The Barossa Mag - 2 - Autumn 2017

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Autumn 2017 | FREE

Barossa Bygones LUKE’S PASSION FOR HISTORY

A quiet achiever COMMITTED TO COMMUNITY

A time honoured tradition 70 YEARS OF VINTAGE FESTIVAL


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PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Darren Robinson

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EDITOR Tony Robinson Contributors: Alicia-Lüdi Schutz Todd Kuchel Heidi Helbig Lee Teusner Kristee Semmler Catherine Harper Adam Hunt Claire Wood Neil Bullock Sam Smith

from the team Welcome to the autumn edition of The Barossa Mag. Since launching TBM in December last year, our team has experienced a generous amount of messages of support and feedback. We are truly thankful for this.

DESIGN Stephanie Gann Jessica Waldhuter

As TBM will naturally evolve, our dedicated team will also continue to work hard to shape the publication to ensure it provides the perfect fit for our inspired region.

PHOTOGRAPHY Alicia-Lüdi Schutz Sam Kroepsch Pete Thornton John Krüger

In this issue, we welcome additional contributors. Offering their elite talents in photography and meaningful writing, their skills will help to showcase and celebrate the people of our community.

ADVERTISING Darren Robinson darren.robinson@leadernews.net.au Jordan Stollznow jordan.stollznow@leadernews.net.au

The autumn edition explores the time-honoured tradition, Barossa Vintage Festival. Wolf Blass describes his early days working in the Barossa and how, from humble beginnings, he created one of Australia’s most internationally recognised wines. Celebrating 70 years, the Festival has been cherished by ‘Barossans’ and visitors alike.

Autumn 2017 | FREE

We meet with Light Pass resident, Luke Rothe to provide an insight into our local heritage. There’s no denying Luke’s commitment to preserve the history of our region. Learn about the founders of Barossa’s Kind Hearted Kitchen, Ruby Stobart and Rachael Braunack whose not-for-profit food venture continues to fill stomachs and hearts around the Barossa. Draw inspiration from Debbie Miles, one of the Barossa’s busiest volunteers whose work behind the scenes is integral to the success of many community groups and organisations. Easing into cooler weather, our local foodies serve up some delicious recipes for you to try.

nes Barossa Bygo FOR HISTORY LUKE’S PASSION

A quiet achiever UNITY COMMITTED TO

COMM

tradition A time honoured E FESTIVAL 70 YEARS OF VINTAG

Our cover: Wolf Blass photographed by John Krüger PUBLISHER Leader Newspapers Pty Ltd 34 Dean Street, Angaston 08 8564 2035 leader@barossaleader.com.au The Barossa Mag™ All material appearing in The Barossa Mag™ is copyright© unless otherwise stated or it may rest with the provider of the supplied material. The Barossa Mag™ takes all care to ensure information is correct at the time of printing but the publisher accepts no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of any information contained in the text or advertisements. Views expressed are not necessarily endorsed by the publisher or editor.

* FLOWERS & COFFEE * BAKED GOODIES * GOOD TIMES 55C MURRAY ST, NURIOOTPA 8562 1612 OPEN 7 DAYS || FLEURSOCIAL.COM.AU

We look forward to celebrating autumn with you and hope you enjoy the lively photography and inspired stories we have to share with you.

Darren Robinson Publishing Director


TBM Contributors

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TODD KUCHEL

As an avid reader and film fanatic, I am a freelance writer with an appreciation for story telling. From articles and reviews to my own creative writing, I pride myself on the finest details.

HEIDI HELBIG

In a career spanning print media, communications strategy and public relations, Heidi’s passion for storytelling has never wavered. Away from the desk she watches the seasons change in a small patch of century-old Grenache and tries to satisfy the enquiring minds of the little people in her life.

SAM KROEPSCH

What started as hobby in the early 2000s, Sam found that his passion for taking photo’s was only the beginning. Sam now focuses mainly on Commercial and Bottle Photography as well as capturing people’s special moments. Away from the camera Sam enjoys water sports and exploring the country side, usually with a camera close by!

ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ Proud to be a grapegrower’s daughter, Alicia enjoys telling the stories of those who shape the region whilst adding to the Valley’s rich cultural tapestry as a brass musician.

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PETE THORNTON

That ‘picture tells a thousand words’ thingo always seemed pretty clever to me. I always hated writing 1000 word essays at Uni - so photography it is for this guy! 12 years in as pro photographer, Pete loves working with a story, and getting the best out of people to create unique, artful images.

