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THE BLAZE Rock Ridge High School February - March 2019

MORE THAN A MONTH

Volume 2 | Issue 2 | theblazerrhs.com

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The Rock Ridge Commuinty celebrates the importance and influence of Black History -- and reflects on current trials and triumphs. pgs 6-7

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STAFF Editorial Board: Editor-in-Chief Bianca Alvarez Business Manager Taylor Dorsett Copy Editors Shradha Dinesh Elise Tsao Photo Editor Megha Korpol

Visual: Design Editors Rida Ali Arena Soupakhoun Web Manager Kate Anarfi Social Media Manager Jala Byrd Production Coordination: Sports Editor Muskan Bajwa Artistic Coordinator Nina Harris Adviser: Katy Greiner

MISSION STATEMENT We, The Blaze news staff, are committed to providing the Rock Ridge High School community with accurate, up-to-date information, highlighting diverse events and people, and sparking conversations for underrepresented stories.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR... From celebrating diversity to winning state championships, the months of February and March were full of excitement and pride for Rock Ridge students. Inside, you’ll read about the importance of Black History Month to the students here, about Greg Manternach and the wrestling team as they headed for states, and about how PEER showed support and encouragement of healthy relationships. As you read through all the articles, you understand more about who we are as a school. You understand what we've gone through to become the people you see in the hallways. Not only did we have two months of joy, but we also look forward to the coming events. Prom is around the corner, an exciting day for both juniors and seniors as they plan to spend a night full of memories, laughter, and happiness. On behalf of the entire staff, we’d like to thank you all for the tremendous amount of support we've received over our last issue. Thank you to those who have helped us put this issue together, from our numerous sponsors to our peers and faculty members buying our candy. We truly could not have done this without you. Readers, thank you for making Rock Ridge a place where we can all be ourselves, support one another, and have fun. We hope you feel just as proud as we do to be students at RRHS. Bianca Alvarez, Editor-in-Chief

Rock Ridge High School 43460 Loudoun Reserve Dr. Ashburn, VA 20148 Covers Designed by: Rida Ali, Shradha Dinesh, and Muskan Bajwa Front Cover Photos by: Muskan Bajwa and Jala Byrd Front Cover Photos of: Students & faculty featured in pgs 8-9 Back Cover Photos of: All people mentioned by interviewees as inspiring figures. All images from Wikimedia Commons.

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CONTENTS

Paint It Orange

4-5 6-7 8-9

news

More Than a Month feature

Prom-ise Me feature

10-11

Don’t Hate It, Debate It

12-13 14-15

To The Finish Line

clubs and organizations winter sports spotlight

Breaking The Boredom arts and entertainment

THANKS SPONSORS Bronze Level:

Bronze Level:

Platinum Level:

Sherri Anthony Janice Lloyd Tera VanDyke Rakinya Hinson Krithika Karthik Shoba Dinesh Akhila Sandhya Rao Dinesh Mohan Khristie Greiner Gaby Greiner Smera Sheik

Halle Boynton Angela Byrd Myron Byrd Letitia Bryant Beulah Willis-Brown Shandi Pendergrass Kanika Pendergrass Erika Wells Susan Smith Saira Khan Muhammad Ali

Nikisha Paige Katy Greiner

Silver Level: Antoinette Young

Gold Level: Rex Boone

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PAINT IT ORANGE PEERing into healthy relationships and what it means to Love BY: Shradha Dinesh

