The Barossa Mag - 7 - Winter 2018

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T H E Winter B AROSSA 2018MAG | FREE| 1

FROM TRASH TO TREASURE Joel is a master of imagination

WHEN TEARS INSPIRE JOY BAFFC Celebrate ten years of fundraising

CLAYTON’S UNDERTAKING Life of service is a celebration of life


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E X P E R I E N C E

B R E A T H T A K I N G

Canada & Alaska I N

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PA N O R A M I C R O C K I E S A N D A L A S K A C R U I S E 23 DAYS - VICTORIA TO VANCOUVER Personally escorted from Adelaide by Phil Hoffmann Travel

Unique to Phil Hoffmann Travel enjoy the most leisurely journey through the Rockies. Begin in Victoria with time to explore beautiful Butchart Gardens with breakfast before the crowds arrive. In Whistler, learn about the heritage of Canada’s indigenous people. Skim over Blue River in search of bears before enjoying two nights at Jasper National Park. Traverse Athabasca Glacier before continuing onto the picture-perfect Lake Louise. Spend three nights in Banff before boarding the iconic Rocky Mountaineer train in GoldLeaf Service for a breathtaking journey. From Vancouver you’ll conclude this memorable trip of a lifetime with an unforgettable seven night cruise in a Verandah stateroom through Alaska’s spectacular Inside Passage. EXCLUSIVE TO PHT GUEST: Fully escorted from Adelaide by Phil Hoffmann Travel, see Canada’s landscapes on a fourdimensional FlyOver Canada experience, airport lounge access on your return flight^ private one-way home-to-airport transfer.

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*Terms & Conditions Apply: Prices correct as at 9 May 2018 but may fluctuate due to changes in surcharges, fees, taxes and include applicable early payment discounts. UT23PHT price based on 10 May 2019 departure for 23 day itinerary Panoramic Rockies & Alaska Cruise. Pricing is valid until 30 Nov 2018, or until sold out. After this date pricing and deals will be superseded. Offers are not combinable, available on new bookings only and subject to availability. Offers may be withdrawn at anytime. ~Due to seasonal conditions, Blue River Safari with lunch on Day 6 is not available. See back cover for further information as well as all terms and conditions. COMPANION FLY FREE: Valid Apr-Sep 2019 departures. Flights must be booked with APT and both passengers must travel on the same flights. Flights are based on wholesale airfares in Economy Class (L class) with Air Canada (or another airline of APT’s choosing). All offers are subject to availability of airline and booking class. Once class is sold out surcharges apply ~Fully escorted tours subject to minimum numbers of passengers travelling on the same departure. ALL OFFERS: All offers are valid until sold out. Limited suites on set departures are available and are subject to availability. Not combinable, available on new bookings only and may be withdrawn at any time. A limited number of offers are available on selected itineraries and departures. DEPOSITS: A first non-refundable deposit of $1,000 pp is due within 7 days of booking. Final payment is due 110 days prior to the tour’s departure date. All air is ticketed upon receipt of the first deposit. Any changes made after ticketing may incur an amendment and/or cancellation fee and, in some cases, tickets are non-refundable. B ^HOLIDAY NOW PAY LATER HSBC. Interest free reverts to the cash advance rate. Offer available every day. Annual fee $79. Minimum purchase amount $500. *Interest free finance is applied only to promotional transactions for the specified period. Balances outstanding at the end of the promotional period will form part of the normal account balances and will accrue interest at the cash advance rate current at the time. See in-store for details. Monthly repayments are required and calculated at 3% of the outstanding balance or $20, whichever is higher. Lending criteria, terms and conditions, fees, and charges apply and are available on application. Offer available every day. Credit provided by HSBC Bank Australia Limited ABN 48 006 434 162.Australian Credit Licence 232595.Booking Conditions and Phil Hoffmann Travel Schedule of Professionalism applies. E&OE. BAROSSA MAG-APT-JUN


PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Darren Robinson EDITOR Tony Robinson CONTRIBUTORS: Adam Hunt Alicia-Lüdi Schutz Catherine Harper Claire Wood Heidi Helbig Kristee Semmler Lee Teusner Neil Bullock Sam Smith Todd Kuchel

T H E B AROSSA MAG | 3

welcome to the winter edition of The Barossa Mag There’s nothing like a season’s change to open your eyes to the beauty that is the Barossa... Winter is here in all its glory… Afternoon strolls replaced by high-vis road side walkers, 8.30 p.m. microwave wheat bag rituals, buckets of warm water on the windshield in the morning and the old Briggs and Stratton resting up in the garden shed.

DESIGN Jessica Waldhuter Lucy Fechner Maddison Krause

Now it could be just me but I swear with every year that passes, I add more layers of clothing when I go to bed... Am I just getting older? Or am I just getting colder?

PHOTOGRAPHY Alicia Lüdi-Schutz John Krüger Pete Thornton Sam Kroepsch Dave Graor

It’s an exciting thing to be in the story business. The people we meet, the photos we take, the ongoing relationships that are forged, the truth we share... layers.

ADVERTISING Darren Robinson darren.robinson@leadernews.net.au Jordan Stollznow jordan.stollznow@leadernews.net.au

We introduce you to an enlightened and broadminded educator named Asher Rohde, who is getting results inside and out the classroom through her holistic approach.

Winter 2018 | FREE

Layers... with every year I live in the Barossa, I uncover new layers...

In this new edition of The Barossa Mag, we uncover a few new ‘layers’ for winter... Meet sculptor, Joel Zimmermann. We discover the Barossa’s ‘master of imagination’ in his Murray Mallee studio.

After a decade of providing financial assistance, support and improving the life of cancer patients in the region, we speak with founding members, Tash Goldsworthy and Julie Combe of Barossa Area Fundraisers for Cancer and reflect on their journey of inspiration and joy. We speak with Clayton Scott, one of only two ‘Master’ Funeral Directors in the state, about the balance of celebrating life. Celebrating a career of over 30 years as a chocolatier, we enter the kitchen of Bryon Pearson to learn about his sweet and fulfilling life. And new to The Barossa Mag is contributor, Luke Rothe. With each edition, Luke will take us on a journey in time via stories about his treasures; a unique collection dedicated to the Barossa Valley’s history titled ‘Barossa Bygones’.

H TO TREASURE FROM TRAS of imagination

The Barossa is full of people with wonderful stories to tell. We hope you enjoy reading them as much as we do uncovering them.

Joel is a master

S INSPIREg WHEN TEAR ten years of fundraisin

JOY

BAFFC Celebrate

UNDERTAKING CLAYTON’S life a celebration of Life of service

is

OUR COVER: Asher Rohde Photographed by John Krüger PUBLISHER Leader Newspapers Pty Ltd 34 Dean Street, Angaston 08 8564 2035 info@barossamag.com The Barossa Mag™

Jordan Stollznow, The Barossa Mag

barossamag.com

All material appearing in The Barossa Mag™ is copyright© unless otherwise stated or it may rest with the provider of the supplied material. The Barossa Mag™ takes all care to ensure information is correct at the time of printing but the publisher accepts no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of any information contained in the text or advertisements. Views expressed are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher or editor.

LOCAL ARTISAN COFFEE & TEA WITH AN EMPHASIS ON QUALITY

A large range of premium coffee & tea, single origins & blends.

Available instore at Provenance Barossa or phone & online orders welcome.

Coffee & tea accessories available or special orders upon request.

8562 2680 | beanaddiction.com.au 18 - 28 Tanunda Road, Nuriootpa


TBM Contributors

4 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG

TODD KUCHEL

ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ

As an avid reader and film fanatic, Todd is a freelance writer with an appreciation for storytelling. From articles and reviews, to his own creative writing, Todd prides himself on the finest details.

Proud to be a grapegrower’s daughter, Alicia enjoys telling the stories of those who shape the region whilst adding to the Valley’s rich cultural tapestry as a brass musician.

HEIDI HELBIG In a career spanning print media, communications strategy and public relations, Heidi’s passion for storytelling has never wavered. Away from the desk she watches the seasons change in a small patch of century-old Grenache and tries to satisfy the enquiring minds of the little people in her life.

PETE THORNTON That saying ‘a picture tells a thousand words’ always seemed pretty clever to Pete. He always hated writing 1000 word essays at Uni – so photography it was for this guy! 12 years in as a pro photographer, Pete loves working with a story, and getting the best out of people to create unique, artful images.

SAM KROEPSCH

JOHN KRÜGER

What started as a hobby in the early 2000s, Sam found that his passion for taking photo’s was only the beginning. Sam now focuses mainly on Commercial and Bottle Photography as well as capturing people’s special moments. Away from the camera Sam enjoys water sports and exploring the country side, usually with a camera close by!

With Barossa connections dating back to the settling of Hoffnungsthal, John Krüger has been shooting as a freelance photographer around South Australia for the last 17 years. His favourite subjects are amazing food and interesting people. John loves positive stories as well as how his photos can bring them to life.

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 5

36-39

55-59

42-45 contents 8-9

Events

41

Pet advice with Catherine Harper

12-15

Joel finds purpose in repurposed artwork

42-45

Putting the fun in fund-raising

16

Local history with Luke Rothe

46-49

Wine Reviews

20

Gardening advice with Kristee Semmler

51

Health and Wellbeing with Lee Teusner

22-26

Asher puts life into learning

52-53

Seasonal Recipes

28-29

Barossa Unearthed

55-59

A sweet and fulfilling life

30

Book Review

60-63

Weddings

34

Travel inspiration with Sanna Saunders

64-65

Social Scene

36-39

Honourable undertaking

Discover the magic

OPEN 7 DAYS 9.30AM TO 5.30PM 1561 Barossa Valley Way, Lyndoch | kellermeister.com.au


Pure Cabernet 1 Year Anniversary

The Home of St Hugo may be in the Barossa today, but St Hugo started its life in the Coonawarra more than three decades ago with wines made solely from the noble Cabernet Sauvignon. Help us celebrate this heritage and our first year of opening the St Hugo home with a dinner focusing on the best vintages of St Hugo Coonawarra Cabernet - past, present and future. Starting with a tasting of six of the most outstanding museum wines from St Hugo’s best vintages, conducted by winemaker Dan Swincer, we will to progress to a celebratory six course degustation dinner with dishes created to enhance our very best Cabernets.

Wines will include our limited release ‘Private Collection’ and the extremely rare and collectable ‘Vetus Purum’. Back vintage large format wines will be opened, with a sneak peak at the best that is yet to come from the house of St Hugo.

Date Friday 22nd September, 2017 from 5:30pm

Location St Hugo, 2141, Barossa Valley Way, Rowland Flat, SA, 5352

Pricing $200 per person

Booking Details Email enquiries: Cathy Chapple cathy.chapple@sthugo.com Phone enquiries: (08) 8115 9200 Bookings: www.sthugo.com/experience Please Drink Responsibly.

