The Barossa Mag - 3 - Winter 2017

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Winter 2017 | FREE

SOOTHING MELODIES Jamie and Vicki share their story

COURTNEY’S TENACITY The rise of women’s football

LARGER THAN LAMINGTONS Steve’s fundraising a flight above the rest


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PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Darren Robinson

TH E BAROS SA M AG | 3

EDITOR Tony Robinson CONTRIBUTORS: Adam Hunt Alicia-Lüdi Schutz Catherine Harper Claire Wood Heidi Helbig Kristee Semmler Lee Teusner Neil Bullock Sam Smith Todd Kuchel

from the team I absolutely adore this time of year... Don’t you? It makes me reminisce of winters’ past... Crisp morning air, fog drifting across the valley, my grandma’s chicken soup… clothes hanging on the backs of chairs in front of a crackling fire... gutters overflowing with crimson leaves, just begging to be cleared away one more time... that favourite thick coat I buried in the cupboard months ago...

DESIGN Jessica Waldhuter Stephanie Gann

It’s winter in the Barossa. A time I personally enjoy and look forward to. It’s something about the change in seasons that makes me see the beauty that is our region. Not to mention the people that make it such a dynamic place to be.

PHOTOGRAPHY Alicia-Lüdi Schutz John Krüger Pete Thornton Sam Kroepsch Bradley Phillips Dave Graor

In this winter edition of The Barossa Mag, we talk to Steve Aherns. A man who has found a way to support the local community by sharing his lifelong love of aviation. Be inspired by the story of musos, Vicki and Jamie Blechynden who share their love of music as a means to create happiness for all involved.

ADVERTISING Darren Robinson darren.robinson@leadernews.net.au Jordan Stollznow jordan.stollznow@leadernews.net.au Winter 2017 | FREE

We meet local football star Courtney Jensen. She describes what it’s like to be part of an exciting future through the new Australian Football League for Women. We introduce three local Lutheran pastors with a passion for the open road… They share their love of motorcycling and positivity for everyday life. With 58 vintages under his belt, local, Malcolm Schutz shares his knowledge of the changes in Barossa Viticulture over the years. We speak with natural therapist, Nev Bentley and discuss alternatives we can consider when we are not feeling 100%. Introducing from this edition are two new sections. Find upcoming events for the local calendar via our Events section and new contributor, Tyson Stelzer shares his knowledge on 20 Barossa wines you should try…

MELODIES SOOTHINGVicki share their story Jamie and

’S TENACITY COURTNEY football The rise of women’s LAMINGTONS LARGER THAN g a flight above the rest Steve’s fundraisin

OUR COVER: Vicky Blechynden photographed by Pete Thornton - What Pete Shot

From all of the team here at The Barossa Mag, we wish you a wonderful winter season and hope you enjoy the engaging stories of our people and this amazing region. Join us, as we uncover the real Barossa…

Jordan Stollznow The Barossa Mag

PUBLISHER Leader Newspapers Pty Ltd 34 Dean Street, Angaston 08 8564 2035 leader@barossaleader.com.au The Barossa Mag™ All material appearing in The Barossa Mag™ is copyright© unless otherwise stated or it may rest with the provider of the supplied material. The Barossa Mag™ takes all care to ensure information is correct at the time of printing but the publisher accepts no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of any information contained in the text or advertisements. Views expressed are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher or editor.

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TBM Contributors

4 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG

TODD KUCHEL

ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ

As an avid reader and film fanatic, Todd is a freelance writer with an appreciation for storytelling. From articles and reviews, to his own creative writing, Todd prides himself on the finest details.

Proud to be a grapegrower’s daughter, Alicia enjoys telling the stories of those who shape the region whilst adding to the Valley’s rich cultural tapestry as a brass musician.

HEIDI HELBIG In a career spanning print media, communications strategy and public relations, Heidi’s passion for storytelling has never wavered. Away from the desk she watches the seasons change in a small patch of century-old Grenache and tries to satisfy the enquiring minds of the little people in her life.

10-11

PETE THORNTON That saying ‘a picture tells a thousand words’ always seemed pretty clever to Pete. He always hated writing 1000 word essays at Uni – so photography it was for this guy! 12 years in as a pro photographer, Pete loves working with a story, and getting the best out of people to create unique, artful images.

SAM KROEPSCH

JOHN KRÜGER

What started as a hobby in the early 2000s, Sam found that his passion for taking photo’s was only the beginning. Sam now focuses mainly on Commercial and Bottle Photography as well as capturing people’s special moments. Away from the camera Sam enjoys water sports and exploring the country side, usually with a camera close by!

With Barossa connections dating back to the settling of Hoffnungsthal, John Krüger has been shooting as a freelance photographer around South Australia for the last 17 years. His favourite subjects are amazing food and interesting people. John loves positive stories as well as how his photos can bring them to life.

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16-19

2 pairs multifocal glasses from $299 Nuriootpa: 39 Murray St, 8562 3777.

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 5

23-25

44-46

29-31 contents

34-35

A positive state of mind

8-9

Events

37-40

Wine reviews

10-12

Our life is changed through music

42

Pet advice with Catherine Harper

14

Travel inspiration with Adam Hunt

16-19

Big sky, big dream, big picture

44-46

58 vintages and still growing

20

Gardening advice with Kristee Semmler

49

The Silent Invasion Book Review

23-25

Football - A woman’s game too

50-51

Seasonal recipes

26

Wellbeing with Lee Teusner

53-55

Weddings

29-31

Reverend Revheads

57-58

The Social Scene

Discover the magic

OPEN 7 DAYS 9.30AM TO 5.30PM 1561 Barossa Valley Way, Lyndoch | kellermeister.com.au



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our N E W CELLAR DOOR

Our new cellar door expands the original settler’s cottage into a world class cellar door experience. The building has been designed using local materials, builders and artisans to take advantage of the magnificent view over our Descendant vineyard. A humidified, walk-in glass cellar houses six bottles of every vintage of Torbreck wine. The building features private dining and tasting rooms, which can be opened up to accommodate a larger structured group tasting. Torbreck Vintners Cellar Door welcomes visitors 7 days a week. We invite you to enjoy our warm hospitality and taste our range of wine with our friendly staff between 10am and 5pm.

348 Roennfeldt Road, Marananga SA 5355. Phone: +61 (8) 8568 8123. Email: cellardoor@torbreck.com Follow us on Torbreck Vintners and @TorbreckBarossa

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8 | THE B A R OSSA MAG // E VE NTS

BONJOUR BAROSSA

SUNDAY, JULY 9 / 10.30 A.M. - 5 P.M. SEPPELTSFIELD VINTAGE CELLAR Seppeltsfield of the Barossa Valley invites lovers of all things French to Bonjour Barossa - a French food, wine and cultural celebration. Be transported to the cobbled streets of Paris to indulge in French foodie delights including patisserie (pastries & desserts), boulangerie (breads & baked goods) and charcuterie (cured and smoked meats), along with other favourites of beef bourguignon,

cheese and ice-cream. Join us for cooking demonstrations and a Champagne Masterclass by Le Cordon Bleu Australia, A Seppeltsfield Epicurean Walking Tour hosted by Seppeltsfield on-site Executive Chef Owen Andrews, live Parisian jazz music and an exclusive Pol Roger Champagne Lounge. Fun for all the family with Junior Sous Chef Workshops, face painting, petanque and more.

BAROSSA GOURMET WEEKEND SEPTEMBER 1 - 3 PROGRAMME LAUNCH JULY 17 Spend the weekend roaming, exploring and savouring the culinary food and wine delights of the Barossa through a series of truly Barossan events and experiences. A true celebration of Barossa hospitality.

THE 2017 BAROSSA WINE SHOW

SEPTEMBER 11-15 PRESENTATION DINNER - SEPTEMBER 14

CURRY & CABERNET

The annual Barossa Wine Show, first held in 1977, is seen as a showpiece of the region’s very best wines in any given year. Hundreds of wines are entered in over 20 different classes and judged over three days, with trophies presented at the Awards Presentation Dinner. Entries are open to Barossa Grape and Wine Association members.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 ST HUGO, 2141 BAROSSA VALLEY WAY, ROWLAND FLAT

SUNDAY, AUGUST 13 10.30AM – 5PM WHISTLER WINES

Come along to Whistler and enjoy the warmth of an open fire on our lawns. Featuring delicious curry, live music and Whistler Wines by the glass or bottle. Bring your family and friends and settle in for the afternoon. Bookings are not required. BYO chairs, tables and jumpers. No BYO food or alcohol.

GINA HOGAN - NIGHT AND DAY - THE DORIS AND SHIRLEY SHOW TUESDAY, JULY 4, 11.00 A.M. BAROSSA ARTS & CONVENTION CENTRE The fabulous Gina Hogan returns to the stage with another standout show featuring songs from Doris Day and Shirley Bassey. These two iconic women are as different as night and day, yet Gina moves effortlessly from Doris, the quintessential all-American “girl next door” to the dramatic and powerful Shirley, capturing the essence of these two women. You’ll be taken

All day breakfasts Light lunches Coffee and sweets

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8563 3116

ST HUGO PURE CABERNET CELEBRATION

on a trip down memory lane, with songs like Secret Love, Everybody Loves a Lover and On Moonlight Bay. And from the Shirley collection, Diamonds are Forever, Big Spender and more. Book tickets in person at Barossa Arts & Convention Centre, 130 Magnolia Road, Tanunda or by phone on 8561 4299.

The Home of St Hugo may be in the Barossa today, but St Hugo as a wine started its life in the Coonawarra more than 3 decades ago with wines made solely from the noble Cabernet Sauvignon. The grapes grown on this rich strip of rusty red “Terra Rossa” soil, one that sits over an old limestone sea bed are the source of much envy in the wine world with Coonawarra Cabernet proving for more than sixty years to cellar brilliantly. Help us celebrate this heritage and out first year of opening the St Hugo brand home, with a dinner focusing on the best vintages of St Hugo Coonawarra Cabernet, past, present and future. Starting with a tasting of six of the most outstanding museum wines from St Hugo’s best vintages, conducted by winemaker Dan Swincer we will to progress to a celebratory six course degustation dinner with dishes created to enhance the very best Cabernets we have available. Wines will include our limited release “Private Collection” wines and the extremely rare and collectable “Vetus Purum”, who knows there may even be back vintage large format wines opened and possibly a sneak peak at the best that is yet to come from the house of St Hugo. $200 per person. For further enquiries please contact Cathy Chapple on 8115 9200 or email cathy.chapple@sthugo.com Bookings: www.sthugo.com/experience available closer to the date.


