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giving back:

FROM THE SIERRA TO THE SEA 2014 A N N UA L REPORT

B AY. O R G


TABLE OF CONTENTS F R O M T H E C E O ............................................................................. 4 F R O M T H E C H A I R M A N O F T H E B O A R D . ....................................... 5 2014 E X E C U T I V E L E A D E R S H I P ..................................................... 6 B AY. O R G ........................................................................................ 8 A Q UA R I U M O F T H E B AY ............................................................. 1 0 B AY M O B I L E ............................................................................ 1 2 H Y B R I D F E R R Y ....................................................................... 1 3 T R O U T I N T H E C L A S S R O O M .................................................. 1 3 S E A L I O N C E N T E R ....................................................................... 1 4 E CO C E N T E R AT H E R O N ’ S H E A D PA R K . . ...................................... 1 6 B AY M O D E L A L L I A N C E ............................................................... 1 8 T H E B AY I N S T I T U T E .................................................................... 2 0 B AY R E S TO R AT I O N . . ............................................................... 2 2 R I V E R S A N D D E LTA ................................................................ 2 2 CO A S T A N D O C E A N ............................................................... 2 3 T H E B AY I N S T I T U T E AWA R D S C E R E M O N Y ............................ 2 4 S A N F R A N C I S CO B AY G A L A .................................................. 2 5 2014 F I N A N C I A L S ....................................................................... 2 6 P R O G R E S S I N CO N S E R VAT I O N .............................................. 2 8 D O N O R S A N D S U P P O R T E R S . . ..................................................... 3 0 S U P P O R T E R S P OT L I G H T ........................................................ 3 0 D O N O R S ................................................................................. 3 2 V O LU N T E E R S . . ........................................................................ 3 6


FROM

THE CEO J O H N F R AW L E Y As our work evolves in tandem with the changing world,

also been working to build three new divisions to help

we always keep our mission in sight: We must protect

us reach new audiences: with the Sea Lion Center, the

our Bay and the water that sustains it. If we fail at this

Bay Model Alliance, and the EcoCenter at Heron’s Head

mission, we risk losing not just vital natural resources,

Park. Together, these five environmental divisions carry

but our ecological heritage—our very identity. We

out vital conservation and education work under the

cannot let these things disappear to the ages, which is

shared umbrella of bay.org.

why we are, at our heart, a conservation organization focused on reaching people.

We can do so much more when we act together, and that’s what bay.org is all about: doing more than ever

This year, we underwent tremendous growth in

to inspire collaboration and unite the Bay Area with a

pursuit of our mission to protect, restore, and

collective voice and singular vision.

inspire conservation of San Francisco Bay and its watershed, from the Sierra to the sea, with the goal of engaging more people in the conversation. As you know, Aquarium of the Bay has partnered with The Bay Institute to become one of the top 10 AZAaccredited zoos and aquariums in the nation in terms of conservation, spending more than 10 percent of our revenue to protect the wild ecosystems that belong to our animal ambassadors. What we need is a collective push to protect San

I hope that as you read through our annual report, you’ll be inspired by our vision to protect the natural world we celebrate at Aquarium of the Bay, Sea Lion Center, Bay Model Alliance, and EcoCenter at Heron’s Head Park, and which we fight to defend at The Bay Institute. I hope you’ll join us in this growing movement of collaboration and conservation, and help secure a natural legacy that we will be proud to pass on to the next generation. Warm regards,

Francisco Bay and its watershed—a stretch of land that encompasses 40 percent of the state of California. And so, while our scientists at The Bay Institute continue their tenacious efforts to safeguard our imperiled rivers, upholding legal victories secured more than a decade ago, and while Aquarium of the Bay’s naturalists have educated more students than ever before, we have

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John Frawley President and CEO of bay.org


FROM THE

CHAIRMAN BOARD STEVEN MACHTINGER This past year was momentous for our organization and

approach, our organization is becoming more and

for our mission as we merged The Bay Institute into

more like the ecosystem we strive to protect and honor.

The Bay Institute Aquarium Foundation and renamed the combined organization bay.org. This formally completes the ambitious integration begun when we brought the two organizations together in 2009—an enormous undertaking that demanded huge amounts of adaptability, endurance, and shared desire to continue evolving into a better version of ourselves.

Ironically, as our organization has grown in strength, our mission has become more challenging. Our research shows that the single most important ingredient for a healthy Bay is the sufficient flow of fresh water from the rivers and streams of the Sierra Nevada Mountains into the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta and through the Bay into the Pacific Ocean. For decades, the health

bay.org now serves as the umbrella organization for five

of this system has been compromised by unsustainable

vibrant divisions—The Bay Institute, Aquarium of the Bay,

water projects that divert these flows to municipal,

the Sea Lion Center, the Bay Model Alliance, and the

industrial, and agricultural uses. The effects of climate

EcoCenter at Heron’s Head Park. Each year, these

change and a drought of historic proportions have added

divisions connect hundreds of thousands of Bay Area

to this problem; impending sea-level rise will exacerbate

children, adults, educators, and visitors to the ecosystem

it still further.

we call home: San Francisco Bay and its watershed, from the Sierra to the sea.

As policymakers strive to address the system’s limitations and the demands of competing constituencies, it is

Through these organizational changes, we have created

increasingly vital that our voices be heard to express our

a new kind of environmental group: an entrepreneurial

love for the Bay and to advocate for its needs. With your

enterprise focused on collaboration toward the shared

support, bay.org can elevate those voices still further—

goal of conserving and celebrating the wonders and

lending momentum and volume to a growing movement of

beauties of the Bay ecosystems. Our divisions provide

people who truly appreciate the value of the Bay, and the

up-close encounters with the creatures that populate

lives that depend on it.

our watershed; conduct scientific research on how our ecosystems work; educate the public about the stressors that threaten our environmental health; and advocate for sensible policies that will protect our natural

Steven Machtinger bay.org Board Chair

resources. With this systemic and interconnected

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LEADERSHIP B OA R D O F D I R E C TO R S A S O F D E C E M B E R 2014 St e ve n M a c h t i n g e r, C h a i r Nancy Carlson, First Vice Chair Will Wolcot t, Second Vice Chair Dean Morehous, Secretary A i m e e B r o w n , Tr e a s u r e r Ellen Adams Ben Bleiman Kay Carney Ethel Daly Harrison “Hap” C. Dunning Deirdre “Derry” H. Henderson Carol Lind Captain Peter McIsaac Scooter Simmons M o r g a n Ta r r Derith Wisnom

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BAY.ORG In 2009, seeking to reach a broader audience, The Bay Institute acquired Aquarium O UR M ISSI O N IS TO PR OT EC T, R E S TO R E,

of the Bay, transforming the privately owned aquarium into a nonprofit marine nature center for the Bay, on the Bay. The Aquarium’s exhibits provided an inspiring window to San Francisco Bay’s diverse but imperiled ecosystems and wildlife,

AN D INSPI R E

allowing us to engage and educate the next generation of watershed stewards

CO NSERVAT I O N O F

while supporting vital research and policy work at The Bay Institute. Last year we

SAN FR AN CISCO BAY

began expanding on that integrated approach, acquiring new vectors of outreach

AN D I T S WAT ER SH ED,

to increase our impact.

