371 | 328 Main St, Rockland THE FOGGY GOGGLE | 207.824.5056 | South Ridge Lodge, Sunday River, Newry FREEDOM CAFE | 207.693.3700 | 923 Roosevelt Trail, Naples FROG AND TURTLE | 207.591.4185 | 3 Bridge St, Westbrook FRONT STREET PUBLIC HOUSE | 207.442.6700 | 102 Front St, Bath FRONTIER CAFE | 207.725.5222 | Fort Andross, 14 Maine St, Brunswick FUSION | 207.330.3775 | 490 Pleasant St, Lewiston GATHER | 207.847.3250 | 189 Main St, Yarmouth GENO’S ROCK CLUB | 207.221.2382 | 625 Congress St, Portland GFB SCOTTISH PUB | 207.934.8432 | 32 Old Orchard St, Old Orchard Beach THE GIN MILL | 207.620.9200 | 302 Water St, Augusta GINGKO BLUE | 207.541.9190 | 455 Fore St, Portland GINZA TOWN | 207.878.9993 | 1053 Forest Ave, Portland GOVERNOR’S INN | 603.332.0107 | 78 Wakefield St, Rochester, NH GRITTY MCDUFF’S | 207.772.2739 | 396 Fore St, Portland GRITTY MCDUFF’S/AUBURN | 207.782.7228 | 68 Main St, Auburn GUTHRIE’S | 207.376.3344 | 115 Middle St, Lewiston HANNA’S TAVERN | 207.490.5122 | 324 Country Club Rd, Sanford HARLOW’S PUB | 603.924.6365 | 3 School St, Peterborough, NH

HIGHER GROUNDS COFFEEHOUSE AND TAVERN | 207.621.1234 | 119 Wa-

ter St, Hallowell

HIGHLANDS COFFEE HOUSE |

207.354.4162 | 189 Main St, Thomaston

HILTON GARDEN INN/PORTSMOUTH | 603.431.1499 | 100 High St, Portsmouth, NH

THE HIVE | 207.985.0006 | 84 Main St, Kennebunk

THE HOLY GRAIL | 603.679.9559 | 64 Main St, Epping, NH

IPANEMA BAR & GRILL |

207.942.5180 | 10 Broad St, Bangor IRISH TWINS PUB | 207.376.3088 | 743 Main St, Lewiston IRON TAILS SALOON | 207.850.1142 | 559 Rte 109, Acton

JIMMY THE GREEK’S/OLD ORCHARD BEACH | 207.934.7499 | 215 Saco Ave,

Old Orchard Beach JONATHAN’S | 207.646.4777 | 92 Bourne Ln, Ogunquit KELLEY’S ROW | 603.750.7081 | 421 Central Ave, Dover, NH THE KENNEBEC WHARF | 207.622.9290 | 1 Wharf St, Hallowell KERRYMEN PUB | 207.282.7425 | 512 Main St, Saco KJ’S SPORTS BAR | 603.659.2329 | North Main St, Newmarket, NH

LAST CALL | 207.934.9082 | 4 1st St, Old Orchard Beach LFK | 207.899.3277 | 188A State St, Portland THE LIBERAL CUP | 207.623.2739 | 115 Water St, Hallowell LILAC CITY GRILLE | 603.332.3984 | 45 N Main St, Rochester, NH LION’S PRIDE | 207.373.1840 | 112 Pleasant St, Brunswick LITTLE TAP HOUSE | 207.518.9283 | 106 High St, Portland LOCAL 188 | 207.761.7909 | 685 Congress St, Portland LOCAL SPROUTS COOPERATIVE | 207.899.3529 | 649 Congress St, Portland MAINE STREET | 207.646.5101 | 195 Maine St, Ogunquit MAINELY BREWS | 207.873.2457 | 1 Post Office Sq, Waterville MAMA’S CABARET | 207.777.1050 | 16 Park St, Lewiston MAMA’S CROWBAR | 207.773.9230 | 189 Congress St, Portland MARK’S PLACE | 207.899.3333 | 416 Fore St, Portland MATHEW’S PUB | 207.253.1812 | 133 Free St, Portland MATTERHORN | 207.824.6836 | 292 Sunday River Rd, Newry MAXWELL’S PUB | 207.646.2345 | 243 Main St, Ogunquit MAYO STREET ARTS | 207.615.3609 | 10 Mayo St, Portland MEMORY LANE MUSIC HALL | 207.642.3363 | 35 Blake Rd, Standish MILLBROOK TAVERN & GRILLE | 207.824.2175 | Bethel Inn, On the Common, Bethel MJ’S WINE BAR | 207.653.6278 | 1 City Center, Portland MR. GOODBAR | 207.934.9100 | 8B West Grand Ave, Old Orchard Beach MYRTLE STREET TAVERN | 207.596.6250 | 12 Myrtle St, Rockland NARAL’S EXPERIENCE ARABIA | 207.344.3201 | 34 Court St, Auburn NEWCASTLE PUBLICK HOUSE | 207.563.3434 | 52 Main St, Newcastle NOCTURNEM DRAFT HAUS | 207.907.4380 | 56 Main St, Bangor THE OAK AND THE AX | | 140 Main St, Ste 107-Back Alley, Biddeford OASIS | 207.370.9048 | 42 Wharf St, Portland OLD GOAT | 207.737.4628 | 33 Main St, Richmond OLD MILL PUB | 207.474.6627 | 39 Water St, Skowhegan OLD PORT TAVERN | 207.774.0444 | 11 Moulton St, Portland OTTO | 207.773.7099 | 574-6 Congress St, Portland PEARL | 207.653.8486 | 444 Fore St, Portland PEDRO O’HARA’S/LEWISTON | 207.783.6200 | 134 Main St, Lewiston PEDRO’S | 207.967.5544 | 181 Port Rd, Kennebunk PENOBSCOT POUR HOUSE | 207.941.8805 | 14 Larkin St, Bangor PHOENIX HOUSE & WELL | 207.824.2222 | 9 Timberline Dr, Newry PLEASANT NOTE COFFEEHOUSE | 207.783.0461 | First Universalist Church of Auburn, 169 Pleasant St, Auburn PORT CITY MUSIC HALL | 207.899.4990 | 504 Congress St, Portland PORTHOLE RESTAURANT | 207.773.4653 | 20 Custom House Wharf, Portland PORTLAND EAGLES | 207.773.9448 | 184 Saint John St, Portland PORTLAND LOBSTER CO | 207.775.2112 | 180 Commercial St, Portland PROFENNO’S | 207.856.0011 | 934 Main St, Westbrook THE RACK | 207.237.2211 | 5016 Access Rd, Carabassett RAVEN’S ROOST | 207.406.2359 | 103 Pleasant St, Brunswick READFIELD EMPORIUM | 207.685.7348 | 1146 Main St, Readfield THE RED DOOR | 603.373.6827 | 107 State St, Portsmouth, NH RI RA/PORTLAND | 207.761.4446 | 72 Commercial St, Portland RI RA/PORTSMOUTH | 603.319.1680 | 22 Market St, Portsmouth, NH THE ROOST | 207.799.1232 | 62 Chicopee Rd, Buxton ROOSTER’S | 207.622.2625 | 110 Community Dr, Augusta ROUND TOP COFFEEHOUSE | 207.677.2354 | Round Top Farm, Main St, Damariscotta

ROYAL BEAN | 207.846.1009 | 18 Yarmouth Crossing Dr, Yarmouth RUDI’S | 603.430.7834 | 20 High St, Portsmouth, NH RUN OF THE MILL BREWPUB | 207.571.9648 | 100 Main St, Saco Island, Saco SALVAGE BBQ & SMOKEHOUSE | | 919 Congress St, Portland SEA DOG BREWING/SOUTH PORTLAND | 207.871.7000 | 125 Western