EVENTS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 9

MARANANGA BRASS BAND’S NIGHT OF MUSIC

THE 2017 MARANANGA WINE SHOW

SATURDAY, JUNE 24 / 7.30 P.M. TANUNDA SHOW HALL

THE VINTAGE CELLAR, SEPPELTSFIELD WINERY

The Marananga Brass Band is in its 93rd year and has achieved outstanding success at competitions, especially in the early years. The Night of Music commenced at Freeling in 1973, was moved to Angaston for 4 years, and has been at Tanunda for 39 years. The night is a celebration of Popular Brass Band Music with special local guests, Michaela Jenke, Jeannette Mickan and Very Jayne. To book tickets, contact Lynette Heinze on 0473 252 758 or the Barossa Visitor information Centre.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26 / 7 P.M. Marananga hosts one of the Barossa’s best kept secrets – the Marananga Wine Show. An initiative of the Marananga Lutheran Church, the annual event showcases wines from the western Barossa and is the only sub-regional wine show in Australia. The public tasting provides guests a rare opportunity to taste more than 120 wine entries, and to cast their vote for the People’s Choice award. The public tasting is a celebration that offers guests a taste of western Barossa hospitality and the renowned winemaking traditions of this local community.

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL ON STAGE NURIOOTPA HIGH SCHOOL

EXPLORATION IN TEXTURE MIXED MEDIA PAINTING WITH GAYNOR HARTVIGSEN SATURDAY, JUNE 17 / 10 A.M. - 4 P.M. BAROSSA REGIONAL ART GALLERY

MATINEE SHOWS ON JUNE 22 - 23, 11 A.M. EVENING SHOWS ON JUNE 23 - 24, 7 P.M. BAROSSA ARTS & CONVENTION CENTRE

In this workshop you will delve into the fascinating world of textural painting techniques. Expand your repertoire of mark-making and textural effects and learn how to make your own texture medium. Beginners welcome. Gaynor Hartvigsen is a contemporary artist and experienced educator. Her art practice ranges from contemporary landscape and conceptual painting to sculptural assemblages using found and recycled materials.

A high energy and well-known show, the musical challenges people to break away from their cliques and express who they really are. Students have been working hard rehearsing choreography, learning lines, singing harmonies, playing the songs and designing the set.

SOUTH AUSTRALIAN LIVING ARTISTS FESTIVAL (SALA) AUGUST 1 - 3

The SALA Festival celebrates local, contemporary visual art. Held over the month of August, SALA is an opportunity for local artists to pair with local venues to exhibit interesting and diverse works across the state. For many Barossa-based artists, SALA is an opportunity to exhibit their works in their own region, connecting

with local businesses and bringing the area alive. Those interested in discovering more about SALA in the Barossa should visit www.artmusicdesignbarossa.org.au, where they will find a comprehensive map created by Creative Barossa, which lists all of the SALA venues and exhibitions in the region.

DAMIEN LEITH ROY - HALL OF FAME TOUR - A TRIBUTE TO ROY ORBISON SATURDAY, JULY 8 / 8.00 P.M. BAROSSA ARTS & CONVENTION CENTRE Revered singer-songwriter Damien Leith revisits the music of Roy Orbison in 2017 with a massive regional tour. The tour commemorates 30 years since Roy Orbison was inducted into the Rock n Roll and Songwriters’ Hall of Fame. Damien will be performing songs such as In Dreams, Crying to Running Scared, Oh

EXHIBITIONS

Pretty Woman and Blue Angel, to name a few. The show is jam-packed with as many Roy songs that can be fitted into the set list. A tribute to Roy Orbison is a show for all ages. Book tickets in person at Barossa Arts & Convention Centre, 130 Magnolia Road, Tanunda or by phone on 8561 4299.

WORKSHOPS

EXPRESSIONS IN WATERCOLOUR

MIXED MEDIA PAINTING - GAYNOR HARTVIGSEN

JOIN US FOR THE RE-LAUNCHSat OF17 June, 10-4pm – ALAN RAMACHANDRAN SPACE 25OUR May – NEW 26 June& VIBRANT RETAIL Delve into the fascinating world of textural painting techniques. Expand your repertoire of mark-making and S A T U RIMPRESSIONS D A Y 4 J U N E– BOTANICAL @ 3pm LASTING textural effects. 3 B A S E DON OW ROA , TANUNDA MEMORIES WOOL &D SILK – IGORA OPALA

BAROSSA REGIONAL G A L L E R Y

The official opening will showcase our new

29refurbished June – 24 July retail space, complete with new, local and regional stockists, and will be

ARTS IS US by drinks and nibbles, music accompanied and artist demonstrations.

– FOCUS DAY OPTIONS GROUP 4 Please July –indicate 27 Julyyour attendence by email to

info@barossa.sa.gov.au or by phone (08) 8563 0849.

(08) 8563 8340

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BOTANICAL PRINTING WEARABLE ART - IGORA OPALA Sat 22 & Sun 23 July, 9-5pm

Learn techniques behind Botanical printing on fabric and how this can be integrated into wearable felt art and homewares.

www.barossagallery.com

|

3 B a s e d o w R o a d , Ta n u n d a


10 | THE B A R OSSA MAG

WORDS BY HEIDI HELBIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 11

Through that experience we got a lot of inspiration and also experienced a very strong sense of support from the community that we never knew existed.”

- Vicki


12 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG

> VICKI AND JAMIE BLECHYNDEN

If Vicki and Jamie Blechynden’s music resonates with a rare, indefinable truth, it’s almost certainly because of the “extraordinary life” they have shared. The Tanunda couple’s journey has been filled with shattering lows and phenomenal highs that continue to inspire their music, their professional aspirations and their desire to pay it forward. Vicki explains the profound personal trauma that changed them indescribably; the loss of their daughters, Estelle, at 12 days old and Temperance, at 10 weeks and one day. “Through that experience we got a lot of inspiration and also experienced a very strong sense of support from the community that we never knew existed,” says Vicki. “It really highlighted for us how precious it is to have a community like ours and it’s another element of our being in the music industry – that desire to give back to our community in some way.” The pair is singularly committed to raising the profile of the live music scene in the Barossa and providing a platform for original artists. And if anyone is up to the challenge, it’s these passionate and prodigious musicians. Jamie has no fewer than six instruments in his repertoire and 20 years’ experience in the music industry, having cut his teeth on blues, jazz and concert music. He went on to tour nationally with blues band, The Grasscutters and folk/ jazz band, Psea and has composed and

recorded music for film and television, including SBS documentary, Going Bush and the ABC’s Australian Story. Vicki, meanwhile, is a musical chameleon, applying her skills wherever they are needed including composing and performing original music for their acoustic Americana-styled band, Very Jane.

acoustically spectacular setting of the Tanunda Soldiers’ Memorial Hall are met with an intimate and intoxicating blend of wine and music by candlelight. “We see these touring artists who have been on the road for weeks and months come in, and it’s not just another gig for them,” says Vicki.

‘Stella One Studio’ is his custom-built, “technically mind-blowing” studio, and his next big project. “The studio started as a result of producing and recording our own music and evolved into a client-based studio,” says Jamie. “Every project is different, and so is

Then there’s full-time and part-time work, parenting (Bobbie is 4 and Ellouise is 2) and half-a-dozen side projects, including the weekly open mic nights at the Weintal.

“We have never had to source the musicians or acts ourselves; they have always come to us and we are particular about the quality.

Between them, they are singer, song writer, performer, producer, recording engineer and, perhaps most tellingly, entrepreneur.

“Quite often it’s this gig that will determine whether or not they come to South Australia.”

in the long room in Chateau Tanunda at

That’s not to say it’s all wine and skittles for the couple, they will single-handedly co-ordinate the event management, from marketing and ticketing right down to candlesticks, home-made supper and white linen tablecloths.

picture of what they want to achieve;

“My poor mother takes them home and washes and irons them for us,” laughs Vicki.

my own ideas to life – I love that.”

“I’ll make the artists a home-cooked meal and we have musicians stay at our house – in fact mum had Jim (Moginie) and Neil (Murray) at her place and she cooked them a meal when they got home from the gig!

challenges of a digital age dominated by

Cue the Song Room acoustic sessions nine years ago. “We released an album called The Song Room in 2008,” recalls Vicki. “We did the CD launch at the (Barossa Regional) Gallery and had this great response. “We were supported by friends of ours, The Huckleberry Swedes, seasoned performers who have travelled all over the world, and they commented they loved the space and would love to do it again.” And so the Song Room series was born, a masterstroke that brought international acts and Australian musical royalty to the Barossa’s doorstep; among them, Mick Thomas (Weddings, Parties, Anything), Shane Howard (Goanna), Neil Murray and Jim Moginie (Midnight Oil), The Baker Suite, Bill and Casey Chambers, Liz Stringer, Jen Cloher and Mia Dyson. Patrons stepping into the visually and

“It’s hard, hard work. I think that’s why we want more people to come, and more importantly, to know this calibre of music is on their doorstep.” The Song Room experiment has also provided great industry contacts for Jamie’s other great love, sound recording and mastering.

every personality. “We don’t always record in the studio; we recorded Sam Brittain’s first album night when they shut the cellar door. “Sometimes the artist will have a strong others are a blank canvas and they have a bunch of songs without a vision to bring them together. “Then I have a creative licence to bring

Jamie acknowledges the obvious GarageBand experts and overnight online sensations. “Kids are playing ipads, not guitars,” he says. “There’s no apprenticeship, no honing your skills. “There needs to be passion for the process. I’m all for people buying recording gear and having some technical knowledge – I reckon that’s a wise thing to do – but when it comes to being your best, you want to be surrounded by people with the passion, the tools and the experience.”


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SPORTS


14 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG // TR AV EL

WORDS BY ADAM HUNT PHIL HOFFMANN TRAVEL BAROSSA VALLEY The Kimberley in Western Australia’s far north, has an immense and complex landscape that encompasses spectacular gorges, waterfalls and cave systems, pockets of lush rainforest, rugged and unforgiving outback and an astonishing variety of wildlife. The unconstrained space, and wild and natural beauty of this region is unmatched and unforgettable. Despite its remoteness, the Kimberley is achieving a surge in popularity. Located north of the Tropic of Capricorn, the climate in the Kimberley is a tropical monsoon climate, defined by distinct wet and dry seasons. Kimberley’s dry season is the perfect time to visit weather-wise, characterised by clear blue skies, easterly winds and balmy days with some chilly nights.

The Kimberley

The chance of rain is very unlikely. Kimberley’s wet season however, is a very different story. During the wet season, the Kimberley becomes hot and humid, sometimes violent, and very unpredictable. The remote Kimberley region was one of the earliest settled parts of Australia, with the first arrivals landing about 40,000 years ago from the islands of what is now Indonesia. It’s home to hundreds of thousands of rock art paintings and drawings. These beautiful and mysterious paintings are hidden in outback bush galleries on the huge escarpments and terracotta rock surfaces of the north Kimberley.

in Australia’s oldest operating outdoor cinema at Sun Pictures or learn about Broome’s fascinating history as a major pearling town with a visit to a pearl farm or the Pearl Lugger’s Museum. Travel along the Gibb River Road – a 660-kilometre long outback highway that stretches between Broome and Kununurra, through the heart of the Kimberley. Explore Tunnel Creek, a cave system carved through the Napier Ranges said to be over 350 million years old, or geological wonder, Windjana Gorge.