FR OM T H E SIER R A

In April of 2014, bay.org acquired 501(c)(3) status, doing business as Aquarium of

TO T H E SE A .

the Bay, The Bay Institute, the Sea Lion Center, the EcoCenter at Heron’s Head Park, and the Bay Model Alliance. By merging these five divisions under the bay.org umbrella, we’ve been able to optimize administrative and programmatic activities by sharing staff expertise, combining business operations, and coordinating development activities. Strengthened by the passion of our supporters and the scope of our new bay.org collaborative model, we’re continuing to fight for the long-term environmental needs of our native waterways. bay.org’s goal is to protect our environment—defending it from harm, restoring it to health, and inspiring individuals and institutions throughout the Bay Area to join in the effort. Our coalition of five divisions addresses issues that impact the Bay and its unique ecosystems, making us a powerhouse of watershed research, education, and advocacy. Our innovative network of institutions is leading efforts to improve water quality standards, leveraging policy to protect native species and restore wetlands, operating a mobile classroom to help educate underserved youth, creating inspirational live-animal exhibits viewed by thousands, working with Bay Area restaurants to provide sustainable seafood information and training, and so much more. Together, we inspire and empower more than a million people annually—offering the excitement of discovery while encouraging an appreciation of the natural world, and ultimately instilling the wonder that will prepare a new generation of stewards for the local environment.

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Aquarium of the Bay is San Francisco Bay’s Aquarium. Passionate about providing unforgettable encounters with the natural world, and with an iconic waterfront location at the edge of the city, the Aquarium offers a unique view of the Bay, both above and below the water. Experience live encounters with more than 30,000 animals, from sharks and bat rays to river otters, all of which are native to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Watershed. sea lion center offers interpretive programs to complement one of San Francisco’s most popular attractions: the congregation of wild California sea lions at PIER 39. From late summer to late spring, hundreds of these iconic animals lounge on floating wooden rafts at K-Dock, attracting more than six million visitors a year. The Sea Lion Center offers daily presentations to teach visitors about these amazing animals, their role in the ecosystem, and how they are affected by our actions. The EcoCenter at Heron's Head Park focuses on environmental education and public outreach, connecting people with the beauty of San Francisco’s wild landscapes and promoting sustainable resource use, environmental justice, and experiential learning in a completely off-the-grid, LEED Platinum/Zero Net Energy building. The Bay Model Alliance, a partnership between the Bay Model Visitor Center and bay.org, is a waterfront education center administered by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. It showcases a working hydraulic model of the San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta System, offering visitors a visual tool to learn about the San Francisco BayDelta Watershed system and its connection to the Pacific Ocean. The Bay institute develops and leads scientific research, education, and advocacy programs aimed at the preservation of the watershed, including the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers and their tributaries, Suisun Marsh, San Pablo Bay, San Francisco Bay, and nearshore ocean waters.

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AQUARIUM OF THE BAY Situated on the San Francisco waterfront and home to more than 30,000 local marine and terrestrial animals, including species threatened with extinction, Aquarium of the Bay is a catalyst for conservation of the nature in and around the Bay and its watershed. A linchpin in bay.org’s collaborative partnerships, Aquarium of the Bay showcases native animals in engaging and personal ways. Each year, more than

events are also designed to

“Bay.org’s Aquarium of the Bay is an inspiring example of how zoos and aquariums are transforming into conservationbased organizations. Over 10% of their entire budget goes back to protecting wildlife in wild places.”

nurture emotional connections

—Congressman Jared Huffman

500,000 people visit and participate in Aquarium activities. In addition to introducing guests to the wonders of our native aquatic wildlife and habitats, our exhibits, programs, and

that can transform into powerful personal and political action. Our education programs are always free of charge, and reach more than 20,000 students each year across all nine Bay Area counties. Over

60% of our students come from low-income and marginalized communities, and more than 5% have special needs. Curricula, which are aligned to both California State Science Standards as well as the Next Generation Science Standards, stress the importance of hands-on learning and appreciation for the natural world. We bring family and community events to neighborhoods throughout the Bay Area, working both independently and in collaboration with our bay.org partners. Our research and development efforts, which focus on saltwater species, are grounded in peer-reviewed science. Our goal is to create accurate habitats and foster healthy animals that will engage and inspire visitors. Aquarium of the Bay, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), is a member of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA), and is certified as a Green Business by the city of San Francisco.

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TH I S YE AR’S H I G H LI GH T S • For Coastal Cleanup day, coordinated 11 sites along the East side of San Francisco, including Heron’s Head Park, in collaboration with California Coastal Commission and Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy. • Installed a new Voting for Conservation exhibit to highlight our commitment to shark research, shoreline cleanups, healthy rivers, and K–12 education. • Transformed the river otter collection, sending two otters to other AZA-accredited institutions to participate in breeding programs and acquiring two new captive-born river otters. • Conducted thorough “contact training” with new river otters, training them to target, move into enclosure, kennel, present paw, and remain motionless for blood draws—all to facilitate care with minimum stress for these watershed ambassadors. • Presented the Aquarium’s first annual Predation Celebration special event. For 15 days we focused on food-web education, highlighting sea stars, river otters, and sharks with specific activities for each animal. • Helped organize and present at the Fisherman’s Wharf Sustainable Seafood Initiative workshop for approximately 25 chefs and fishermen. • Facilitated an underwater evening event for Dive Heart, an international organization that teaches SCUBA diving to children, adults, and veterans with disabilities. • Published articles and peer-reviewed documents in professional settings and journals. • Completed the concept planning and design of the Discovery Zone outside the Aquarium’s entrance and installed new flooring, paint, graphics, benches, live plants, and decorative items.