Ave, South Portland

SEA DOG BREWING/TOPSHAM | 207.725.0162 | 1 Maine St, Great Mill Island, Topsham SEA40 | 207.795.6888 | 40 East Ave, Lewiston SEASONS GRILLE | 207.775.6538 | 155 Riverside St, Portland SERENITY MARKET & CAFE | 603.319.1671 | 25 Sagamore Rd, Rye, NH SHEEPSCOT GENERAL | 207.549.5185 | 98 Townhouse Rd, Whitefield SHENANIGANS | 207.213.4105 | 349 Water St, Augusta SILVER HOUSE TAVERN | 207.772.9885 | 123 Commercial St, Portland SILVER SPUR | 207.345.3211 | 272 Lewiston St, Mechanic Falls SILVER STREET TAVERN | 207.680.2163 | 2 Silver St, Waterville SKIP’S LOUNGE | 207.929.9985 | 299 Narragansett Trail, Buxton SKYBOX BAR AND GRILL | 207.854.9012 | 212 Brown St, Westbrook SLAINTE | 207.828.0900 | 24 Preble St, Portland SLIDERS RESTAURANT | 207.824.5300 | Jordan Grand Resort Hotel, Sunday River, Newry SOLO BISTRO | 207.443.3378 | 128 Front St, Bath SONNY’S | 207.772.7774 | 83 Exchange St, Portland SONNY’S TAVERN | 603.343.4332 | 328 Central Ave, Dover, NH SOUTHSIDE TAVERN | 207.474.6073 | 1 Waterville Rd, Skowhegan SPACE GALLERY | 207.828.5600 | 538 Congress St, Portland THE SPAGHETTI STAIN | 603.343.5257 | 421 Central Ave, Dover, NH SPARE TIME | 207.878.2695 | City Sports Grille, 867 Riverside St, Portland SPEAKEASY | 207.596.6661 | 2 Park Dr, Rockland SPRING HILL TAVERN | 603.431.5222 | Dolphin Striker, 15 Bow St, Portsmouth, NH SPRING POINT TAVERN | 207.733.2245 | 175 Pickett St, South Portland STONE CHURCH | 603.659.6321 | 5 Granite St, Newmarket, NH STUDIO BISTRO AND BAR | 207.824.3241 | Mill Hill Inn, 24 Mill Hill Rd, Bethel STYXX | 207.828.0822 | 3 Spring St, Portland SUDS PUB | 207.824.6558 | Sudbury Inn Main St, Bethel SWIG ‘N SMELT PUB | 207.864.5671 | 976 Saddleback Mountain Rd, Rangeley TAILGATE BAR & GRILL | 207.657.7973 | 61 Portland Rd, Gray THIRSTY MOOSE TAPHOUSE | 603.427.8645 | 21 Congress St, Portsmouth, NH THE THIRSTY PIG | 207.773.2469 | 37 Exchange St, Portland TIME OUT PUB | 207.593.9336 | 275 Main St, Rockland TORCHES GRILL HOUSE | 207.467.3288 | 102 York St, Kennebunk TOWNHOUSE PUB | 207.284.7411 | 5 Storer St, Saco TRAIN’S TAVERN | 207.457.6032 | 249 Carl Broggi Hwy, Lebanon TUCKER’S PUB | 207.739.2200 | 290 Main St, Norway TUG’S PUB | 207.633.3830 | Robinson Wharf, Southport UNION HOUSE PUB & PIZZA | 207.590.4825 | North Dam Mill, 2 Main St, 18-230, Biddeford UNION STATION BILLIARDS | 207.899.3693 | 272 St John St, Portland WATER STREET GRILL | 207.582.9464 | 463 Water St, Gardiner THE WHALER | 207.934.9853 | 20 Staples St, Old Orchard Beach ZACKERY’S | 207.774.5601 | Fireside Inn & Suites, 81 Riverside St, Portland

Pride Portland! 2014 will be June 20–22. Join us for Pride Portland! Fundraising Events.

3 Spring Street • Portland, Maine • 207.828-0822 • www.styxxportland.com

Styxx All-Stars Benefit for Pride Portland! Wednesday, March 19 • 7 pm – 1 am Pride Portland organizers, Chris O’Connor and Jill Barkley, behind the bar. Dancing all night with DJ Cherry Lemonade. Special performances by Shaunna Rai and Vanila Honey-Bush. All tips and 15% of bar proceeds donated to Pride Portland!

BLACKSTONES 6 Pine Street Portland Maine 207-775-2885 www.blackstones.com

Blackstones Fundraiser Fridays Fridays, March 21, April 18, May 23 during Happy Hour. Vanila Honey-Bush and Patrick Afthim bring you Beauty and the Bear Proceeds from Shipyard Draft Specials will benefit Pride Portland! Prizes • Special Drinks • Fun • Music • Laughs • Surprises


24 march 21, 2014 | the portLand phoenix | portLand.thephoenix.com

portLand.thephoenix.com | the portLand phoenix | march 21, 2014 25

Listings | noon | Portland Public Library, 5 Monument Sq, Portland | 207.871.1700 or portlandlibrary.com

SATURDAY 22

”LIT: READINGS & LIBATIONS” | with R.J. Keller + T.L. Manning + Meg North + Danielle Bannister + Kate Cone + E.J. Fechenda | 5:30 pm | Slainte, 24 Preble St, Portland | 207.828.0900

SUNDAY 23

”RHYTHMIC CYPHER,” POETRY OPEN MIC | with Rhythm & Regalia

| 6:30 pm | Dobra Tea, 151 Middle St, Portland | 207.370.1890

MONDAY 24

”POETRY ON TAP” | open mic & fea-

tured poets | 9 pm | Mama’s Crowbar, 189 Congress St, Portland | 207.773.9230

”SEANACHIE NIGHTS: IRISH TALES OF WIT & HUMOR” | spoken word &

musical performances by Lynne Cullen + Janet Lynch + Kurt Kish + Katy Rydell | 7 pm | Bull Feeney’s, 375 Fore St, Portland | $9 donation | 207.773.7210

TUESDAY 25

”MELT: A SPRINGTIME EROTIC READING” | 7 pm | Slainte, 24 Preble

St, Portland | 207.828.0900

OPEN MIC & POETRY SLAM | with

Port Veritas & featured poets | 7 pm | Bull Feeney’s, 375 Fore St, Portland | $2.50-3 | 207.773.7210

WEDNESDAY 26

MATTHEW JUDE BARKER | discusses

J UST G OT H APPIER

M ON .– S AT. 4 PM – 8 PM

S UNDAY 11 PM –1 AM

Healthy, Fun Adult Entertainment | 207.772.8033 | 200 Riverside St. | PTsShowclub.com MODELS USED FOR ILLUSTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY

Northern Lights The BeST selection of hookahs & accessories including Fantasia Shisha The LARGeST selection of vaporizers (including parts and accessories)

•Water pipes from Illadelph, HBG, MGW, delta 9, and Medicali •Local hand blown glass from around the country •Tapestries and Posters •ONLY authorized Illadelph in the area

SATURDAY 22

”BIOTECHNOLOGY & AGRICULTURE: CHALLENGES AHEAD FOR JORDAN & KAZAKHSTAN” | with Subhash

Continued from p 22

NEW HAPPY HOUR

NEW ENGLAND ARCHIVISTS’ ANNUAL MEETING | See listing for Thurs

shire, Memorial Union Building, 83 Main St, Durham, NH | 603.862.2600 or unhmub.com

The Irish of Portland, Maine | noon | Portland Public Library, Rines Auditorium, 5 Monument Sq, Portland | 207.780.0118 WALTER KIRN | reads his novel Blood Will Out | 7 pm | Music Hall, 131 Congress St, Portsmouth, NH | $40 | 603.436.2400 or themusichall.org/ tickets/index.asp

”CREATING & SUSTAINING VIBRANT LOCAL ECONOMIES IN MAINE” | 9

Minocha | 12:30 pm | University of New Hampshire, Memorial Union Building, 83 Main St, Durham, NH | 603.862.2600 or unhmub.com ”THE BITCOIN SYMPOSIUM” | 5:30 pm | Music Hall, 131 Congress St, Portsmouth, NH | $5 | 603.436.2400 or themusichall.org/tickets/index.asp

am | University of Maine - Augusta, Randall Student Center, 46 University Dr, Augusta | 207.621.3000 or mainelocaleconomies.org

University of Southern Maine - Portland, Southworth Planetarium, 96 Falmouth St, Portland | 207.780.4249 or usm.maine.edu/planet

Portland Museum of Art, 7 Congress Square, Portland | 207.871.1700 or portlandmuseum.org

NEW ENGLAND ARCHIVISTS’ ANNUAL MEETING | See listing for Thurs

SUNDAY 23

”CHEMICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT” | with Cory Theberge | 7 pm |

”TITLE IX BEHIND THE CAMERA: WOMEN IN MEDIA” | call for time |

MONDAY 24

”COMEDY, ECONOMICS, & CLIMATE CHANGE” | with Yoram Bauman | 4:15

”THE ABUNDANT LIFE” | artist talk

pm | Bates College, Pettengill Hall, 4 Andrews Rd, Lewiston | 207.786.8376

with James Aponovich | 4 pm | Bowdoin College, Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.725.3000

”THE FATE OF PHARMACOLOGICALLY ACTIVE CHEMICALS IN THE ENVIRONMENT” | with Cory The-

”POWER AND SURVIVAL: THE UNTOLD STORY OF SLAVE DRIVERS IN THE BRITISH CARIBBEAN” | with

berge | 7 pm | University of Southern Maine - Portland, Southworth Planetarium, 96 Falmouth St, Portland | 207.780.4249 or usm.maine.edu/ planet

Randy Browne | 4:30 pm | Bowdoin College, Moulton Union, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.725.3225

”FILMING RWANDA WITH ORPHANS OF THE GENOCIDE: A DOUBLE-LENS APPROACH & CONVERSATION” | with Alex Dauge-Roth

TUESDAY 25

NEW ENGLAND ARCHIVISTS’ ANNUAL MEETING | with workshops, panels, & keynote lecture by Ian MacKaye | Thurs-Sat | Sheraton Harborside Portsmouth, 250 Market St, Portsmouth, NH | 603.431.2300 or http: ”THE SCIENCE OF CHARACTER” | film screening & discussion | noon | Portland Public Library, Rines Auditorium, 5 Monument Sq, Portland