of esy ourt to c (Pho nW alia 9/It ix 8 Fen s) mon Com edia kim /Wi edia ikip

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behaviors. “They’ll be like ‘Oh it’s fine. It was just one time,’” Khan said. “But you want to reassure them that ‘I’m here for you and you’re not alone in this, but you have to realize that you have to weigh out the pros and the cons. Is it hurting you?’” If so, Khan says, it’s a sign that the relationship should end. Joyce and Khan, as part of a Rock Ridge Positive Experiences in Educational Experiences (PEER) initiative, chose to support the One Love Foundation -- an organization formed by Love’s family following her death to educate people about healthy relationships -- as to spread awareness for the cause. As part of their February awareness campaign, PEER encouraged students to wear orange in solidarity, support their bake sale, and purchase wristbands that sported One Love’s campaign slogan, “#LoveBetter.” “It’s not just about making money [to donate], it’s also making people realize that this is an important issue,” Khan said. Love’s family, recognizing that young people are disproportionately vulnerable to abusive relationships, started the foundation to help people learn how to identify dangerous behaviors. “Relationship abuse is a silent epidemic that impacts 1.5 million high school students each year,” Grace Carmichael said, One Love’s Engagement Coordinator. The #LoveBetter campaign, promoted by -Neera Khan PEER, encourages people to be mindful and advocate for healthy In a CDC (Centers for Disease relationships within their own lives Control and Prevention) report on intimate partner violence, 26% of female and others’. “[Meaningful conversations] in turn will inspire the victims and 15% of male victims -- of next generation to lead a movement to either physical or psychological relationship violence -- are first exposed love better and change the statistics to relationship abuse prior to the age of around relationship abuse.”Carmichael said. 18. Frequently, people interpret abuse At the heart of the movement, in toxic relationships solely as physical abuse, while emotional abuse --- such as Joyce believes that people should controlling behaviors or manipulation -- support each other, whether they reach out to friends, an adult, or an often gets overlooked, Joyce said. Oftentimes, Khan said, students can be organization like One Love. “Just spread the love,” said Joyce. dismissive of harmful relationship lot of people don’t know when they’re in an unhealthy relationship,”senior Ellie Joyce said. “Yeardley Love didn’t know -- there are a bunch of warning signs.” Joyce, referencing Yeardley Love, a 22-year-old University of Virginia student who was killed by her ex-boyfriend in 2010, believes that educating people about healthy relationships is imperative to curtail the problem. Senior Neera Khan shares this sentiment. Khan believes that discussing healthy relationships and being able to differentiate healthy relationships from unhealthy relationships is essential in high school, where there are a plethora of interpersonal connections.

you want to reassure them that ‘I’m here for you and you’re not alone in this, but you have to realize that you have to weigh out the pros and the cons. Is it hurting you?’

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MORE THAN A MONTH Q&A about Black History Month with RRHS Students and Staff COPY & PHOTOS BY: Jala Byrd & Muskan Bajwa |DESIGN BY: Shradha Dinesh, Rida Ali, & Jala Byrd

Edwin Harmon (Senior) Q: What obstacles do black men face?

A: “Oppression. There’s a lot of stereotypes surrounding us, especially with masculinity with black men. We’re expected to be these hypermasculine beings and that’s not the case for everybody ... in this county, we’re expected to fill that masculinity mold. If you’re not a football or basketball player, they don’t think you’re black enough.”

Everette Callaway Isabelle (Science) Duchatellier Q: What does Black History (junior) Month mean to you?

A: “It’s an opportunity to take a step back from what has become the normal curriculum to observe the contributions that a specific group of Americans have made. I think that a lot of people break it down to think that we only learn black history for one month, which is the largest misconception having a month creates. It gives a group of people a time to get excited about the contributions that they have made that they wouldn’t have felt another month of the year.”

Q: How do you celebrate Black History Month?

A: “Personally, I celebrate it all year Jordan Faustin (Senior) Q: Have you ever been discriminated because of your skin color?

A: “When I lived in Georgia, my school was predominantly white. One of my teachers thought that I was not as literate as the other kids, so she put me into a class so that I could learn English again. But English is my first language. I noticed that everyone else in the class was black. Later, I took a state placement test. I got a 98%.”

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long. My goal is to consistently add to the community which I am a part of. I also like to share the types of contributions that that community has made. What I do specifically during that month is look at what other organizations are doing so that I can spread that information. But I think that if we put ourselves into a box, to where we are only discussing and celebrating it in one month, we are completely ignoring the purpose of having the month.”