BY THE N U M BERS

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PRO GR AM H I GH LI GHT S B AY M O B I L E “I have been bringing

For teachers in the San Francisco Bay Area, Aquarium of the Bay’s BayMobile is

my Kindergarten

an amazing new educational gift: It brings the Bay and ocean to their students free

classes to Aquarium

of charge, helping many educators challenged with taking their students out of the

of the Bay since 2007, along with the other three Kindergarten classes at my school. Every year it is one of the best field trips we

classroom on a field trip. Launched in March 2014 with a grant from the Metropolitan Transportation Commission and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District’s Spare the Air Youth grant program, the BayMobile is a traveling lab that brings free, hour-long programs to students in all nine Bay Area counties (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma).

take. [We] find that

Staffed by a team of education experts from Aquarium of the Bay, and bringing

after seeing, touching

along animal ambassadors such as sea stars, hermit crabs, turtles, and snakes, this

and learning about

mobile classroom is a magnet for excitement and hands-on exploration. These free

the animals in the bay during their aquarium visit, students make connections to the actions they can take in their daily lives to protect the bay…. We deeply appreciate that Aquarium of the Bay offers free admission to our many lowincome students. This free field trip opportunity opens doors for students in so many ways.” —Gretchen Schuessler, L.R. Flynn Elementary School, San Francisco

programs focus on how climate change is affecting the San Francisco Bay watershed and include immersive science experiments. Activities—such as watching the pH change while blowing air through a straw into a cup of water—illustrate for students exactly how ocean acidification is happening along our coasts. Students are also engaged in discussing what they can do in their everyday lives to help combat climate change, such as using public transportation, buying locally grown food, and using less electricity at home. All courses meet Next Generation Science Standards and have been developed for all grade levels, from kindergarten through high school. In addition to the BayMobile’s school visits, the team has also made popular appearances at libraries, summer camps, and public events, including those at other bay.org affiliates such as the Bay Model in Sausalito and the EcoCenter at Heron’s Head Park in the Bayview–Hunters Point neighborhood of San Francisco. With continued support, BayMobile educators expect to bring their messages of conservation and stewardship to more than 13,000 students and families in the greater Bay Area each year.

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HYBRID FERRY Since 2011, Aquarium of the Bay has partnered

how the boat derives its energy from renewable

with Alcatraz Cruises to offer an innovative program

resources, and more. Students learn about the

that focuses on learning about the Bay. Supported

ecology of the Bay, the history of its waters, the

by a grant from the John and Marcia Goldman

impact of climate change, and what they can do

Foundation, this unique educational experience has

to protect this vital resource.

been updated to align with California State Science Standards and Next Generation Science Standards

The excursion culminates in a visit to Aquarium of the Bay, where the experience of learning about the Bay from above the water is enriched by a

HORNBLOWER AND ALCATRAZ CRUISES

are proud to collaborate with Aquarium

guided tour offering underwater views of more than

30,000 local marine animals.

of the Bay on this educational cruise around San Francisco Bay, educating thousands of students who will serve as the torchbearers for conservation, sustainability, and protection of the environment for decades to come. —Denise Rasmussen, Alcatraz Cruises, LLC

T ROU T IN T HE CL A SSRO OM In partnership with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Aquarium of the Bay helps support educators by providing equipment, supplies, training, and support for K–12 Trout

for students in grades 5 through 8. This generous

in the Classroom projects.

funding has also helped us partner with Dr. Sylvia

Offered statewide, the project trains and helps

Earle to produce an inspirational introductory video

teachers set up and run chilled-water aquariums

focused on exploration of the Bay for all students to

in their classrooms. Fertilized trout eggs are

watch once onboard the vessel. In 2014 we offered

delivered to prepared classes, where students

38 Hybrid Ferry field trips to Bay Area students and

watch the eggs hatch, learn about the development

hosted a Teacher Appreciation sailing adventure for

of the fry, and sometimes take the baby fish to

83 participants, all free of charge.

nearby streams to be released into the wild.

During the school year, a team of educators

The experience of watching a baby fish

take students on 4-hour excursions aboard the

emerge from a tiny orange egg is life-changing

Hornblower Hybrid, the nation’s first hybrid-

for many students, who would not normally be

technology ferry. Once aboard, expert naturalists

able to see the process firsthand. In the course

offer an immersive learning experience that

of their studies, students learn about the fish’s

introduces students to multiple facets of the

anatomy, adaptations, life cycle, and habitat, and

San Francisco Bay and its natural surroundings.

discover how their own actions can affect the

Interactive learning stations aboard the vessel

aquatic environment.

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SEA LION CENTER On January 17, bay.org celebrated the Grand Opening of the Sea Lion Center, one

“We stopped in to see the sea lions and we stuck around for over an hour! We watched

of its newest divisions, and one with strong ties to Aquarium of the Bay. The new nature center, made possible by the generosity of the Bar Pilots, Harvey and Gail Glasser, and PIER 39, overlooks PIER 39’s K-Dock hangout, where large groups of barking, rambunctious sea lions have made their home since 1989.

the sea lions and took

While hundreds of gregarious sea lions making themselves at home at the edge

in an educational

of the urban landscape might once have been considered a nuisance, today

class at the Sea Lion Center. My children learned about their habitat and how humans [affect] their lives. They also learned about conservation and their rehabilitation center. My kids came home [and] have saved the sea lion center camera as their ‘Favorites’ on their tablets and watch the sea lions every day.” —Aggie, online reviewer

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they have become a major tourist attraction, and a great opportunity for bay.org staff to reach out to the public. Recognizing that the presence of these wild marine mammals offers a valuable educational opportunity, Sea Lion Center staff have developed programs and activities that focus on the sea lions and their environment—in particular, cleaning up the ocean landscape by removing derelict fishing gear, eradicating plastics and pollutants, and making the public aware of their own personal connection with the Bay. Open daily, and offering free admission, the Center features interactive exhibits, classroom facilities, educational presentations, and one-on-one interactions with staff naturalists. The Sea Lion Center has become a great favorite of the public, and is dedicated to educating visitors about the city’s famously raucous residents, the environment in which they live, and conservation efforts to protect them.