Cosmopolitan Broome is the coastal gateway to the Kimberley.

Explore the Kimberley’s picturesque gorges, where you can swim in refreshingly cool waterholes, dip below cascading waterfalls or just sit back and admire the serenity.

Take a camel ride along the picturesque Cable Beach at sunset, watch a movie

Geikie Gorge and the stunning Cathedral Gorge, near the world-famous

Bungle Bungles, are popular ones. Mitchell Falls are culturally and spiritually significant for the Wunambal people - a helicopter flight over the spectacular falls is a memorable way to experience them. Horizontal Falls are a natural phenomenon, made up of massive tidal movements. Because of its size and isolation, the best way to experience this immense region is on a tour. Premium touring options offered by APT include stays in luxurious wilderness camps and lodges, stations, hotels and resorts. For more information on how to discover the Kimberley, contact Phil Hoffmann Travel, Barossa Valley, phone 8562 3411.

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16 | THE B A R OSSA MAG

> STEVE AHRENS

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 17

big sky big dream big picture WORDS BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN KRÜGER

The sky’s the limit for one Lyndoch based businessman whose passion for flying has taught him to look at the big picture and aim high. Pilot, Steve Ahrens, says “aviation is a disease”, one he caught as a seven year old from his father, Claude who was enticed by the “whole romance of flying”. “I was in the plane every chance I got, flying with dad. But dad only ever got what was known as a restricted licence, so he couldn’t go wherever he liked, he was always bound within so many miles from take off. “I remember coming home from trade school one day, I was 19 at the time and dad said how would you like to learn how to fly?

“I can’t remember if I said do horses eat hay or is the Pope Catholic!” laughs Steve. His father’s one proviso was for Steve to get his full licence and so he began lessons at the nearby Rowland Flat air strip with Bruce Hartwig, the late Colin Hayes’ private pilot at the time. Steve and his dad would eventually take ownership of a plane - a dream come true for both father and son who would use it for their family business. He still owns that 1977 Piper Cherokee and has clocked up more than 1,000 hours in the pilot’s seat. But he will never forget his very first solo flight, the trust his instructor had in his abilities, the “sense of achievement and elation” and the freedom he continues to enjoy to this day.

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 19

Rather than doing a lamington drive, we just thought we’d do something a bit bigger.”

- Steve

Strangely, Steve has a fear of heights, yet it’s from the pilot’s seat that the 55 year old husband and father of two finds his outlook on life. “I like to look at the big picture and I think that’s all part of the aviation thing, even in business I’ve tried to look at the big picture. I think that comes from flying because when you get up there you can see the big picture – you can see where everything fits in the landscape.” Steve’s “big picture” theory has launched even bigger dreams, having spread his love for aviation to the masses as chief organiser of the Barossa Air Show which celebrated a record-breaking 10th event in April. He recalls how a chat over a glass of Shiraz with fellow Lyndoch local, Rick Burge and reading an inspirational book about a South Australian pilot who built an aeroplane and flew it solo around the world twice, would lead him to an interesting discussion at his old school, St. Jakobi.

idea...We could call it a fly-in or we could call it an air show. If we called it a fly-in we can’t charge for spectators to come in but we could have a sausage sizzle and stuff...But if we went down the path of an air show we could charge people to come. “I think everybody was naïve enough to say let’s do an air show - that sounds pretty cool! “Rather than doing a lamington drive, we just thought we’d do something a bit bigger.” That classic Steve understatement would launch a biennial project that has since raised “about a half a mill” over the years. But it wasn’t all smooth flying to get that first 1998 event off the ground, with major aviation bodies and experts saying “you cant’ do that...it will never work”. Such naysayers just fuelled Steve’s passion further and he was determined to succeed because “they were wrong”.

His children were students there at the time and Steve was on school council.

“I think essentially, most people thought we were nuts!”

“Morale was down, the school was pretty small and funding was a bit scarce,” he describes.

As chairman of the successful Gemütlichkeit at the time, Steve had some knowledge of how big events were organised.

Thinking it would be a good idea to get the pilot author to fly to the school and give a talk, Rick and Steve thought perhaps they could turn that idea into a fundraiser and it “sort of just developed” from there. “I remember going to the school council and saying look, I’ve got this

“How hard can it be? We’ve just put on the Gemütlichkeit, all we are going to do is pull the music stuff out and insert aeroplanes, that’s all it is.” A gritty determination kicked in. “Don’t think of the reasons why you

can’t do it, think of the reason why you can!” And whilst his head feels “like something out of the exorcist” on Air show day attending to safety protocols, pilot scrutinisation and what he calls a growing “culture of compliance”; seeing the display he pictured in his mind’s eye come to life is reward in itself. His late father would be proud. “I’ll let you into a little insight,” says Steve of the most recent airshow. When the roulettes did the love heart, I had a tear in my eye – that was dad.” Now the Barossa Airshow is recognised by pilots as setting a benchmark and they clamber to be a part of it. “It’s as much a friend-raiser as a fundraiser. Here’s a small school that thinks big and I can only hope that filters back to the kids...it’s the only primary school in the world that puts on an air show.” With all the work organising such a big event alongside his day job as General Manager and Director of Lyndoch Motors, one would think Steve is too busy for anything else. He laughs out loud as he reveals “a few” other things people may not know about him, including being a past Kapunda Rifle Club champion. “I got to shoot in the Australian Champion of Champions,” he says. “My name was at the top of the list...but that’s because it was in alphabetical order!” Eyes sparkling, he reveals his

more “earthbound” passions. “Well, there’s blacksmithing,” he says casually, bringing out an ornate envelope opener from his top drawer that he made in his backyard “smithy”. “That’s all in one piece...I just practice little things like tying knots and stuff.” Dubbed a “serial chairman” by some of his mates, Steve agrees to a certain extent. “I was the chairman of the school council, the Gemütlichkeit committee, the inaugural chairman of the Southern Barossa Community Childcare Centre and Parish chairman...I’ve dropped out of the church scene, upset too many people!” He’s also a past president of the SA chapter of the Australian Entrepreneur’s Organisation (EO) and continues to be an active member. And whilst he says the organisation might sound a bit snobby it’s anything but. “I still don’t know how to spell entrepreneur!” he laughs. He credits the business group for building his confidence and opening doors to opportunities that have brought him out of his comfort zone. “I don’t see myself as an entrepreneur. A business person - yes, but it’s not just about business, it’s about family, it’s about the person, it’s about community. “It’s the bigger picture...and living your legacy.”


20 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG // GA RDENING

WORDS BY KRISTEE SEMMLER THE BAROSSA NURSERY

What to do in your Winter garden

When we think of winter we often think cold rainy days, tucked up inside by the fire with a hot cup of soup.But not all winter days are so cold and rainy! And on those sunny, fresh winter days there is so much you can do outside in your garden it’s actually one of the best seasons to get some of those garden jobs done.

Who doesn’t love a bargain! Winter is when seed potatoes become available home grown potatoes taste AMAZING and they produce heaps! Other produce plants for winter plantings include: garlic, asparagus, rhubarb and raspberry canes. You’ll thank yourself later in the year when you’re harvesting the best tasting home grown crops!

Planting: Lots of plants prefer to be planted in winter because they are going through winter dormancy and therefore have plenty of time to establish before summer. Deciduous trees, fruit trees and roses are probably the most well-known for winter plantings. Barossa Nursery has a great range of bare rooted trees and roses. Bare rooted means much cheaper plants and it’s when we have our biggest range available.

Pruning: Once again this applies mainly to deciduous trees, shrubs and roses. Once they have dropped all their leaves it’s a good idea to prune and shape your trees and to give your roses a good hard prune. Removing branches facing inwards on fruit trees and roses helps to reduce disease and ensures even ripening on your fruit. To be aware some plants don’t like to be pruned in winter. As a general rule of thumb, if it’s not deciduous, don’t prune

it in Winter because the outer foliage of other plants is often what protects them from frost burn and extreme cold. Prune these other plants in early Spring or after they finish their Spring flowering, once the risk of frost has passed. Spraying: Spray your deciduous fruit trees (mainly peaches and nectarines and apricots) with Lime Sulphur OR copper oxychloride and white oil. This helps to stop fungal problems for the year ahead such as leaf curl, apricot freckle and shot hole. Spray for weeds on a fine day. With the cooler weather and increased rain, come more weeds in the garden. Wait for a sunny day when no rain in expected for eight hours. Try not to spray weeds in windy weather as it can blow the weed spray onto other plants and kill them. If you don’t like to use chemicals on

your garden there is also a natural weed spray available at the Nursery. Feeding: Usually plants slow their growth right down in winter and because of the cold don’t tend to take up many nutrients. Seamungus is the exception in terms of feeding in the winter. It’s like the pelletised form of the well known Seasol and helps to thicken the cell wall of plants’ leaves and make them more resistant to the cold. It is also great health booster for the garden to get it through the winter months. Even though it’s cold, rugging up and getting outside in the garden makes you feel so warm inside. It’s a great way to boost your mood and get some much needed garden jobs done. So go on, get outside and enjoy the stark beauty of the winter garden.

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 23

FOOTBALL a woman’s game too WORDS BY HEIDI HELBIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON

> COURTNEY JENSEN


24 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG

If AFL is a man’s game, someone clearly forgot to tell Courtney Jensen. The 20-year-old netballer-turnedfootballer is coming off a notable grand final performance last month in the debut season of SA Women’s Football League (SAWFL). Courtney’s tenacity and versatility assisted her in contesting every game for the North Adelaide Roosters, catapulting her into the spotlight and the company of women’s AFL elite including Crows co-captain, Erin Phillips; Sarah Perkins and NAB rising star, Ebony Marinoff. It seems no-one is surprised by the meteoric rise than Courtney herself. Sitting in her family home at Nuriootpa, her number 25 Roosters Guernsey slung across the kitchen chair, the down-to-earth retail worker says she didn’t so much chase a football dream as stumble across it. “During school I played footy for Nuri High against other schools and a couple of girls we played in Adelaide said ‘you’re actually alright, you should come and play for the state team’. I didn’t realise there was a state team,” recalls Courtney.

“I’d always liked footy but I never thought it was a thing girls could do.” Unaware of her natural talent – “I’d always been able to kick a football and handball one” – in 2015 Courtney made the under 18s state team. She was playing for Angle Vale when she was handpicked to trial for the women’s state competition. “They were looking for girls who would have the skills to play at SAWFL level…and also show leadership, that we were not just individuals but could work as a team,” says Courtney. “We found out a couple weeks later what team we were selected in. I really hadn’t thought about it so it was a good surprise. “I guess in the first ever season we didn’t know what to expect or what they were expecting, but moreso I was just excited to be giving it a good hard go.” What followed was a gruelling eight-week season when the Roosters dropped only one game on their way to

the history-making grand final against Norwood Redlegs in April in front of a 2000-strong crowd.