The St. Hugo difference A grand avenue of cork-trees welcomes those seeking the casual yet refined dining experience that is St. Hugo. It is here where wine is the star and food is its stage in a tantalising show of harmony. Elegant, marble top dining tables and classic Barossa vineyard views set the scene at the Rowland Flat restaurant which was officially opened in September, 2016. Executive Chef, Mark McNamara moved to the Barossa 25 years ago, lured by its reputation as a fine food and wine destination. Today he leads a team who work alongside wine makers to create menus that both surprise and delight. “Collaboration is the cornerstone of the food experience at St Hugo,” Mark says. “It’s always about the wine selection, we don’t set out to tell a particular food story, rather dishes evolve around individual wines, with seasonality and regionality always at the heart of every dish.” After forty years honing his skills as a chef and gathering knowledge, Mark now finds

himself as a mentor; not in a formal, structured way, but rather as someone who inspires the next generation. “I love to share my learning with the people I interact with, customers and colleagues alike,” he says. A chef’s table looking into the St. Hugo kitchen allows diners to witness that knowledge in action an opportunity to speak with the chefs to gain an insight into the personalities behind the plate. Characters like Sunny Chawla, of Tanunda, who recently stepped into the role of sous chef. A former civil engineer in his home country of India, the 32 year old father of two moved to the Barossa back in 2008 to study commercial cookery at Nuriootpa TAFE. Sunny has fulfilled his childhood dream of becoming a chef and says he loves the way St Hugo challenges him to be creative with its focus on wine. “It’s what makes us unique. The making of a dish for us is a totally different concept, we bring the wine out first.”


ADV E RTORI AL

St. Hugo chefs, Giles Hussey, Hayley Kavanagh and Sunny Chawla Left inset: Executive chef, Mark McNamara

“If you love wine and food and want to come and experience something different, take the leap and come see what we are doing. I think people will be very surprised.” - Hayley Kavanagh

He describes the way chefs are given wines to taste alongside 70-80 ingredients to find the perfect flavour combination. Sourcing local produce is always a priority and whilst the choice of protein is important, it is the final piece in creating a menu. “They might give us a Shiraz and we have no idea what dish is going to go with that unless we try it with every ingredient to find what works best,” says Sunny. “We always do what the wine tells us to do.” Bringing his team together in a united force of creativity is what Sunny says is his strength in the kitchen. On his days off, he enjoys a round of golf at Tanunda Golf Club and spends Wednesdays at Impact Church volunteering as a barista. “I take my kids there, they have a play and I make maybe 50 to 60 coffees in a day! “It just gives me some relaxation...I’m

doing something for someone else rather than sitting around at home doing nothing. “It’s fun and I am giving a little of myself to the community.” And fun seems to be an integral part of the St. Hugo team. Chef de partie, Giles Hussey, of Nuriootpa says keeping up morale in the kitchen is his specialty. “I’m usually the Dad jokes guy, the one making puns,” he laughs. Giles is behind their appropriately named “Guaca - bowly” night lawn bowls team who take to the green during Summer months. He’s also the one growing his moustache as an avid fundraiser for Mowvember, a men’s health initiative. This camaraderie is a powerful ingredient as chefs work to produce the ultimate wine and dining experience. “We want to showcase what we are doing in Barossa’s backyard,” he says. “We are only five minutes down the road

from Tanunda. With most of us living in the Barossa, you probably even know us. Have a wander, have a peak!” This same enthusiasm is in abundance in the team’s youngest chef, Hayley Kavanagh. Fresh out of her apprenticeship, the 22 year old started out at Jacob’s Creek before being offered a position at St Hugo. “At this point in your career, you do get comfortable but you have to think how you are going to grow as a person and how you are going to grow as a chef , so I took it!” she says. “I’ve learnt so much. It is so good to work in a kitchen that is so diverse.” Fresh new ideas and youthful exuberance is what Hayley brings to the kitchen and she thrives on the creativity. “This whole process we work with, I have never seen before. “It’s very different but it’s great because you come up with these dishes. They might

have seen a version of it, but it’s not going to be like anyone else’s because of the way we structure our menu,” explains Hayley. She encourages food and wine lovers to discover St. Hugo, which took out four prestigious awards in 2017 including the Gourmet Traveller Wine Australia’s Cellar Door with Best Food award; two South Australian Tourism awards and a silver award for best new regional restaurant in Australia. “If you love wine and food and want to come and experience something different, take the leap and come see what we are doing. I think people will be very surprised.”

St Hugo, 2141 Barossa Valley Way Rowland Flat, SA 5352 Phone enquiries: (08) 8115 9200 Bookings: www.sthugo.com/experience Please Drink Responsibly


8 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG // E VE NTS

BAROSSA GOURMET WEEKEND

SA SPRING GARDEN FESTIVAL 2018

AUGUST 31, SEPTEMBER 1 AND 2 BAROSSA VALLEY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 - 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M. MT PLEASANT The very picturesque township of Mt Pleasant will be the backdrop to 2018 SA Spring Garden Festival on September 22. Mt Pleasant Farmers Market will partner with the festival, and run in conjunction with extended trading hours to align with those on the festival day. The SA Spring Garden Festival will appeal to a dedicated cohort of SA home gardeners seeking a competitive authentic garden festival experience. The scope of the event is the whole spectrum of gardening – quality plants, garden furniture, decor and garden care products, sustainable gardening, and guest speakers. There will be a great line up of special guest speakers, including media

presenter Sophie Thomson, South Australian presenter on ABC television’s G ardening Australia, a popular newspaper columnist, national public speaker, TEDx presenter, author, broadcaster and horticulturalist. For the DIY gardeners, in partnership with the Mount Pleasant Men’s Shed, there will be a demonstration on recycled raised garden wicking beds. For the children a special workshop, working with garden owners with an experienced oral designer, where the children can use their creative flair to make their own oral masterpiece. Admission is $5 per person, $3 for pensioners and children under 15 are free.

Barossa Gourmet Weekend is a true Barossa celebration, showcasing authentic regional food of provenance sourced from local producers and accompanied by worldclass wines. From intimate tastings, exquisite dining experiences, masterclasses, lingering brunches, garden parties,

WINE AUCTION AND DINNER

24 HOUR RELIABILITY TRIAL

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 - 7 P.M. FAITH LUTHERAN COLLEGE, TANUNDA In the heart of this year’s Barossa winter, there’s simply one event you cannot miss. In recent times, the calibre of wines available at the Faith Lutheran College Wine Auction and Dinner has attracted wine enthusiasts from outside the region, and 2018’s auction will maintain this pedigree of excellence. Friends and fellow wine enthusiasts come together for an evening beginning with pre dinner drinks and canapes in the theatre foyer, followed by main course and

JULY 14 AND 15 KAPUNDA HARNESS CLUB, KAPUNDA

dessert on stage surrounded by the impressive aesthetics of the theatre. With an emphasis on limited release, museum wines or large format wines, the annual auction features a collection from prominent and emerging wineries of the Barossa who have donated their flagship wine to go under the hammer. Tables of 10 encouraged, individual ticket purchases welcome. All tickets $50. Includes 3 course dinner and arrival drink.

The annual 24 Hour Reliability Trial will be held on the weekend of July 14 and 15 at the Kapunda Harness Club. The first bike leaves main control at 11.01a.m. Saturday morning. The committee, sponsors, land owners, officials, control keepers and everyone else involved in the

weekend make this amazing event happen. Programmes and merchandise will be for sale on the weekend from main control – but be quick it won’t last long. Come out and show your support to these incredible people taking part in Australia’s ultimate reliability trial.

TASTE THE EVOLUTION MASTERCLASS SATURDAY, JULY 7 - 11 A.M. TO 1 P.M. ELDERTON WINES, NURIOOTPA

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN LIVING ARTISTS FESTIVAL (SALA) AUGUST 1 TO 31

The SALA Festival celebrates local, contemporary visual art, held over the entire month of August. The festival allows local artists to pair with local venues to exhibit interesting and diverse works across the

picnics, platters and flame grilled feasts, it’s the perfect weekend for wine enthusiasts, foodies and families wanting to discover the Barossa. And with spring in full flight, there’s no better time to soak up the Barossa and savour everything it has to offer. Photo by: Martin Ritzman.

state, with many different forms of art on offer. For many Barossa based artists, SALA gives them the chance to exhibit their works in their own region, co n n e c t i n g w i t h l o c a l businesses and bringing the area alive.

Join the Ashmead family and Winemaker Richard L a n g fo rd i n a h o ste d masterclass showcasing the evolution of some of Elderton’s best known wines. Taste four flights of three wines: past, present and future. Hear the stories behind the wines whilst gaining an insight into winemaking processes and how to assess

EXHIBITIONS

the aging ability of a wine. Tickets are $60 each, including local artisan bread, cheese and smoked meats. Saturday, July 7 2018 from 11a.m. to 1p.m. in Elderton’s barrel hall, Elderton Wines, Nuriootpa Limit of 4 tickets per person. RSVP by Monday, July 2 – unless sold out prior.

WORKSHOPS BAROSSA VISITOR INFORMATION CENTRE

OZQUILT NETWORK INC

JOIN US FOR THE RE-LAUNCH OF - CALENDAR COMPETITION - AUSTRALIA WIDE FIVE 4 September - 28 September 2018 OUR NEW & June VIBRANT RETAIL SPACE May through to 11 2018 S ACOLOUR T U R D A YOF4 WATER JUNE @ 3pm THE Gaynor and Manser 3 B A SHartvigsen EDOW RO A DMel , T ABoneNUND A

12 June - 23 July 2018

BAROSSA REGIONAL G A L L E R Y

The official opening will showcase our new

CREATIVE SOULS - SALA refurbished retail space, complete with new, and regional stockists, and will be 28local July - 31 August 2018

accompanied by drinks and nibbles, music

and artist demonstrations. TIFFANY PARBS your attendence by email to 24Please Julyindicate - 3 September 2018

info@barossa.sa.gov.au or by phone (08) 8563 0849.

(08) 8563 8340

|

INTERNMENT This exhibition will be held during October and November 2018 and will showcase photos and stories of people who were interned in South Australia during WWI and WWII. If you were interned or know someone who was, and are willing to share stories, photos or mementos of that experience, please call 8563 8412 or email info@barossa.sa.gov.au

www.barossagallery.com

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3 B a s e d o w R o a d , Ta n u n d a


EVENTS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 9

BAROSSA SEASONS: WINTER JULY 6 TO 8

In addition to Barossa Gourmet Weekend, there is now Barossa Seasons, a programme of food, wine and experiences. Barossa Seasons: Winter is a seasonal celebration of food, wine and experiences for both locals and visitors alike to the region. From a mass bonfire of

old dead vines, a winter night market serving dishes that will warm you within, an afternoon bush walk between wineries. Barossa Seasons: Winter is your perfect excuse to embrace this season with the warmth of friends, food from the fire and red wines to match.