”INSIGHT: A DISCUSSION WITH SCHWA FIRE CREATOR MICHAEL ERARD” | 5:30 pm | SPACE Gallery, 538 Congress St, Portland | 207.828.5600 or space538.org

WEDNESDAY 26

”SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE CURRICULUM” | with Emily Kane | noon | Bates

”FANTASTIC SPACES: VISUAL IMAGINATION IN CHINESE ARCHITECTURAL PAINTING” | with Zoe Kwok |

College, New Commons Building, 136 Central Ave, Lewiston | 207.786.6330

”VETERANS ISSUES: FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO TODAY” | with Mike

Michaud + Donald Beattie + Ryan Lilly + Amy Marcotte | Maine Historical Society, 489 Congress St, Portland | 207.774.1822 or mainehistory.org

FRIDAY 21

”ART & THE ECOSYSTEM: HOW PORTLAND IS GROWING & SUPPORTING THE CREATIVE ECONOMY”

TALKS THURSDAY 20

ARTIST TALK WITH DAN MICHAELSON | 12:30 pm | Maine College of Art,

Osher Hall, 522 Congress St, Portland | 207.775.3042

”BEING QUEER, LATINA/O & BILINGUAL: LANGUAGE, IDENTITIES & INTERACTION” | with Holly Cashman

| 3:30 pm | University of New Hamp-

| with Jennifer Hutchins | noon | Lewiston Public Library, 200 Lisbon St, Lewiston | 207.784.0135 or lplonline.org

”CONVERSATIONS WITH THE CANDIDATES: MAINE’S NEXT GOVERNOR” | with Mike Michaud | 11:45 am | University of Southern Maine - Portland, Luther Bonney Hall, Bedford St, Portland | 207.780.4200

Dating Easy

panel discussion with Eileen Eagan + Eric Blanchard + Ida Gammon-Wilson + Leroy Rowe | 5 pm | University of Southern Maine - Portland, Glickman Family Library, 5th Floor, 314 Forest Ave, Portland | 207.780.4270

4:30 pm | Bowdoin College, Visual Arts Center, Beam Classroom, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.725.3000

”POSTCOLONIAL DELUSIONS: THE CARIBBEAN & GLOBAL DISSOLUTION” | with Mayra Santos-Febres | 7

pm | Bowdoin College, Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.775.3357

THURSDAY 27

”BEING HUMAN -- CONVERSATIONS THAT MATTER: AUTHORITY” | panel

discussion with George Mason + Pious Ali | 7 pm | Maine Jewish Museum, 267 Congress St, Portland | 207.329.9854 or treeoflifemuseum.org

”SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE CURRICULUM” | See listing for Thurs ”STILL LIFE: AN ANTHROPOLOGY OF STONE” | with Hugh Raffles | 7:30 pm

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ART

”STORIES OF SPECIATION: SPERM INVASION, DEFECTIVE MALES, AND HYPERDIVERSITY” | Bowdoin College,

GALLERIES

”UNCANNY RETURNS: LITERARY ZIONISM & MODERNISM” | 7 pm |

3 FISH GALLERY | 207.773.4773 | 377 Cumberland Ave, Portland | 3fishgallery.com | Thurs-Sat 1-4 pm & by

Druckenmiller Hall, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.725.3567

Bowdoin College, Massachusetts Hall, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.725.3000 ”WYATT EARP: A VIGILANTE LIFE” | with Andrew C. Isenberg | 7 pm | Bowdoin College, Hubbard Hall, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.725.3000

THEATER ACORN PRODUCTIONS’ FAIRY TALE PLAYERS | 207.854.0065 | Acorn Studio

Theatre, Dana Warp Mill, 90 Bridge St, Westbrook | March 22-30: Aladdin & the

Magic Lamp | Sat 11 am; Sun 2 pm ADD VERB PRODUCTIONS | 207.871.1700 | Portland Public Library, 5 Monument Sq, Portland | March 27: “Out & Allied: The Performance” | 3:30 pm

AIRE (AMERICAN IRISH REPERTORY ENSEMBLE) | 207.799.5327 | Portland

”CONTESTING & CELEBRATING CITIZENSHIP: COMMEMORATING THE CIVIL RIGHTS ACT OF 1964” |

| noon | Bates College, New Commons Building, 136 Central Ave, Lewiston | 207.786.6330

| Bowdoin College, Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center, 3900 College Station, Brunswick | 207.775.3321

Stage Studio Theater, 25A Forest Ave, Portland | March 20-April 6: Da | ThursFri 7:30 pm; Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm | $20, $15 seniors COMMUNITY LITTLE THEATRE | 207.783.0958 | laclt.com | Great Falls Au-

ditorium, Great Falls School, 30 Academy St, Auburn | March 21-30: Beau Jest | Fri-

Sat + Thurs 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $18, $15 seniors, $12 youth

DRAMATIC REPERTORY COMPANY |

800.838.3006 | University of Maine - Augusta, Klahr Center, 46 University Dr, Augusta | March 21-23: My Name is Rachel

Corrie | Fri 7 pm; Sat-Sun 2 pm | $17-20 GASLIGHT THEATER | 207.626.3698 | gaslighttheater.org | Hallowell City Hall Auditorium, 1 Winthrop St, Hallowell | March 21-29: Mornings at Seven | FriSat + Thurs 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $12, $10 seniors/students GOOD THEATER | 207.885.5883 | goodtheater.com | St. Lawrence Arts Center, 76 Congress St, Portland | March 20-30: The Outgoing Tide | Thurs 7 pm; Fri 7:30 pm; Sat 3 & 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $20-30

MAD HORSE THEATRE COMPANY

| 207.747.4148 | Mad Horse Theater, 24 Mosher St, South Portland | March 2030: Orphans | Thurs-Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $20, $15 seniors/students (Thurs pay-what-you-can) PENOBSCOT THEATRE COMPANY | 207.942.3333 | penobscottheatre.org |

Bangor Opera House, 131 Main St, Bangor

| Through March 30: God of Carnage | Thurs + Wed 7 pm; Fri-Sat 8 pm; Sun 3 pm | $24-37 PLAYERS’ RING | 603.436.8123 | playersring.org | 105 Marcy St, Portsmouth, NH | March 21-23: Next to Normal | FriSat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm | $12, $10 seniors PORTLAND OVATIONS | 207.842.0800 | Merrill Auditorium, 20 Myrtle St, Portland | March 22: Man of La Mancha | 2 & 8 pm | $45-70 PORTLAND PLAYERS | 207.799.7337 | 420 Cottage Rd, Portland | March 21-April 6: Private Lives | Fri-Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 2 pm | $20 PORTLAND STAGE COMPANY | 207.774.0465 | Susie Konkel Theater for Kids, 25A Forest Ave, Portland | March 22: “Play Me a Story,” dramatic readings of children’s stories | 10:30 am | $15 | 25A Forest Ave, Portland | March 25-April 13: Tribes | Tues-Thurs 7:30 pm | $35-45 PUBLIC THEATRE | 207.782.3200 | thepublictheatre.org | 31 Maple St, Lewiston | March 20-23: Good People | Thurs-Fri 7:30 pm; Sat 8 pm; Sun 2 pm | $20, $5 youth 18 & under ROCHESTER OPERA HOUSE | 603.335.1992 | 31 Wakefield St, Rochester, NH | March 27-30: Hamlet | 7 pm | $14 SHOESTRING THEATER | 207.615.3609 | Mayo Street Arts, 10 Mayo St, Portland | March 21-22: Alice in Wonderland | Fri 7 pm; Sat 11 am | $10

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE - GORHAM | 207.780.4141 | usm.maine.

edu | Russell Hall, 37 College Avenue, Gorham | March 20-23: The Mystery of

Edwin Drood | Thurs-Sat 7:30 pm; Sun 5 pm | $21, $15 seniors, $10 students

appointment | Through March 31: “Color Journey,” oil & fabric works by Gretchen Langer AARHUS GALLERY | 207.338.0001 | 50 Main St, Belfast | aarhusgallery.com | Tues-Sun 11 am-5:30 pm | Through March 30: “6th Annual ‘44N 69W: Radius Belfast’ 2014,” mixed media group exhibition AUCOCISCO GALLERIES | 207.775.2222 | 89 Exchange St, Portland | aucocisco.com | Thurs-Sat 9 am-5 pm | Through April 5: “Abstract Personalities,” works by Kate Russo + “Reconstruction,” works by Ellie Porta Barnet COMMON STREET ARTS | 207.749.4368 | 20 Common St, Waterville | commonstreetarts.com | Wed-Sat noon-6 pm | Through April 26: “Colby on Common,” mixed media group exhibition CONSTELLATION ART GALLERY | 207.409.6617 | 511 Congress St, Portland | constellationgallery.webs.com | MonThurs noon-4 pm; Fri noon-4 pm & 6-8 pm; Sat 2-8 pm | Through March 25: “Patterns, Pixels, & Pastels,” mixed media group exhibition DOBRA TEA | 207.370.1890 | 151 Middle St, Portland | Mon-Thurs 11 am-10 pm; Fri-Sat 11 am-11 pm; Sun 11 am-6 pm | Through March 31: “Aspens,” acrylics by Colleen Edwards EDWARD T. POLLACK FINE ARTS | 617.610.7173 | 25 Forest Ave, Portland | Wed-Sat 11 am-6 pm | March 27-30: “AD 20/21 & Boston Print Fair” EL CENTRO LATINO DE MAINE | 207.749.8823 | 68 Washington St, Portland | Through March 31: “The Streets of Cuba,” photography by Karen Miller ENGINE | 207.229.3560 | 265 Main St, Biddeford | feedtheengine.org | TuesFri 1-6 pm; Sat 11 am-4 pm | Through March 22: “The Rumpus Redux,” mixed media group exhibition