While the Roosters went down by 27 points in the final after an arm wrestle, Courtney has no regrets about the result.

Traditionally a midfielder, Courtney was slotted into defence in what was always going to be “a really tough match”.

“Someone has to lose and to make the grand final for the inaugural season, it was just a great experience all round,” she says.

“It was pretty nerve-wracking until that first touch – once that’s done you just try to do your best and think about what you can do for the team,” said Courtney. That team-focused attitude earned her the respect of head coach, Matt Slade. “Courtney rotated through the backline and did end up forward and she was a versatile player,” Slade says.

Watching in the wings were Courtney’s family members, who didn’t miss a game. Mum Jacqui is not surprised by Courtney’s overnight success, nor her capacity to take everything in her stride – including her ability to continue balancing her role as a key Nuriootpa Netball Club centre court player with her newfound footy commitments.

He also commended her commitment.

“Probably the biggest surprise was when she said ‘Mum, I might give footy a crack’ – that was a bit unexpected,” says Jacqui.

“In terms of her work ethic, she was excellent,” Slade said. “We had to reward that and she did well to stay in the team and play every single game.”

“But she’s always been quite gifted when it comes to sport – she’s one of those fortunate kids who can pick anything up quickly.

“She was filling holes and it was an important role.”


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 25

I’d always liked footy but I never thought it was a thing girls could do.”

- Courtney

“She puts in a lot of hard work; she’s

“I guess women’s football had only just

“Sure, there’s the endurance and

not home often to do the dishes but she

started growing when I was getting into it

speed that men have on the women, but

is 100 per cent committed to her sport

and I don’t think anyone thought it was

look back to when the men’s competition

and her team and we’re very proud of

going to be such a massive movement.”

started – scores were low and the skills

her.”

With female participation in the sport

The public response has also been overwhelmingly supportive,

although

increasing by 19 per cent to 380,000 in

“Wait a couple years and it will change.

2016, Courtney takes little notice of the

As it continues to grow it will allow

nay-sayers.

women to try hard and push themselves

Courtney says there’s a little way to go. “Some supporters say women are not “A lot of people say football is for boys, netball is for girls,” she says.

weren’t the best.

fast enough or don’t go hard enough,” she says.

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even harder.” She points to the AFLW inaugural premiers, saying the dream of wearing

the red, blue and yellow is absolutely attainable. “To see the Crows win the grand final, it’s everything to us – it makes us want to build more and more,” Courtney says. “To see how far they have come in such a short time, it’s so great for the younger generation to look up to these girls and maybe pursue that themselves. “You just have to have self-belief in what you can do.”


26 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG // W E LLBEING

WORDS BY LEE TEUSNER GO VITA TANUNDA Disclaimer: Some information has been extracted from the Go Mag.

Wouldn’t you love to say “I haven’t had a cold in years”?The truth is a strong immune system is your best defence against disease. Your immune army inoculates you against invaders. Try these daily drills to strengthen your immune soldiers! Your body can be compared to a car. Drive it too much and it wears out, not enough and it seizes up, drive badly and it breaks down. Similarly if you do anything too much, too little or incorrectly then your immune system suffers. Immunity thrives on moderate and regular activities – rest, exercise, eating and working. Listen to your body by practising healthy habits and addressing imbalances immediately. As Benjamin Franklin noted, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” Exercise waste away A moving body flushes toxins through the lymphatics, pumping immune cells to needy areas. Consistent, correct exercise reduces colds by 50 per cent according to one study. Activity also stimulates the respiratory system to expel mucus and bowels to excrete waste. Defence downers When your body’s busy battling toxins like alcohol, cigarettes, chemicals and sugar it has less energy to eliminate infections. Toxins breed bugs like maggots

For invincible immunity, this Winter

on festering garbage. Banish bugs by eating pure unprocessed foods, drinking filtered water, regular cleansing and washing hands. Immune armoury Astragalus is a Chinese adaptogen increasing disease resistance by raising interferon, T-cells and red blood cells. It’s a herb to consider with hayfever, flu, colds and coughs related to stress. Dr Mauligit of Texas University found it helped restore immune function in cancer patients. Those with a fever, autoimmune conditions or on lithium should seek medical advice before taking. Elderberry comes from the sambucus tree which Hippocrates called his “medicine chest”. Its antioxidant flavonoids enhance immune function and reduce mucus.Several studies have shown its effectiveness against flu strains, reducing the duration and severity. It also combats sinusitis, sore throats, tonsillitis and bronchitis. Excess dosage can cause diarrhoea. Echinacea. America’s top selling herb is a popular preventative against colds, flu and skin infections. Liquid Echinacea angustifolia at the onset stops a virus from spreading and Echinacea pallida heals skin infections. Echinacea is an effective lymphatic cleanser reducing tonsillitis and glandular fever. It’s safe to take as a

daily immune enhancer as a review of 14 clinical trials found it reduced colds by 58 per cent and their duration by 1-4 days. Very rarely rashes and stomach upsets are an echinacea side effect. Garlic cloves contain antibiotic allicin which is antiseptic, anti-bacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal. Some people prefer a supplement containing garlic’s infection fighting compounds rather than the eating the cloves whole and dealing with garlicky after breath! Research reveals garlic prevents and treats colds, coughs, candida and septic wounds. Garlic also reduces cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Garlic does increase the effect of blood thinning medications and can aggravate acidic reflux. Iron is essential for energy and immunity. Anaemia, suffered by 70 per cent of Australian women, leaves us tired and low in infection fighting cells. Excess iron however breeds disease by feeding pathogens. The recommended dose for iron is for 8mg/day for men and 18 mg/ day for women. The least constipating forms are ferrous fumerate and chelate. Vitamin C, B12, and Folic acid also aid iron’s absorption. Vitamin C, lysine, olive leaf and zinc are excellent antivirals to prevent and treat conditions such as the flu, cold sores and fevers. A review of six studies found

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T H E B AROSSA MAG | 29

Reverend

WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ

It’s a sight to behold and not one usually associated with pastors, when motorcycling ministers Adrian Kitson, Julian Bayha and Detlev Vosgerau arrive at Marananga’s Gnadenfrei Lutheran Church.

“I think most pastors are stereotyped into a particular personality and character,” says Greenock Lutheran Parish’s Pastor Detlev, now seated with the others in the back pew of his Sunday workplace.

The serenity of the Seppeltsfield landscape with its sweeping carpet of vines and towering palm trees is broken by the low rumble of purring engines and flashes of highly polished chrome, sparkling in the bright Autumn sun.

“But we’re not like that at all, in fact we are all very different...In a sense, it’s almost like the community dehumanises us because we are clergy.”

Wide smiles are proof that these faithful three are just like any other Barossans who love nothing more than to don their leathers and go for a spin.

There is a nod of agreement from all three as they chat about the “huge gamut of personality types” and varied pastimes shared among their clergy colleagues, from playing footy to arm wrestling.

> DETLEV VOSGERAU, ADRIAN KITSON AND JULIAN BAYHA

“I think turning up on a motorcycle... shocks people into realising that this person coming to see them is not just a pastor, he’s a person,” Detlev says. The German born minister of 35 years migrated to New Zealand before going to the Lutheran Seminary following a few years at university. Arriving in the Barossa just six months ago, he likes to say he’s “the oldest and wisest, but the newest kid on the block” when it comes to the Barossa’s bikie ministers. Not one to be “hooked” on any particular model or make, Detlev has

ridden motorbikes since the age of fifteen. “It was the cheapest form of transport in the early seventies... you couldn’t afford cars in New Zealand and I liked going fast and the only way to go fast was on a motorbike!” he laughs. The self described extrovert admits to taking a tumble or two along the way, but nothing too serious. “That’s okay, it only hurts for a little while! Life is inherently risky.” His current ride is a BMW but he can’t say the exact number of bikes he’s owned over the years.


30 | T HE B A R OSSA M AG “My wife would say too many! I never get attached to a particular type of bike so I keep changing them on a fairly regular basis...I just like something and there you go!” It’s a stark contrast to the pastor sitting alongside him who is staunchly proud of his choice of motorbike. “I’ve got a Triumph Thunderbird,” announces Pastor Adrian Kitson with a cheeky grin. “It’s a beautiful piece of machinery, it’s biblical...You won’t find BMW or Honda in the Bible, but you will find Triumph, the word appears quite a lot of times.” The Nuriootpa St. Petri Lutheran Church pastor loves a low riding cruiser but says he would “never ride a Harley”. He’s got the leather bikie vest and rocks a navy blue face scarf - a stark contrast to the robe and stole you’ll find him wearing on a Sunday. Adrian was “a kid about 8 years old” when he was introduced to dirt bikes or what he calls “chook chasers” on the family farm. “That was the beginning...and I’ve ridden all the years since.” A full time church worker for about 30 years, Adrian has been a pastor for 17. “I was the same age as when Jesus got crucified, so 33 - I was hoping it wasn’t going to turn out the same way!” he laughs. “I was a youth worker and did that for more than 10 years and then decided Seminary was the place to try...It was a bit of a long journey.” Looking back, he describes himself as a “yuppy” twenty year old who didn’t


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 31 want to be one of “those pastors”. “They were part of the problem, not part of the solution,” he said of his thinking at the time. “Eventually it made a fair bit of sense to at least study theology and see what happens after that. That was kind of the start of my Seminary journey - then it made sense. “All these years later and I’m not dead yet! I’m not burnt out terribly much so I’m still in the game, see how long I last!” His wry sense of humour belies a deep spirituality that all three share as they serve God and their communities. All agree their preferred mode of transport has “definitely” helped in their ministries at various times, starting conversations that would never have happened otherwise. Riding motorbikes, whether alone or together, is an experience they all treasure. “I reckon in our job, you never finish anything... there is multiple things all the time whereas when you ride a motorbike, there’s one thing - you start and you finish and it’s a good day . You have one focus and you are just another geeza on the road,” Adrian says. “It’s fun too, but I think the serious aspect of it is the whole thing about blokes needing to talk about stuff. Us pastors are public people and it’s an interesting job with high expectations. So, it’s really great to just chew the fat about what’s going on for each other and that’s what I value most when we go away. “It wards off a bit of burnout I think, maybe a bit of depression, the old black dog and all that stuff. There’s a reason why these bike groups exist I think.”

Tanunda’s Langmeil Lutheran Church’s Pastor Julian couldn’t agree more.

in the church aisle, there’s a sparkle in his eye that says it’s crossed his mind.

“We’ve actually got a group at Langmeil that gets together reasonably regularly for bike rides, they’re are called Langmeil Lutheran Larrikins – the LLL.”