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Q: What does Black History Month mean to you?

A: “Black History Month means, to me, that my color isn’t overlooked. For a month, I feel pretty great about myself. I feel that black figures have done so much to improve our country and they deserve to be recognized. We only have one month where our colors matter, and it sucks that it’s the shortest month of the year, but it means everything to me. I’m proud of my color, it makes me more confident and it’s what makes me ‘Black Magic.’”

it sucks that it’s the shortest month of the year, but it means everything.

A: “I celebrate this month by

expressing my color and wearing statements to educate others. Also by thanking my fellow historical black figures to getting me here, and my parents for raising me to be super happy about my color.”

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Q: How do you celebrate Black History Month?

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MORE VOICES Faculty and students voice their opinions on Black History Month and currents issues black people face

Q: What does Black History Month mean to you?

Rhapsody Barbrow Morgan Smith (Government) (senior)

A: “Black History Month, to me,

Q: What struggles have you experienced as a black teacher in Loudoun County?

Q: What does Black History Month mean to you?

A: “Not having a lot of representation

great month of the year for us to recognize all the attributes and things that our fellow black people have done in the past, and how it’s helping us now.”

with other teachers and myself. There’s a lot of topics that we cover in government that I feel like I’m the only person that can speak to if we’re talking about racism or if we’re talking about gender equality, because I’m the only one. It can get lonely, not having someone else to be able to bounce ideas off. When Madison Trust came up, I’m the go-to person to talk about it and there are times when I wish there were more diversity within the school system so that kids have other people they can talk to, look up too, ask questions of, and be examples of for our community.”

Q: What obstacles do black women face?

A: “What I’ve learned is that I can’t get upset. It’s hard for a black women to get angry because when Serena Williams was angry or upset at any point during her match, it automatically went to the idea of the angry black woman. I’m pretty laid back, but whenever I get upset the first reaction is that I’ve went to ‘black mom mode.’ It’s never taken seriously. It’s either used as a meme or something that people will be intimidated and afraid of.”

A: “I think Black History Month is a

Q: What obstacles do you think black people face in this country?

A: “We face everything, even though they say racism is no longer a thing. [I feel] we are constantly being discriminated against in the workplace and in public. We go through police brutality. We have to work harder than any other race to get half as much as they do.”

We have to work harder than any other race to get half as much as they do

Q: What obstacles do black people face in Loudoun County?

A: “Well because Loudoun County

means celebrating the good things that African Americans have contributed to society. It’s a good month to reflect upon the success of our culture.” -senior Lauryn Kyser

A: “Black History Month to me is a time where black people are able to celebrate our ancestry and educate those who may not know of our black excellence.” -senior Ryyana Cunningham

A: “It’s a point of reflection in terms of how far we’ve gone as people and how far we have to go to be able to still become members of this contributing society.” - Mr. Gregory Spurlock

Q: Name a black person that inspires you.

A: “I respect everyone that took the courage to stand for racial equality.” -senior Kenneth Coleman

Q: What special characteristics do black people have?

A: “Perseverance. We’ve come from bad times and even though they aren’t all the way good, they’ve gotten better. We wouldn’t make it this far without perseverance, determination, and faith.” -Mr. Jason McDonald

A: “We can have our hair curly or straight. Our hair grows up instead of down.” -freshman Haley Townsend

doesn’t have as many black people as Q: What black person inspires other counties, I feel like black you? A: “I’m inspired by my mom, she’s not students have to work harder to prove

Q: What obstacles do you think black

famous, but what she’s been able to do-growing up in the 60s in Harlem and where she is now -- is something that I strive towards being ... Serena Williams because I’ve always wanted to be like her because GOAT.”

get a job at a rec facility. He had to cut his dreads because they didn’t want him working with them.” -junior Darius Mayo

themselves in the classroom and in sports. There’s not as many black teachers.”

people face in Loudoun County?