BLACK HINGE STABLES DINNER FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 - 6.30 P.M. PINDARIE WINES, GOMERSAL Pindarie Wines, Barossa Valley are hosting their Black Hinge Stables Dinner with food by “The Cellar Kitchen” on August 10 at 6.30pm. Menu carefully prepared by Head Chef Derek Salmon using delicious

BONJOUR BAROSSA AT SEPPELTSFIELD SUNDAY, JULY 8

A Barossa winery tour with friends to warm the cockles of your heart in Winter. Sound dreamy? How about adding some of South Australia’s best French artisan breads, chocolate, macarons, crepes and croissants to go with your glass of Shiraz - now that’s deserving of a “hon hon hon” in your best French accent! Get ready to don your beret and striped jumper, Bonjour Barossa, Seppeltsfield’s French Festival, is returning on July 8. Now in its third year, Bonjour Barossa come to

Seppeltsfield estate reimagined as a Parisian style marketplace, bringing together food, wine and homeware vendors to the backdrop of French themed music and entertainment. A sell-out experience in previous years, onsite Events Executive Chef, Owen Andrews, will offer a walking tour of some of Seppeltsfield’s food culture sites. Entry tickets: $15 per person including etched Bonjour Barossa wine glass. Children 2-17: $5 entry. Children under 2: free.

MENOPAUSE THE MUSICAL – WOMEN ON FIRE

local ingredients such as Apex Dough and Saskia Beer free range chicken. Limited tickets are ava i l a b l e, s o to g e t yours email pindarie@ pindarie.com.au or phone 8524 9019.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4 - 8 PM Inspired by a hot flush and a bottle of wine, Jeanie Linders created Menopause the Musical as a celebration of women who are on the brink of, in the middle of, or have survived ‘The Change’. Since its first performance, the show has evolved as a ‘grassroots’ movement of women who deal with life after 40 and all the challenges they conquer mentally, physically and spiritually. Do you think that 500,000 Australian women

could be wrong? We don’t think so. After all, that is how many have seen this hilarious show over the last two and a half years. And they love it! So much so, many of the audience members have come back again to join with their sisters in this 90 minute, one act laugh-a-thon! The performance will be held at Barossa Arts and Convention Centre, August 4 at 8p.m.

2018 BAROSSA WINE SHOW SEPTEMBER 10 - 14

The annual Barossa Wine Show which was first held in 1977, is seen as a showpiece of the region’s best wines in any given year. Over 700 wines are entered each year in over

2018 MARANANGA WINE SHOW PUBLIC TASTING SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 - 7 P.M. SEPPELTSFIELD WINERY, SEPPELTSFIELD An initiative of Marananga Lutheran Church, the annual Marananga Wine Show showcases wines from the western Barossa and is the only sub-regional wine show in Australia. The public tasting provides guests with a rare opportunity to taste more than 120 wine entries and to cast their vote for the People’s Choice award. Held in The Vintage Cellar of Seppeltsfield

Winery, the public tasting is a celebration that offers guests a taste of western Barossa hospitality and the renowned winemaking traditions of this local community. For further information contact Cathy Wills on cathy@tourismbarossa.com.au or 0412 214 844. Tickets: Barossa.com Photo by: Mason Digital Photography.

BAROSSA BAROQUE & BEYOND SEPTEMBER 29 - 30 Fasten your fun belts! Barossa Baroque & Beyond is happening again on the Labor Day weekend. Make sure you put Saturday, September 29 and Sunday, September 30 in your diary. Saturday: Something quite special in the afternoon at the Peter Lehmann Cellar Door. More of that with Tafelmusik at fermentAsian that evening and then humming into Sunday with a wonderful afternoon concert at the Regional Gallery in Tanunda. Followed by a musical interlude at the PLW

Cellar Door. Then up the hill to Cabaret in Old Redemption with some old and some newer friends to close out the weekend with a casual night filled with musical delights interspersed with laughter and a plenitude of fine Barossa food and wine. Sharon Grigoryan has yet again gathered a collection of great musicians to astound and delight you. So pop it in your diary! All events will be booked through the Barossa Information Centre this year.

20 classes which are judged over three days with trophies awarded at the Presentation Dinner. Entries are open to members of the Barossa Grape and Wine Association.

BAROSSA MARATHON FESTIVAL AUGUST 19 - 7 A.M. TO 3 P.M. TANUNDA The Barossa Marathon Festival is held every year starting in the scenic vineyardsurrounded Tanunda. The event attracts runners from right across the world, wanting to challenge their fitness levels in the marathon (42.2 kilometre), half marathon (21.1 kilometre), 10 kilometre and 5 kilometre events. The course is very flat, perfect

for those wanting a quick time or ‘personal best’. The Festival is also Association of International Marathons and Distance Races (AIMS) certified, meaning the event can be used to get a qualifying time for other international AIMS events, including Boston Marathon. Feel the landscape. Meet the people. Experience the Barossa.

texture & hue

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10 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG

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12 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG

Joel finds purpose in repurposed artwork WORDS BY HEIDI HELBIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON

The tools of Joel Zimmermann’s trade are not his arc welder and recycled scrap metal, but a childlike imagination and carefree spirit. The Tanunda sculptor transforms materials considered “useless and unwanted” into objects of unexpected beauty – a throwback to his childhood in the Murray Mallee. “Growing up on a farm in the bush as kids was fantastic; I was always messing around with junk, building things,” says the 23-year-old, adding with a grin: “I guess you’d say I’m doing exactly what I did back then.” Also a talented musician and songwriter, his decision to become an artist after finishing Year 12 was quickly validated with peer acclaim, a prestigious SALA award and the opportunity to exhibit during Prince Charles and Camilla’s royal visit to the Barossa in 2015. “I don’t think I could ever have a nine-to-five job,” says Joel. “I don’t like being locked into things – I love freedom.” He finds that freedom in the sculpting process, which is both creative and conforming. “Before I start a piece I will have very specific measurements, but because of the different items that are used I never completely know what the finished piece will look like, and no two pieces will ever be the same,” Joel says. “I’m about to begin a project where a client has an idea in mind but there’s not a lot of guidelines; when you have a lot to play with, it’s then you really become creative and imagine what you could do.” His work has evolved from small-scale pieces in high school to life-size Clydesdale horses, jaguars and lions. “Back then I made a lot of smaller pieces very much focused on repurposing items,” Joel says.

“I never completely know what the finished piece will look like, and no two pieces will ever be the same. When you have a lot to play with, it’s then you really become creative and imagine what you could do.” - Joel Zimmermann


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 13


14 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG

“A couple of years ago I started getting larger commissions and realised it was probably more of a business than a hobby.” Proving the adage that one man’s trash is another’s treasure, Joel sources scrap metal from local farms and transports them to his Sedan studio with his dad’s semi trailer.

“Usually it’s whole machinery,” says Joel. “I never know exactly what I need so I guess it’s always a battle to find the most suitable items; I might strip apart a header but all those pieces will never go to just one project.”

“I look back at my first horse and I hate it,” he says. “Back then I would create a shell to make the shape, so the inside was hollow and in quite a few spots you could see inside and through it.

With a single draft horse representing over 250 hours of work, Joel admits it has been a steep learning curve.

“Now I literally start from the inside out and layer all the way out. The pieces are two or three times heavier and use more

materials, but they look very solid and have a lot of presence.” However Joel’s smaller pieces are equally striking. “I do really like the finish of the little birds,” he says. “I run a brass brush over to finish them which gives them a brass colour and they end up being these lovely little golden-looking things.”


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 15

Joel also has a gift for imparting expression and movement in his animals.

metal over the eyes – you can add a sense of anger or fright or some kind of struggle.”

“If you look at my very first horse it’s symmetrical, staring straight ahead,” says Joel. “Now my animals might be raising a leg, turning a head or flicking a mane.

While animals remain his bread and butter, Joel’s latest ‘Game of Thrones’-inspired commission is likely to stretch his artistic limits. The six-metre-high iron throne will grace a Kangaroo Island resort hilltop overlooking the ocean.

“A great way to do something different is if you put a piece of

While he describes it as “a logistical nightmare”, Joel’s not about to lose any sleep over the complexities of the project. “Quite often I doubt my ability to put something together but they have all worked so far, so I have no doubt this one will too,” he says. The commission, coupled with his recent foray into film and

You Tube, is likely to generate exposure on a new scale for Joel. “(The choice between) music and art has always been a battle and now I’ve got into film, I see that as the foundation that will keep me motivated and give me structure,” he says. “If I can bring all three of them together – music, art and film – that will be beautiful.”


16 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG // HI STORY

Our Barossa heritage is often overshadowed by our great wines and food, but I recently discovered a piece of old Barossa furniture with an interesting story. Numerous German cabinetmakers settled in this region from the mid 1800’s, bringing with them a style of furniture used in their homeland. Carl Wilhelm Schaedel, a ‘tischlermeister’ or ‘master cabinetmaker’, arrived in South Australia from Brandenburg in 1856, settling in Nuriootpa. By the 1870’s he had the means to build a substantial house with a

large basement workshop, (pictured c.1890’s), which still stands in Nuriootpa’s main street. Wilhelm produced a variety of Baltic pine and Australian red cedar furniture from the 1850’s to the 1890’s including wardrobes, kitchen cupboards, chests of drawers, tables and chairs. Just as an artist would sign a painting, Wilhelm sometimes signed his furniture; also leaving an important date and place of manufacture. Occasionally one of Wilhelm’s artisan pieces comes to light, as did the

WORDS BY LUKE ROTHE

pictured kitchen dresser. It was during recent restoration that Schaedel’s signature was discovered, increasing its historical significance. Written in pencil: - ‘C.W. Schaedel, Nuriootpa, 5 April 1891’ It’s important to keep the ‘story’ associated with any historic object. When researching the German family history of the dresser I came up with a great result. The owner’s grandfather’s wife had previously been married at Light Pass on 18th April 1891 – 13 days after Schaedel signed the dresser. This is significant.

We can assume that the dresser was a gift to the bridal couple, probably from one of the parents. Furniture gifting was not unusual in the Barossa, to help a couple furnish their humble home. Schaedel wardrobes and dressers can be visually recognisable by their ‘scrolled’ top pediment. This became a ‘signature style’ and was also used by Wilhelm’s brother, Hermann, a cabinetmaker working further down Murray Street. The Schaedels and other local cabinetmakers have left a lasting legacy of collectable Germanic furniture.