T H I S YE AR’S H I G H LI GH T S • Presented Grand Opening celebrations introducing the new Sea Lion Center to the public. • In celebration of World Oceans Day, presented activities focusing on the dangers of marine debris. • Hosted San Francisco Bar Pilots for a collaborative staff training. • Developed new classroom programs for visitors, all aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards and provided free of charge. • As part of the NOAA Fishing for Energy grant, introduced a new presentation titled Sea Lions and the Ghosts Below and commissioned a video focusing on reducing derelict fishing gear in our oceans. The video was accepted into the San Francisco International Ocean Film Festival.

BY T HE N U M BERS

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THE ECOCENTER AT HERON'S HEAD PARK The EcoCenter is a living classroom—an amazing space for environmental education,

“One of the greatest spots in California to learn about water conservation, waste

public outreach, and connecting people with the beauty of San Francisco’s wild landscapes. It was the first LEED Platinum/Zero Net Energy building in San Francisco and the first LEED certified building in Bayview–Hunters Point. Supported in part by the Hanley Foundation, the EcoCenter is completely off the grid and showcases best

treatment, renewable

practices in solutions to human impact on the environment. It has become a model for

energy, biodiversity,

green building, sustainable resource use, and experiential learning.

green infrastructure, conservation, and environmental justice. A true Gem :)” —Laurie S., online reviewer

The newest addition to bay.org’s growing conservation collaborative, the EcoCenter has emerged as an organization dedicated to empowering youth through experimentation and education, focusing on understanding principles of environmental justice and sustainability. With a grant from the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, College of San Francisco Sustainability 91 students and

5 City

5 high school students from

Southeast San Francisco were accepted as paid interns. These summer interns learned about the EcoCenter’s sustainable design features, explored green job opportunities, and created a short video about water conservation. In addition,

8 students from City

College of San Francisco joined the Center for a fall school-term internship program. These students, who were enrolled in the “Applied Research in Sustainability” work experience course, received credit for spending

120+ hours at the EcoCenter

throughout the semester. Throughout the year, the EcoCenter at Heron’s Head Park features programs for students from elementary school through college, offering tours, seminars, workshops, and family-focused events led by bay.org’s educators and naturalists. Because of its youth-based focus, the EcoCenter enhances opportunities for conservation education in the urban landscape, expanding the scope of bay.org’s capabilities while also doing the important work of training a new generation of environmental stewards. The EcoCenter provides valuable opportunities for place-based learning and greenjobs training and has become a powerful resource for local students interested in environmental education and public-outreach training. Programs are all free of charge, and the building is open to the public Wednesday through Saturday.

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T H I S YE AR’S H I G H LI GH T S • Signed lease as the newest division of bay.org. • Formed the EcoCenter Advisory Committee made up of 15 community members representing

11 organizations from Southeast San Francisco who are committed to the success and vision of the EcoCenter. • Began weekly Science Saturday programs. These events, which are free to the public and cover a variety of topics, are often presented in collaboration with partner organizations. Programs offered during 2014 included “DIY Cheese Making” with San Francisco Milk Maid; “BioBlitz” in collaboration with California Academy of Sciences and SF Environment; “Wetland Bird Walk” in collaboration with San Francisco Nature Education; “Three Million Pounds of Shrimp Went to See” in collaboration with Chinese Whisperers historical group; “Ranging Rover Visits the EcoCenter” in collaboration with Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy, and more.

BY T HE N U M BERS

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BAY MODEL ALLIANCE “Of course it’s five stars. It’s amazing

The Bay Model, built in 1957 by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is a working,

and free. Insightful,

three-dimensional hydraulic scale model of San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento–

nerdy wonderfulness

San Joaquin River Delta system. Located on the waterfront in Sausalito, just north

awaits you the

of the Golden Gate Bridge, the site began as a scientific research center. In 2000, it

next time you’re in Sausalito, trying to avoid the crowds.

became a fully accessible education center, and is now a valuable new partner to the bay.org collaborative.

You are guaranteed

For years, students have made their field-trip pilgrimages to the Bay Model Visitor

to learn something,

Center. The impressive structure helps visitors visualize the local landscape,

but if you’re not

understand the interconnectedness of our waterways, and discover the importance

in the mood for

of safeguarding these features for others to share and enjoy.

educational museumstyle displays, just

In 2013, the Bay Model Visitor Center partnered with bay.org to form the Bay Model

fast forward to the

Alliance, and in 2014, Aquarium staff began working with the U.S. Army Corps

part where you’re

of

standing in a massive

events, lectures, and film presentations now extend the visitor experience, giving

wooden warehouse

guests new opportunities to learn about life in the Bay, conservation efforts, and

with a funky-yet-

stewardship opportunities.

super practical functional model of the entire Bay Area’s

Engineers

to

expand

the

Center’s

interpretive

programming.

Workshops,

The size of two football fields (1.5 acres), this unique structure is the only one of its kind in the world. It is capable of simulating the actions of tides and currents

100 times the speed of nature, the

waterways complete

surrounding the San Francisco Bay. Moving at

with active tides. The

model allows scientists to track long-term events in a short amount of time. Engineering

endless maze of the

tests there in the 1950s and ‘60s headed off a proposed civil works project that

Delta’s complexity

would have filled in most of San Francisco Bay, ultimately saving Bay Area waterways

is particularly eye-

from ecological disaster and beginning a new era of environmental reassessment.

opening, and the

Today, the Bay Model offers promising opportunities for local conservation efforts,

whole thing feels

education, and outreach.

like a delightfully giant swimming pool art project with an engineer’s precision.” —Marshall E., online reviewer

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T H I S YE AR’S H I G H LI GH T S • Participated in the Sausalito Herring Festival, providing public outreach information and activities. • Launched free monthly BayMobile presentations, featuring interactive programs based on shrinking carbon footprints, ocean acidification, and how the greenhouse gas effect works. Presentations included activities focused on local sustainable seafood, food webs, and more. • Presented “Cephalopod Celebration,” bringing squid dissections and other fun, family-friendly activities focusing on cephalopods to Bay Model guests.

