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beantown counter

More than 50 percent of property in the city of Boston — state buildings, church grounds, college campuses, etc. — is tax exempt. These charts, stats, and graphs illustrate Boston’s property tax addiction: rising costs, a declining real estate market, and state restrictions on how much cash the city can collect.

[FIGURE 1]

Who owns what

Residential

65%

Residences account for most of Boston’s land value.

$56.6 billion

business

35%

Total Property value

$30.2 billion

$86.8 billion

2009

$2.26 billion 2011

on ca ch Bost

2007

$2.16 billion

u

How m

$2.17 billion

ct n colle

2011

$1.54 billion

on collects How much Bost

2009

$1.38 billion

2007

$1.27 billion [FIGURE 6]

How much boston can levy Boston could face trouble if it needs to collect more property taxes than it is entitled to by state law.

2012

2010

$2.3 billion

2009

[FIGURE 2]

$2.39 billion

Who Pays what

$2.4 billion

Businesses pay the bulk of the property taxes.

2007

$2.19 billion

Residential

[FIGURE 5]

39%

How much boston spends

$601 million

$1.86 billion

$1.54 billion

61%

$938 million

Boston’s total budget is on the rise, but the amount of money the city can raise through property taxes is limited.

2003

Total Property taxes business

2011

$1.6 billion

[FIGURE 4]

How much property is worth

2008

The residential property market has leveled off and is in decline — casting a shadow over the city’s primary revenue source.

$1.5 billion

$59.29 billion $44.31 billion

17,277

$1.2 billion 2011

$56.53 billion

2004

2009

2004

2007

2001

$29.23 billion

cost of city workers

20011

16,277

RESIDENTIAL

2004

16,055

Number of city workers

[FIGURE 3] 2011

$30.2 billion

BUSINESS 2001

$21.27 billion

2007 2004

$27.22 billion

$21.83 billion

DATA from boston municipal rese arch bure au and the cit y of boston; GR APHIC BY TAYLOR ARGENZIO

How much city employees cost The price of city workers is skyrocketing, even though the city has slashed jobs to cut costs.

Beantown Counter  

More than 50 percent of property in the city of Boston — state buildings, church grounds, college campuses, etc. — is tax exempt. These char...

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