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FAR FROM STATIONARY

When Chris and Lynn Semmler bought an office and stationery supply business in Nuriootpa back in 1996, the world was a very different place. The internet was in its infancy and phones were barely mobile, let alone smart. Back then, the former bank at old “post office corner” was home to all office essentials and customer service was king. Fast forward 22 years and today’s Office National Barossa is a modern, purpose built space on Railway Terrace, evolved to meet the demands of a fast-paced digital era with a second generation of Semmlers at the helm. For Chris and Lynn’s son, Anthony and his wife, Joanne, customer service still reigns supreme since taking over the business 18 months ago. The couple admit the leap to ownership was a big challenge and although they had been working within the company, they were not fully prepared for what lay ahead. Their journey is far from conventional, both having come from completely different backgrounds. Anthony was a manufacturing jeweller for ten years and Joanne a veterinary nurse before spending a couple of years as a podiatry assistant. On moving to the Barossa from Adelaide in 1999, Anthony immediately began in the warehouse of his parents’ business before ultimately working his way into a management role, whilst Joanne spent some time working in the retail area and then in the service department for around 8 years after the new building opened in March, 2003. A three-and-a-half-year stint in a related industry in Queensland, when their sons, Darcy and Isaac were little, allowed the couple to gain more knowledge. “We just wanted to break away to do something different and Anthony wanted to do something other than work in the family business to get outside experience,” says Joanne. “I’m really glad we did that and we were both able to work for someone else with different expectations,” adds Anthony. Looking back at their first 18 months of ownership, they agree it was quite the eye opener. “When mum and dad started out, it was the only place to go, people shopped locally, had no reason to go anywhere else. You were the only one here for everything. Pre-internet, customers didn’t have the same options as they do today,” Anthony explains. Whilst there was a transition plan in place, Anthony felt a little unprepared for an industry which faced such rapid change. “We found it somewhat overwhelming when we first took over but have worked our way into the role of managing.” Joanne adds, “We knew we had to evolve as a business reasonably quickly but didn’t feel we were completely equipped with the skills necessary to take us to that next level.”

The duo has since worked tirelessly to take the upper hand and Anthony can say he now has a better understanding of the meaning of ‘management’ in this fiercely competitive world of retail and its online challenges. They now have a team of dedicated road based representatives which allow for even better customer service. “Whilst it is a digital, online world, you can’t replace that face-to-face service...We understand and recognise its value,” Anthony says. Anthony loves encouraging young staff members within the team of more than a dozen employees. “Just their infectious enthusiasm and motivation can be quite inspiring,” he says. “I like seeing the development of people like that and if they have the motivation to progress further in our business we provide the opportunity, there is no restriction here.” It’s this ability to inspire and mentor which Anthony has taken beyond the walls of business into the wider community. He has volunteered for the Nuriootpa Football Club as committee member and managed his son’s team, even though he never played a game of footy in his life. “There’s an irony in that I guess!” he laughs. Now that his boys are focusing on cricket, Anthony has joined that committee. But it’s his ‘big brother’ role with the Barossa Community Options Men’s Friendship Group that Anthony feels is particularly worthwhile, especially for Greenock’s Mark Kernich with whom he is partnered for monthly outings. “Corporate volunteering they call it, it’s about giving back at that community level.” Although he is reluctant to call himself a mentor, Anthony’s natural leadership within a business that prides itself in “selling solutions” is proudly leading the way and he and Joanne feel they are now keeping up with today’s demands. The stationery supply business of yesteryear is far from staying stationary - it’s building, changing and diversifying. “We are moving into so many categories and there’s no restriction, it’s not just a stationery business anymore, it probably hasn’t been for a long time. “We can supply anything that goes in an office and then some…selling our expertise and resolving issues.” Joanne says their business is about looking after others, working together and recognising needs. “That’s what we are looking to achieve, making sure we are solving their workplace issues to allow their businesses to grow.” Anthony agrees. “I think we are very fortunate to live in a prosperous region. You need to make the most of the opportunity that this presents. As a business, you are doing yourself and your region a disservice if you are not being pro-active. There’s plenty happening out there,” he says. “It’s hard work but it’s exciting.”

officenationalbarossa.com.au (08) 8562 1200 9 Railway Terrace, Nuriootpa


ADV E RTORI AL

The Office National family, Lynn and Chris Semmler with son Anthony and his wife Jo Semmler.

Anthony Semmler and Mark Kernich sharing a laugh.


20 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG // GA RDENING

WORDS BY KRISTEE SEMMLER THE BAROSSA NURSERY On trend, plant addict, crazy plant lady, indoor jungle, obsession are all terms I’m seeing more and more when referring to indoor plants. I’ve seen Facebook posts of people who have upward of 90 indoor plants in their home! I don’t have that number in my home, but I’m pretty proud of my indoor lovelies and could not imagine my home without them! They not only look amazing and bring my home to life, but the health benefits are pretty darn impressive too! First and foremost of importance to me, especially with a baby in the house, is that they reduce the toxins in the air and improve air quality within the home.

Indoor plants.... the new obsession

Studies suggest they can remove up to 90% of some toxins! Impressive! The more plants in a room, the more toxins absorbed and the more oxygen released. I have two huge and healthy motherin-law’s tongues or Sansevieras which are one of only a few plants that release oxygen at night, ensuring a great and healthy sleep! I also love the ‘feel good’ vibes that indoor plants give off. We can call that improving well being. Indoor plants and ‘green’ views are known to make people happier, have proven to improve concentration and reduce stress. I can attest to this - when I take my plants

outside to liquid feed. I don’t feel nearly as happy or house proud as I do when they are inside, quietly making my home look better, and me feel better, with their shiny green leaves and beautiful lushness! The indoor plant trend has taken off and is set to continue for years to come. This is one obsession we should all get on board within our homes and workplaces - the health benefits are just too good to ignore (no dieting or exercise required either!) Going into winter when the nights are dark and the days are grey, these green beauties bring a pop of fresh colour into our homes - And they just make any space

look so much better! Now to choose my next plant to add to my indoor jungle.... happy indoor gardening! My top five hardy indoor plants: • Zanzibar gem - if you forget to water your plants this one’s for you! It thrives on neglect! • Kentia palms and parlour palms - lush and green and easy to grow. • Mother in laws tongue - requires little water/ care and releases oxygen at night. • Devil’s ivy - gorgeous trailing plant that looks awesome hanging down from a shelf or bookcase. • Spider plant - variegated leaves give great colour and these guys are super easy to grow.

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22 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG

“There are lots of roles in teaching besides being the teacher. It’s those aspects that make teaching what it is… and why I love the job.” - Asher Rohde


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 23

Asher puts life into learning Asher Rohde’s holistic approach to teaching is getting results, inside the classroom and out.

WORDS BY HEIDI HELBIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN KRÜGER

Walking among a throng of Nuriootpa High School students as the siren sounds, fresh-faced Asher Rohde might easily be mistaken for one of her young protégés. But enter her Year 12 psychology class and it’s clear Asher is no Gen Z, but an enlightened and broad-minded educator with a heart for her students. In fact the wellbeing of her students is just as important as the psychology and English

curriculum Asher teaches, especially in the context of unprecedented social media exposure, bullying and teen depression. On any given day Asher might be confidante, mentor or mediator. “There are lots of roles in teaching besides being the teacher,” says the 26-year-old from Nuriootpa. “The fact students can come to me and feel comfortable

speaking to me gives them someone else they can confide in. “It’s those aspects that make teaching what it is…It’s part of who I am, and it’s why I love the job.” Destined for a career in education, Asher credits her grandmother and many “amazing” teachers with awakening her natural sense of curiosity. “I’ve wanted to be a teacher ever

since I can remember,” says Asher. “My grandmother (Donella Beinke) was a teacher and the way she taught us grandkids, you could tell she was a teacher – in the most empathetic way. She genuinely wanted us to learn. “I think I have always appreciated school and learning…I always found school, not easy, but I really liked the challenges.”


24 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG

>> Asher Rohde, Erin Schrapel and Mitchell Gebert.

Leaving Nuriootpa High a student and returning a qualified teacher, Asher is now privileged to work alongside her mentor and former psychology teacher, Kirsty Gebert. “She’s the reason I am a psychology teacher today. As soon as she started teaching me, I knew,” says Asher.

“She was so passionate, always extending and challenging us, and that sparked the passion in me. I think that’s what makes a really good teacher.” Like so many scholars before her, Asher continues to be fascinated by the science of psychology. “It’s about why people do what

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they do, how people learn. I love it, if you can’t tell,” Asher laughs.

However Asher is careful not to psychoanalyse those around her.

“It’s so relevant to everyday life. I love when my students go home and talk to their parents or grandma or sister or brother about what we’ve been discussing and how it applies to their life.”

“I sometimes do it subconsciously – probably mostly with my family members – but I try to take people at face value,” says Asher. “It’s important to separate my personal life from my teaching

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life because you can cross over very easily.” As for her status as a young female teacher, Asher sees it as both a gift and a double-edged sword. “It’s a big advantage because I can relate to the kids; it wasn’t that long ago that I was in high school,” says Asher.

“I can connect with my own experiences and it doesn’t seem like a lifetime ago.

Technology is also a gamechanger, inside the classroom and out.

“It does have its disadvantages too. There have been times when my students don’t respect my authority as they would an older teacher, or speak inappropriately. You have to shut that down instantly and turn it into a learning experience.”

“There are so many great online tools you can use that weren’t available even five years ago, quizzes and Padlet (online post-it notes) to help encourage discussion,” says Asher. “I’m always looking for different ways of teaching and applying

so I can better teach my kids; I want to put myself in their shoes and understand how they best learn.” But with unprecedented levels of online addiction, Asher says students need to be discerning. “With social media students are accessible to one another 24-7. That’s really hard to get away

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26 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG

>> Rachael Golder, Mitchell Gebert, Sophie Hodges, Erin Schrapel and Asher Rohde.

from, especially for those being bullied,” she says. “Fortunately we are more accepting of anxiety and stress and there’s lots more ways of dealing with it. “If we can encourage students to look from a different

G

perspective and ask ‘what’s the real story’, ‘where’s the truth’, ‘what research do I need to do’, that’s a really valuable skill to have.” For all the complexities facing vulnerable teenagers, Asher remains full of hope for the

next generation and their capacity to make their way in the world.

and have that really educated perspective on issues,” says Asher.

“There are some brilliant kids that I’m teaching who just have so much knowledge about what’s going on in the world and can evaluate things

“I think they are going to have the most amazing, successful career and life beyond school. “These kids just amaze me.”

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28 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 29

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON

Fire...

A simple, primal and old as time method of cooking that Lachlan Colwill of Hentley Farm Restaurant has found himself returning back too. Lachlan is drawn to the simplicity of cooking with fire and red gum for the incredible flavours imparted on the food from smoke and flame.

It really is in stark contrast to his years of training in world class facilities, using the best kitchen ‘tools’ and techniques. But a desire to reinvent himself and his food has seen this chef originally from Freeling include this earliest of cooking techniques back into his arsenal to ensure his customers have the most amazing food experience here in the Barossa.

This chef seems to be in a pretty good place right now, driving quality and innovation in food, whilst helping build a destination in the Barossa with wide acclaim and recognition.