GLEASON FINE ART/BOOTHBAY HARBOR | 207.633.6849 | 31 Townsend Ave, Boothbay Harbor | gleasonfineart. com | Mon-Sat 10 am-5 pm; Sun

11 am-4 pm | Through March 29: “Winter Color,” paintings by Andrea Peters + Tom Curry + Kevin Beers + Mitch Billis + Phil Barter GREENHUT GALLERIES | 207.772.2693 | 146 Middle St, Portland | greenhutgalleries.com | Mon-Fri 10 am5:30 pm; Sat 10 am-5 pm | Through March 29: “Marching Forth,” mixed media group exhibition KITTERY ART ASSOCIATION | 207.967.0049 | 8 Coleman Ave, Kittery | kitteryartassociation.org | Sat noon-6 pm; Sun noon-5 pm | Through March 23: “Truth/Consequences,” student exhibition | March 27-April 20: “Recycle, Refurbish, Reclaim,” mixed media group exhibition

MAINELY FRAMES AND GALLERY

| 207.828.0031 | 541 Congress St, Portland | Mon-Wed 10 am-6 pm; ThursFri 10 am-8 pm; Sat 10 am-6 pm; Sun 1-4 pm | Through March 31: drawings by William Harrison OAK STREET LOFTS GALLERY | 207.553.7780 | 72 Oak St, Portland | call for hours | Through March 31: “Fluidity,” acrylic paintings by Lisa Maria PHOPA GALLERY | 207.317.6721 | 132 Washington Ave, Portland | WedSat noon-5 pm | Through April 12: “Tamarind to Hope, Tim Higbee | Hope Editions, print collaborations & solo work” PORTLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY | 207.871.1700 | Lewis Art Gallery, 5 Monument Sq, Portland | portlandli-

brary.com/programs/LewisGallery.htm

| Mon-Thurs 10 am-6 pm; Fri 10 am-7 pm; Sat 10 am-5 pm | Through March 29: “Collage x 10,” mixed media group exhibition RICHARD BOYD GALLERY | 207.792.1097 | Island Ave & Epps St, Peaks Island | Thurs-Sun 10 am-5 pm | Through March 31: “Intersections: A Solo Exhibition of Paintings by Katherine Cartwright, NWS” RIVER ARTS | 207.563.1507 | 241 Rte 1, Damariscotta | Tues-Sat 10 am-4 pm; Sun noon-4 pm | Through March

27: “Innerscape: The World Inside,” mixed media group exhibition

SANCTUARY TATTOO & ART GALLERY | 207.828.88665600 | 31 Forest

Ave, Portland | sanctuarytattoo.com | Tues-Sat 11 am-7 pm | Through March 31: “Crypto-Faune, Chimera-Flora,” mixed media group exhibition SPACE GALLERY | 207.828.5600 | 538 Congress St, Portland | space538.org | Wed-Sat noon-6 pm | Through April 25: “Last Place Ever,” mixed media works by Pat Falco | Through May 2: “Let Our Love Guide You From This World to the Next,” window installation by Cooper Holoweski SUSAN MAASCH FINE ART | 207.478.4087 | 4 City Center, Portland | susanmaaschfineart.com | Tues-Sat 11 am-5 pm | Through March 31: paintings by Lynda Schlosberg + “Portrait Photography,” by Melonie Bennett + Cole Caswell + Denise Froelich + Sean Harris + Julee Holcome + Jack Montgomery + DM Witman THINK TANK/PORTLAND | 207.619.3660 | 533 Congress St, Portland | call for hours | Through March 31: “Photographic Anthology ‘89-’99: Dublin, New York, Portland,” by Colin Malakie

MUSEUMS AFRICAN CENTER FOR THE SACRED ARTS AT THE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN CULTURE | 207.871.7188 | 13

Brown St, Portland | museumafricanculture.org | Tues-Fri 10:30 am-4 pm; Sat noon-4 pm | $5 suggested donation | Through April 14: “The Spirits of the Grassland” | Ongoing: “An Exhibition of Bronze”

BATES COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART

| 207.786.6158 | 75 Russell St, Olin Arts Center, Lewiston | bates.edu/museumabout.xml | Tues-Sat 10 am-5 pm | Through March 21: “How to Make the Universe Right: The Art of the Shaman in Vietnam & Southern China” + “Remix: Selections from the International Collage Center,” mixed media

BOWDOIN COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART | 207.725.3275 | 245 Maine St,

Brunswick | bowdoin.edu/art-museum | Tues-Wed + Fri-Sat 10 am-5 pm; Thurs 10 am-8:30 pm; Sun 1-5 pm | Free admission; donations welcome | Through June 1: “Surrealism in Motion,” short films + “The Object Show: Discoveries in Bowdoin Collections” + “Under the Surface: Surrealist Photography” | Ongoing: “American Artists at Work, 1840-1950” + “Contemporary Masters, 1950 to the Present” + “Lovers & Saints: Art of the Italian Renaissance” COLBY COLLEGE | 207.859.5600 | Museum of Art, 5600 Mayflower Hill Dr, Waterville | colby.edu/museum |

Tues-Sat 10 am-5 pm; Sun noon-5 pm | Free admission | Through June 8: “American Weathervanes from a Distinguished Maine Collection” + “Histories of Now: Six Artists from Cairo,” video works + “Julianne Swartz: Affirmation,” sound installation + “Spaces & Places: Chinese Art from the Lunder-Colville Collection & the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston” + “The Lunder Collection: A Gift of Art to Colby College” | Ongoing: “Process & Place: Exploring the Design Evolution of the Alfond-Lunder Family Pavilion” + “Alex Katz Collection” FARNSWORTH ART MUSEUM | 207.596.6457 | 16 Museum St, Rockland | farnsworthmuseum.org | 10 am-5 pm, open until 8 pm with free admission Wed | $12, seniors & students $10; under 17 free and Rockland residents free | Through March 30: “The Wonderful World of Oz: Selections from the Willard Carroll/Tom Wilhite Collection” | Through April 27: “19th Century Perspectives: People & the Land,” paintings FRYEBURG ACADEMY | 207.935.9232 | Pace Galleries of Art, 18 Bradley St, Fryeburg | fryeburgacademy.org | MonFri 9 am-1 pm; by appointment | Through March 31: “Robert Casper, 1928-2012,” paintings ICA AT MECA | 207.879.5742 | 522 Congress St, Portland | Wed-Sun 11 am-5 pm; Thurs 11 am-7 pm | Through April 6: “Bryan Graf: Across the Interior,” photography installation + Robert Beatty: “Soundtracks for Takeshi Murata” | Through March 31, 2016: “We Are What We Hide,” long-running exhibit in & outside gallery walls

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART |

800.699.1509 | Artists at Work Gallery Project Window, 522 Congress St, Portland | Through April 18: “Melt,” win-

dow installation by Reenie Charriere | 522 Congress St, Portland | Through June 4: paintings by Anne Ireland PORTLAND MUSEUM OF ART | 207.775.6148 | 7 Congress Square, Portland | portlandmuseum.org | Tues-Thurs + Sat-Sun 10 am-5 pm; Fri 10 am-9 pm | Admission $12; $10 students/seniors; $6 youth 13-17; free for youth 12 & under and for all Fri 5-9 pm | Through April 6: “Youth Art Month,” student works | Through April 27: “Fine Lines: American Drawings from the Brooklyn Museum” | Through July 27: “PMA Family Space: Clint Fulkerson,” drawings | Through Aug 3: “George Daniell: Picturing Monhegan Island,” photographs & drawings| March 22-June 15: “Preserving Creative Spaces: The Historic Artists’ Homes & Studios Program,” documentary installation

SALT INSTITUTE FOR DOCUMENTARY STUDIES | 207.761.0660 | 561

Congress St, Portland | salt.edu | Tues-

Fri noon-4:30 pm | Through March 21: “Flash Forward,” student photography exhibit