BY T HE N U M BERS

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THE BAY INSTITUTE For nearly

“The first time I heard the rushing water of the San

35 years, The Bay Institute has been developing and leading scientific

research, education, and advocacy programs to preserve the San Francisco BayDelta Watershed, a landscape encompassing

40% of the state of California. At

the core are three major initiatives that focus on important facets of our work: our

Joaquin, I thought

Bay Restoration, Rivers and Delta, and Coast and Ocean programs. Together, these

the river sounded

efforts continue to make progress saving our threatened wetlands; restoring natural

like a highway. I was

flows to our rivers to support a healthy Bay-Delta ecosystem; reforming how California

quickly corrected—

manages its precious water resources; and increasing public understanding and

highways sound like

support for ocean and coastal protection.

rivers. This statement has profoundly changed the way I think of water, and

Our Bay Restoration Program works to restore

100,000 acres of San Francisco

Bay wetlands, revitalizing critical habitat for many endangered species. Following last year’s release of our groundbreaking Horizontal Levee study—an innovative

underscores the

solution to sea-level rise that combines habitat restoration with flood defense and

importance of work

water filtration—Bay Restoration staff met with numerous government agencies and

done by The Bay

community groups expressing interest in the topic.

Institute to keep water in the forefront of our rapidly changing environment.” —John Sutter, CNN columnist

Our Rivers and Delta Program is centered on restoring natural flows and habitats for a healthy Bay-Delta ecosystem, reforming how California manages its precious water resources. Our work in this area aims to make our water use more efficient and environmentally friendly, and focuses on saving the estuary’s native species from extinction. Launched in 2013, the Ocean and Coastal Program focuses on building partnerships to address timely ocean issues. The program’s goal is to increase public understanding and support for ocean and coastal protection, from promoting sustainable seafood practices to inspiring ways to rid the ocean of plastic debris. Together, these programs offer science-based advocacy for our entire watershed, from the Sierra Nevada Mountains to the Pacific Ocean. Our efforts speak to needs of the land, rivers, Bay, and coast, and the many species that make the Bay Area an iconic landscape recognized around the world.

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TH I S YE AR’S H I G H LI GH T S • Staff joined CNN Opinion writer John Sutter for a live webcast launching a recently published report on his summer journey down the San Joaquin River accompanied by staff of The Bay Institute. • Won important legal victories, including rulings on pending appeals covering San Joaquin drainage issues, endangered species litigation, and long-term water supply contract arrangements. • Submitted joint comments with the Natural Resources Defense Council, Friends of the River, and California Sport Fishing Protection Alliance opposing a new plan to construct the Temperance Flat Dam, which would negatively impact flows needed for the San Joaquin Restoration Program. • Worked with other conservation groups on a media and political campaign to rebut arguments for HR 3964, educating decision-makers and the public about how water supplies can be drought-proofed through conservation and recycling, rather than by eliminating protections for fish and wildlife. • Participated on an expert panel for the Water Education Foundation symposium of the Bay-Delta Conservation Plan. Staff briefed reporters prior to the draft plan’s release, and were prominently featured in media coverage, including on KQED’s Forum and local news programs. • Continued our popular Film and Lecture Series, offering outstanding free programs with world-class speakers. • Signed a Memorandum of Agreement with Deep Ocean Exploration and Research and with Dr. Sylvia Earle to initiate efforts to help transform Aquarium of the Bay into an “Exploration Hub.” • Spearheaded work to secure low-cost berthing facilities along the San Francisco waterfront for nonprofit vessel operators. • Helped expand the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary from ~1,282 to ~3,295 square miles. • Helped expand the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary from ~529 to ~1,268 square miles.

BY T HE N U M BERS

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PRO GR AM H I GH LI GHT S BAY R ES TO R AT I O N PRO GR AM Over the past 100 years, sea level has risen 8

the construction of an elevated causeway to

inches along the California coast. With continued

replace Highway 37 between Novato and Vallejo.

sea level rise, people, homes, businesses, roads,

The causeway would accelerate restoration of

and airports will be at risk due to flooding. In

over 25,000 acres of tidal marshes while storm-

2014, our innovative Horizontal Levee approach

proofing the aging roadway, an area where periodic flooding from rising tides will increase dramatically

“It is my honor to say to all of The Bay Institute: Thank you for what you do.” —Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi

in the coming years. As a member of a State Advisory Panel on invasive species, we worked to update the 2006 Ballast Water legislation. Our goal was to improve the program’s effectiveness at preventing harmful, invasive species being introduced through the discharge of ballast water from international vessels docking in California. Exotic organisms arriving in the estuary via ballast-water discharges are

to addressing sea-level rise was discussed with local flood protection and sanitation agencies, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Contra Costa Mayors Association, and the heads of Bay Area water agencies. We secured a federal trademark for the term “Horizontal

wreaking havoc on native fish and bird populations, disrupting the estuary food chain and degrading native habitat. By protecting the health of our waters and our rare tidal ecosystems, the Bay Restoration program helps safeguard the Bay’s ecological heritage.

Levee” and have been working with the East Bay Dischargers Association and San Francisco Estuary Partnership to spread the news to regionally elected officials about the cutting-edge Oro Loma Horizontal Levee project slated to break ground in the spring of 2015.

In 2014, we created and promoted a drought plan that identifies dozens of actions that can be taken over the next two years to use water more efficiently—an effort that was shared by

Ever vigilant against the reality of sea-level rise,

numerous partner conservation groups, business

The Bay Institute’s Bay Restoration Program is

interests, and water districts.

working with a coalition of partners to advance

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We conducted the environmental community’s most

highlighting world-renowned ocean experts,

extensive scientific and policy review of the Brown

authors, and filmmakers. A Peter Benchley/Blue

Administration’s proposal to build twin tunnels in

Frontier seminar on May 31st, for example, featured

the Delta, combing through more than 30,000

Jane Lubchenco (former head of NOAA), Sylvia

pages of documents to detail major analytical flaws

Earle (National Geographic Explorer in Residence),

and potential impacts on endangered species and

Margaret Leinem (Director of Scripps Institution of

habitats. Our scientists won major victories in court

Oceanography), Steve Palumbi (Director of Hopkins

to uphold crucial protections for the endangered

Marine Station), Congressman Sam Farr, and

Chinook salmon and threatened Delta smelt—

others. Topics ranged from plastics cleanup and

protections that The Bay Institute’s scientists

climate change to sustainable seafood choices and

helped develop and implement years ago.

species extinction.