A ‘mostly’ portrait and ‘brief’ interview series exploring the idea that one image has the power to tell the whole story. Each ‘sitter’ suggests the next person to be photographed in this series, and thus ensues an interesting and unknown trail of Barossa identities to come. Stay tuned… Pete.


30 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG // B O OK REVIEW

BOOK REVIEW REVIEW BY TODD KUCHEL

Children of Blood and Bone WRITTEN BY TOMI ADEYEMI Eleven years ago, King Saran orchestrated a raid; slaughtering the Maji to eliminate all magic. Stripped of their destiny, their children, ‘the diviners’ are left reduced to living penniless lives as peasants. With the announcement of a senseless tax Zélie, a diviner left motherless after the raid, travels to the royal market in the hope of trading fish. Meanwhile, King Saran has discovered an ancient scroll

capable of reigniting magic. After witnessing the murder of her servant at her father’s hand, King Saran’s daughter, Amari flees the castle with the scroll. Needless to say, Amari and Zélie’s paths collide and together they embark on a thrilling mission to outrun the monarchy and return magic for good. I understand this novel has received a decent amount of hype and is predicted to

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be the next giant YA fantasy franchise, with a movie deal already in place. I admit I don’t usually take to such heavy fantasy. They usually start with countless unknown references expecting readers to follow without explanation. The children of Blood and Bone however swiftly brings its readers up to speed without needless prolonged explanation.

Teamed with a deep message of humanity and equal rights, this book is fantastic. I was hooked from the very beginning. Those infatuated with existing fantasy franchises, here’s a chance to get on board another great adventure from the very beginning. The children of Blood and Bone is available now from Raven’s Parlour book store, Tanunda.


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ADV E RTORI AL

Everything you thought you knew about aged care has changed. Today, consumers have much more say in determining what they need to live a fulfilling and rewarding retirement. Aged care providers like Barossa Village have to be far more flexible and adaptive in meeting these needs and providing choices. Older people in our community mistakenly believe that asking for help to manage their daily lives means losing their independence. Nothing could be further from the truth. Seeking support when you need it, results in far better outcomes for living a happier and healthier life. We call it an “integrated care approach” that can be accessed through our retirement living, home care, supported accommodation and residential care. This integrated approach is unique to Barossa Village and provides our clients a seamless transition as they age and the support to live a productive and better life. Our qualified staff are available to help you navigate your way through My Aged Care, tailor a Home Care Package to help you live independently in your own home, explore the options of our independent living units in Tanunda, Nuriootpa and Angaston, or discuss supported accommodation and residential care. Be proactive and achieve the goals that you want to live a more fulfilling life. Barossa Village is a community owned not for profit organisation, celebrating over 55 years of providing aged care services to the Barossa.

www.barossavillage.org | p. 08 8562 0300


34 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG // TR AVEL

My Vine Change After nine years of dreaming and two years of solid planning, we finally made our move from the hustle and bustle of the city to the picturesque Barossa Valley. Working for seven years at Burnside Village in one of the busiest travel agencies in South Australia has certainly opened my eyes to the world - with thousands of destinations and a large number of different travel styles to keep me on my toes. The date finally arrived and our dream came true as we made our ‘vine change’ from the city lights to the vines of the Barossa Valley. Living in Tanunda and working in Nuriootpa has certainly offered the

work/life balance we had both been looking for. I feel very fortunate and blessed to have landed firmly on my feet here at Phil Hoffmann Travel Barossa Valley. I work alongside a wonderful team and we have fantastic clientele. Getting to know the community, by attending local functions and community events, has allowed me to quickly settle into my role and new life here. Throughout my years in travel, I have certainly found a passion for certain styles of travel and destinations. One of my specialty areas is constructing round the world airfares.

WORDS BY SANNA SAUNDERS PHIL HOFFMANN TRAVEL BAROSSA VALLEY These offer incredible value and I love the challenge of creating a great itinerary that covers as many cities as possible, at the best possible price.

parts of the world myself.

Nowadays, more and more clients are taking longer holidays, rather than a few shorter ones, and having the ability to travel to North America and Europe in the one trip is quite appealing to them – and that’s where I can help.

Ticking the Rocky Mountaineer rail journey off my bucket list was definitely a highlight – it really was everything I was hoping it would be!

Without a doubt the most popular destinations at this time of year are Europe, USA and Canada. Finding a travel agent with a solid knowledge of these destinations is paramount, and the best way I have gained this knowledge is with firsthand experience, visiting these

Canada would have to be one of the top three countries I’ve visited.

Canada is such a fantastic country to visit and the Rockies are simply spectacular. If you’re thinking of travelling there in 2019, now is the time to take advantage of our earlybird sale. Why not pop in and see myself and the team at Phil Hoffmann Travel Barossa Valley? We would love to make you a coffee and talk all things travel.

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36 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG

“Yes, I am a Christian. But, you mightn’t see me at Church on a Sunday. Sunday is a day of rest for me because I’ve been to that many religious services I think I’ve said all my prayers I’m going to have a Sunday off!” - Clayton Scott


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 37

Honourable undertaking WORDS BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON

It is said there are only two certainties in life. Tanunda’s Clayton Scott pays his taxes like any law abiding citizen but as one of only two ‘Master’ Funeral Directors in the state, he is also in the unique position where death is his living. Walking into the Nuriootpa funeral parlour which bears his name, you are warmly greeted by a tall, snappily dressed figure. It’s then you realise this is someone people spend most of their lives avoiding as far as professions go. Yet Clayton has the calming, reassuring presence you would expect from an undertaker, even the rich timbre of his voice suits his role to perfection. One has to wonder though, why does anyone choose to dedicate his life to such a career where tears and sadness are the norm? Clayton smiles at the question he knew was coming, it seems there’s an interesting story about to unfold. “I grew up in a hotel environment, the Kent Town Hotel,” he says. “My father was a publican, he was born in a pub; my mother and her father were publicans and my father’s father was a publican. “That was my life growing up. Day starts, go to school and you come home and go upstairs so you are not in the pub environment.” Clayton describes an idyllic childhood at “the top of Rundle Street”. Back in those days, hotel hours were “six o’clock open and eight o’clock close” and Clayton’s grandmother, whom he affectionately called “Narnie”, played an important role in he and his brother’s upbringing. “My grandmother was our carer...she lived at the hotel too. Then she got ill and was taken to hospital and she never came out,” recalls Clayton. “I never saw her again. She was gone.” As a 10 year old, Clayton barely understood the concept of dying and his “children should not be seen” upbringing in the hotel also rang true for Narnie’s funeral, so he was not allowed to attend. “That didn’t dwell very well with me... Why couldn’t we go? What happens? “I was very inquisitive and that’s when the interest started.”


38 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG

If you didn’t know this child’s future, one could consider what followed to be an unusual pastime for someone of Clayton’s tender years. Curiosity taught him back pages of newspapers were filled with funeral notices and because he lived so close to West Terrace Cemetery, why couldn’t he hop on his bicycle and learn more? “I investigated,” Clayton says. “I watched funerals at churches...I could watch from my bike and see what was going on. Then at West Terrace Cemetery, I’d look to see if there was a burial happening.” What Clayton discovered was a celebration of life facilitated by a team of caring people who provided one last opportunity to say goodbye - he didn’t have that with Narnie. “That’s when I decided that’s what I wanted to do,” Clayton says. “That was the calling. I could see that I could do what they were doing. It was my

background, in my nature.” The journey continued for Clayton as he sought more information on a topic children were supposed to be blissfully ignorant of. “I had to find out how you get a career in this industry and there is not a lot of information at all. “So then I started to go and visit funeral parlours.” Clayton has to laugh, he knows how odd his story must sound - don’t most ten year old boys want to be firefighters? He speaks of funeral directors “humouring” him and telling him to come back when he’s older and the plot in the backyard where wooden clothes pegs marked the site of any “dearly departed” insects he found. “A caterpillar, butterfly… whatever I found dead in the backyard, I didn’t care. It got buried! “And because I lived in a pub, there were lots of matchboxes

and I would collect them... I had my own little register, where I would record everything. I knew it was all in the newspaper so I had to record everything I was doing. “I just wanted to give them respect, that’s it.” Clayton was 13 years old when, whilst with his father on a business trip to Kapunda, he met funeral director, Kon Pfitzner. He could never have imagined that years later he would own Pfitzner Funerals because at the time, he was just doing his regular school holiday “research”. “I didn’t go to playgrounds... I went looking for cemeteries and funeral parlours!” he laughs. “I went around the front, no one there. I see there is a back entrance so I walk around the block and there was Mr Pfitzner with a hearse… So, I introduced myself. “He was very receiving; he

didn’t shoo me away. He thought oh well, it’s a career and not many people want to do it. “That’s the first time I saw somebody. He showed me someone in a coffin and said this is what is going to happen and that was that.” A student counsellor at Unley High School immediately recognised Clayton’s caring, empathetic nature and passion for the industry. “He actually got what I needed to pursue what I wanted to do.” Work experience with Daryl Blackwell at FW Blackwell, led Clayton to being offered a position as a funeral director’s assistant. “My year of schooling ended on November 24 and on November 28, 1978, I started working in the funeral industry. I was sixteen.” Forty years on, Clayton can say he has reached the pinnacle of his industry after being mentored by some of the best

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 39

and gaining qualifications in all fields of Mortuary Science.

with the musical society, “back in the day”.

talking, saying this or that and they just have no idea.”

Along the way, he met his wife, Debbie “in a bus”; they moved to Tanunda following the acquisition of Colin Liebich Funerals and raised two children, Caitlin and Lachlan.

Whilst outwardly, Clayton exudes an aura of complete control, he has an emotional side few will ever see.

Remaining confidential is part of the job and strictly legislated, a ruling that can cause heavy burden.

“I’m mentally strong, but I’m not a machine,” says the 56-year-old.

“What annoys me is we don’t get any debriefing or counselling. Others say we’ve been to a debrief yet we never get invited,” Clayton says.