A: “Getting jobs. My cousin tried to

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PREPPING FOR PROM The behind the scenes of making a magical night BY: Rida Ali & Elise Tsao

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o, what’s the deal with prom, anyway? It is given so much credence by high school students; many look forward to this day from their freshman year. According to senior Thomas Clark, “[Prom] is much more formal [than Homecoming] ... I think [it’s] really cool that they are able to outsource the location. It’s a high-quality event, and the school does a good job at it.” In the years past, Rock Ridge’s Senior Prom has traditionally been held in the Marriott hotel, but the number of the potential attendees this year poses a major problem, according

Pho to c our tesy

officer Sarah Omari said. “The venue itself is really spectacular -- we wanted a theme that fits with that. We didn’t want some theme where we had to have so many decorations that took away from the beauty of the actual room,” Storm said. The night is one to remember. “[Promgoers] should be excited for this special night; it’s going be an experience that they haven’t had before,” Storm said. Students should anticipate the “that first moment when they walk into the ballroom and they see that this prom is different from all the other proms that they’ve had; it’s a really special event.”

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to junior class sponsor Ashley Storm, who sponsors the planning committee with Susan Spengeman. “We didn’t have too many choices, but we like to be in Loudoun Countyand [Bellevue Conference and Event Center] was recommended to us, and then we went for a visit, and Ms. Spengeman and I -we were both like, ‘We have to have our prom here, it's so amazing; the kids will love this.’” Despite the initial difficulty in finding a place to host, the chosen location went hand-in-hand with the theme. The theme, Ever After, which stems from the notion that prom is a fairy-tale experience, features a color scheme of rose gold and white. The venue, which boasts high ceilings and a staircase, exudes grandeur. “It’s exactly how you picture Cinderella walking into the ball,” Storm said. The setting plays a huge role in the atmosphere. “We look at the venue, and think about what theme would look nice in that venue,” junior class

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Prom-ise Me?

Your helpful guide to promposal, by a sophomore. Better than the WikiHow. BY: Elise Tsao

Establish a country for your date - Creating an independent state not only shows true dedication, but it’s also a guaranteed way to become Prom King and Queen (of a sort). Although it may seem ambitious, the process is much simpler than most think. First, find territory; you may have to conquer some land. This is also the best way to get the attention of both your date and rival nations. Second, declare independence; this may be lumped in with the first step, if you opted to conquer land. Third, gain recognition from the United Nations (UN) or another international power -- it may be difficult to show the required “love of peace” if you used force to establish territory. According to international law, there are four basic requirements for a state: (1) a permanent population, (2) a defined territory, (3) a government, (4) and the capacity to enter into relations with other states. If your prom date says no -- in hindsight, this may be highly plausible, given the circumstances -- who cares? You’ll get to exercise your inner megalomaniac over your own country; who thinks about high school prom after that?

Establish a country

Buy all the advertising space in the next news magazine Promposing via the ads in your (free) student newspaper -- “The Blaze” -- means killing two birds with one stone: You get a date, and you get to support your valued fellow students. You could even say this is a shameless self prom-o. Ad space in our quarterly news magazine ranges from $100 for 1/16 of a page to $750 for a full page advertisement. (Contact us at rockridgehsnews@gmail.com for more details)

Advertise in the newspaper

Take your date to the stars - Fewer than 600 people have been in space, probably because costs range from $500,000 to $8.7 million, just to get on the waitlist. Fortunately, for the less affluent (and less patient), it is possible to send a picture of you and a loved one to the Kármán line -- a point in the atmosphere 62 miles above sea level -- for a mere $6.95. What says “date me” more than sending an image of your crush to space to be memorialized forever? (See www.photospace.com for more details)

Take them to the stars Blow your date away with a fireworks display Experience as a pyrotechnician is generally required to gain a license to operate large fireworks. The law regarding the colorful explosives vary by state, but as with anything, ignoring the rules simplify things significantly. It is worth noting here that being caught will result in a Class 1 Misdemeanor, but what’s the worst that could happen? As with anything regarding promposal, optimism is always recommended.