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE - AUGUSTA

| 207.621.3243 | Danforth Gallery, Jewett Hall, 46 University Dr, Augusta | MonThurs 8:30 am-7 pm; Fri 8:30 am-5 pm | Through March 28: “UMA Architecture Exhibit,” juried exhibition | Through April 4: “Sum & Parts: Documentary Sculpture & Photographs” | Through April 5: “Higher Forms of Art,” mixed media student exhibition

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE - FARMINGTON | 207.778.7072 | Art Gallery, 246

Main St, Farmington | Tues-Sun noon-4 pm | Through March 27: “Process,” works by Sarah Bouchard

UNIVERSITY OF MAINE MUSEUM OF ART | 207.561.3350 | Norumbega

Hall, 40 Harlow St, Bangor | umma. umaine.edu | Mon-Sat 10 am-5 pm |

Free admission | Through March 22: “Time’s Wife,” paintings by Hannah Cole | Ongoing: “Selections from the Permanent Collection”

local beer live music comedy painting poetry pub quiz

UNIVERSITY OF NEW ENGLAND PORTLAND | 207.221.4499 | Art Gallery, 716 Stevens Ave, Portland | une.edu/ artgallery | Wed 1-4 pm; Thurs 1-7 pm;

Fri-Sun 1-4 pm | Through June 14: “The Painting of John Calvin Stevens” | Through June 15: “Recent Acquisitions & Selections from the Permanent Collection,” mixed media | Ongoing: paintings & photography by Maine artists + labyrinth installation

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE - GORHAM | 207.780.5008 | Art Gallery,

USM Campus, Gorham | usm.maine. edu/~gallery | Tues-Fri 11 am-4 pm; Sat-Sun 1-5 pm | Through April 6: “USM Juried Student Exhibition,” mixed media

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN MAINE - PORTLAND | 207.780.5008 | Area

Gallery, Woodbury Campus Center, Bedford St, Portland | Mon-Fri 7 am-10

pm | Through March 28: “Transitions: USM Juried Art Alumni,” mixed media | Through May 1: “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here,” traveling exhibition | Through May 31: “Rescued, Redeemed, Revived,” book arts

OTHER MUSEUMS CHILDREN’S MUSEUM & THEATRE OF MAINE | 207.828.1234 | 142 Free St,

Portland | kitetails.com | Tues-Sat 10

am-5 pm; Sun noon-5 pm; Mon during school vacations | $10, $9 seniors, $7 youth under 17, free under 6; first Friday of the month is free 5-8 pm | March 20: Tiny Tots: Water Play; Star Show 11:30 am; Just Sew Storytelling 3:30 pm | March 21: Fire Safety Friday 10 am; Papier Mache for Toddlers 10:30 am; Hip Hop Speaks 11:30 am; Blue Block Science 2:30 pm | March 22: Pop-Up Playscape Day 10 am-5 pm; The Eyeball Show 11 am; Open Art Studio: Cardboard Worlds 2-3pm; Smooshy, Smelly Science: Close Up 3:30 pm | March 23: Cooking Healthy: Veggie Dumplings 11 am; Kitchen Chemistry 1 pm | March 25: Cooking Healthy: Fruit Juice Gummies 11:30 am; Glow Stick Science 3 pm | March 26: Open Art Studio: All Things Wet 11 am-2 pm; Optical Illusions 3:30 pm | March 27: Tiny Tots: Puppet Storytime 10:30 am; Star Show 11:30 am; Just Sew Storytelling 3:30 pm

Sunday - Friday 4 - 7p: All Drafts $3 All Whiskies 20% off Thursday & Friday 5 - 6p: BACON & CHEESE Happy Hour

Hello Newman $1.50 PBR & Bud 16oz Cans Friday 9:30p: Kilcollins upstairs Saturday 9:30p: Skösh upstairs Thursday 9:30p:

Dave Rowe downstairs

Monday 7p: Monday 8p: Tuesday 7p: Tuesday 9:30p: Wednesday 8-10p: Wednesday 8-11p:

Seanachie Night Geeks Who Drink

Poetry Slam Open Mic Comedy Squid Jiggers

$3 Baxter Stowaway/Seasonal Drafts

portland’s pub 375 Fore Street in the heart oF the old Port 773.7210 Facebook.com/bullFeeneyS @bullFeeneyS


26 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

Our Ratings

dinner + Movie

MOvie Review

Dining Review

outstanding excellent good average poor

$ = $15 or less $$ = $16-$22 $$$ = $23-$30 $$$$ = $31 and up

xxxx xxx xx x z

Nominate your favorite

PORTLAND Business

Based on average entrée price

BEST

extreme localism

THE

when flavors speak louder than words _By B ria n duff

f

FShort Takes

Vinland’s pontifications become white noise, which fades away as you appreciate the food and its distinctive coherence of flavors and textures — the Nordic, astringent, piney, ascetic goodness of it all. Vinland’s extreme localism has led to a mastery of the dried and the fermented — starting with the amuse-bouche of an earthy beet chip topped with a dollop of tangy yogurt and a bit of bitter radish. A gimlet cocktail gets its sour from yogurt whey instead of citrus, which smoothed out the gin’s bite and harmonized with the mint of pine syrup. A rum cocktail uses the same whey, as well as ginger, to create an appealing fruitless tropicality. Yogurt also provides the base for the turnip soup — white and silky with a sort of pleasant probiotic tang. The turnip deepens the bitterness and gives the soup some heft, while fermented carrot and greens provide sharpness. Even better was the oat polenta — creamier than most corn versions, and less sweet. The hearty oat complemented a just-sour goatcheddar sauce, and big pieces of tender delicata squash. A scallop entrée showed off Vinland’s distinctive strength in the ingenious potato risotto that was the foundation of the dish — much lighter and less oily than most rice versions. The barely seared scallops, from the sea that afternoon we were told, tasted of it. A broth infused with mushroom and seaweed brought some subtle funkiness, roasted carrots added sweetness, and spirals of dried beet offered texture. Pork capocollo — usually cured —

hAVe IT your whey tangy yogurt provides the base for vinland’s turnip soup. is prepared sous-vide (sealed in an airtight bag and cooked in a water bath) at Vinland and seared in herb butter. The pale and tender result has a subtle ham-like flavor. A red cabbage kraut was so lightly fermented it was almost fresh, and the pine cheese crisp had a funky intensity. Vinland’s myriad ideas are most eloquently expressed when the food itself speaks for them. And the restaurant lets that happen — the menu and the service offer few hints of the righteousness that has become Vinland’s public persona. The handsome room is spare and well lit, the better to appreciate the presentation of the cuisine — which remained true to its astringent-aesthetic from that beet chip beginning to a delicious dried-parsnip crumble for dessert. What is most appealing about Vinland

Muppets Most wanted

90 MinUtes | r | nickelodeon

$$$ VINLAND | 593 Congress St, Portland | Tuesday-Saturday, 5:30-close; Sunday brunch 9:30-1:30 | Visa/MC/Amex | 207.653.8617

xxw Muppets MOst wanteD 106 MinUtes | pG | westbrook cineMaGic + saco cineMaGic & iMax + sMitty’s biddeford + reGal brUnswick + nordica + aUbUrn + lewiston + oxford

dream imagery is heavy-handed, the characters sketchily realized, and the high-toned dialogue comes out stilted more often than not. This is best enjoyed for the wordless sequences in which Villeneuve and cinema-

tographer Nicolas Bolduc exploit Toronto’s postmodern architecture to creepy effect. With Jake Gyllenhaal, Mélanie Laurent, and Isabella Rossellini.

_Ben sachs

THEPHOENIX.COM/THEBEST

seems utterly entwined with its resourceful response to the limitations of Maine winters. Vinland seems to thrive among limitations, and one wonders if it will lose some of its Nordic appeal in the relative abundance of summer. When the Scandinavian filmaker Jørgen Leth sought to remake his film The Perfect Human (with its climatic Danish meal) five times, each with a different restriction, one requirement scared him most: “Not a fucking cartoon!” But the resulting animation was beautiful. Maybe there is something cartoonish in Vinland’s radical experiment with localism, but the result is also lovely. ^

Movie reviews in brief

xxw eneMy I haven’t read José Saramago’s 2002 novel The Double, but its premise — an introverted history teacher meets a small-time actor who is his double, and drives both the actor and himself nuts — is the sort of Kafkaesque nightmare that’s difficult to film. Much of the suspense takes place inside the characters’ minds, and the obscure narrative calls for a more delicate balance between realism and fantasy than Canadian director Denis Villeneuve (Incendies, Prisoners) can provide. This is fitfully successful as a mood piece, though the

2014

Jim Henson never liked the idea of Disney getting its hands on the Muppets, but that’s where they wound up in 2004, when his family sold the characters from the beloved TV series The Muppet Show for an undisclosed sum. Weirdly, the first two Muppet movies produced by Disney both dwell on nefarious showbiz deals: in the franchise relaunch The Muppets (2011), an oil tycoon schemes to buy the

Muppets’ longtime theater, and in this sequel duplicitous manager Ricky Gervais sends the crew on a tour of Europe to facilitate a criminal caper. The verbal wit is fairly weak this time around, though as in the previous film there’s an endless succession of three-second star cameos, and a subplot confining Kermit the Frog to a Russian gulag offers the bizarre spectacle of Ray Liotta, Danny Trejo, and Jemaine Clement singing and dancing as grayfaced prisoners. James Bobin directed; with Tina Fey, Ty Burrell, and Celine Dion duetting with Miss Piggy.