Meanwhile, Clayton served at the highest level as President of Australian Funeral Director’s Association, during which time he helped facilitate national guidelines with Prime Minister John Howard to be used in the event of pandemic flu and terrorism attacks. He shares his leadership expertise by filling many volunteer roles, from chairman of local radio station, Triple B FM to President of the Nuriootpa Football Club. “I’ve been chairman of all sorts of things...I get asked, I help. It’s what I do.” Clayton continues to lend his voice to emcee events, drawing on skills learned during evenings treading the boards

Clayton admits to shedding a tear at funerals and has seen more than his fair share of heartbreak, especially in his coronial work. “Murders, murder suicides, car crashes – everything,” he says. There is one thing Clayton feels the public often don’t grasp. “If someone dies and it is a coronial matter where the police are investigating a death or a doctor doesn’t want to issue a death certificate...people don’t understand we represent the coroner, not a funeral director. “The rules are ‘no dialogue’... it is a different aspect of death care. But, you hear people

He plans to fight for change and if his past is any indication, it will happen. “Psychologically, our work is stressful and traumatic sometimes. You can’t show emotion because we’ve got to lead the way.” And lead the way he does, whether it is quietly advocating for a reduction in speed limit for notoriously dangerous intersections, or educating young drivers by introducing “mock accidents” to high schools in an effort to curb the road toll. Clayton will step up. “I don’t want to see kids in a car,

I don’t want to see anyone in a car. You can’t stop it, but you can educate.” Clayton is “honoured and privileged” to serve families and is proud of the path he has chosen. He and Debbie have struck a good work-life balance and it seems Clayton’s dry sense of humour also helps as he tells of the day when Adelaide crematorium staff went on strike, leaving the gardeners running the show – “awkward!” This month, Clayton is preparing to emcee a brass band night in the Tanunda Show Hall and says entertainment is a coping mechanism. He’ll likely be dressed in a loud jacket – the complete opposite to his sombre work suit. “I switch off from funerals, put myself in another world… otherwise you would lose your mind!,” he laughs. “And I hate fishing!”

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PET ADVICE // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 41

Chips and Snips: WORDS BY CATHERINE HARPER BAROSSA VETERINARY CLINIC Unless you have been snoozing under a rock, you would be aware that laws surrounding cat and dog ownership are changing in South Australia as of July 1, 2018. These changes affect everyone who owns a dog or cat and can be a little confusing, so let’s try and clear a few things up. All dogs and cats of any age and including working dogs must be microchipped by July 1st. The SA government has been supporting pet owners to make this easier through their ChipBlitz initiative and Barossa

What’s changing in SA’s Pet Laws?

Vet Service has also been offering discount days. Details of these can be found at ChipBlitz.com or below. All dogs and cats born after July 1, 2018 must be desexed by six months of age. Exemptions can be gained for working dogs or breeding dogs, but the rule is designed to reduce unwanted dogs in shelters and promote responsible ownership. A new dog registration system called DACO will be used to register dogs across South Australia. This is online and will require you as owner to keep details updated and correct.

Dog and Cat breeders all must be registered with Dog and Cat Management Board and adhere to a new set of industry standards around welfare and sale of animals as pets. If you are unsure about any of these details, please go to dogandcatboard. com.au or give the clinic a call and one of our friendly staff will be able to assist with the answer. Remaining $29 discount opportunities in the Barossa are: Kapunda: Thursday, June 7, 14, 21 and 28 from 1-5 p.m.

Call 8566 2301 for an appointment. Nuriootpa: Saturday, June 23 from 8.30 a.m.-12 noon and Tuesday, July 10 and 17 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Call 8562 1162 for an appointment. If you are unsure whether your pet is microchipped or if you are unsure if the details are up to date Barossa Vet Service is proud to offer a free microchip check for all your pets. No appointment required. Just drop into the clinic and the friendly staff will be happy to help.

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 43

Putting the fun in fund-raising WORDS BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN KRÜGER

A selfless group of big hearted Barossans are proving the old cliché of putting “fun” into fundraising is a winner. Volunteer run organisation, Barossa Area Fundraisers for Cancer’s mission is to “Financially assist, support, maintain and improve the quality of life for cancer patients in the area” and they’ve been doing just that for 10 years. Founding members, Julie Combe, president and Tash Goldsmith, secretary still pinch themselves when they think of how much money the group has raised in the last decade, with conservative estimates suggesting a minimum of $600,000. It was considered a brave step for the Barossa branch to break away from the nationwide fundraising group they were originally affiliated with, and although they appreciated their efforts were “for the bigger picture”, the fact only 10 percent of the money raised was returned to their local community bothered members. “Back then, the Barossa girls were in the running for an award,” explains Julie. “We had raised $88,000 in one year… we were the highest money raisers in regional South Australia. We thought isn’t it a shame we don’t get more of that? Why can’t we raise money for our own?” A meeting at The Clubhouse in Tanunda set the group on a new path. “We thought how do we go about starting up our own fundraising group? First thing was we needed to have some money so we all put in $2, there were a dozen of us on that night, so we had $24,” laughs Tash. “Jack Ferrett came in and asked what are you girls doing? And he slaps 500 bucks on the table! “We got a raffle license and raised $1,200 from our $524 – we thought this is great! We can do this.” Jack was instrumental in helping the group with their constitution and has since become the group’s patron. “He’s always been so generous. He was our inspiration to get going and when we got the constitution, Wyndham Rogers did all of that for nothing. It was all lovely!” Julie says. The group’s first big event was a country music show at the Vine Inn featuring the Costa Brothers. Tash admits they had no idea what they were doing but that didn’t seem to matter because they had a lot of fun in the process. “It worked, I think we brought in about $5,000,” she says. “We went totally overboard! We had butterflies hanging from the ceiling… one of the girls from the committee made them.”


44 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG Those brightly coloured symbols of new life now form part of the BAFFC logo which feature on two cars, driven by volunteers, which the group provide for cancer patients needing to travel to the city for treatment. “The butterfly – it’s the start of a new beginning,” Julie says of the colourful symbol adoring the vehicles that need replacing every two years due to the sheer number of kilometres clocked up. Today, the group number more than 25 volunteers, including two “brave” men, and are nothing short of master fundraisers. “We are down pat with doing stuff now, we are so fine-tuned!” laughs Tash. They’ve hosted pyjama parties, girl’s nights, giant auctions and raffles, speak to organisations and rattle tins. Julie even admits to talking four “hot guys” into taking off their shirts for the highest bidder at one event, raising an extra $600 in the process. “Our motto is to never miss an opportunity!” she says.

Projects BAFFC now fund include home assistance, palliative care rooms, resources at local libraries and massage therapy as well as a wig programme, prosthesis fittings and much more.

help nursing staff find veins for chemotherapy and blood warming machines to reduce pain during transfusions.

Even something as simple as cosy blankets lovingly made by local “Probus knitting ladies” gifted to palliative care patients or silk “chemo caps” for those who have lost their hair are initiatives facilitated by the group.

Describing themselves as “well organised, mature, rat bags,” BAFFC is more than a fundraising group, it’s friends wanting to giving back.

“The McGrath breast care nurse loves us because she says we are the only region that do what we do,” says Tash.

“We are looking out for each other’s needs as well as the community’s and I think if we can be of any help to anyone who is travelling with this terrible disease, and it’s an expensive disease, there are no two ways about it; if we can financially assist and support, that’s what we’ll do.”

“We have all these people ‘on tap’,” she says of their impressive network which includes a range of service providers and volunteers who give of their time and talent. “It’s kind of grown a little bit bigger than Ben Hur, but that’s fantastic - it’s just amazing, people are so generous.” Further afield, BAFFC have purchased specialised equipment for hospitals where locals frequent, things like $9,000 “acuvein” devices to

“There are all those little things that make a difference.”

“We are group of volunteers who have now become family,” says Julie.

The duo know only too well how valuable such support can be through their personal experience. Tash was just 31 years old when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. “I didn’t have chemo or radiation therapy, but I did have

my breast removed,” she says. “For me there was that connection to the people in the group…It was more about feeling like I needed to do something. With all the terribleness of it all, it was nice to do something to make it better. “There are times when I’m so busy I’m like gosh, I don’t have time for this! But, then there’s this little birdie on my shoulder saying you know what? This is what you need to do.” Julie agrees, she too has dedicated her time for a heartfelt reason. Her husband, Roy passed away from lung cancer 20 years ago. When Roy was diagnosed, there was little support available during the 12 weeks before he died. “We just came out of the doctor’s room… we drove home and I thought what do we do now? “Even the palliative care rooms… I used to sit there and there was nothing. There was a plastic clock on the wall, a chair and a bed. It was so stark.”


>> Barossa Area Fundraisers for Cancer treasurer, Denis Tompkins is also a volunteer driver and spends many hours commuting patients to and from city appointments. “It gives me a great deal of satisfaction doing what I do,” he says of his role. As a bowel cancer survivor and someone who has had two melanomas removed, Denis is a great advocate for screenings and early detection. “I tell you what, I wouldn’t be here otherwise.”

Making palliative care suites feel homely was the first project BAFFC took on and whilst there have been sad times, the group have supported each other along the way. “I must say, I think I have repaid

Roy, but now I’m moving onto helping new people. Every day we hear of someone affected by cancer,” Julie says.

reckoned with.

definitely get side-tracked.”

“We stand out from the crowd,” says Tash.

Julie giggles in agreement.

A decade on, the “purple army”, with their highly recognisable uniforms, are a force to be

“We’re a fun-raising committee! Yes, we do stick to an agenda and get things done, but we

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WINE REVIEWS

46 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG // W I NE REVIEWS

HAYES FAMILY

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The power and might of this single block high in the hills of Ebenezer in the northern Barossa effortlessly swallows up 20 months in a new French puncheon. It has emerged a deep black purple, rippling with density of black fruits, black pastilles and coal dust. A wine for lovers of the full impact of the northern Barossa, yet with line, length, finely structured tannins and balance to support it.

The St Hugo team have targeted a fresher, crisper and more crunchy style through earlier picking and more whole bunches in the ferment. The result frames pretty berry fruits in savoury spice. A change in the Shiraz parcel has produced a beautifully fine-boned style of well-defined tannins.

A classic Barossa Shiraz that unites density with definition, packed with blackcurrant and blackberry fruit and layers of dark chocolate French oak, structured with firm, fine and slightly furry tannin structure. Built for the long-haul, it has the tension and frame to go the distance.

Derek Fitzgerald intended to blend this Mataro from a single site in the south of the Barossa, but couldn’t resist keeping it aside when he saw the quality of the fruit. The fruit integrity more than endorses his decision and he’s done a masterful job of upholding red fruit brightness, mixed spice complexity, even notes of sarsaparilla, beautifully framed in refined tannins and lingering long with bright acid line.

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WINE REVIEWS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 47

EDEN HALL

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SHIRAZ 2016 A beautifully refined Eden Valley Riesling of lifted kaffir lime spice that captures the mood of the cool, slow-ripening 2017 season in focused lime and granny smith apple fruit, nuanced with a ripeness and fragrant exotic lift reminiscent of pink lady apple. It holds itself with impressive line and length, with the immediately approachable ripeness of the vintage contrasting a structure of stamina.

From the top of Mengler’s Hill, the highest vineyard from which St Hallett sources, this is a characterful and structured style for lovers of Eden Valley Shiraz. It’s tangy and bright, proudly proclaiming its cool altitude credentials in herbal notes and grippy, fine tannins and great length and focus that promise enduring potential.

There is fragrance and elegance here of wild strawberry and raspberry fruit, within a style of spice and dried herbs. Bright acidity well supports tannins of fine structure. 40% whole bunch sits comfortably and lifts the spice and tannin grip, while upholding a refined and restrained style. It finishes long and well balanced.