Despite these victories, there is still more to do,

A primary initiative of the Coast and Ocean

and we have continued to work with federal and

Program is to support the implementation and

state agencies to set targets for restoring healthy

expansion of marine protected areas (MPAs). We

Chinook salmon and steelhead populations in the

engaged in local, regional, statewide, and national

San Joaquin River basin.

initiatives to support our statewide MPAs and our national marine sanctuaries. In 2014, we circulated a pledge to support state MPAs and the expansion

COA S T A N D O C E A N P R O G R A M

of the National Marine Sanctuary waters off the

In 2014, the Coast and Ocean program led an

Golden Gate Bridge. The initiative received support

initiative with other stakeholders to secure low-cost

by people from 22 states and 33 countries. We

berthing facilities along the San Francisco waterfront

also released a short video supporting MPAs,

for nonprofit vessel operators. This effort resulted

which was circulated at events at Aquarium of the

in recognition from the Port of San Francisco and

Bay, the San Francisco International Ocean Film

the Bay Conservation and Development Committee,

Festival, and internationally, receiving praise from

citing its value for historical, educational, and

all over the United States and Europe.

environmental maritime nonprofits that intend to help promote public access to the Bay. Partnering with other bay.org divisions, we presented 15 events in a Film and Lecture Series

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THE BAY I N S T I TUTE AWARDS CEREM O NY On March 4, 2014, we celebrated the achievements of great advocates for the Bay with our annual Awards Ceremony. The evening kicked off with a VIP reception before honoring three individuals for their outstanding achievements in protecting and restoring the San Francisco Bay watershed. This year, we were delighted to celebrate the achievements of Lauren Sommer, Robin Grossinger, and Ed Ueber.

HARO LD G ILLIAM AWAR D FO R E XCELLENCE IN ENV IRO NMEN TAL R EPO R T ING Lauren Sommer A reporter with QUEST, KQED’s multiplatform science series, Lauren has a background in environmental policy and has authored a number of well-researched pieces about California water and the Bay-Delta ecosystem. Her work has appeared on Marketplace, Living on Earth, Morning Edition, and All Things Considered. The award, named for San Francisco author and environmentalist Harold Gilliam, recognizes knowledgeable and skilled reporting on complex local environmental issues.

C AR L A BAR D BAY EDUC AT I O N AWAR D Robin Grossinger Robin Grossinger is a Senior Scientist at the San Francisco Estuary Institute, where he directs the Resilient Landscapes program. His innovative work has been acclaimed for helping scientists, managers, and the public appreciate both the dramatic transformation and the impressive resilience of the state’s ecosystems. The Bay Education Award honors the late Carla Bard, a statewide leader on water issues and a former member of The Bay Institute Board of Directors.

BAY HERO AWAR D Ed Ueber Ed Ueber is an award-winning fisheries management expert, educator, and conservationist. Ed, who currently gives his time to multiple marine-environment-focused Bay Area nonprofits, spent 25 years at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), where he created the first Marine Sanctuary Beach Watch program, the SEALS seal protection and education program, and the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association. The Bay Institute’s Bay Hero Award honors those whose efforts have led to increased protection and restoration of the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary.

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SAN FR AN CI SCO BAY GAL A On October 9, 2014, The Bay Institute welcomed guests for our annual San Francisco Bay Gala—an elegant event celebrating five years of partnership between The Bay Institute and Aquarium of the Bay, and recognizing all our Board, staff, conservation partners, and supporters do to protect, restore, and inspire. The event took place at Aquarium of the Bay, which had been transformed into an underwater wonderland. Our valued supporters raised critical funds to provide free science-based environmental education programs, protect and care for thousands of animals, and lend a voice for conservation and restoration of our Bay, rivers, and coastal waters.

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FINANCIALS 2014

UN R E S T R I C T ED TEMPORARILY TOTAL R E S T R I C T ED

CO N S O L I DAT E D

REVENUES

S TAT E M E N T O F

AC T I V I T I E S A N D

CONTRACTS

495,350

OTHER

195,062

195,062

9,089,606

9,089,606

1,776,292

1,776,292

NE T ASSE TS

O PER AT I N G R E V EN U E S TICKET SALES

$8,399,194 495,350

G I F T SH O P R E V EN U E S

SALES

$8,399,194

LESS COST OF SALES

844,647

844,647

931,645

931,645

PU B L I C SU PP O R T

766,898

955,958

SPECIA L E V EN T S

$189,060

REVENUES

378,903

378,903

154,200

154,200

224,703

224,703

LESS EXPENSES

I N T ER E S T A N D OT H ER I N CO M E

N E T A SSE T S R EL E A SED

FR O M R E S T R I C T I O N TOTA L R E V EN U E S

32,664

374,689

(374,689)

11,420,205

(185,629)

32,664

11,234,576

EXPENSES

PR O G R A M SER V I CE S

EXHIBITS

6,809,762 6,809,762

EDUCATION PROGRAMS

2,034,374

2,034,374

FIELD RESTORATION 1,140,575

1,140,575

AND CONSERVATION SU PP O R T SER V I CE S MANAGEMENT AND GENERAL

FUNDRAISING

TOTA L E XPEN SE S

E XC E S S O F E X P E N S E S OVER REVENUES N E T A S S E T S beginning of year N E T A S S E T S end of year

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763,538

763,538

522,795

522,795

11,271,044 11,271,044

149,161 (185,629) (36,468) 2,769,049

$2,918,210

374,689 3,143,738

$189,060

$3,107,270


2014

ASSETS CU R R EN T A SSE T S

CASH

SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS

398,352

GIFT SHOP INVENTORIES

124,877

GRANTS RECEIVABLE

ACCOUNTS AND OTHER RECEIVABLES

259,479

PREPAID LOAN FEES AND OTHER ASSETS

285,872

$ 823,369

28,050

S TAT E M E N T O F FI N A N C I A L POSITION

1,919,999

N O N - CU R R EN T A SSE T S

PR O PER T Y A N D EQ U I PM EN T— PL ED G ED

C A SH R E S T R I C T ED FO R LOA N PAYM EN T S

857,917

PR EPA I D LOA N FEE S

260,909

CO N S T R U C T I O N I N PR O G R E SS A N D OT H ER A SSE T S

198,932

7, 832,127

9,149,885

$ 11,069,884

LIABILITIES & NET ASSETS CU R R EN T L IA B I L I T I E S

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE

ACCRUED EXPENSES

275,140

CURRENT PORTION OF NOTES PAYABLE

945,716

DEFERRED INCOME

$ 413,852

8,049 1,642,757

N O N - CU R R EN T L IA B I L I T I E S

PEN SI O N L IA B I L I T Y

N OT E S PAYA B L E

193, 552 6,126, 305 7,962,614

N E T A SSE T S U N R E S T R I C T ED

T E M P O R A R I LY R E S T R I C T ED

2,918, 210 189,060

3,107, 270

$11,069,884

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PRO GRES S I N CO N S ERVAT I O N Our field conservation spending puts bay.org institutions in the top ten AZA-accredited zoos and aquariums in the nation. We could not do it without your support.