Blow them away

Commission a your date a sculpture - What better way is there to show genuine affection than to commission a life-size sculpture? This versatile way of memorializing something also comes with a plethora of mediums: chocolate, sand, or the more traditional marble or bronze. Unlike many high school relationships, your statue will last forever. (See www.hanlonsculpture.com, www.sandsculpture.com, or www.bigstatues.com for more details.)

Organize a flash mob Unfortunately, organizing a flash mob means you actually need friends. For the more aloof, there are flash mobs available for hire, if you think your ego can take the hit. Prices are upwards of $600 based on the number of people, although you may want to gain prior approval from the proprietor of the location. Dazzling your date with a flash mob? It’s a sure bet.

Organize a flash mob

Commission a Sculpture

*This piece is a work of satire. Follow any advice at your own risk.

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DON’T HATE IT, JUST DEBATE IT

Debate contends for victory at Broad Run and Metro Finals Contests BY: Megha Korpol & Elise Tsao

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he 2018-2019 Rock Ridge debate season is coming to an end, with many partnerships in Public Forum (PF) and individuals in LincolnDouglas (LD) advancing to Metro Finals. This competitive tournament took place on March 9. Junior Megha Vasudevan placed second at the Broad Run Invitational in the LD division. In her second year of debate, she has already become cocaptain for the LD sector, where she plays a decisive leadership role. “I like to talk, and I like to argue,” Vasudevan said. “Competitive debate helps me do both of those in a professional environment.” She further elaborated that she joined LD because“it helps teach me a lot of skills, like how to research something, and how to write a cohesive case, especially in LincolnDouglas,” which “places more importance on the ethics of something.” Junior Pranav Addepalli, the vice president of debate, and junior Surya Mamidiyala, one of the PF co-captains, also recently placed second in PF varsity at the Broad Run Invitational and qualified for Metros. “I joined debate because I wanted to have an opportunity to concentrate the argumentative and passionate spirit I have,” Addepalli said. The two competed together at Metro Finals and earned third place in the varsity division. From here, they will move on to compete at nationals. “It’s going to be a lot of work, but I’m really excited and ready to get going when the topic comes out. It’s going to be a great experience even if we don’t do well,” Addepalli said about the upcoming nationals tournament. Addepalli, who plans to run for president in the 20192020 debate season, wants to see the

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Rock Ridge debate team prosper. “Hopefully our team can become one of the real powerhouses in the district, like Oakton. We already have some really strong teams and being able to hone our skills and help the rest of the team will be amazing,” Addepalli said. Sophomore Dylan Green, who also competed in Metro Finals, has been on the LD debate team for two years now. “I just thought it was interesting, and I wanted to do law for a while, and liked the morality aspect,” Green said regarding his decision to join debate. This was Green’s first year

I like to talk, and I like to argue; competitive debate helps me do both. - Junior Megha Vasudevan

competing at Metro Finals. Rashmi Francis and Mihika Rao, a team of sophomores on the PF side, said, “We both really enjoyed public speaking and arguing. After we went to the initial meeting, we really enjoyed the team environment. It’s a really cohesive team.” They competed in Metro Finals for the first time in the JV division. Sophomores Millie Pandya and Aarnav Arni are a first-year debate team, but they have already progressed to debating at the varsity level and competing at Metro Finals. “It’s the people that spend all their time researching and doing mock trials that end up succeeding,” said Pandya.