A dense, brooding Shiraz of deep black purple potency that delivers the might of Ebenezer and Greenock without sacrificing fruit integrity or balanced poised. Finely structured tannins and balanced acidity provide confident support. Serve it blind to any selfrespecting Barossa lover and watch them guess it’s worth double the price.

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48 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG // W I NE REVIEWS

GRANT BURGE MESHACH BAROSSA SHIRAZ 2012

PEWSEY VALE THE CONTOURS EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2012

MESH CLASSIC RELEASE EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2012

Deep in colour yet vibrant in hue, the distinguished 2012 season has given birth to a Meshach of brooding power, surging with black fruits of all kinds, black pastilles, liquorice and dark chocolate, underlined by the gamey complexity of two years maturation in oak barrels. Firm, fine tannins draw out a finish of great line and length. Signature Barossa Shiraz and benchmark Meshach.

The great 2012 season in Eden Valley is tracking with pristine determination at six years of age, upholding the tension of pure lime and lemon that defined its youth, and ever so slowly building the personality of honeyed toast, spice and roast nuts. It has barely embarked on its secondary journey, and its magnificent, taut yet ripe acidity and stunning line and length promise a profound future.

The calibre of the 2012 season in the esteem of Robert Hill-Smith and Jeffrey Grosset is evidenced in their first ever rerelease of Mesh. Five years of bottle age has built wonderful depth of toasty, spicy, roast almond complexity while doing nothing to diminish the laser line and lemon and lime tension of this great vintage. For all it represents, it’s a bargain.

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GRANT BURGE SHADRACH BAROSSA CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2010

PEWSEY VALE EDEN VALLEY 1961 BLOCK RIESLING 2012

TURKEY FLAT VINEYARDS BUTCHER’S BLOCK SHIRAZ 2016

The spectacular 2010 season has delivered a Barossa Cabernet of well-tempered ripeness, upholding blackcurrant and capsicum varietal integrity and framing it in the supple, succulent generosity of the Barossa. At eight years of age, the gamey, pan juice and roast capsicum personality of maturity adds a layer of intrigue. Fine tannins remain confidently poised, promising medium-term potential.

A new release to commemorate the 170th anniversary of Riesling at Pewsey Vale, from a ‘dress circle’ block in this grand, historic site, this is a riesling layered with considerable depth of old vine presence, and amplified texture of slatey Eden Valley minerality. It juxtaposes cool, high acid tension with the generosity of the season. In undeviating line and determined length, this is a Riesling force to be reckoned with.

Welcome to the new age of Barossa Shiraz, where early-picked freshness and characterful pepper and spice rule! Maker Mark Bulman was concerned his brand new release might be chastised for not being sufficiently ‘Barossa’. To the contrary, he’s captured a regional and varietal integrity too often masked by alcohol and oak. Modern palates want more Barossa Shiraz of such delightful refinement.

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ROCKFORD ROD & SPUR SHIRAZ CABERNET 2014

HENSCHKE KEYNETON EUPHONIUM 2013

MESH EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2017

Bright, crunchy Cabernet leaves a more pronounced impression than its one-third inclusion might suggest, well meshed with the spice and succulent berry fruits of Shiraz, freshened with lively acidity and nicely textured, super fine tannins. A blend of length and vibrancy, promising strong ageing potential.

A well-crafted wine that utilises the fragrance and structure of more Cabernet, Merlot and Cabernet Franc than usual to balance this warm season. The result is a wine of violet fragrance, crunchy dark berry fruits and a firm, grainy chassis of tannin structure. Four years of maturity has brought subtle gamey, savoury complexity that carries through a long finish.

A fragrant apple blossom and white pepper bouquet and steely lime juice, granny smith and talc palate tone the exuberance and exotic quince notes of the season. It concludes with a wonderful juxtaposition of tension and concentration, carrying with great line and length. A standout of the season, and it will be among the longer lived.

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WINE REVIEWS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 49

CHARLES MELTON GRAINS OF PARADISE 2015

CHARLES MELTON NINE POPES 2015

TORBRECK BAROSSA VALLEY ROUSSANNE 2017

Charlie Melton’s more traditional, American-oaked Barossa Shiraz is full of black plum and black cherry fruits, backed with layers of savoury spice and milk chocolate. It’s a supple and approachable style of well-textured, fine-grained tannins and a long and plush finish.

Charlie Melton aspires to smoothness in his signature blend and the great 2015 season has given birth to a particularly plush and supple rendition. He had tactically deployed a touch of Mataro from the top of Mengler’s Hill to lend a savoury, herbal garrigue-like complexity to counter its juicy and sweet feel. It finishes with a long, effortless glide.

This zesty young Roussanne exuberantly declares Ian Hongell’s arrival at Torbreck, beautifully juxtaposing fresh, wild lemons with exotic nashi pear and star fruit complexity. Exclusively from the 1994 planted Descendant vineyard, this is a finely textured and elegant style of finesse and class rarely seen in this variety.

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WINE REVIEWS BE SEEN IN THE BAROSSA MAG. SEND YOUR WINE SAMPLES TO: TYSON STELZER, 14 ANDREA STREET, TARRAGINDI, QUEENSLAND 4121

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HEALTH & WELLBEING // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 51

WORDS BY LEE TEUSNER GO VITA TANUNDA Disclaimer: Some information has been extracted from the Go Mag.

Hemp is the world’s most nutritionally complete food source. No other natural resource on earth offers the commercial, economic and environmental potential of hemp. Up until recently it wasn’t legal to sell or market hemp as a food in Australia. But after acceptance of much scientific research, the Australian Government and food regulators have given it the green light, so we can all enjoy the health benefits, as is done in most other countries around the world. What the ancients knew, modern physicians and scientists have rediscovered. Cultures around the world have been cultivating, trading and celebrating industrial hemp with the earliest records dating back 8,000 years to ancient China, where health benefits were first documented in the Chinese Pharmacopeia. Hemp is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids with the perfect omega ratio and contains less common stearidonic (SDA) and

Hemp is not a dirty word

gamma linolenic acids (GLAs), which fight inflammation and provide cardiovascular benefits. Hemp is also easily digested, is a complete source of protein with all nine essential amino acids, and contains cholesterolfighting phytosterols, B vitamins (including folate) and minerals. Hemp protein is superior to other plantbased protein sources including soy, rice and pea as it is a highly digestible, complete wholefood with a bioavailability rating of 98%. Hemp protein powder works well in smoothies, juice and yoghurt. It’s nonGMO, non-allergen, gluten free, dairy, soy and lactose free. It’s claimed a human could survive indefinitely on hemp protein and water alone as it contains everything the body needs to function. Add the sustainability aspects of hemp, and the argument to use it as a pantry staple are compelling. One acre of hemp can produce 1,000L of oil, 30 tonnes of fibre and more medicine

and biofuel than any plant in the history of the world.

Cannabis consists of over 100 known cultivars, all unique in chemical structure.

Hemp was the most important plant on earth 200 years ago.

Cannabis also contains over 400 phytonutrients and 80 known cannabinoids, which, according to numerous clinical trials, may have compelling efficacy in medical applications.

According to historian Dr John Jiggens, during the Age of the Sail, a global shortage of hemp crops motivated English botanist, Sir Joseph Banks to establish a hemp production colony in the South Pacific to fuel the British maritime expansion with ropes and sails made from its fibre. Hemp’s emergence in the 20th century was plagued by a comprehensive campaign resulting in its ban. Hemp was bundled together in postprohibition enforcement riddled with misunderstandings to its relation to the cannabis plant. Hemp shares only the botanical name Cannabis sativa and looks similar but differs in chemical structure and preparation. Consumption of the seeds, oil or protein from hemp will not produce psychoactive effects, even in large amounts.

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Non-psychoactive cannabis preparations rich in other key compounds such as cannabidiol or CBD oil, have demonstrated effectiveness through clinical studies in treating neurological disorders such as intractable epilepsy. Note in Australia CBD is a schedule 4 prescription medicine. In the wise words of pioneering entrepreneur, Henry Ford, “Why use up the forests which are centuries in the making, if we can get the equivalent of forest and mineral products in the annual growth of the hemp fields?” On November 12, 2017, hemp seed food and beverage products were approved for legal sale and consumption in Australia and New Zealand. You can find your Hemp health products at Go Vita Tanunda.


52 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG // R E C IPE

RECIPE BY PETER CLARKE VINTNERS BAR & GRILL

GOATS CHEESE CHURROS You will need:

Method

50g butter

Bring the butter, salt, milk and water to boil in a small saucepan.

Place your mixture into a piping bag fitted with the star nozzle.

Add your flour and cook on a low heat for 1 minute.

Heat a small pot of vegetable oil to 180oC and pipe 12cm long churros straight into the hot oil.

8g salt 100ml milk 100ml water 160g flour 170g grated la dame 3 eggs 80g goat’s curd 1 small jar truffle honey vegetable oil for frying

Transfer the mixture to a Kitchen Aid fitted with the paddle attachment, add the finely grated hard goat’s cheese and paddle for two minutes on medium speed until slightly cooled. On low speed add your eggs to the mixture and combine for one minute.

Fry for 2 minutes then transfer to a tray lined with paper towel. Serve the churros along side the goat’s curd drizzled with ruffle honey.


RECIPE // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 53

RECIPE BY CLAIRE WOOD CARÊME PASTRY

POTATO MASCARPONE & SAUSAGE TARTS

RECIPE BY NEIL BULLOCK BAROSSA DISTILLING CO

MS MAPLE This has become one of our favourites at the Distillery. The Vermouth and Maple Syrup create a perfect balance of sweet and dry and when combined with the Gin, it becomes a delicious cocktail perfect for a Winters day.

You will need:

1 x 375g packet Carême all butter puff pastry, defrosted 100g mascarpone cheese 1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons finely grated parmigiano reggiano cheese Salt and pepper 300g potatoes, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 pork and fennel sausages 1 egg Few sprigs fresh oregano optional to serve SERVES 6

Like anything, the quality of the ingredients you use will have a big impact on the final product. So here we go!

You will need:

For the garnish:

A Rocks glass Ice 45ml Generations Gin 10ml Adelaide Hills Dry Vermouth (or another quality Dry Vermouth) 10ml Real Canadian Maple Syrup

A ‘cheek’ or 2cm diameter disc of orange peel A lighter or match 1 Cinnamon Quill

Method Method

Lay the pastry vertically and cut the puff pastry in half down the middle from top to bottom so you have two 27 x 17.5 cm tarts and place both on a large tray. Score a 1.5cm border around the edge of each tart.

Toss the potatoes in the olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Layer the potatoes over the cheese mixture slightly overlapping each other. Squeeze the sausages out of their casings and dot 2cm pieces of sausage all over the tarts. Top with the additional grated cheese

In a bowl combine the mascarpone and 1/4 cup grated cheese, season with salt and pepper and mix until well combined. Top each tart with 1/2 of the mixture leaving the border free.