2014 EXPENSES

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2014 REVENUES

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29


SUPPORTER

SPOTLIGHT A few words from

BOARD MEMBER BOB ERICKSON “Once, while walking down a trail coming home, I remember stopping and watching a river otter slide down a hill into the water, and then run back up and slide back down again, over and over. It was a delightful experience. They do know how to entertain themselves!” An avid fisherman and duck hunter, Bob Erickson’s interest in water issues began with the simple concern that there be “enough water for fish.” After moving to San Francisco in 1951, Erickson’s natural love of salmon and trout joined a growing fascination with the Bay, its unique challenges, and its role in our quality of life to produce “an intense marrying of interests.” Erickson wishes more people knew about the challenges to the Bay and what it means to them. During a project his wife worked on with high school students 50 years ago, he recalls encountering kids who had never seen the ocean, and the limits that

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represented. “In seeing the Bay,” Bob said, “they were seeing that there’s something broader than the cement streets they lived on.” Over the course of nearly two decades of service, Erickson has been very impressed with the work of The Bay Institute’s scientists, declaring that, “No one has a broader approach to solving the Bay’s unique problems.” He was also very pleased by our partnership with Aquarium of the Bay, the inclusion of animal ambassadors such as the river otters, and the expansion of education programs. To him, these accomplishments represent efforts to take care of the Bay in many ways. If Erickson has a piece of advice, it’s this: Invest in your education, use your resources to figure out what’s happening, and make a positive contribution to the world around you.

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DONORS W E ACK N OW LED G E

$10,000+

$5,000 –$9,999

Anonymous

Anonymous

Big Bus Tours

CityPASS, Inc.

AN D SIN CER ELY

Blue & Gold Fleet

Comerica Bank

T HAN K T H E

Aimee Brown

The Hanley Foundation

California Wildlife Foundation

Harrison “Hap” C. Dunning

craigslist Charitable Fund

Robert J. Erickson

FO LLOW IN G IN D I V IDUAL S,

The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Steve and Barbara Hearst

FO UN DAT I O NS,

Gene and Ethel Daly

Hillsborough Garden Club

CO R PO R AT I O NS,

Edmund and Jeannik Littlefield Foundation

Platinum Advisors

Environment Now

Port of San Francisco

Environmental Science Associates

Heike Schmitz and Markus Fromherz

Firedoll Foundation

Morgan and Bill Tarr

T H EIR CO N T I N U ED

Harvey and Gail Glasser

The Sausalito Art Festival Foundation

SUPPO R T.

Benjamin and Ruth Hammett

Union Bank

AN D GOV ER N M EN TAL PAR T N ER S FO R

Deirdre H. Henderson Lucy Jewett

$2,500 –$4,999

The Leavens Foundation

Anonymous

Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund

Greer & Veronica Arthur

Steven N. and Susan Machtinger

AT&T Inc.

MSB Cockayne Fund, Inc.

Barney & Barney, a Marsh & McLennan Agency LLC Company

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Pacific Gas & Electric Company PIER 39 Port of Stockton Resources Legacy Fund Ronald W. Burkle Foundation San Francisco Bar Pilots The San Francisco Foundation Toll Bridge Program Oversight Committee (MTC) William and Kristine Wolcott

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Baydelta Maritime BiRite Nancy and Andrew Carlson Roger Conley FLAX art & design GEICO Pleasant Hill Gray Line of San Francisco Brian Huber Lucas Public Affairs Steven L. Merrill


New England Aquarium Novak Druce Connolly Bove + Quigg LLP RDJ Enterprises, LLC Recology Golden Gate San Francisco Estuary Partnership San Francisco Public Utilities Commission Sam Schuchat and Ilana DeBare Ryan and Ashley Stone Marissa Goodman Thieriot and Charles Thieriot

The Jim and Patty Rouse Charitable Foundation Levi Strauss & Co. Duncan Ley McBain & Trush, Inc. Marilyn McConnell Seth LaForge and Ania Mitros Clare and Matthias Moran Natural Resources Defense Council Sam and Mandy Parke

Tonic Beverage Catering

Tiffany Pisoni

Dan and Stacey Case Family Foundation

Luke Proskine Read Investments

$1,000–$2,499

JoAnna Robertson

Allianz Global Investors

Foundation for Ecology and Culture

A. Philip Randolph Institute San Francisco

Walt Shubin

California Rice Commission

Ann Stone

Northpoint Shopping Center

Strategic Solutions Advisors

Marc A. Levin and Jeffrey N. Dauber

Walter Advocacy Fund of Tides Foundation

Dharma Foundation

Captain Stephen and Linda Ware

Dibble & Dibble

Elise Wen

Wacky Jacky Sport Fishing

Willie L. Brown, Jr., Inc.

Eventbrite

Terry F. and Douglas R. Young

Fidelity Family Office Services Fisherman’s Wharf CBD

$500 –$999

Jon Fleischman

Carter Agar

John and Anita Frawley

Tod and Fiona Bensen Charitable Trust

Mike Gallagher

Altshuler Berzon LLP

Jim Glover

The Beckedorff-DiGangi Family

Theadora and Kenneth Gray

Rob Born

Tyler Hofinga

Timothy Brantley

Jerry J. Wilson Memorial Foundation

Marilyn Brennan and Charles Williams

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Brickman 550 Kearny LLC

Barbara Hendricks

Norm and Marty Buckhart

Carolyn R. Hunt

California Academy of Sciences

Dennis Hunter

Call of the Sea

Nina Grove and Kenneth Johnson

Laura Canaya

Mike La Rocca, A. La Rocca Seafood, Inc.