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JOHN KRÜGER

With Barossa connections dating back to the settling of Hoffnungsthal, John Krüger has been shooting as a freelance photographer around South Australia for the last 17 years. His favourite subjects are amazing food and interesting people. John loves positive stories as well as how his photos can bring them to life.

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“Perception is reality…” “A few years ago, we moved away from timber 6 pack boxes and into gloss cardboard for our flagship Elderton wines, Ashmead and Command. On release of both wines, we instantly noticed that sales rates had decreased. It was especially noticeable in people buying the 6 packs as gifts, and it sliced a hole in our sales rate both locally and internationally.” “But we saw the light quick smart. Within a vintage or two we were back in custom-made timber boxes from Barossa Enterprises and Ashmead and Command haven’t looked back since.” “We’ve been working with Barossa Enterprises for over a decade. They do more for us than just make beautiful timber boxes. They provide us with a full service – labelling, tissue wrapping, packing and shipping our wine, plus supplying us with export pallets as well.” Allister Ashmead, Co-Managing Director, Elderton Wines

Contact Deb or Mandy on 8562 4855 or go online to www.barossaent.com.au for a quote


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6 1 -23

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3 1 8-4 contents 6-9 Wolf Blass - the maverick, the mogul, the man

25-8 38-41 Kind Hearted Kitchen 42 Gardening advice with Kristee Semmler

11-14 Barossa Bygones

45 Wellbeing with Lee Teusner

16-23 Conversations with Colin

46 Pet Advice with Catherine Harper

25-28 Celebrating 70 years of the Barossa’s best

49 Travel inspiration with Adam Hunt

31-33 Jess faces her biggest challenge

50-51 Seasonal recipes

34-35 Committed to community

53-55 Weddings

36 Goldfinger Book Review

57-58 The Social Scene

2 pairs multifocal glasses from $299 Nuriootpa: 39 Murray St, 8562 3777.

Price complete with standard multifocal lenses with scratch resistant coating. Extra options not included. Price for other lens types may differ. Price correct at time of print. Second pair must be from same price range of frames and lens range or below. Must be same prescription.


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WOLF BLASS the maverick, the mogul, the man WORDS BY ALICIA-LÜDI SCHUTZ PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN KRÜGER

He’s the name behind one of the most famous wineries in the country, an industry mogul whose personality is as big and bold as the internationally recognised wines he puts his name to. Winemaking maverick, Mr Wolf Blass AM sits in the board room of his Hindmarsh Square Office, walls lined with accolades and images of memorable moments captured time. It’s obvious he has earned the utmost respect from his peers. On the board room table is memorabilia showcasing an incredible life, from a humble birth certificate dated September 2, 1934 Stadtilm, East Germany, through to extravagant 80th birthday celebration photographs and publications. The collection is massive and tells the story of a wine industry character whose innovation and determination has helped bring the Barossa to the world stage alongside the likes of Penfold’s Max Schubert, Orlando’s Guenter Prass and Peter Lehmann whom he proudly called friends. “Considering my age, there are not many of us around anymore!” Wolf says in his thick German accent, adding to his already larger than life personality. Paging through hand written notes, he’s about to tell the story of his life in Australia, his eyes sparkling with enthusiasm because he knows it’s a great tale. It begins with a highly trained young German winemaker with a “Kellermeister” Diploma from Wurzburg Wine University, working in Bristol, England. The year is 1960. “I had an offer from Kaiser Stuhl or The Barossa Valley Co-operative. They were looking for somebody to generate the sparkling wine business in competition against Orlando’s Barossa Pearl,” he explains. “That was the in thing at the time. “I could have gone to Venezuela, I had an offer there… I was a bachelor, I thought there were some hot birds there but a revolution broke out and I looked at the Kaiser Stuhl, it appeared to me that it was a good jump professionally to gain another momentum in my life. I was 27 years of age, I thought probably Europe isn’t big enough for me.” In 1961, return ticket in hand, he set off to Nuriootpa having signed a three year contract as Sparkling Wines manager,