Akshath Mahajan and Hrishik Chada, a sophomore PF team, competed in varsity Metro Finals, earning seventh place, and are advancing to nationals. “I like the environment and the fact that in the round, everyone is your worst enemy, but right after you forge long lasting friendships,” said Mahajan. Sophomores Ashwin Lanka and Rahul Kumar, a pair of second-year debaters, have also dominated in tournaments this past season. Both individuals were successful last year with different partners, but ultimately decided the best thing to do for the 2018-2019 season was to partner up with each other. They have worked hard to earn two half bids and qualify for Metros. “I enjoy debate because I can get a diverse knowledge about the world,” Lanka said. This is the Rock Ridge debate team’s fifth year, and they are one of the largest teams in its circuit. “I’ve formed such tight bonds with friends, leaders, and alumni that I know I can count on for things not just for debate,” Addepalli concluded.

Pranav Addepalli and Surya Mamidiyala pose for a photo after placing second at the Broad Run Invitational. “I’m excited for next year and helping the team become even better and really leaving a good legacy,” Addepalli said.

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For updates, sneak peeks, and more, follow us on social media and check out our website!

@ROCKRIDGEHSNEWS

WWW.THEBLAZERRHS.COM Clubs and Organizations

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TO THE FINISH LINE

Freshman Ava Gordon isn’t just shattering school records -- she’s breaking national ones. Meet the fastest freshman in the U.S for the 1600-meter run.

BY: Rida Ali

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so proud of her because she worked so hard for it [her accomplishments]--she doesn’t give up, and that pushes the team to do the same.” Even when she isn’t competing, Gordon is always finding ways to contribute to the team. On Feb. 5, when the district meet took place at Rock Ridge, “she didn’t race...but she was out there for four hours helping the team and helping me out,” Schmidt said.

You are probably going to hit some walls, but you’re never going to hit a wall and not be able to get faster or be better. So just keep going. - Ava Gordon

ordon Ava G esy of court Photo

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In conjunction with school practices, Gordon runs an average of two to three miles before or after school every day to train. Schmidt explained that it is important for Gordon to slowly progress to reach where she needs to be; one can’t jump from doing two miles to doing eight miles. “If you consistently just put your effort in then you’ll just keep progressing,” Gordon said. Even though training is tough, Gordon looks forward to practices and enjoys running with her teammates. “You are probably going to hit some walls, but you’re never going to hit a wall and not be able to get faster or be better. So just keep going,” Gordon said.

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reshman Ava Gordon is one of the fastest freshman runners in the nation, smashing the school records in the 1000-meter and 1600meter run at her very first indoor track meet this year. She was named the fastest freshman in all of United States in the 1600-meter run and third fastest in the 1000-meter run, and she was recently named one of the top ten female runners from Northern Virginia (NOVA), D.C., and Maryland by Run Washington. Gordon has also qualified for nationals with a time of 5:09.56 in the 1600-meter run. “Ava is a young talented runner. Over this first part of her high school career, she’s excelled,” RRHS track and cross country coach Brian Schmidt said. Gordon did not start running until two years ago when her father, Daniel Gordon, asked her to give it a try. She was hesitant at first because she did not want to quit her lacrosse team, but she grew to enjoy running. Previous Rock Ridge record holder, Alex Gordon, Ava’s sister, encouraged her to try running as well. Running requires a lot of mental strength. Gordon encourages athletes to find ways to be motivated to run every day, because running consistently can be difficult. It is important to maintain a balance between school, sports, and social/personal life. Schmidt expressed that, as a coach, it is extremely important to him to help Gordon grow mentally and help keep a balance. In order to help sharpen her mental game, Schmidt coaches her through several scenarios he has experienced in his 20 years of coaching, to make sure she is prepared for any challenge heading her way. Sophomore teammate Sarah Chevraux admires Gordon’s humble personality and hard work. “We are all

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DIVING IN TO STATES The swim team conquers the heat(s) with strong season BY: Elise Tsao

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fter a wildly successful season in which they went completely undefeated, the Rock Ridge boys’ swim team won districts. At regionals on Feb. 2, however, the team lost their winning streak to slide into the stillcommendable second place spot. “I’d say that the most difficult part of the season so far was probably regionals; our boys did not win,” senior Vincent Le said. Sophomore Zach Mitarotonda echoed this sentiment. “We were a little bummed at regionals because we got second instead of winning. We’re pretty amped for states; we still have a good shot at winning states this year, which is a pretty big deal,” Mitarotonda said. Mitarotonda, who has been swimming competitively for eight years now, said that a major factor in the team’s success this year was that “this year we have freshmen, sophomores, and juniors; we just have more depth, more people swimming.”