“I’ve been to funerals... done weddings. It’s great for hospital visiting, especially with parking,” he says.

The group meet on a Saturday morning and ride anything from classic bikes and tourers, to cruisers and off road bikes. “We invite others to come along, numbers range from about 8 to 30. We had one in February and 30 blokes rocked up. “It’s just mainly fellowship, getting together, a bit of bonding with other congregations and other pastors. “You get that connection and you get to know others from other congregations and it opens opportunities for other things you might do together, like Men’s Shed meetings and other events.”

They may not be your typical bikie gang, but these Reverend Revheads are shunning stereotype in style, proving pastors are as human as anyone else as they go about their job. Detlev says, “I don’t think it’s tougher than a lot of professional jobs in all honesty, but it is relentless in that you carry other people’s needs all the time, their emotional, spiritual and other needs and that can be tiresome. I think it’s not fully understood by most people.”

In the lead up to the 500th anniversary of reformation, all agree church culture has changed but are pleased it continues “for the people, by the people”. “The church is under the pump, everyone knows that...but it will survive, it will exist, it will keep serving. It might look different and stuff, but we’ll be around,” Adrian adds. As for their opinion of what Lutheran Church founder, Martin Lutheran would be thinking five centuries on, opinions are divided. “He would have bought a Triumph!” says Adrian. “No, he’s German! He would have ridden a BMW,” say the others. One thing’s for sure - boys will be boys.

Julian has “pretty much” always wanted to be a minister, starting out studying Greek and Hebrew before joining the Seminary. Now in his 23rd year as a pastor, he tells of moving to Germany as a nine year old and being introduced to motorbikes at a young age. He’s been riding ever since and says he’s partial to Japanese built machines, choosing a Honda cross tourer as his current mode of transport. It’s quite the contrast from the first motorbike he rode as a 15 year old. “I started riding on a German Motorfahrt 50cc - a little moped thing with a top speed of 25 kilometres an hour!” he laughs. Julian is known to rock up to the job on his bike. And whilst he has never parked it

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34 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG

A positive state of mind WORDS BY TODD KUCHEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM KROEPSCH

> NEV BENTLEY


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 35

With busy lifestyles leading to tiredness and exhaustion, and mental illness affecting around one million Australians each year; more than ever, people are turning to natural medicine and healing.

During his eleven years as a pilot, Nev lived in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Malaysia, and all over Australia, including remote aboriginal communities, such as Kooljaman and Fitzroy Crossing.

You may have seen an impressive video circulating Facebook, about a 77 year old woman named Marg, who suffered from insomnia for sixteen years, until a man named Nev Bentley treated her with hypnotherapy.

Although his ambition had been to become a pilot, Nev found the profession far less interesting than he had imagined and a rather lonely career, and with a son back home, who he was only able to see once a month, Nev yearned to be settled in the community back home.

Marg was unable to sleep for more than one hour at a time, when the CEO from The Barossa Village first contacted Nev. The night after Marg’s first session she slept for eight hours. Now, two months later, having received weekly sessions from Nev, Marg sleeps a full nine hours every night. “The carers and staff at Barossa Village say she’s like a completely different person now,” says Nev.

The turning point for Nev came during the middle of the night in the Solomon Islands, when he woke, not knowing where he was. Only after making his way to the window and saying aloud to himself, “Oh! I’m in Honiara!” did he realise where he was. “Within a week I had been in four different countries and multiple hotel rooms and compounds, it was horrible,” says Nev.

Science, majoring in acupuncture,) and established a practice here in Nuriootpa.

To help understand how hypnotherapy works, we must first learn about the critical faculty of the mind.

Nev has also become a major sponsor of the Angaston Netball Club.

We learn from a young age how to perceive the world, and that we have two minds, the conscious and the unconscious.

Due to having limited free time to study during university, Nev tried hypnotherapy in the hope of both increasing his memory to help him accomplish a credit grade point average and also lose some weight. After his hypnotherapy sessions he achieved a distinction average and had lost 23 kilos.

Unfortunately, this critical faculty is also what holds our limited beliefs for ourselves.

Inspired by the results, Nev decided to practise hypnotherapy. Now, due to its success, hypnotherapy has become his primary line of work.

By leading his clients into hypnosis, Nev is able to bypass the critical faculty, and communicate directly with unconsciousness to install a positive state of mind.

Nev understands the concerns people have surrounding hypnotherapy; that they’re afraid of being controlled or made to jump around like a chicken, like you see on stage hypnosis. Hypnotherapy is completely different, and Nev enjoys educating people on its true nature.

“With all this wonderful sleep her body is having a chance to heal. Sleep deprivation is actually a form of torture; causing mania and depression. It can even lead to serious physical ailments.”

Nev had developed an interest in acupuncture, having used it for so many of his own injuries, ranging from whiplash after a car accident, tennis elbow, muscle tear after a dislocated shoulder, shin splints and tendinitis.

At Bentley Wellness, not only is Nev able to use hypnotherapy to help people sleep, but also for relaxation, weight loss, addictions, phobias, cravings, even anxiety and depression.

Nev took a redundancy from flying on a Thursday and by the following Monday, was on a full time course in remedial and dry needling therapy at the Australian College of Massage.

One example is the driving trance; when you may have driven somewhere and you get lost in your thoughts.

Born and raised in the Barossa Valley, Nev attended Tanunda Lutheran School and Faith Lutheran College.

Two years later, he finished his master practitioner certificate in hypnotherapy, NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming) and timeline therapy.

The next thing you realise is thirty minutes have gone by and you have little recollection of the journey when you arrive.

Nev did this with a training company in the United States and is registered with the American Board of Hypnotherapy.

During the initial appointment, Nev asks his patients to imagine how they would like to be: their target weight, free of addiction, free of grief ...

He has now finished one year of his four year degree (Bachelor of Health

He then asks to make that picture very clear in their mind, and proceeds to guide them into installing that as a future memory. You are aware the entire time.

Having wanted to become a pilot most of his younger life, he went onto study aviation at the Parafield airport, where he succeeded in becoming a commercial pilot.

The space that separates them is called the critical faculty, which does not get established until we’re seven years old.

It’s a process of following directions and using one’s imagination to achieve a positive state of mind. Hy p n o s i s i s s o m e t h i n g we experience each day. It’s merely getting lost in our own thoughts.

A study was made in the seventies, using closed doors with handles on the same side as the hinges. Most adults would try the door knob and leave it, assuming the door was broken, while kids under seven were able to solve the problem with ease. “Children under seven are literally living, breathing and walking unconscious minds,” says Nev. “They haven’t had a lifetime of knowing which side of the door the handle is meant to be on. The same principle applies to anything we have learned in life; over time our beliefs and habits, good or bad, become deep seated. Hypnotherapy loosens the grip on these bad behaviours and eventually we can throw them away.” There hasn’t been a person yet that Nev has not successfully been able to hypnotise. So if there are any areas in your life you need help with, whether it’s to quit smoking, insomnia, relaxation, removing phobias, negative emotion, guilt, anxiety or depression, Nev is available to help anyone of any age. Though for depression, Nev suggests checking with your doctor first to see that hypnotherapy would be a suitable treatment option.


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WI NE REVI EWS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 37

WINE REVIEWS by Tyson Stelzer

PHOTO BY DRAGAN RADOCAJ

The Barossa Mag is proud to welcome highly acclaimed wine writer, Tyson Stelzer to the team as he reviews 20 wines from the region, starting this winter edition.

winning wine writer, television host, international keynote speaker, tour host and wine show chairman and judge.

2015, Australian Wine Communicator of the Year 2015 and 2013 and International Champagne Writer of the Year 2011.

He brings with him a wealth of knowledge, spanning back to the day he first fell in love with wine whilst tasting “the great 1996 vintage” in Barossa cellar doors, 20 years ago.

The host and producer of television series, “People of the Vines Barossa and Tasmania”, has also written 15 wine books, including Barossa Wine Traveller, and is a regular contributor to 15 magazines.

Tyson is the author of the Barossa Wine School curriculum, taught around the world and is a sixth generation descendent of an early settler of the Barossa Valley.

His wife, Rachael is the niece of Rob and Anna Schrapel of Bethany Wines and they enjoy regular visits to the Barossa from their home in Brisbane where they live with their sons, Linden, Huon and Vaughn.

Since that time, Tyson has forged out a career as a multi-award

He was named International Wine & Spirit Communicator of the Year

As such, he is proud to be anointed as a Baron of the Barossa and feels a connection to Stelzer Road in

Turn the page for Tyson’s winter selection and discover some true gems of the Barossa.

Tanunda, where his grandfather grew up in the Stelzer homestead and cultivated bush vines.


38 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG // W I NE REVIEWS

PETER LEHMANN STONEWELL SHIRAZ 2012

HENSCHKE MOUNT EDELSTONE EDEN VALLEY 2014

DUTSCHKE ST JAKOBI BAROSSA VALLEY SHIRAZ 2014

An epic Stonewell, infused with monumental density of black plum and blackberry fruit, masterfully supported by dark chocolate oak. For all of its commanding volume, it is never broad nor heavy, pulled obediently into line by finely structured yet confidently enduring tannins of great definition. It culminates in a finish of astonishing line and length. Irresistible now, it will confidently live for two decades.

Released before the 2013, this is an enthrallingly evocative and elegant Mount Edelstone. It’s infused with deep yet refined succulent blueberry fruits, savoury spice, white pepper and layered complexity of exotic spice, culminating in a refined and approachable finish of finely structured tannins. It lingers very long and accurate. A characterful and accurate expression of the 102-year-old vines of this celebrated vineyard and one of the greats under this label.

The more challenging seasons

peterlehmannwines.com

henschke.com.au

97 POINTS

$100

96 POINTS

$225

YALUMBA THE SIGNATURE BAROSSA CABERNET SAUVIGNON SHIRAZ 2013

define the greatest vineyards A grand vintage for The

and the most talented winemakers. Dutschke’s most famous wine bears testimony to this great site in Lyndoch, lacking nothing in depth and character of black fruits, while

Signature, seamlessly contrasting the succulent blueberry fruits of Shiraz with the blackcurrants and tobacco leaf of Cabernet, framed in a finely scaffolded and enduring

presenting a more precise, spicy

cage of impeccable tannins. It

and tangy demeanour that

has all the ingredients to go the

spells both immediate allure and

distance (except for a screw

compelling endurance. Bravo.

cap).

dutschkewines.com

yalumba.com

95 POINTS

$40

95 POINTS

$60


WINE REVIEWS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 39

TEUSNER MC SPARKLING SHIRAZ 2010

TEUSNER ALBERT BAROSSA SHIRAZ 2014

TEUSNER THE WARK FAMILY SHIRAZ 2015

The great 2010 season in the Barossa was particularly endearing for sparkling reds, blessed with plush black cherry and plum fruit and liquorice and yet medium-bodied restraint and definition. Kym Teusner has captured it impeccably, with supple allure, fine-grained structure, dark chocolate oak, creamy bead and lingering persistence. One of the great vintages for MC, and it’s only going to get better with a few more years in bottle.