“The decision was right and I’ve still got the return ticket in my pocket - I’ve never used it!” a hearty laugh fills the room. “I signed the contract not knowing what the company was all about, I thought it was a highly sophisticated technical company which it wasn’t. The company was broke, the co-operative was in big trouble. “We had to build probably a fighting tank out of a sardine can because there was no money. You had to be really innovative as an individual to create things, that was a lot of fun suddenly. “It was the beginning of a positive employment centre for the Barossa.” Wolf talks of the lack of co-operation between wine companies of that era, his monologue peppered with “bl***y” this and “bl***y” that, one of few words he says with an Aussie twang. “As a winemaker, you weren’t even allowed to communicate with other winemakers, that’s how the industry was – you may exchange secrets! Of course, there was no such thing as a secret but it was an interesting period.” Enter the Friday night “Horse and Herring Club” – a social group Wolf instigated to create some camaraderie between winemakers from different wineries who would bring bottles of wine along to share. “There was no delicatessen shops, nothing, the only thing was herring in tins and biscuits – that’s what we were eating and we had a punt on the horses at the weekend. “We became socially engaged,” he says, valuing the friendships made. His three year contract now at an end, Wolf moved to Thebarton and worked as a freelance technical advisor seven days a week and clocking up thousands of kilometres in his 1957 VW Beetle serving well known wineries. “I was working for $2.50 an hour!” says Wolf. “I started as a consultant with overalls and rubber boots to convert these companies from port and sweet wines into table wines. It was a tough period.” The wines he was making for others were soon noticed by wine judges and critics. “Then I think, I’ll do something on my own while I was helping all these other guys. But, of course, I didn’t have any money – I started with peanuts!”

It was on a wine tasting stop in Victoria’s Great Western region, during an annual trip to the Melbourne Football Grand Final with Nuriootpa Football Club friends, Peter Rosenberg and Brian Kalleske, that Wolf bought two hogsheads of Malbec. He would blend this purchase with Shiraz from Langhorne Creek to create his very first wine in 1966, the same year he registered the business name “Bilyara”, the aboriginal name for “Eaglehawk” which would feature so prominently on labels and publicity in the future. “That was a big deal….my first venture, 2,500 bottles. “Brian Linke, the baker and my late friend, he lent me some money to buy some grapes.” In 1969, Wolf stopped consulting, taking up a contract as manager and chief winemaker at Tolley Scott and Tolley. “Within three years, Tolley’s became the most successful red wine producer in Australia – unheard of! Against the total bl***y lot!” Meanwhile, Wolf continued his own production after hours with assistance from grape growers and wine industry colleagues, particularly Darkie Liebich from Rovally Wines who bottled Wolf’s “first big” vintage in 1967, free of charge. “I think it was 1,500 dozen, that was lots…. He gave this to me as a gift because I made sparkling wine for him which was called Charmane and it became the number one sparkling wine in South Australia.” Wolf bought an “old army shed” on the Sturt Highway and together with “another chap called Bob Cundy” worked tirelessly on a bold new venture. “Then came the confrontation between Tolley Scott and Tolley management and me, Wolf Blass,” he says with fire in his eyes, his hands now clenched tightly on the board room table. “Are you going to maintain your own production or do you want to stay in our company 100 per cent? You cannot have both ways. “I went to the telephone and phoned up all my friends which I helped in the past and they said we’ll help you… I went back into the board room and I told them in the Australian language – you can stick it!” Having built up his stock since 1966, he began Wolf Blass Wines International in 1973 with a $2,000 overdraft arranged by his bank manager at the time, Kapunda’s Bill Adams.


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“THEN I THINK, I’LL DO SOMETHING ON MY OWN WHILE I WAS HELPING ALL THESE OTHER GUYS. BUT, OF COURSE, I DIDN’T HAVE ANY MONEY – I STARTED WITH PEANUTS!” - WOLF BLASS

1971 ART EXHIBITION: Wolf Blass, Wyndham Hill Smith, Rod Schubert and Neil Tamke “My stock was stored in Greenock at the garage from Norton Schluter!” he says, dropping the name of another local identity “John Glaetzer’s wife was in charge of hand labelling and Elsie Tamke, they did the hand labelling for the ’66, ’67 and ’68.” “Nothing went wrong… I won the packaging award, I won three Jimmy Watson, John Glaetzer joined me. I could have jumped off the sixth floor of the Hilton Hotel and I wouldn’t have broken a leg!” Sensational publicity with Wolf quoted as saying, “My wines make weak men strong and strong women weak!” captured people’s imagination along with the barrage of medals and trophies from national and international wine shows which Wolf says was described as “obscene”. He coins the phrase, “No medals – no job” and provides employment and success to associated local