He further elaborated on the hard work going on behind the success of the swim team. “Most mornings I’ll get up at 4:15, to go to practice in the mornings. Practice is from 5 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. And once I get to school, it’s just a normal day.” The athletes’ dedication paid off in records. On the boys’ side, junior Jacob Conway, freshman Bailey Deluise, junior Reese Fye, junior Trace Wall, and junior John Zapp all placed in individual races. Additionally, the boys took second the 200-meter medley relay. On the girls’ team, senior Emerson Davis and freshman Tatum Wall also placed; eighth in the 100meter butterfly stroke and second in the 100-meter freestyle stroke, respectively. The girls’ team placed fifth in the 200-meter freestyle relay and 8th in the 400 meter freestyle relay. On Feb. 16, the boys finished the record-breaking season as state runners-up.

BACK AT IT AGAIN Rock Ridge wrestlers return to states

BY: Kate Anarfi

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restling had an impeccable season, finishing with a record of 12 - 9. There were four students who went to states: senior Richard Wrenn, sophomore Yunus Gheyaszada, senior Greg Manternach, and senior Jason Braig. Despite the individual focus of the sport, the team stayed after extra days and ran drills to prepare their state qualifiers for the tough competition they were about to face. “Everyone on our team is very supportive of each other, and we are the only ones who can help each other, so we really just have formed that bond of support and trust,” sophomore Colby Williams said. Manternach came first in the 195 lb weight class. “Greg really pushed himself in practice the whole year. He had a goal in mind and was not going to let anyone or anything get in the way of that. He was always looking for a coach to talk to and learn from each of his matches,” Coach Patrick Nufable said. “I was nervous, but confident, in myself going into states this year it was tougher than last year, but I think I improved, so I was able to overcome that,” Manternach said.

The boys’ swim team beams after states on Feb. 15. “We got second instead of winning (above) Senior Greg Manternach backpoints [at regionals] we wanted to have a perfect season,” said Mitarotonda prior to the his opponent on the first day of states. competition. The team finished the 2018-2019 season as state runners-up. Photo by Kate Anarfi Photo courtesy of Zack Mitarotonda

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B R E A K. . .ING THE BOREDOM T V S H O W S M O V I E S

staffer opinion

Over the break, I’ll be watching TV shows like “The Office,” “Blue Planet ll,” and “America’s Next Top Model.” I’ve watched these shows before, but I enjoy rewatching them. -Taylor Dorsett

“Bodyguard” is a show that has been picked up recently by Netflix as a Netflix original, starring Richard Madden. The show is about a veteran who is in charge of being the bodyguard of a high ranked government official. Overall, the show is really suspenseful and filled with action, dealing with corruption within the government. -Bianca Alvarez

“Narcos.” It’s a lengthy series with a lot of plot twists and action-packed events. I’ve been watching it for about a month now, and I’m currently on Season Three, Episode One. On Netflix, I would say I’m most likely to binge “Narcos: Mexico,” “Somewhere Between,” and “Criminal Minds” over the break. -Maya Barbour

“Umbrella Academy” it came out recently, and I had read the comics in 2016, so naturally I had to watch it. It’s been really good so far. I’ve been slowly watching it since it came out last month, and I’m [on] episode six now. There’s only one season out right now, though. There are some really good binge-worthy shows on Netflix, like the “Haunting of Hill House,” “Arrested Development,” and “House.” -Ryyan Claps