2014 will never go down as

The Wark family vineyard

a blockbuster season in the

captures the depth of black

teusner.com.au

94 POINTS

$65

Barossa, but in the right hands there is a spicy allure and tangy

THORN-CLARKE SANDPIPER EDEN VALLEY PINOT GRIS 2016 A Gris in a Grigio shape, pale,

plum, black cherry and blackberry fruit of the great

light and focused, with pear

a beautiful contrast to the deep

Stonewell district of the Barossa,

presence and lemon crunch,

black plum, blackberry and

beautifully presented by Kym

focused, fresh, fruity and spicy.

lift to this vintage that provides

black cherry fruit of Barossa Shiraz. Dark chocolate oak and finely textured tannins support

Teusner and his team, polished

a long finish that epitomises

beautifully refined tannins and

alluring Teusner gloss.

great persistence.

teusner.com.au

teusner.com.au

94 POINTS

$65

A celebration of the personality

with subtle dark chocolate oak,

92 POINTS

of Gris and the cut of cool, estate Eden Valley vineyards.

thornclarkewines.com.au

$30

90 POINTS

$20


40 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG // W I NE REVIEWS

DUTSCHKE OSCAR SEMMLER ST JAKOBI VINEYARD BAROSSA VALLEY SHIRAZ 2014

SEPPELTSFIELD PARA GRAND TAWNY NV

Oscar is St Jakobi on the next level of power, depth and concentration, which does not necessarily make it better. But in seasons of contemplative allure and poised restraint, the extra layers and intensity of Oscar are compelling indeed, and 2014 is the epitome. Black fruit power of seamless carry is underlined by bright acidity and compellingly fine tannins. Wow.

The masterful wizardry of one of Australia’s most celebrated fortified estates is packed into grand fruit intensity of dried fruits of all kinds, layered with magnificent aged complexity (more than 10 years average age). This is a tawny of gripping line and a finish that disappears beyond the horizon. It’s hard to believe it’s the youngest (and cheapest) child of the Para family. For all it represents, it’s great value, too. Masterful.

dutschkewines.com

seppeltsfield.com.au

95 POINTS

$68

95 POINTS

YALUMBA THE VIRGILIUS EDEN VALLEY VIOGNIER 2015 Yalumba has for decades worked tirelessly to craft Viognier of poise, texture and complexity, while toning the exuberant tendencies of this bold variety, and recent vintages bear testimony to their resounding success. The latest iteration is an exemplar, seamlessly uniting elegant citrus with almost ripe apricots and spice that lingers until kingdom come.

yalumba.com

$38

95 POINTS

$45

PENFOLDS BIN 150 MARANANGA SHIRAZ 2014

PENFOLDS RWT BIN 798 BAROSSA VALEY SHIRAZ 2014

A season of low yields and high temperatures, this is at first a savoury, gamey and charcuterie Marananga of firm, fine oak tannin structure that calls for time to integrate. In time, impressive presence and depth of dark berry fruits emerge. Fruit and classy dark chocolate oak carry with even line and great persistence, promising strong potential.

Renamed Bin 798 because that’s RWT on your phone, yet always RWT under the surface, this is a vintage that unites generous black and red fruits with dark chocolate oak, full and confident, with excellent fruit persistence backed by well-polished, finely structured tannins of great endurance. In line, length and poise, one of the great RWT’s, and a triumph for this low-yielding, warm, dry season.

The iconic Rockford Black Shiraz is as multifaceted as its vast depth of maturity predicts, with all the personality of old vine fruit ricocheting in black plum, black cherry, liquorice, even a hint of sarsaparilla, and the ever present, long-lingering delight of high cocoa dark chocolate. Age has brought notes of cedar, leather, mixed spice and orange liqueur. It’s magnificently finished with perfectly integrated dosage and firm, fine yet somehow creamy tannins that will sustain it for a good while yet.

penfolds.com

penfolds.com

rockfordwines.com.au

95 POINTS

$90

95 POINTS

$200

ROCKFORD BLACK SHIRAZ NV

94 POINTS

$64

PENFOLDS BIN 51 EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2016

HENTLEY FARM BLACK BEAUTY SPARKLING SHIRAZ NV

YALUMBA EDEN VALLEY VIOGNIER 2015

Sourced exclusively from the Woodbury Vineyard, this is at once beautifully refined and at the same time intense, rich and immediate, celebrating a wonderful harmony between floral lift and an intense fruit core of red and green apple, kaffir lime, lemon and even nuances of anise. It carries with outstanding persistence and wonderfully defined mineral structure.

This young sparkling Shiraz Viognier brims with the black plum and black cherry depth of the Barossa, layered with the dark chocolate character of French oak (40% new). For its age, based on the 2014 vintage, it pulls off the balance with consummate control, supported by well-toned, firm, fine tannins that will sustain it well into the future.

It takes the talent and deep experience of the Yalumba outfit to coax such calm restraint and low alcohol precision from Viognier, and this vintage is the most elegant to date under this label. A pale, bright straw hue announces a crunchy style of pear, grapefruit and vanilla, concluding with the inimitable, spicy presence of Viognier.

penfolds.com

hentleyfarm.com.au

yalumba.com

94 POINTS

$30

93 POINTS

$62

92 POINTS

$24

DUTSCHKE SAMI ST JAKOBI VINEYARD CABERNET SAUVIGNON 2014

GLAETZER WALLACE BY BEN GLAETZER BAROSSA VALLEY SHIRAZ GRENACHE 2015

THORN-CLARKE SANDPIPER EDEN VALLEY RIESLING 2016

2014 is not a season to leap out of the glass and trumpet its greatness, but give it sufficient conversation and it will slowly unfold its story of bright varietal integrity, tangy structure, fine tannins and dark chocolate oak. One for the cellar.

Juicy red berry fruits and spice unite in

A pale, tense and precise Eden Valley

a supple style that celebrates the fresh

Riesling, coiled and tense in its youth, with

raspberry and strawberry character of

medium-term potential. Understated lemon,

Grenache, harmoniously united with the

lime and granny smith apple fruit will

finely structured tannins and black fruit

blossom in time. Value.

dutschkewines.com

glaetzer.com

91 POINTS

$32

depth of Shiraz.

91 POINTS

thornclarkewines.com.au

$23

90 POINTS

$20


Pure Cabernet 1 Year Anniversary

The Home of St Hugo may be in the Barossa today, but St Hugo started its life in the Coonawarra more than three decades ago with wines made solely from the noble Cabernet Sauvignon. Help us celebrate this heritage and our first year of opening the St Hugo home with a dinner focusing on the best vintages of St Hugo Coonawarra Cabernet - past, present and future. Starting with a tasting of six of the most outstanding museum wines from St Hugo’s best vintages, conducted by winemaker Dan Swincer, we will to progress to a celebratory six course degustation dinner with dishes created to enhance our very best Cabernets.

Wines will include our limited release ‘Private Collection’ and the extremely rare and collectable ‘Vetus Purum’. Back vintage large format wines will be opened, with a sneak peak at the best that is yet to come from the house of St Hugo.

Date Friday 22nd September, 2017 from 5:30pm

Location St Hugo, 2141, Barossa Valley Way, Rowland Flat, SA, 5352

Pricing $200 per person

Booking Details Email enquiries: Cathy Chapple cathy.chapple@sthugo.com Phone enquiries: (08) 8115 9200 Bookings: www.sthugo.com/experience Please Drink Responsibly.


42 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG // P E T ADVICE

WORDS BY CATHERINE HARPER BAROSSA & KAPUNDA VETERINARY CLINIC Are your joints feeling stiff on these chilly mornings? Are you struggling to get out of bed and start the day? Well chances are, your pet is too! Across all species, signs of arthritis tend to be worse in the cold and our older pets are likely to be feeling the chill in the past few weeks. It is important to remember that a year in the life of a dog or cat is roughly equivalent to seven human years and so our seven year old dog is middle aged with rickety joints to match. Arthritis is the most common disease in our older pets with approximately 50% of dogs over the age of seven suffering from the disease and it is estimated that over 55% of these go untreated. The arthritis process, referred to as degenerative joint

Them old bones

disease, is a result of accumulated wear

Cats:

and tear over the course of an animal’s life

• More time sleeping than previously.

and leads to pain and inflammation in the

• Reluctance to jump up.

joints.

• Poor grooming over back and tail.

Arthritis is insidious and is often dismissed by owners and is described as ‘just slowing down’. Some of the symptoms include: Dogs: • Stiff getting out of bed in the morning. • Slow to start moving, but warm out of it. • No longer sitting ‘square’. • Reluctance to jump onto ute/bed/couch. • Lameness – often coming and going. • Licking at joints.

• Overgrooming over joints. • Change in demeanour when being petted/brushed. • Lameness. The great news is that there are many options to help our aging pets! A few simple things you can do to help your pet include: • A soft, warm, comfortable bed in a draft free area. • Easy access to food and water i.e.

• Tiring more easily on walks.

don’t have to go upstairs or through a

• Change in demeanour.

doggie door.

• Ensure pet is at a healthy weight (if you are not sure, ask your vet!). • Daily moderate exercise – swimming is great! (Maybe not so much for the cat). • Book an annual health check at your local vet. • Assess your pet for the symptoms discussed above. The first step to managing arthritis, is to identify the problem; if you are concerned your pet is showing some of these symptoms, then mention them at the annual check-up or book an appointment today at Barossa Veterinary Service. The vet can then assess your pet and work with you to address the specific needs of your pet with a tailor made management plan.

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44 | T H E B A R OSSA MAG

58 vintages

and still growing


T H E B AROSSA MAG | 45

Industry comes full circle for life-long grapegrower WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ

From handpicking to mechanical harvesting and back to handpicking again, Nuriootpa grapegrower, Malcolm Schutz has seen his industry come full circle. He’s just completed his 58th vintage and has to smile when he thinks of the changes he’s witnessed in viticulture practices over the years, especially in his own vineyard where grapes have been harvested by the family for more than a century now. Malcolm explains how the old “rod and spur” pruning method, replaced by modern day permanent spur techniques, is back in vogue; the dry grown principles of an era before irrigation, are back in use and the mechanical harvester? Well, that wasn’t used at all this vintage. Meanwhile, grass is left growing like lawn on un-worked land; shoots and bunches are thinned by hand and vine canopies are kept at a “balanced minimum” to help maximise air flow and sun exposure on berries in an effort to

achieve every modern day viticulturist’s goal - premium grade grapes. Winemaker’s demand for maximum quality off minimal yields is a far cry from the mind-set held in the seventies and early eighties when big crops were king, yet it’s closer to the way early Barossans would have tended their vineyards. Malcolm’s grandfather, Gottlieb Obst was the former custodian of his 20 acre valley floor property which he bought as an eager young twenty year old. Back then, half the land was growing fruit trees, the other had bush vine Mataro, Doradella and trellised Shiraz. “I reckon some of those Shiraz vines were growing for at least 50 years before I had the property,” Malcolm says. He recalls walking up and down the property as a pre-schooler. “I would follow my grandfather who was using the single farrow plough. He’d go with the horse up and down each row about nine times, working up less than a

> STUART AND MALCOLM SCHUTZ

foot with each pass and I used to walk in the trench behind him. All the work was done by draught horse and it would’ve taken three weeks to plough this 20 acre block– it was that jolly slow. Now I don’t do it at all!”