THE BLASS FAMILY: Sharyn, Shirley, Wolf, Sue and Anton

businesses as wine production soared to dizzying heights to meet international markets in 30 countries. “We were selling bl***y wine everywhere!” says Wolf who was spending months overseas expanding a powerful distribution network. But something had to give. “I got a little bit toey because my marriage broke up… The company became pretty big and I started worrying about it so I said I better become a public listed company.” The company would eventually merge with Mildara to form Mildara Blass which would be acquired by Foster’s five years later for $560 million. Today, the Wolf Blass label continues to be a key brand in the Treasury Wine Estates portfolio. Wolf describes, in gripping detail, a cut-throat business world with chance meetings in hotel foyers, amalgamations, takeover bids, life changing decisions

and deal sealing handshakes. Looking back, there are “no regrets” and whilst he is no longer an executive of the company, he is still working five days a week. “My job is now looking at the Wolf Blass Foundation project and from the $1 million which I put in when I was 60 years of age, I’ve developed the finance up to $7 million - I must know how to run a business!” he says. There’s a flashy new project on his mind and he reveals the plans for his latest venture. “Now I’m putting a $3.5 million project up in Hahndorf – the Wolf Blass Gallery and Museum. “I will not say this is my last one, but it is a big project – it’s going to be huge!” The Wolf Blass legend will live on. “Never stop, just keep going…that’s my motto!”


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� ABOVE: Max Schubert, Peter Lehmann and Wolf Blass � BELOW: Mayor of Adelaide, George Joseph with Wolf Blass

A FUN SIDE TO WOLF “I turned the bl***y place upside down”, says Wolf Blass describing his arrival in the Barossa. He cheekily selects a book and flicks to the preface written by the late Len Evans to answer the question of how he would describe himself. “I found him determined, argumentative, ebullient, assertive and idealistic,” Wolf reads out loud. He doesn’t disagree. “That’s how he saw me, I do not judge myself, I leave it to others!” he laughs. There is no doubt Wolf has worked hard all his life, but there was fun to be had along the way. He enjoys, and has sponsored, the Nuriootpa Rover Football Club, Barossa Car Club, horse racing, snow skiing and pistol shooting and has revelled in the traditions and supported the Adelaide German Club and Barossa Vintage Festival over the years. He even played the drum kit, honing his skills on one he kept in his wine cellar at home. “When I was young I liked jazz, I was sponsor of the Kit Kat Club – you’ve got no idea! Anything with action, I was there!” Currently the “number two” member of the Greenock Business Luncheon Club, a social group which he says has been “sticking together” for more than half a century, he says, “This is when you make business”. “Initially it was a group of people who also promoted the Barossa Valley and we invited distributors... It was all part of a very happy luncheon arrangement with a lot of fun. Today you don’t do that, you don’t look in each other’s face, you are playing around with a bl***y mickey mouse machine!” Happily married to his third wife, Shirley, Wolf says, “She put the white flag up!” As one of the true characters of the wine industry, Wolf is known for his snappy dressing and bow tie which is as famous as the winery he founded. “It had something to do with when I was a consultant. I had a normal tie and had overalls… running around. The tie was always dangling around! So I said, even if I’ve got rubber boots on, I like to be well presented so I put the bow tie on - it may sound crazy but it is as simple as that - a touch of class.” Within every legend there is a little larrikin and Wolf describes the funfilled rivalry between wine makers of the time. “Peter Lehmann, at the Bacchus Club, presented a wine made out of apples… He fooled everyone, nobody knew what it was. “What I did, next vintage, I had some peaches and one of the girls at the office, she came in and had to throw peaches into the crusher. We had made a red wine with a lot of peaches in the stuff and left one hogshead fermenting, processing in a different manner. I was trying to get back at Peter Lehmann….it turned out a bl***y sensation! “I think the wine industry is fun…it’s all there for enjoyment. Now, if you don’t enjoy this, how can you make other people happy?”



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WORDS BY TODD KUCHEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAM KROEPSCH It’s not hard to forget the fine details of history: the fashions, interests and passions of what was once so familiar; letters from loved ones, toys and furniture we’ve owned, or even local businesses we’ve seen come and go. Things surrounding us in everyday life are sometimes so easily overlooked. Even things that are precious can become lost forever. With that in mind, just imagine the history connected to belongings of Barossa Valley’s community dating back to the German settlers in 1842. It’s thanks to one man, named Luke Rothe; blessed with the gift of appreciating our heritage that a wonderful collection of our history exists, preserved like a time capsule in the heart of Barossa Valley. Luke’s passion for all things old began when he was 11 years old, with the thrill of the discovery of an antique coffee grinder in a neighbour’s shed.