“Lilo and Stitch,” because Stitch is adorable. The movie shows the relationship between 2 very different characters coming together and supporting and loving each other. Its also a classic movie so you can never go wrong with it. -Samantha Desousa

“The Dark Knight Rises” is a good movie. It has action and drama as well as having the greatest acting performance ever by Heath Ledger. The Joker and Batman are just overall iconic characters. -Nehal Huq

LOVE, ROSIE staffer opinion

staffer opinion

“Netflix has tons of good movies, like “The Dark Knight Rises,” “The Girl in the Photographs,” and “13 Cameras.” Personally, I really liked “13 Cameras” because it was scary and suspenseful and the ending was a cliffhanger. A sequel was recently released, called “14 Cameras,” so I’ll probably watch it over the break.” -Taylor Dorsett

It’s a bit more of a “girly” movie, however, “Love, Rosie” is a really good film starring Lily Collins and Sam Claflin. It’s about two best friends who create all these plans, but an unexpected thing occurs that shapes Rosie's life forever. You see how their friendship grows from when they were younger, to how they are as adults. They overcome the obstacles they face such as love and death. It’s considered a romantic movie, but it's great if you're having a night in. -Bianca Alvarez

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Rock Ridge seniors give their recommendations on how to end your spring break boredom through...tv shows, movies, music, and places to visit.

By: Bianca Alvarez & Taylor Dorsett

Photos courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

staffer opinion

staffer opinion

I’ve been listening to Ariana Grande’s “Sweetener” album as well as her “thank u, next” album on repeat recently. I also listen to certain songs like “Faneto” by Chief Keef, “CANTU” by Amine, and “Broken Clocks” by SZA all the time. -Taylor Dorsett

staffer opinion

The best song to listen to over break is definitely “The Way It Goes” by Hippo Campus. That song is the perfect relaxing but upbeat song that I can just imagine listening to with the windows down while you’re either with your friends or driving alone because it just overall is a happy song. -Bianca Alvarez

Lately, I’ve been listening to mostly R&B music such as Khalid’s “Suncity” album. Some of my favorite songs at the moment are “Sucker” by The Jonas Brothers, “7 rings” by Ariana Grande, and “Salvation” by Gabrielle Aplin. -Tasnia Chowdhury

“Caged bird” by J. Cole is a good song to listen to because of the message. The message it sends is powerful and relates to prison reform. It’s also good because the flow of the song is really mellow and chill. -Anis Shanneb

staffer opinion

Even if you aren’t going anywhere, D.C. has great places that you can visit over the break. The Artechouse has an “In Peak Bloom” exhibition that brings spring alive on a screen, and it’s stunning. It opens on March 20th and doesn’t end until mid-May. -Taylor Dorsett

If you’re not going anywhere for break, Middleburg, VA is such a cute place to go visit for a day with your friends. It’s close by and more relaxed if you don’t feel like going to a city like D.C. It’s filled with little stores, restaurants, and hole-in-the-wall type places. They have a resort that's open to the public called The Salamander; they have a nice open area to enjoy the view and just relax with friends. -Bianca Alvarez

Compass Coffee in D.C. is a 2 great place to visit because it’s a cozy place with great drinks. It’s fun to sit in there because there is enough space for a lot of people, but it's also good if you're on the go in the city. I usually get one of their lattes, like an almond one or gingerbread when it's seasonal. Their matcha is a pretty good drink too. -Hannah Ark

Song Byrd in D.C. is a record cafe, which allows you to order food and you can shop around for vinyls. It’s also a music venue for concerts at night for smaller acts. I like going, because I like music and looking at different vinyls. -Miki Peng

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Profile for RockRidgeHS News

Volume II | Issue II | Feb/March  

Rock Ridge High School's Student Newspaper, Volume II, Issue II. Take a look at how our community celebrates the importance and influence of...

Volume II | Issue II | Feb/March  

Rock Ridge High School's Student Newspaper, Volume II, Issue II. Take a look at how our community celebrates the importance and influence of...

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