A “new” three farrow plough was introduced to the implement shed and used in conjunction with a dodger nicknamed the “gut buster” because it had to be pushed and pulled to dodge around the vines in every row.

Whilst the practice of no till, or “controlled neglect” as it is known within the industry, is a relatively recent change for improving soil structure and moisture infiltration, Malcolm believes his grandfather had foreseen its benefits.

“It was hard work. You always knew when the neighbours were dodging because you could hear them yelling out ‘get closer, out further, stop’ - I’d go to bed dreaming about it!”

“He was helping to pick grapes one year and there was one little area that we hadn’t worked…he commented that those vines were just as fresh as the other ones and they had just as many grapes on.” In those early years, Malcolm used Grandpa Obst’s old “International Farmall A” to keep the land weed free. “When I bought the property, that was the first tractor I used, I had that for a lot of years but Grandpa warned that I should still keep the horse harness in the shed, just in case fuel ran out.”

Malcolm would eventually update to two David Brown tractors that are still in use today, much to the delight of tourists who stop to photograph the classic duo towing double loads of grapes to Penfold’s (Treasury Wine Estates), the winery Malcolm has delivered 100 per cent of his crop to right from the beginning. “Those old tractors are more convenient to jump off and on when you’re picking,” he says. “The newer cabin tractor we use is best for spraying and mowing, that’s providing the air conditioner works of course.”


46 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG

Vines are largely left to their natural growth patterns to intensify fruit flavours and encourage roots to grow deep into the soil to find their own moisture, much like grandpa Obst would have done. It’s yet another full circle moment for Malcolm who has returned to dry grown principles used in the days before he called the bulldozers in to remove all the original fruit trees and plant trellised Mataro, Pedro, more Shiraz and some Grenache which “is still there”. “Basically, there wasn’t enough money in stonefruit. “The vineyard was dry grown and we were averaging about 1 ½ to 2 tonne to the acre back then. We’re back to that now again.” The introduction of irrigation made an impact on the way grapes were grown in the decades when “quality wasn’t such an issue” and most vineyards had both red and white varieties because if wineries didn’t want one, they were sure to need the

other, creating some bargaining power. “The prices of all varieties were set at the same price all over the Barossa. The more tonnage you got, the more money. Some put bores in and we all sort of followed… We’d be getting up to around 5-8 tonne to the acre. “We used soaker hoses, the whole land was flooded and I would walk up and down the vineyard changing hoses.” The dawn of the drip line offered more controlled irrigation at the turn of a tap. “Everyone thought that was a real smart idea.” Before the modern battery-pack operated pruning shears, Malcolm pruned everything with “ordinary hand snips” and placed the vine off cuts into heaps on every other row. “We used to go through with a pitch fork and just throw them in an old burner. My mum used to drive the tractor sometimes and she’d get covered in smoke!

“I reckon burning the cuttings would have kept the diseases down, but it’s not practical now. “You would plough in the winter and there wasn’t any spraying at that time because there were no diseases to worry about...you would spray for grubs a bit occasionally, but you never had to spray for mildew, I didn’t even have a spray plant. “Now all these diseases have come from somewhere, I don’t know how... Someone must have brought them in their pockets!” Grape varieties have changed over the years too and now only Shiraz is grown alongside his original Grenache. Malcolm comments on how vineyards and their management seem to reflect Europe’s grapegrowing countries with a more hands-on approach to manipulate crops. “I remember the late Galvin John mentioned when he was on holidays

over in France, that they were bunch thinning and this was years before the trend came here. I was rather surprised to hear that and thought hang, I hope it doesn’t happen over here. “Gal said there was one vineyard that would be used for one style of wine and across the road, another was used for a different quality wine and that’s how it is in the Barossa now too.” Malcolm is one of the few grapegrowers that weathered the grape pull of the eighties and whilst there were some lean years, he’s grateful that he’s always been able to sell his grapes. His son, Stuart is a viticulturist now too and the grandsons were all grape picking alongside their grandfather this past vintage. Asked when he might retire, the 78 year old smiles and shrugs. “There’s no time to retire!”

reasons why I’m grateful to be

Oh, by the way... if you know of someone who would appreciate the level of service I provide, please call me with their name and business number. I’ll be happy to follow up and take great care of them.

your Real Estate Consultant 1

It’s a privilege to be your trusted Real Estate Professional. Our relationship is important to me, and I look forward to continuing to develop this bond in the future.

2

Sharing my expertise. I enjoy giving you the scoop on the local real estate market. If you’re thinking of putting your home on the market, or are just curious about its value, I can provide a market analysis of your property. For a clearer picture of what’s really going on in the market, contact me to learn more about the current trends in our market.

3

Your support is vital. It’s an honour to help wonderful people like you navigate our local real estate market. And your referrals to other great people help me to thrive.

CJ Setlhong

M: 0448 085 077

Cj.setlhong@harcourts.com.au www.barossavalley.harcourts.com.au CJ Setlhong Property Sales Consultant Barossa Harcourts Harcourts Barossa Valley RLA 263081


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INDEPENDENT HOME LIVING OPPORTUNITIES Barossa Village have some exciting new independent retirement living property opportunities of which you can be a part. You can still secure one of our premium properties on Magnolia Street, Tanunda, or, we invite you to have input into your new home selections by purchasing one of our eight stunning homes yet to be built in Angaston. We also have a range of existing homes available for you to move into immediately - 1 bedroom to 3 bedrooms, and priced from $145,000 to $350,000. Don’t leave it too late to enjoy what may be some of the best years of your life! Take the opportunity to sell your existing home, move in with us and pocket the difference

Our independent retirement living options embrace the Barossa living experience. We build in small clusters of three to eight homes, and our properties are situated in the heart of Tanunda, Angaston and Nuriootpa. This provides you with the security and support you need while keeping you close enough to the action. We want to relieve you of the ‘hum drum’ chores of home ownership and smooth the way for you to enjoy the things you have been adding to your ‘bucket list’ over the years. It really is as easy as picking up the phone to start the ball rolling to begin an exciting new phase in your life. Join Barossa Village on this stage of your journey and become part of our rich and caring Community.

Phone Tim Trudgen on 8562 0300 | barossavillage.org

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A stunning world class Restaurant with a passion for using fresh local and regional produce. Backed by great staff, we endeavour to ensure that a visit to Lyndoch Hill Restaurant will be memorable and rewarding. HAPPY HOUR MON-SAT 4.30 - 6PM LUNCH FRI-SUN 12 - 2.30PM; DINNER MON - SAT 6PM - LATE Dining bookings recommended - Phone (08) 8524 4268 1221 Barossa Valley Way, Lyndoch www.lyndochhill.com

FIRE, GAME MEAT, CRAFT BEER, LIVE MUSIC & BOUTIQUE WINE If You’re Game will be featured at the Beer and BBQ Festival in Adelaide 28-30 July Find more information on www.adelaidebeerfest.com.au


BOOK REVIEW // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 49

The Silent Invasion BY JAMES BRADLEY REVIEW BY TODD KUCHEL Ten years after an outbreak of DNA altering spores, the world is being infected; plant life, animals, even humans. When 16 year old Callie discovers that her 5 year old sister Gracie is changing, she flees to escape the ruthless Quarantine officer’s and heads for the Zone, an area outside

their jurisdiction located in the far north of Australia. The blurb suggests that the infection has come from space and that people are becoming part of a vast alien intelligence. This is no doubt a preview of things to come in the sequel, as I found nothing but mystery surrounding

the cause, and no mention of aliens.

mistreatment of an infected dog.

This novel is a thrilling adventure; a page turner with a post war, apocalypse feel surrounded by mystery that had me eagerly reading Callie’s desperate journey to save her sister until the startling end.

The Silent Invasion is part one of a new trilogy by award-winning Australian author James Bradley.

Though, a word of warning for dog lovers, it contains a rather brutal

Available now from Ravens Parlour book store Tanunda.

It’s an entertaining read that I would recommend for anyone 12 +

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50 | T HE B A R OSSA MAG // R E CIPES

THE DICKENS

This is a great cocktail for the Winter months. Inspired by a similar concoction made by the Charles Dickens character Mr Micawber, it made his “face shine as if it had been varnished all over”!

Serves: 2-3

RECIPE BY NEIL BULLOCK BAROSSA DISTILLING CO Photography by Alicia Lüdi-Schutz

1 Cup of Barossa Generations Gin 1 Cup of Tawny Port (We have used Dutschke Bourbon Barrel Tawny for that extra layer of flavor) Juice of 1 Lemon Juice of 1/2 an Orange 1 Whole Orange segment 1/2 Pineapple ring, peeled and cored (optional) 1 teaspoon of brown sugar 1 teaspoon of honey 1 whole stick of Cinnamon 5 Cloves A pinch of finely grated Nutmeg To Garnish: 1 Cinnamon Stick A little grated Nutmeg (Simply multiply the ingredients for a larger group)

Place all of the main ingredients into a small well washed saucepan and heat very gently on the stove top for 15 mins at the lowest setting. While it is infusing balance the sweet/sour flavor with Honey and Lemon Juice to your taste. Take off the heat and strain into a Cocktail mixing jug if you have one, otherwise use a heat resistant measuring jug. Pour into small glassware, we have used a tasting glass from Spiegelau Perfect Serve Collection. Garnish with a stick of Cinnamon and a pinch of finely grated Nutmeg. You could strain into a China Tea Pot and serve in bone china tea cups with a slice of Gingerbread. That might feel far more civilised on a chilly winters afternoon.

Tanunda Lutheran Home Inc. 27 Bridge Street, Tanunda | 8563 7777 | info@tlhome.com.au | www.tlhome.com.au

Residential Care 117 permanent places and 2 respite places High-standard state-of-the-art residential care facility Dedicated dementia-specific area

Independent Retirement Living New accommodation available soon Support services and facilities Quality lifestyle choices For all enquiries, call Carolyn Redden, Independent Living Coordinator, 8563 7709 or 0417 351 123 | ilu@tlhome.com.au


RECIPES // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 51 PHOTO BY MARTIN RITZMANN

CHARRED BROCCOLI & LENTILS WITH PRESERVED LEMON & SALTED RICOTTA

APPLE PIE Serves 6 – 8 This makes two medium sized apple pies or one large.