Brush the edges of the tarts with beaten egg and bake for 30 minutes or until the edges are golden and the sausage is cooked. Serve immediately with fresh oregano.

You can now get a bit flash by ‘expressing’ the Orange over the glass. Cut a cheek/2cm disc of peel from the orange. Warm it with a flame, being careful not to singe any fingers.

Preheat oven to 200° Celsius.

1/2 fill your Rocks glass with ice. Measure and pour the Gin, Vermouth and Maple Syrup over the ice Stir well to combine all 3.

When it has started to release the oils, squeeze the cheek in the direction of the flame over the top of the glass. The oils will spray out and ignite in a short burst of flame. Drop the orange in the glass and look very smug that you did not burn yourself! The final stage is to position the Cinnamon Quill, in the glass and give it all a quick swirl. Serve and enjoy!


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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 55

A sweet and fulfilling life

WORDS BY TODD KUCHEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM KROEPSCH

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“When you’re working in something you’re enjoying it’s a pleasure. It’s kept me occupied. I think it’s helped keep me alive.” - Bryon Pearson.


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 57

>> Rachael Doecke with Bryon Pearson.

Chocolate, the undeniable temptation for us all; once an indulgence for the wealthy, the tasty treat derived from the cocoa bean has become one of the most popular foods in the world. These days however, while we have no trouble satisfying our cravings, few are able to sample the traditional delight of handmade chocolates. Fortunately, one man’s retirement hobby evolved into a successful business, supplying our local community with handmade chocolates for the last thirty years. In 1979, Bryon Pearson moved to the Barossa Valley as a consultant marketing manager for St Hallett Wines, later being employed full time as marketing manager. From St Hallett’s, Bryon managed the Die Gallerie restaurant in Tanunda, until a special request lead to the role of PR manager at Seppeltsfield. Nearing the end of his time at Seppeltsfield, Bryon attended a chocolate making course in Adelaide with his late wife, Lorna. “It was pretty crude,” Bryon admits. “But it taught me the basics; how chocolate is manipulated. From there I developed my recipes and skills and got my own plant together.” In 1989, following five years at Seppeltsfield, Bryon intended to retire, though wound up lecturing tourism subjects at Adelaide TAFE. Shortly after, Bryon grew tired of travelling each day and retired again. “That was my second retirement,” he laughs. By that time Bryon had developed his chocolate making skills and was giving many away. It was then that Bryon made a list of the bed and breakfasts in the area and established himself as Barossa Gourmet Confections.


58 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG

“People said, oh you should open a shop, but if you open a shop you need to be there 9-5. “I thought that if I can tie up bed and breakfasts and hotels, places like that, I can supply as a wholesaler. And that was the way I went.” Six months later, Bryon was working sixty-two hours a week, making three to four hundred chocolates per day. He would package in the

evenings and deliver once a month to thirty-three B&B’s around Barossa, Clare and even Mt Gambier. “When you’re working in something you’re enjoying it’s a pleasure. It’s kept me occupied. I think it’s helped keep me alive.” Though bed and breakfasts have been Bryon’s lifeblood, he has also showcased his creations at the Barossa Farmers Market each Saturday since 1991.

Over the year’s Bryon has catered for weddings and received numerous requests from customers. The strangest being a chocolate male’s anatomy. When asked if he accepted he chuckles, “No, no, I took the bar on that, though I have made breasts several times.” Bryon has also enjoyed making odd flavours, like chocolate coated cheezels, pretzels, and even chilli and wasabi flavoured chocolate.

“I still think I make the best rocky road,” Bryon admits. “That has been my big seller.” “I’ve always been an experimenter, that’s my pleasure. Just doing this day in and day out would bore me to tears.” Now, after thirty years of chocolate making, Bryon is retiring for a third time at ninety years of age. He is passing the business to

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 59

Chris and Noel Doecke, who are establishing a microbusiness for their daughter Rachael, who has Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, with the intent of ensuring a fulfilling future for her. In purchasing the business a new kitchen has been erected at Chris and Noel’s home, in which Chris and Bryon will work with Rachael, teaching her the art of chocolate making as well as packaging and labelling of the chocolates.

This will also be done with the help of Rachael’s daily support workers. They also hope to eventually include other young adults, living with a disability in the venture. “You should have seen the first time she (Rachael) packed the chocolates,” Bryon recalls. “She couldn’t wipe the smile off her face from what she achieved.” While I am assured the quality

and recipes will remain the same, Chris has chosen to rename the business Ability chocolates; a name that came as a brainwave of Chris’ friend, John Hughes, by removing dis from disability; therefore, a more fitting title for future intentions. Chris welcomes any businesses interested in stocking Ability chocolates to contact her directly. By no means does Bryon plan

to slow down in retirement. In fact he intends to use his newfound time developing hard centred creations and assist Chris when at all possible. Those partial to the delight of chocolate, whether it’s rocky road, freckles, mint or coffee you’re after, do yourselves a favour and make your way to the Barossa Farmers Market for the entire Ability chocolates range.

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60 | T HE B AR OSSA M AG // W E DDING

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Flight Centre Barossa Valley is relocating to a brand new store! As of 18 October 2017 our new location is: Shop 20 Barossa Central Shopping Centre, 1 Murray Street Nuriootpa SA 5355 Restrictions and conditions apply. Please askask us detailsatordetails visit ourorwebsite at flightcentre.com.au/lowest-airfare-guarantee. * Restrictions and Please us for visit our website at flightcentre.com.au/lowest-airfare-guarantee. Restrictions and conditions apply.conditions Please ask usapply. for further details or for visitfurther our further website flightcentre.com.au/lowest-airfare-guarantee. ▼

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WEDDING // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 61

Lucy Summerton & James Fechner MARRIED AT BROOKLYN FARM, MYPONGA BEACH DECEMBER 9, 2017

L & J FECHNER Hair and Make-Up Rachel Daff/Sweet Blend & Kristi McDonald Photography Mike Hemus Photography Cake Apex Bakery donuts Honeymoon Road trip along east coast of Australia

A family dinner for Lucy’s birthday at her mum’s house turned into a double celebration when James took her into the garden, held her hands and surprised her with a marriage proposal. James thought this was the perfect place to propose because the garden was one of her dad’s favourite places and after he passed away in 2011, he felt that being in the garden Lucy’s dad would be with them and the family too. The happy couple who met six and half years ago through James’ sister and Lucy’s friend were married by Verity Slee at Brooklyn Farm, Myponga Beach on December 9. The venue set the theme for the ceremony and the reception because of its natural Australian beauty with the stunnning weatherboard house, old stone barn, enormous gum trees and the rolling hills that meet the beach. A lot of fun was had for their 115 guests at the reception when a version of pass the parcel was played which involved hilarious dance moves, songs and jokes. For her special day Lucy wore a Caleche Bridal two-piece, long silk skirt with lace top and long tulle veil. Her bridesmaids were Maddy Rochau, Rachel Rice and Kristi McDonald while the groom’s attendants were Taylor Chinner, Matthew Kroschel, Jordan Kuchel and Joel Robins. Lucy and James said, “The help from their family and friends to make their special day truly memorable was overwhelming and they felt very loved.” Lucy is the daughter of Vicki and the late Shannon Summerton of Nuriootpa and James is the son of Sharon and Philip Fechner of Tanunda.


62 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG // W E DDING

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WEDDING // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 63

Jessica O’Callaghan & Jay Nash MARRIED AT THE RESERVE, SEPPELTSFIELD ROAD DECEMBER 16, 2017

J & J NASH Hair and Make-Up Mel Holman and Mandy Nash Flowers Fleur Social Photography Dan Evans Photography Bonbonaires Linkes Bakery honey biscuits

The Napa Valley will always be a special place for Jess and Jay. In September last year the couple were holidaying in the U.S. when after a day of wine tasting and a beautiful dinner afterwards, Jay got down on one knee and asked Jess to marry him. After 11 years together they were married by Celebrant, Victoria Blechynden at The Reserve, Seppeltsfield Road on December 16. They were later joined by 150 guests for a reception catered by Louise Haynes in their honour at the same venue. The two tier wedding cake featured vanilla with lemon curd and red velvet with buttercream. From sourcing as much local produce in the menu to the wine list and dancing the night away under the stars the couple gave their guests the best Barossa experience. For her special day Jess wore a Suzanne Harward dress whilst her attendants, Elyse Dirckze (maid of honour), Mary O’Callaghan, Sophie Slattery, Christie Gowans and Cate Sim wore a mix of dresses in the colour palette of neutrals, blush tones, champagnes and dusty pinks. Best man was Sam Pfeiffer and groomsmen were Michael Taylor, Henry Slattery, Jenson Mader and Darcy Daniher. Jay and Jess said, “Having their family and friends together in one place was by far the best decision and having their dog Cooper in the ceremony nearly stole the day when he decided to stop halfway down the aisle and roll over”. Jess is the daughter of Peter and Jo O’Callaghan of Melbourne and Jay is the son of John and Jill Nash of Nuriootpa.


64 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG // SO CIAL

NURIOOTPA ROVER FOOTBALL CLUB SPONSOR’S DAY on Saturday, May 26 Photos by Bradley Phillips 1. Val Shephard (Life Member) and Kathy Romeo (Barossa Brakes). 2. Nerissa and Paul Button (CCL Label). 3. Helen Turnbull (Angas Park Hotel), Jayne Siegele (Barossa Nissan), Rachel Pridham (Hahn Corp) and Leanne Chapman (Schild Estate Wines). 4. Ros and Marcus Schulz (Schulz Wines). 5. Chris Linke (Nuriootpa Football Club President) and Jon Siegele (Barossa Nissan). 6. Roger Mattschoss (Bucklands Estate Wines and Life Member) with Melva Graetz (Colt Club). 7. Jo and Luke Cartwright (Sparky’s A-Class Electrical).

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SOCIAL // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 65

CATS THE MUSICAL on Friday, May 25 Photos by Tony Robinson 1. Natasha, Kevin and Amelie de Lacy, of Lobethal. 2. Cassie, Bella and Lexie Pudney, Nuriootpa. 3. Helping out as theatre attendants at CATS were Anne Read, Jeneane Zimmermann and Nerida Harris. 4. Brenda Whittle and Jessica McCall, both of the Barossa. 5. Chris and Dennis Williamson, Freeling. 6. Ruby Preston and Makaya Sauer, of Eudunda with Jaz Williams, Marrabel and Hollie Preston, Eudunda. 7. Anne and Noel Hart, Inglewood.

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66 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG // SO CIAL

MELODIENACHT on Saturday, May 26 Photos by Tony Robinson 1. Front: Beck Cornish, Hayley Spaans and Michelle Othams. Back: Julie Modistach, Danielle Young and Andrea Clark.

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68 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG

BAROSSA VALLEY