_Jr Jones

#PORTPHX #TheBestMaine

Do you see this iPad mini ? ™*

IT COULD BE YOURS. Sign up at ca to join o scobayeye.com ur ebla We’ll dr aw the n st list. am lucky iPa d mini™ e of one winner!

“On a swaying bridge between two worlds.” A family is forced to reconsider their relationship and how they communicate when their son, Billy – who was born deaf but stayed out of “deaf culture”– meets Sylvia, a young woman from a deaf family. Interweaving keen insight and surprising moments of humor, this Off-Broadway hit explores language, identity, and what it means to fit in with those close to you.

“...succeeds in escorting us into a world that few of us know.” “...explores issues of communication, self-expression and individuation with a wonderful ear for detail.” LL.Bean, Maine Home+Design, maine., WEX, The Portland Phoenix, Mainebiz, Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram

PORTLANDSTAGE Tickets: 774.0465 where great theater lives www.portlandstage.org

Contest to end 4/30/14. Casco Bay EyeCare employees and their immediate families are not eligible. *16 GB iPad mini™

We think you’ll enjoy connecting with us. Look forward to receiving eblasts once a month or so with news about what’s happening here at Casco Bay EyeCare: sales and special offers, designer frame lines we’re adding, updates about how to best use your insurance coverage for vision care, and tips about eye and contact lens health.

cascobayeye.com Michael Anastasio, OD • Robert Banglmaier, OD Kyle Benner, OD • Steven Goldstein, OD Timothy Kearins, OD • Sian Liem, OD Francis Robbins, OD • Timothy Tolford, OD 152 Middle St. Portland 773-2020

770 Congress St. Portland 772-8384

256 US Route One Falmouth 781-5580

Ten Q St. South Portland 799-3877

7 Portland Farms Rd. Scarborough 883-2809

0214

How easy is it to be self-satisfied for eating local? So easy that last week US Representative Bill Huizenga, a Republican from Michigan, congratulated himself on the passage of the Farm Bill by reminding reporters that “there is nothing hotter than farm-to-table.” Seen that viral video of Mitch McConnell and wondered why he is smiling so much? He is pleased about foraging his own nettles, of course! In offering cuisine made entirely with ingredients from Maine, the new restaurant Vinland seeks to perfect a trend at the moment it has become banal — like Al Green did with soul music or the Flamboyants did with gothic architecture. This is not necessarily bad. Sure, the Flamboyants lacked elegance, but thank god for Green’s mid-career repertoire. Whether we should be thankful for Vinland depends on how they pull off the conceit. It is hard to swallow sanctimony, especially regarding a cliché. And in its self-promotion Vinland has shown a predilection for cant — promising lessons in ethics, aesthetics, nutrition, history, and politics. As Vinland’s manifesto concludes (after stating 19 principles; read the whole thing at vinland.me): they “hope to honor the indigenous and the myriad non-humans who have been so grievously harmed by Western culture. We hope to earn their welcome….” Too late, I fear! And too little, if what you are offering is expensive meals. So it’s a pleasant surprise that dinner at Vinland feels neither too overtly ecofriendly nor too ego-friendly. Perhaps


28 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

Unless otherwise noted, all film listings this week are for Friday, March 21 through Thursday, March 27. Times can and do change without notice, so do call the theater before heading out. For up-to-date filmschedule information, check the Portland Phoenix Web site at thePhoenix.com.

movie Th e a Te r lisT ing s

dinner + Movie Portland CInEMaGIC Grand

333 Clarks Pond Parkway, South Portland | 207.772.6023

nEEd For SPEEd 3d | 3:40, 9:40 non-StoP | 1:30, 4:20, 7:20, 9:45 PHIloMEna | 12:50, 7 Son oF God | 12:10, 3:30, 7:25 3 daYS to KIll | 12:20, 3:30, 7:25 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | 1:20, 7:15 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE 3d | 4:25,

a PlaCE at tHE taBlE | Mon: 7:30

USM SCHool oF MUSIC MUSICal tHEatrE FIlM SErIES

Divergent

10 Bailey Hall, Gorham | 207.780.4198

dIVErGEnt | 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 tHE lEGo MoVIE | Fri-Sun: 11:30 am,

9:35

WESt SIdE StorY | Sun: 2

2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 | Mon-Thu: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 tHE MonUMEntS MEn | 1, 7 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | Fri-Sun: 11:30 am, 2:10, 4:40, 7, 9:30 | Mon-Thu: 2:10, 4:40, 7, 9:30 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | Fri-Sun: 11:15 am, 1:45, 4:15, 7:10, 9:40 | MonThu: 1:45, 4:15, 7:10, 9:40 nEEd For SPEEd | 1, 3:50, 6:45, 9:30 Son oF God | 4, 9:30 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | Fri: 11:30 am, 2, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45 | Sat-Thu: 2, 4:20, 7:15, 9:45

9:30

WatErVIllE oPEra HoUSE

nICKElodEon CInEMaS 1 Temple St, Portland | 207.772.4022

dIVErGEnt | Fri: 12:40, 2, 3:30, 5, 6:30, 8, 9:25 | Sat: 12:40, 2, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 | Sun: 12:40, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 | Mon: 12:40, 2, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 | Tue-Wed: 12:40, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 | Thu: 12:40, 2, 3:30, 6:30, 9:25 lIKE FatHEr, lIKE Son | 3:20, 9:10 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | 3, 9:30 tIM’S VErMEEr | 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:30, 9:20 12 YEarS a SlaVE | 12:40, 6:15 tHE WInd rISES | 12:45, 3:45, 6:50

PMa MoVIES

7 Congress Square, Portland | 207.775.6148

orCHEStra oF EXIlES | Fri: 6:30 | Sat: 2

WEStBrooK CInEMaGIC

183 County Rd, Westbrook | 207.774.3456

aMErICan HUStlE | 12:10, 3:20, 7:20 dIVErGEnt | noon, 12:20, 3:10, 3:30, 6:30, 6:45, 9:30, 9:50

FroZEn | 12:20, 3:20 tHE lEGo MoVIE | 11:50 am, 2:10, 4:30, 7, 9:20

lonE SUrVIVor | 6:50, 9:30 tHE MonUMEntS MEn | 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:10

Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | 11:50 am, noon, 2:10, 2:20, 4:30, 4:40, 7, 9:20 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | 12:10, 12:30, 3:10, 3:30, 6:50, 7:10, 9:30, 9:45 nEEd For SPEEd | noon, 3:30, 6:45, 9:50 non-StoP | 12:20, 3, 7:20, 9:50 rIdE alonG | 7:20, 9:40 Son oF God | 12:10, 9:30 3 daYS to KIll | 3:20, 6:50 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | 12:10, 3:10, 6:40, 9:10

tYlEr PErrY’S tHE SInGlE MoM’S ClUB | 12:20, 3, 7:10, 9:40 tHE WolF oF Wall StrEEt | noon, 3:40, 7:30

MaInE alaMo tHEatrE

85 Main St, Bucksport | 207.469.0924

tHE lEGo MoVIE | Fri-Sat: 6:30 | Sun: 2

aUBUrn FlaGSHIP 10

12 YEarS a SlaVE | 12:10, 3:20, 6:40,

CEntEr tHEatrE

Sat: 2, 6 | Sun: 2 | Mon-Thu: 6

EVEnInGStar CInEMa

MaInE JEWISH FIlM FEStIVal

Tontine Mall, 149 Maine St, Brunswick | 207.729.5486 Call for shows & times.