Since then Luke has been buying, swapping and inheriting treasures for 40 years to create a unique collection dedicated to Barossa Valley’s history titled, ‘Barossa Bygones.’ At a home, naturally surrounded by vineyards, I’m welcomed by Luke, only too happy to share his treasures. As we enter the main display, I’m met with an overwhelming presentation of antique cupboards, tools, oil tins and advertisement pieces, from boxes to business signs; each one in pristine condition and with a story which Luke is happy to tell. His attention to detail is especially outstanding, having placed all things related to advertisement in a way that will strike a chord with its audience. As we make our way around, Luke reveals themed displays inside each cupboard. There is one filled with the anodized aluminium and bright colours spanning the 50’s to the 70’s;

one full of gentlemen’s smoking and shaving paraphernalia, featuring his great-grandfather’s smoker’s cap and top hat dating 1890; one with vintage cereal boxes, one for women’s collectables and one entirely dedicated to the 1930’s which features a gramophone that was his first auction piece, purchased from the Redeemer Lutheran School auction in 1978. As I move in further, I recognise labels and tins I had seen as a child inside my grandparents’ house. At the back there’s a winnower, once used by farmers to separate chaff from wheat and bag it. There’s a butter churn with its receipt dating 1904, and a cabinet of Appelts drinks that were manufactured in Nuriootpa from 1906 until 1975 and Tanunda Aerated Waters, manufactured from the 60’s to the 80’s. He has hundreds of old calendars in boxes, a lolly cabinet, with Lifesavers from the 1950’s for one


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example and even a wagon and a set of crutches used by his grandfather after receiving treatment at the Willows’ Hospital for a broken leg in 1915. As a basic rule, this collection can include anything appealing from the 1840’s until the 1970’s; thus stopping at the introduction of the barcode. Cabinet makers that had settled here from Germany in the 1800’s were responsible for creating a unique Barossa style. They came with knowledge and design, but had no choice but to use the materials our land had to offer. Luke’s knowledge of these works is extensive and he has a fantastic collection featuring works from Wilhelm Schaedel, Hermann Schaedel, Karl Launer and Barossa-born ‘Glue-pot Graetz.’ These Germanic Barossa furniture pieces are unique in Australia and deserve recognition. As an example of the depth of Luke’s knowledge, he shows me a railway magazine published in 1911, featuring advertisements of Barossa businesses, including one for R. E. Baird’s General Butcher in Nuriootpa. In a photo of the shop front, there is a timber bench painted white that Luke was able to track down through knowledge of the owners and later purchase. In his workshop stands a well-loved wardrobe, which he calls, the Lange wardrobe. On it, there is German writing, written upside down on the bottom of the door. Luke explains that, after discovering this piece in Waikerie, he learnt that it was once filled with clothes and other belongings before being strapped up and used by Bertha Lange to migrate here from Silesia, Germany in 1867. This story is just one of so many Luke has to share. Being able to share them with people is the reason why Luke prefers to buy privately, direct from families, so that the history of the pieces can be documented. Luke and his wife, Faye, see themselves as caretakers of everything in their collection. What’s most important to them is that they have saved thousands of items from destruction and managed to capture the history of these unique pieces. This is why Luke’s most treasured pieces of history are his ephemera. These are things that were not designed to last the test of time, like letters, envelopes, packaging, even Angaston show tickets beginning from 1896. It’s amazing what these things can tell us about our history.


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Their home is elegantly decorated with examples of their favourite furniture pieces and folders of Luke’s treasured ephemera. He shows me a photograph of himself at age 21 in an old newspaper article, from The Leader written by Tony Robinson, now editor, with the heading, ‘If it’s old, Luke collects it.’ Luke happens to own a complete recount of his great-grandfather’s life, who had placed receipts for every purchase he ever made on wire spikes that were later hung inside his shed.

These were later collected by Luke, and are now preserved like all ephemera, safely inside plastic sleeved folders. This is an amazing collection, well worth a visit from anyone with an interest in Barossa Valley’s history. By no means is the collection completed. Luke and his wife are still buying, swapping and selling to upgrade the collection with better examples. Luke and Faye are thankful to anyone who has helped them, by sharing their knowledge, or parting

with their old wares, even though some are more willing to part with their ‘treasures’ than others. Although a private collection, the Barossa Bygones collection is open to the public every two years, during the Barossa Vintage Festival, as a way of giving back to the community; giving proceeds to Lutheran Community Care. For full details, visit the Barossa Vintage Festival website or inside in the programme.