Pierre Capeder

Rebecca Lee

Lenore and Robert Cavallero

Liberty Dental

Cemrock Landscapes, Inc.

Carol K. Lind and James English

Dan and Lena Chao

Trisha McCollum

Kathy Cleairmont

George Christian Meyer III and Bailey Logan Meyer

David Corbell Delta Wetlands Properties Richard Denton and Kristine Houglet Brooks Dexter Discover the Delta Foundation Corinne & Mike Doyle Sally and Timothy Dukes, in tribute to Richard Fredrick Dodge Ashley Dunning and Ken Sorey Margherita Soule and David Eligator Gretchen and Dick Evans Steve Falk Todd and Erin Farber Floating Homes Association Beverly Prior and John Friedman Carolyn Geiger Daniel Gonzales Charles Goodyear Marritje and Jamie Greene Victoria Grey Joyce Guglielmi Anne Halsted and Wells Whitney

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Margan Mitchell Modern Sailing School & Club Dean A. and Lilla Morehous Alan Olson Elaine Orr James and Joan Paddor PG&E Corporation Foundation Matching Gifts Program Placer Partners Barbara Ransom Julie Regan Ride The Ducks Bruce Riezenman Luanne Rotticci Scarborough Insurance Agency Scott Shuttleworth Andrew Smith Ian Sobieski Lawrence Hobel and Diana Staring Mrs. Katharine H. Johnson Todd Thorner


University of California, Davis

Albert Lau

Antonio Valla

David Loeb

Philip and Ruth Waddington

Jessica Mastors

Nancy P. and Christian Werner

Brad McCrea

Nick and Amanda Wilcox

Peter and Virginia McIsaac

Derith and David Wisnom

Mark and Sunny Mckee Barry Nelson and Jill Cornwell

$250 –$499

Gary Oates

Jacob Adkinson

Drew Patterson

Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association

Paul Perez

Alessandro Baccari

Rich and Tanya Peterson

Roy and Roberta Borgonovo

Ann Procter, in tribute to David Boorkman

Marcia and Norm Brockbank

Karen Bischoff and Jim Quinn

Catherine Conway

Brian Ramos

Marc Ebbin

Russell and Margarete Roesner

Scott Einhorn

Carma Rose

Barry Elkin

Sally and Toby Rosenblatt

Environmental Traveling Companions

Rotary District 5100 Youth Exchange

Frank and Andi Espina

Nancy Rush

Kristie Fairchild

San Francisco Parks Alliance

Kay Carney and Vaughn Filmore

Juana Schurman and Tony Ligamari

Mary Catherine Gonzalez

Tina Shone

Barbara Gregoratos

Andrew Skinner

Donald and Rebecca Grether

Virginia Smith

Andrew Hart

SuperShuttle

Gregangelo Herrera

John and Elouise Sutter

David Hodges

Tamara Goddard Swager

Janis Johnson

Jane Rogers and Michael Fischer

W B Johnson

Will Travis

Mogo Marketing

Charles Wegerle

Michael Sapoznikow

Arlene Wong and Ken Chow

Julie Lappin

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VOLUNTEERS “I have had the opportunity to work with some amazing individuals and animals. Who would O UR D EEPE S T

have ever thought I would hand-feed wolf eels

G R AT I T UD E TO T H E

and giant sea bass one week while posing with

VO LUN T EER S W H O

an 80-pound octopus underwater for the SF

CO N T R IBU T ED 9,487 H O UR S DU R I N G 2014. W E APPR ECIAT E YO UR T I M E, EFFO R T, AN D COM M I TM EN T TO H ELPIN G US ACH IE V E O U R M ISSI O N.

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Chronicle the next?” —Randy Bauwens, Volunteer Diver


250 –500 hours

Sayra D.

Hailey S.

Jessica B.

Sydney Mi.

Hussam M.

Jezeca M.

John T.

Joann C.

Joshua D.

Katherine H.

Kathy B.

Kathleen S.

Mackenzie B.

Kayli P.

Randy B.

Kendra R .

Sheena M.

Lindsay M.

Sonia C.

Maggi H.

Amberlee B. Anthony F. Grace K .

100 –149 hours

Holly W.

Abhijit R .

Jacquelyn W.

Alexander Gu.

Jaren H.

Andrew A .

Raissa P.

Ar thur C.

Richard C.

Cassandra Y.

Sheri J.

Dale V-R .

150 –249 hours Alexander Gr. Chris L. Christopher D. Daniel P. Edward M. Ian L. Jon R .

Elsie C.

1– 49 hours

Emily E.

Abigail H.

Galiel K .

Alma M.

Jesse N.

Ashley S.

Lili Y.

Carson S.

Maeron Y.

Cassie H.

Maricela A .

Christophe C.

Stephanie C.

Corinna C.

Sydney Ma.

Cristina Z.

Vanessa D.

David P.

Maria L. Mat t G.

Michael P. Natali R . Robynne W. Ryan H. Steve F. Tuan L. Virginia U.

Eli H.

Maximilian R-E.

50 –99 hours

Mika M.

Anndora L.

Nicole O.

Brighton N.

Niko K .

Charlot te L.

Rick H.

Elliot D.

Elizabeth B. Gian Carlo A . Hannah L. Heather K . Imogen K .

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Fi n d o u t h ow yo u c a n b e a b ay. o r g su p p o r te r by contacting our fundraising team. Yo u c a n r e a c h o u r D i r e c t o r o f D e v e l o p m e n t , J e n i f e r B o t c h , b y e m a i l i n g j e n @ b a y . o r g , o r b y c a l l i n g 4 15 . 6 2 3 . 5 3 8 9 .

PRODUC TION ACKNOWLEDGMENTS M a n a g i n g W r i t e r/ E d i t o r : R u t h Te p p e r B r o w n Design & Produc tion: Dar ya Shahvaran I M A G E S © B AY. O R G E X C E P T A S N O T E D P a g e s 10 / 11 & 12 / 13 : C o u r t n e y L a u c h a i r e i P a g e s 3 6 / 37: T i f f a n y C h e n Pag es 24/25 & 38/39: Russ Lev i Ph oto gr ap hy

C O P Y R I G H T ©2 015 B AY. O R G


B AY. O R G The Embarcadero at Beach Street S a n F r a n c i s c o , C A 9 413 3 415 . 6 2 3 . 5 3 0 0 i n f o @ b ay. o r g

2014 bay.org Annual Report