FrontIEr CInEMa

14 Maine St, Brunswick | 207.725.5222 | mjff.org

FrontIEr CInEMa

an aPartMEnt In BErlIn | Sun:

14 Maine St, Brunswick | 207.725.5222

la CaMIonEta: tHE JoUrnEY oF onE aMErICan SCHool BUS | Fri: 2, 6, 8 | Sat: 2

lEWISton FlaGSHIP 10

855 Lisbon St, Lewiston | 207.777.5010

dIVErGEnt | 12:30, 3:45, 7 FroZEn | 1:25, 4:20 tHE lEGo MoVIE | 1:10, 4:05, 6:30 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | 1:15, 4:15, 6:55

tHE MonUMEntS MEn | 12:45, 3:35, 7:15

MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | 1, 4, 6:45 nEEd For SPEEd | 12:50, 3:50, 7:10 non-StoP | 1:40, 4:35, 7:25 roBoCoP | 7:40 Son oF God | 12:35, 3:30, 6:40 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | 1:30, 4:30, 7:30

tHE MaGIC lantErn

9 Depot St, Bridgton | 207.647.5065

dIVErGEnt | Fri: 4:15, 7:30 | Sat-Sun: 12:45, 4, 7:15 | Tue-Thu: 4:15, 7:30 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | Fri: 4:30, 7:15 | Sat-Sun: 1:15, 4:30, 7 | TueThu: 4:30, 7:15 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | Fri: 4, 7 | Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4:15, 7:30 | Tue-Thu: 4, 7

narroW GaUGE CInEMaS

15 Front St, Farmington | 207.778.4877 Call for shows & times.

nordICa tHEatrE

1 Freeport Village Station, Suite 125, Freeport | 207.865.9000

dIVErGEnt | Fri-Sat: 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 | Sun-Thu: 12:40, 3:40, 6:40 tHE lEGo MoVIE | 1:10, 4:05 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | 1:15, 4 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | Fri-Sat: 1, 3:30, 7, 9:30 | Sun-Thu: 1, 3:30, 7 nEEd For SPEEd | Fri-Sat: 7:05, 9:50 | Sun-Thu: 7:05 non-StoP | 1:30, 7:10 12 YEarS a SlaVE | Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:35, 6:30, 9:25 | Sun-Thu: 12:30, 3:35, 6:30

oXFord FlaGSHIP 7 1570 Main Street, Oxford | 207.743.2219 Call for shows & times.

tHE WInd rISES | Fri: 2:30, 5, 7:30 | Sat: noon, 2:30, 5, 7:30 | Sun: noon, 2:30, 7:30 | Mon-Thu: 2:30, 5, 7:30

rEEl PIZZa CInEraMa 33 Kennebec Place, Bar Harbor | 207.288.3828

dIVErGEnt | 5, 8 lIKE FatHEr, lIKE Son | Tue-Thu: 5:30, 8:15

tHE MonUMEntS MEn | Fri-Mon: 5:30, 8:15

rEGal BrUnSWICK 10 19 Gurnet Rd, Brunswick | 207.798.3996

dIVErGEnt | 12:15, 12:45, 3:30, 4:10, 6:40, 7:20, 8, 9:15, 9:45 tHE lEGo MoVIE | 12:10, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30, 10 tHE MonUMEntS MEn | 6:30, 9:30 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | 12:40, 4:20, 6:45, 10:20 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan 3d | noon, 2:25 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | noon, 1, 2:35, 3:45, 5:10, 7, 9:40 nEEd For SPEEd | 12:20, 6:50 nEEd For SPEEd 3d | 3:45, 9:45 non-StoP | 12:30, 4, 7:10, 9:50 Son oF God | 4:50 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE 3d | 12:35, 3:50, 7:45, 10:15

SaCo CInEMaGIC & IMaX

783 Portland Rd, Rte 1, Saco | 207.282.6234

aMErICan HUStlE | 1, 4, 8 dIVErGEnt | noon, 3, 6:30, 9:30 dIVErGEnt - IMaX | 1, 4, 7, 10 tHE lEGo MoVIE | noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20

lonE SUrVIVor | 7, 9:40 tHE MonUMEntS MEn | 1, 4, 7, 9:40 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | 1, 2:55,

noon, 12:30, 3, 3:30, 6:30, 7, 9:30, 10 | Sun: noon, 12:30, 3, 3:30, 6:30, 7 | MonThu: 3:30, 4, 6:30, 7 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | Fri-Sat: noon, 3:15, 7, 9:30 | Sun: noon, 3:15, 7 | Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:30 nEEd For SPEEd | Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9:45 | Sun: noon, 3:30, 6:45 | Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6:30 non-StoP | Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:45, 7:15, 10 | Sun: 12:30, 3:45, 7:15 | Mon-Thu: 4, 7

SnoW WHItE & tHE SEVEn dWarFS | Wed: 11:30 am 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | Fri-Sat:

SMIttY’S CInEMaSanFord

1364 Main St, Sanford | 207.490.0000

BladE | Wed: 7 dIVErGEnt | Fri-Sat: noon, 3:30, 7, 10 | Sun: noon, 3:30, 7 | Mon-Thu: 3:30, 7 tHE lEGo MoVIE | Fri-Sun: 12:30, 4 | Mon-Thu: 4 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:45, 6:30, 9:45 | Sun: 12:30, 3:45, 6:30 | Mon-Thu: 3:45, 6:30 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | Fri-Sat: noon, 12:30, 3:30, 4, 6:45, 9:45 | Sun: noon, 12:30, 3:30, 4, 6:30 | Mon-Thu: 3:30, 4, 6:30 nEEd For SPEEd | Fri-Sat: noon, 3:30, 6:45, 9:45 | Sun: noon, 3:30, 6:45 | MonThu: 3:30, 6:45 noaH | Thu: 7 non-StoP | Fri-Sat: 7:30, 10 | SunThu: 7 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | Fri-Sat: 7:15, 10 | Sun-Thu: 7

SMIttY’S CInEMaWIndHaM

SPotlIGHt CInEMaS

MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | noon, nEEd For SPEEd | 12:30, 3:20, 7, 9:40 non-StoP | 12:30, 3:30, 7:10, 9:50 rIdE alonG | 12:40, 3, 7:30, 9:40 Son oF God | noon, 8 3 daYS to KIll | 1, 4 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | 12:30, 3,

tHE art oF tHE StEal | Fri-Sat:

420 Alfred St, Five Points Shopping Center, Biddeford | 207.282.2224

BladE | Wed: 7 dIVErGEnt | Fri-Sat: noon, 12:15, 3,

3:15, 6:15, 6:30, 9:30, 9:45 | Sun: noon, 12:15, 3, 3:15, 6:15, 6:30 | Mon-Thu: 3:30, 4, 6:30, 7 tHE lEGo MoVIE | Fri-Sun: 12:30, 3:45

MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | Fri-Sat: 12:50, 4, 6:45, 9:20 | Sun-Thu: 12:50, 4, 6:45 nEEd For SPEEd | 12:20, 3:50, 7:05 nEEd For SPEEd 3d | Fri-Sat: 9:40 non-StoP | Fri-Sat: 1:30, 4:25, 7:25, 9:45 | Sun-Thu: 1:30, 4:25, 7:25 PHIloMEna | Fri-Sat: 12:40, 3:30, 7:10, 9:25 | Sun-Thu: 12:40, 3:30, 7:10 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE | 1:20, 4:20, 7:20 300: rISE oF an EMPIrE 3d | FriSat: 9:35 12 YEarS a SlaVE | Fri-Sat: 12:10, 3:20, 6:40, 9:30 | Sun-Thu: 12:10, 3:20, 6:40

7:15, 10 | Sun: 7:15 | Mon-Thu: 7

2:30, 5, 7:30, 10

SMIttY’S CInEMaBIddEFord

2:40, 7:10, 9:05 | Sun-Thu: 2:40, 7:10 tHE artISt & tHE ModEl | Sat: 10 am, 12:15 tIM’S VErMEEr | Fri: 2:20, 4:25, 6:10, 7:55, 9:40 | Sat: 2:20, 4:25, 6:10, 9:40 | Sun-Thu: 2:20, 4:25, 6:10, 7:55 12 YEarS a SlaVE | Fri: 4:35 | SatSun: 12:05, 4:35 | Mon-Thu: 4:35

MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | Fri-Sat:

4, 5:10, 6:50, 9:10

7:30, 9:50

6:50, 9:05, 9:50 | Sun-Thu: 12:30, 3:45, 6:50, 9:05 tHE lEGo MoVIE | 1:10, 4:10, 6:45 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:55, 9:10 MUPPEtS MoSt WantEd | 1, 4, 7:05, 9:35 nEEd For SPEEd | 12:40, 7:10

| Mon-Thu: 4

795 Roosevelt Trail, Windham | 207.892.7000 Call for shows & times.

raIlroad SQUarE CInEMa

746 Center St, Auburn | 207.786.8605

I T A N R TA NEW!