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16 | T H E BAROSSA MAG

WE WERE VERY PAROCHIAL IN THOSE DAYS AND I THINK THE HIGHLIGHT WAS THAT WE BROUGHT ALL THE TOWNS TOGETHER AND WORKED FOR THE BAROSSA - COLIN GRAMP


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Conversations with Colin 70 years of Festival memories WORDS BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ

The year is 1947. It’s a big year for a young Mr Colin Gramp who was celebrating his first year of marriage to wife Josie, the Centenary year of Gramp’s of Orlando as well as starting the first of 50 years’ service on the Wine Show committee for the Royal Adelaide Agriculture and Horticulture Society of SA. It was also the year the young winemaker met up with the late Bill Seppelt and Martin Dallwitz at Nuriootpa’s Angas Park Hotel, attending the first planning session of what would become the Barossa Valley Vintage Festival. Seventy years later, Colin is proud to say he was on the founding committee for one of the most cherished and longest running wine festivals in Australia. “I can’t believe it’s been 70 years!” exclaims the 95 year old as he sits in the lounge room of his Tanunda home, a manilla folder filled with agendas, minutes and event programmes sitting on his knee. Flicking through original documents, now yellowing with age, he finds the notes for an address he gave to the Rotary Club of Adelaide back in 1973. “My memory isn’t too good anymore!” he laughs as he begins to read the very words he spoke during that April evening at the Hotel Australia in the city. “One hundred years after the first vines were commercially planted, the Barossa Valley townspeople decided to celebrate the first Vintage Festival in keeping with the long standing traditions of their forebears, the majority of whom came from Germany, so as to express the happy and contented spirit of the early settlers perpetuated through the generations that have followed,” he says authoritatively. “It has been influenced by songs and music..folk songs handed down from the early settlers and the

formation of choirs, bands and orchestras.” Colin’s carefully penned speech rekindles fond memories, prompting him to bring out a photograph depicting the 1947 Vintage Festival Ball held at the Nuriootpa War Memorial Institute. He points out two happy faces in the group shown standing on a yellow wagon which decorated the stage. “There’s a one year married couple in the middle! Josie was 25 and I would have been 26...we all had a great time. “The biggest disappointment was we couldn’t get a liquor license so there was only grape juice. You know the driveway on the side of the hall? That’s where we had winemaking equipment actually pumping juice and a press case pressing grapes,” he says laughing at the memory. “Because it was so well attended, it formed the nucleus - it’s where it all began.” The following year, and reflecting successful wine festivals in Europe, a float procession and Queen Competition were introduced. Colin describes the crowd of 16,000 people who converged in the Valley for that 1948 event, all eager to join the “festive spirit” and watch Miss Joan Hoffmann being crowned the first Vintage Festival Queen. “We were still picking grapes because we were still making fortified wines in those early days. It was a bit hard going!” From 1947 to 1954 the festivals were planned to be held annually but an unexpected world event quashed their endeavours. “In 1952 when Princess Elizabeth, our present Queen, and her husband Prince Philip were to have honoured us with their presence, the Festival had to

be cancelled at the last minute due to the untimely death of the then King George VI,” he explains. “She was about to fly from South Africa to here. I remember, I think it was a week before.... The Vintage Festival didn’t go ahead out of respect.” Lack of enthusiasm meant there were no festivals from 1955 to 1957 and when the committee reformed to plan the 1958 event, they decided it would be held every four years. “There were several of us who were interested and we kept going and we said to ourselves, gee, we can’t let this slip. We want to get it going again.” Colin was appointed as the second Vintage Festival president, from 1961 to 1967, during the 25 years he served on the committee. He followed the late Mr Bert Scholz who presided from ’47 to ’58. Experience gained from the Royal Adelaide Show led Colin to develop a similar organisational structure which promoted inclusiveness between all the towns and villages in the Valley. “There were town committees and representatives on the board, it really worked well...They represented different areas and wineries – a wide cross section.” In 1965, it was decided that the Vintage Festival would alternate with the Adelaide Festival of Arts and since then it has continued as a biennial event. Many “different ideas of entertainment” were introduced, from fancy dress balls and dancing in the street at Nuriootpa, to industry displays, grape picking competitions, car races, rodeos and medieval tournaments. Art exhibitions, dinners and a wine auction were launched along with a Barossa Wine Fair carnival. Colin has fond memories of the first Weingarten evenings held at the Tanunda Show Hall.