1 head of broccoli with leaves attached 100 grams cooked baby blue lentils 100 grams of grated salted ricotta Handful tatsoi leaves (or baby salad leaves) 1 tablespoon olive oil

1 x 445g Carême Sour Cream Pastry, defrosted RECIPE BY CLAIRE WOOD 150g cold unsalted butter, cut into CARÊME PASTRY cubes 1 cup raw almond meal 135g light muscovado sugar (or soft brown sugar) Zest of one lemon 1.2 kg granny smith apples peeled & cored (use lemon juice to prevent them oxidizing) 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and ginger 1 tablespoon caster sugar 8 ginger snap biscuits - crushed to a medium crumb 1 egg yolk beaten for glazing 1 tablespoon demerara sugar

For the dressing mix together:

Pre-heat oven to 180c fan-forced (200c conventional).

1/2 preserved lemon, rind only, finely chopped 1 head roast garlic skins off & pureed 1 tablespoon champagne vinegar 4 tablespoons olive oil

Unroll pastry sheet, lightly dust with flour and cut in half if making two pies. Line one or two pie tins with the pastry leaving at least a 3cm overhang, place in fridge.

Cut the broccoli into quarters keeping the leaves separate

Slice apples 5mm thick, place in a bowl and mix with the caster sugar and spices. Sprinkle the crushed ginger snaps over the base of the pastry, followed by the apples pilling them high in the middle. Place the almond crumble mix over the apples until surface is covered. Now fold over the excess pastry and crimp around the outer edge to form a border. Brush the pastry with beaten egg and sprinkle with the demerara sugar.

RECIPE BY SAM SMITH FINO SEPPELTSFIELD

Serves 4 Works well as an entrée or as a side dish.

Using a food processor pulse the cold butter, almond meal, sugar and lemon zest, until it forms a crumb.

Toss in the olive oil and then cook the broccoli on a chargrill or BBQ, low heat until tender. Add the leaves at the last minute. Toss together with the lentils, tatsoi leaves & dressing. Arrange on a plate & finish with grated salted ricotta over the top.

Bake in the oven for 40 minutes at 180c fan-forced (200c non-fan). Serve warm with Crème Fraiche or whipped cream.

Note: Salted Ricotta is available from good cheese suppliers & may be substituted with another firm salty cheese such as pecorino or fetta.

Note: The ginger snap biscuits form a barrier between the fruit and pastry preventing the pastry from being soggy.

N E W L A B E LS, F R ES H STO R E , A F FO R DA B L E FAS H I O N P ro u d ly ce le b rat i n g 2 2 ye a rs i n b u s i n e s s

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Our beautifully refurbished Function Rooms are perfect for your next special event.

Enjoy our new menu in the Bistro or dine at Billy Jacks Bar and Courtyard.

ALYSSA HARDING Manager

LINDA CLARK Assistant Manager

At Flight Centre, I use my passion for travel and personal experiences to help create your very own unique travel journeys.

What I love most about what I do is seeing the excitement which travel brings and seeing the confidence it builds.

With Award winning hospitality, The Vine Inn Barossa is the perfect place to meet with friends & family. KYLA NEWMAN Travel Consultant

DANIEL COLES Travel Consultant

HOLLY NIXON Travel Consultant

I love helping families and friends share amazing travel experiences while creating a lifetime of memories. Let me help you!

I believe life is an adventure best lived through travel. My passion is to create unique and personal travel experiences.

Whether it’s domestic, international, cruising or guided tours, I can assist you with all of your travel desires.

The Barossa’s Premier Entertainment Venue 1 Murray St, Nuriootpa

14-22 Murray Street, Nuriootpa | 8562 2133

Visit us in store to discuss a special Gift Registry for your wedding or special occassion.

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Open 7 days 10 - 4.30pm


WEDDINGS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 53

Alanna Obst & George Lawrence MARRIED AT BRIDE’S CHILDHOOD HOME DECEMBER 3, 2016

Alanna and George say their wedding was just simple, relaxed and enjoyable and didn’t want it to end. The couple, who became engaged when George proposed in their kitchen, married at Alanna’s mother’s home in the Moppa by Celebrant, Christine Trenwith on December 3, 2016.

The bride wore a couture gown made by Caleche Bridal.

from Peter Jacksons.

Shona Joy dresses were worn by Alanna’s bridesmaids, Megan Heinrich, Ebony Obst and Kate Lawrence.

cars driven by Mark Obst, Kym

George and his attendants, Alex Rotzler, Jack Lawrence and Will Chaffey wore attire bought

The bridal party travelled in Roocke, Nigel Roocke and Trevor Hollit. Greenock Creek Charters provided transport for the guests. The happy couple celebrated

with family and friends at a

Alanna and George were really

reception held at Lambert Estate

glad they used local businesses,

Wines, Angaston.

they were all amazing and made

Guests enjoyed the delicious food by Hand Made Catering

the preparation for their wedding much easier.

and the white chocolate and

Alanna is the daughter of

raspberry mud cake beautifully

Bronwyn Obst and Stephen Obst

decorated by Make It Yours Cakes

and George is the son of Julie

and Cupcakes - Dana Roocke.

Lawrence and Peter Lawrence.

A & G Lawrence Hair and Make-Up Sarah Craker Weddings | Flowers Viva the Flower Store | Stationery Daisy Loves George | Photographer Tomek Photography | Reception Lambert Estate


Share your story with us...

With more than twelve years experience, Miss Maggies are specialists in wedding and event flowers. We take pride in providing top quality wedding flowers such as bridal bouquets, flower crowns, ceremony and reception florals and hanging installations all over the Barossa Valley. We also provide a wide range of vintage props and hire items and can help you with most of your wedding styling concepts. We offer a full delivery and set up service with free no obligation quotes. Call us today to book a time to talk all things floral.

p: 0431 812 962 e: maggie@missmaggies.com.au www.missmaggies.com.au

Are you getting married in the Barossa or know someone who is? Email jordan.stollznow@leadernews.net.au We would love to hear from you...

SUNDAY 2ND JULY | SALTRAM WINE ESTATE 11am—2pm Over 15 local wedding suppliers Glass of sparkling on arrival FREE ENTRY For more information contact Elle e. elle.mcardle@tweglobal.com m. 0427 803 435


WEDDINGS // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 55

Meggie Zerna & Charles Edwards MARRIED AT TANUNDA JANUARY 21, 2017

From being great friends at Faith Lutheran College, Tanunda and eventually something more when they graduated in 2006, Meggie and Charles have been a part of each other’s lives since. Ready to start the next chapter of their relationship, the happy couple were married on January 21, 2017 at the Zerna residence, Tanunda. They exchanged vows under an old gum tree with a stunning flower garland hanging from the tree which was constructed by their good friend, Bethany Hannay. Meggie wore a simple white lace v-neck dress. Her sister, Lauren Zerna was bridesmaid. Charles wore a textured jacket, paired back with navy pants. His brother, Alex Edwards was groomsman. The newlyweds celebrated their

relationship and commitment to each other with their nearest and dearest at a reception held at Pindarie Wines, drinking amazing wine and eating delicious food. Pendant Edison bulbs hung from the roof of the marquee to create an intimate feel. Meggie changed into a gold and white sequin dress for the dance floor. The happy couple and their guests danced the night away to a 6 piece band put together by Meggie’s brother, Sam Zerna, now living and working in New York. Meggie said, “The day comes and goes so quickly but the warmth, love and happiness that we felt throughout the day and the beautiful memories will stay with us forever.” Meggie is the daughter of Jenny and Neil Zerna and Charles is the son of Sharon and Robert Edwards.

M & C Edwards Hair and Make-Up Sarah Craker Weddings | Flowers Viva the Flower Store | Photography Jessica Clarke

| Reception Pindarie Wines


ü Aluminium windows & doors

hinged, sliding, lifting, bi-fold, louvre

ü Retractable screens Phantom, Brio or Centor

ü Roller shutters ü Security and Decorative Doors and screens

ü Window replacements Energy efficient glass

ü Shower screens ü Ziptrak® brand

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195A MURRAY STREET, TANUNDA | www.rogaschwindows.com.au BLD Lic No. R27295


SOCIAL SCENE // T H E B AROSSA MAG | 57

DEMENTIA DAY FUN RUN Photos by Dave Graor 1. Grant Taylor who is the carer for his wife Leslie, from Nuriootpa. 2. Robert Haines, Angaston and Grant Taylor, Nuriootpa, who were the organisers of the event. 3. Wendy Brown and Karen Lanning, both from Kapunda.

2.

4. Meg and Courtnie Moulds, Tilly and Lou Hadden, all from Angaston.

1.

5. Marie Michopoulos, Keyneton. 6. Bev Saegenschnitter and Kathryn Soar from Carers and Disability Link. 7. Jenny Nitschke, Nuriootpa, with Hazel and Jimmy and Rachael Morrison, Tanunda, with Tilly. 8. Bernadette and Liam Busch from Angaston with Monica Mattner, Tanunda. 9. Thomas Carter, Angaston, finished first in the 5K with 19:13.

4.

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6.

3.

7.

8.

9.

Providing dental education and care for you and your family

Committed to providing you the highest level of dental care in a comfortable and friendly environment

37 Tanunda Rd, Nuriootpa | info@barossadental.com.au | www.barossadental.com.au

To make an appointment, please call 8562 1444


58 | T H E B A R OSSA M AG

LOCAL FOOTBALL Photos by Bradley Phillips 1. William Glen, Liam Hoerisch and Sean Dempsey from Kapunda. 2. Tim Ellbourne and Gary Waldhuter from Kapunda. 3. Sandi Doig, Adelaide and Olivia Waldhuter, Kapunda.

2. 1.

4. Damian Carracher, Mt Gambier; Grant Smith, Karen Petney and Nicole Leaney, Kapunda and Faye Carracher, Mt Gambier. 5. Connor Rothe, Liam Anderson and Riley Menzel from Kapunda.

4.

6. Ben and Tyrell Burgess from Nuriootpa.

LIGHT PASS PRIMARY 100th ANNIVERSARY FAYRE

3.

Photos by Dave Graor 7. Wes Schilling, Nuriootpa, with Mayor Bob Sloane.

6.

8. Khandi Atze, Nuriootpa, singing with the Light Pass Primary choir. 9. Shannan and Colby Coad from Kapunda. 10. Layla, Evanston and Peter Smith, Hewitt. 11. Jacqui Williams, Nuriootpa CFS, with Kyza Watton-Schultz, Nuriootpa.

5.

12. Janet Grosser, Sally Linke and Jayne Siegele who are Light Pass Primary volunteers.

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Made fresh on-site daily 72 Murray Street, Tanunda | 08 8563 3889 | www.beansandcreams.com



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