12:30

tHE GrEat BEaUtY | Tue: 2, 5, 8 | Wed: 2, 5 | Thu: 2, 5, 8

A E L E R ON

2 2 H C AR

M

lIVE BroadCaSt oF War HorSE BY tHE natIonal tHEatrE oF london | Sat: 1

Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | Fri: 6 |

17 Railroad Sq, Waterville | 207.873.6526

dIVErGEnt | Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:45,

1 Common St, Waterville | 207.873.7000

20 East Main St, Dover-Foxcroft | 207.564.8943

JOIN US @ ASYLUM TO CELEBRATE THE ARRIVAL OF OUR Y T R A NEWEST BREW! P E S

6 Stillwater Ave, Orono | 207.827.7411 Call for shows & times.

tHoMaSton FlaGSHIP 10

nEW HaMPSHIrE tHE MUSIC Hall

28 Chestnut St, Portsmouth | 603.436.9900

BEttIE PaGE rEVEalS all | Fri: 7 | Sun: 4 | Tue: 7 | Thu: 7

tHE BroKEn CIrClE BrEaKdoWn | Fri-Sun: 7 | Tue-Wed: 7

lIVE BroadCaSt oF War HorSE BY tHE natIonal tHEatrE oF london | Sat: 1

rEGal FoX rUn StadIUM 15

45 Gosling Rd, Portsmouth | 603.431.6116 Call for shows & times.

FIlM SPECIalS

nICKElodEon CInEMaS

AND MORE

1 Temple St, Portland | 207.772.4022 | mjff.org

aFtErMatH | Thu: 8 aWaKE ZIon | Sat: 10:15 BEtHlEHEM | Wed: 5:30 do YoU BElIEVE In loVE? | Wed: 4 EdIE & tHEa: a VErY lonG EnGaGEMEnt | Sun: 8 EPIloGUE | Wed: 1 FIll tHE VoId | Mon: 8 tHE GatEKEEPErS | Sun: 5:30 HarBoUr oF HoPE | Mon: 5:30 HollYWood & HItlEr | Tue: 6 tHE JEWISH CardInal | Sat: 8 KaddISH For a FrIEnd | Mon: 10 lola | Thu: 10:10 MEltInG aWaY | Thu: 6 MY aUStralIa | Sun: 2:30 oUt In tHE darK | Tue: 8:30 QUalItY BallS | Sun: 10 | Tue: 4 SlEEPInG WItH tHE FISHES | Wed:

BAXTER DRINK SPECIALS

GIVEAWAYS DOORS @ 8 SHOW @ 8:30

7:30

tHE WondErS | Wed: 10

PMa MoVIES

7 Congress Square, Portland | 207.775.6148 | mjff.org

aHEad oF tIME | Thu: 1:30 an aPartMEnt In BErlIn | Sun: 12:30

do YoU BElIEVE In loVE? | Tue: 2 Jon IMBEr’S lEFt Hand | Sun: 3:30

$5 IN ADVANCE $8 @ THE DOOR

raIlroad SQUarE CInEMa an aPartMEnt In BErlIn | Sun: 12:30

BatES CollEGE

aWaKE ZIon | Sun: 7:30 EPIloGUE | Sun: 5:30 tHE JEWISH CardInal | Sat: 8 MY aUStralIa | Sun: 3

anCHorMan 2: tHE lEGEnd ContInUES | Fri: 7:30 | Sat: 2, 7:30 | Sun:

Salt InStItUtE For doCUMEntarY StUdIES

Olin Arts Center, 2 Andrews Rd, Lewiston | 207.786.6255

2, 4:30

tHE Grand

165 Main St, Ellsworth | 207.667.9500

BEttIE PaGE rEVEalS all | Tue: 7:30

9:15 | Sun-Thu: 12:30, 3:40, 7 FroZEn | 1:10, 4:15 tHE lEGo MoVIE | 1, 4:10, 6:55 tHE MonUMEntS MEn | Fri-Sat: 7:15, 9:50 | Sun-Thu: 7:15 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | noon, 2:15, 6:50 Mr. PEaBodY & SHErMan | Fri-Sat: noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 | Sun-Thu: noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:50

Gracie Theatre, 1 College Circle, Bangor | 207.941.7051

HUSSon UnIVErSItY CEntral ParK FIVE | Thu: 7

SPaCE GallErY

538 Congress St, Portland | 207.828.5600

FoUnd FootaGE FEStIVal | Sat: 7:30

IF YoU BUIld It | Wed: 7:30

KENYA HALL BAND DOUBTING GRAVITY

5:30

17 Railroad Sq, Waterville | 207.873.6526 | mjff.org

9 Moody Dr, Thomaston | 207.594.2100

dIVErGEnt | Fri-Sat: 12:30, 3:40, 7,

tHE JEWISH CardInal | Sat: 8 MY aUStralIa | Sun: 3 QUalItY BallS | Sun: 7:30 SlEEPInG WItH tHE FISHES | Sun:

WITH:

561 Congress St, Portland | 207.761.0660 | mjff.org

aWaKE ZIon | Thu: 6 Jon IMBEr’S lEFt Hand | Wed: 6

Strand tHEatrE

345 Main St, Rockland | 207.594.0070 | mjff.org

Smooth, malty lager with a crisp American Hop finish. Enjoyed by the San Francisco prospectors of yesteryear.

TICKETS AT (207) 772-8274, IN PERSON AT 121 CENTER ST., OR PORTLANDASYLUM.COM

aFtErMatH | Wed: 1 an aPartMEnt In BErlIn | Mon: 1 tHE JEWISH CardInal | Sat: 8

UnIVErSItY oF MaInE - aUGUSta

Klahr Center, 46 University Dr, Augusta | 207.621.3530 | mjff.org

HarBoUr oF HoPE | Mon: 1

BAXTERBREWING.COM | FACEBOOK.COM/BAXTERBREWING | @BAXTERBREWING


30 March 21, 2014 | the portland phoenix | portland.thephoenix.coM

F

Back page Jonesin’

Moonsigns

Puzzle solution at ooM thePhoenix.coM/recr

_by syMbo line Da i This week, the moon is waning and will be at the last quarter. Work on projects that have already been established, or that need to be simplified. “Taking things away” is a theme (spring cleaning?) and look for ways to communicate artistically — perhaps singing your request versus an email. Even if you’re not a troubadour, this is a fine week for brainstorming or “thinking outside the box.” Crazy ideas go over better, so if you’re a “seat of the pants” worker, this is your golden hour.

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_ by M a t t J o n es 1

“It’s really nothIng” — and nothing can stop you!

Across 1 casino features 5 pacific coast salmon 9 King novel about a rabid dog 13 Feeling regret 15 Group whose o doesn’t stand for “oil” 16 Quite a distance away 17 commend highly 18 inbox item 19 expensive Japanese beef 20 amount of time before you stop reading inflammatory Web comments? 23 laughingstock 24 Glitch 25 cincinnati-to-detroit dir. 26 $ fractions, for short 29 did hayfield work 31 Wonder-ful count? 33 Force that i’m certain will pull you back to earth? 37 “let the rabbit eat ___” (mail-in 1976 cereal contest) 38 hosp. area for critical cases 39 reese’s “legally Blonde” role 1

©2014 Jonesin’ CrossworDs | eDitor@JonesinCrossworD s.CoM

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40 Food label units that don’t mind waiting around? 45 Get retribution for 46 Sour, as a stomach 47 icelandic band Sigur ___ 48 7, for 14 and 35: abbr. 50 Microbrewery product 51 dr. with six Grammys 54 Burp after drinking too many colas? 57 Beloved honey lover 60 change of address, to a realtor 61 Barracks barker, briefly 62 neighbor of hank hill 63 risk territory 64 Wrath 65 Several 66 Good, to Giuseppe 67 Word appearing before or after each word in the long theme entries 17

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Waning moon in Sagittarius. Folklore says make sauerkraut! But keep that vinegar out of today’s other encounters. Good day for sales calls, instructing others or planning a lengthy journey. those who will resist lessons include Virgo, pisces, and Gemini. leo, aries, Sagittarius, libra, and aquarius could find the humor in the darndest things, while cancer, capricorn, Scorpio, and taurus are waiting for the other shoe to drop. 23

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Waning moon in Sagittarius, over-excitability may prevail. paying too much, or getting over-excited could bring trouble for Virgo, pisces, Gemini, and cancer. For Sagittarius, aries, leo, and capricorn it’s no-holds-barred. You folks will want to be very clear about your needs — it is not the time for vagueness. Scorpio, libra, aquarius, and pisces will be impatient with the status quo. You folks will need to keep traveling, especially if a “geographic cure” keeps you from dwelling on what-can’t-be.

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last quarter moon in moon void-of-course 6:40 am until 4:03 pm when it moves into capricorn. projects begun around March 1 develop further. home improvements (the unglamorous ones) beckon. a great day for kicking bad habits to the curb. and kicking in general — capricorn rules the knees and skin. a day of accomplishment for capricorn, taurus, Virgo, pisces, and Scorpio (but will they recognize this and do something out of the ordinary for Saturday?). libra, aries, and cancer are touchy — give ‘em space. 25

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This horoscope traces the passage of the moon, not the sun. Simply read from day to day to watch the moon’s influence as it moves through the signs of the zodiac. | When the moon is in your sun sign, you are beginning a new 28-day emotional cycle, and you can expect increased insight and emotionality. When the moon moves into the sun sign opposite yours (see below), expect to have difficulties dealing with the opposite sex, family, or authority figures; social or romantic activities will not be at their best. | When the moon is in Aries, it opposes Libra, and vice versa. Other oppositions are Taurus/Scorpio, Gemini/Sagittarius, Cancer/Capricorn, Leo/Aquarius, and Virgo/Pisces. The moon stays in each sign approximately two and a half days. | As the moon moves between signs, it will sometimes become “void of course,” making no major angles to planets. Consider this a null time and try to avoid making or implementing decisions if you can. But it’s great for brainstorming. | For Symboline Dai’s sun-sign horoscopes and advice column, visit our Web site at thePhoenix.com. Symboline Dai can be reached at sally@moonsigns.net.

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Portland 03/21/14