18 | T H E BAROSSA MAG “I will never forget when we had Evan Kleemann - he had the whole of Tanunda rolling around with laughter.. gee it was a good night!” Asked what his Festival highlights were, there is a thoughtful pause as he tries to narrow down what is obviously an extensive list. “We were very parochial in those days and I think the highlight was that we brought all the towns together and worked for the Barossa,” explains Colin. “A lot of hours went into the Float Parade...the floats were floats, they were beautifully done. “Again, it encouraged the people in the villages and the towns to get together, select a Queen and then put together a lovely float for her. “I know Lyndoch, that one year, had a beautiful, huge Grecian urn, in sort of bronze and gold. It was all done with papier mache, but it looked so real!” Colin describes the Barossa Wine Fair carnival as a fitting festival finale. “The whole Barossa was at the Tanunda Oval!” he says as though it happened yesterday. “On the Saturday morning, you had the Parade from Nuri to Tanunda and then when that was over the people flocked to Tanunda Oval for the Maypole and the crowning of the Vintage Festival Queen. “In those days, there were only 27 wineries and we all had a marquee around the perimeter. They served food with the help of charitable organisations supplying the


TH E BAROS SA M AG | 19

1.

workforce...and wine of course! “It was basically all voluntary but when we made a good profit, we divided it up amongst the charitable organisations that provided the workforce.” But for Colin, a touch royal glamour was the ultimate draw card. “I still feel that the crowning of the Queen was the highlight...I can remember standing up on a platform with this huge vine leaf as a backdrop and the actual crowning taking place. “We had a wine barrel...Imagine a cask, we cut a portion out and then put a seat in there and upholstered the back - that was the throne! “I was standing nearby and looking out

2.

over the crowd...You had that wonderful feeling of what a success the Vintage Festival is.” The success of past Vintage Festivals was a result of “everyone working as a team for the betterment of the Barossa Valley” says Colin, a philosophy he worries is beginning to wane. “That’s what I fear...there are so many wineries now, we must not allow a percentage to go out of their way and really reap the benefits for their own good - It should be for the Barossa Valley. “Barossans working together for the Barossa - that’s the very heart of the Vintage Festival.”

1. 1961: Josephine Duffield, Catherine Filsell, Marleene Heintze, Bev Mewett, Yvonne Randall, Rosemary Steinberner, Bernadet Heins and Roslyn Wohlig. 2. 1975: Marie Hage (nee Fechner), Lynette Schulz, Mardi Palmer, Julie Muirhead (nee Hage), who was crowned Vintage Queen, Sandra Elson (nee Roennfeldt). Front: Jane Bartholomaeus (nee Haese) and Pauline Sachse (nee Bessell).

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Hi stori c Barossa Vi ntage Fest ival Spec i a l | TH E BAROS SA M AG | 21


22 | T H E BAROS SA MAG | Historic Barossa Vi ntage Fest ival Spe c i al

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H i stori c Barossa Vi ntage Fest ival Spe c i a l | TH E BAROS SA M AG | 23

Historic Barossa Vintage Festival images sourced from Colin Gramp, Bill Biscoe and Malcolm Schutz.

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TH E BAROS SA M AG | 25

Celebrating 70 years of the Barossa’s best WORDS BY HEIDI HELBIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON


26 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

An unpretentious and time-honoured tradition, 70 years in the making, is quietly being played out in the homes, backyards and sheds of the Barossa. On the eve of the 70th Barossa Vintage Festival, a slow build is gathering momentum as vine rods are stockpiled, instruments are tuned and drop sheets are lifted on dusty parade floats that give little hint of the frivolity that awaits. But South Australia’ largest regional festival would not have had its platinum anniversary if not for a small group of visionary winemakers, entrepreneurs and civicminded folks who threw both caution and convention to the wind in the lengthening shadows of World War II. Against a tide of anti-German sentiment, they planned an event that would stand alongside Germany’s great tradition of vintage festivals. “To me it’s slightly amazing because there was

enormous enmity between Australians and Germans at the time – people had been arrested and put in internment camps because of their Germanic origin,” says Angaston’s Bill Biscoe, former Barossa Vintage Festival Chairman and unofficial historian. “The war ended in 1945 and by ’47 they had a Vintage Festival – I think it reflects something of the Australian spirit, that they did not take it as personally as the British. “Even then, they realised the enormous tourism potential that such an event could bring to the region and said ‘bugger it, let’s give it a shot’.” The fledgling years of the festival were a nod to the fads of the era, such as grand prix, aeroplane exhibitions and rodeos. “The early days were representative of the times with grape stomping, tug-of-wars and the Daughter of

Bacchus (meaning God of Wine); they were the first Vintage Queens, to emphasise the fact it was the vintage festival and culmination of the end of vintage,” says Bill. “The German Vintage Festival Queen used to come out and present the crown to the Queen, and the prize was a trip to Germany. “All sorts of interesting things happened – there were car races around Nuri and the finale was a rodeo at Angaston.” The Festival Ball remained a staple of the event, although founding father Colin Gramp recollects it wasn’t wine that flowed at the modest inaugural event. “Colin recalls how no alcohol was served because of liquor licencing laws – the only consumable grape product of the first ball was grape juice from a huge press in the lane alongside the Nuriootpa Institute,”


TH E BAROS SA M AG | 27

says Barossa Vintage Festival Marketing Coordinator Taryn Wills. “They threw the doors open and grabbed a range of implements to capture the juice straight out of the press cage!” The death of King George VI in 1952 resulted in the cancellation of the pending Festival as a mark of respect, and the much-loved festival went into hiatus for almost a decade until it was resurrected as a biennial event, alternating with the Adelaide Festival. The passage of time wrought many changes, including the transition from Vintage Festival Queen to Young Ambassadors in 1999, and shortening the programme to five days in 2015 to encourage visitors to stay the length of the festival. In its 70th instalment in 2017, old favourites like the Ziegenmarkt, scarecrow competition and town days

will stand alongside newcomers such as Punkt zu Punkt trial run and the Chook Shed Social Club in Tanunda Show Hall – a chance to “let your hair down and your knees up.” While the format has been reinvented to keep pace with evolving community expectations, Taryn said the essence of the Festival remains unchanged. “The community remains at the heart of the festival – that’s what makes it all tick and gives the community such a strong sense of ownership,” Taryn said. “In 2015 there were 50 volunteers for the Festival Parade alone, and this year one third of the events are family friendly. “True to its origins, the Festival is also a major tourism drawcard, giving visitors a chance to embrace the Barossa culture and live like a Barossan.” Bill, who is current caretaker of extensive festival

memorabilia, shares the sentiment that the Festival is a “priceless” community asset. He and a small group of enthusiasts from Friends of Barossa Library are cataloguing the artefacts so the originals can be housed in the State Library Archives. “I think it has huge heritage significance for the people of the Barossa,” says Bill. “The Festival is something unique – we have the longest running and second largest procession in the world nigh of Germany. “The mechanics have changed because of lawyers and insurance companies and regulations, but at the end of the day people still go and sit on the side of Barossa Valley Way with their picnic rugs and a glass of wine to wave at the floats as they go past, and in my mind, that’s the essence of the Vintage Festival.”


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Jess faces her biggest challenge WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ


32 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

Jess with “Napolean” and the rest of her family: Katie, Charlotte, Kym and Jacob holding a photo of her late brother, Riley.

Nuriootpa’s Jessica Hill is a 16 year old whose wisdom shines beyond her years. Proudly “born and bred in the Barossa”, she takes every opportunity that crosses her path as she learns and grows from each experience along the way. Jess is described as the “doer” in the family by parents, Katie and Kym who have seen her caring nature in action as she strives to help others, whether it’s stepping up for family, friends or community. Not one to succumb to peer pressure, Jess says, “I don’t let social influence take control”. Her Mum, Katie describes how her eldest daughter had to grow up very quickly. “Her seven and a half month old brother, Riley passed away when she was nine. She had to grow up and had to be quite strong from that point,” Katie says. “I think that really did shape her because she just turned into this beautiful, caring little person. She was very strong through it, she looked after us.” Although Jess doesn’t remember too much from that time, the sudden loss of her little brother resulted in her becoming a resilient teen that others have come to rely on for friendship and support. Jess’ mental strength captured the attention of a Nuriootpa High School counsellor who selected her to participate in Operation Flinders because of her ability to make friends with people from all walks of life and for her calming nature. “He said that I would be good because I’m so high spirited and am really that ‘neutraliser’ in the group that can keep everyone calm – I was selected for being Switzerland!” says Jess. Not knowing exactly what she was getting herself into, Jess laughs at how she was “dropped in the bush” with nine other students from Nuriootpa and Kapunda High Schools. “Basically, it was 8 days of walking

around the Flinders Ranges and it was intense! Fending for myself, sleeping on the ground, no pillows, no tents, no technology, nothing pretty much! “It was a good experience. It was really good not having technology or anything and just getting to know the people around you. Sometimes they didn’t really get along… I got along with everyone but by the end of it, nobody even really wanted to leave.” She said wandering around in the summer heat in the Flinders helped her to “find herself” whilst gaining a new level of maturity when it came to “getting out of her comfort zone” and being independent. “All that walking…You just wanted to give up but you had to keep on pushing. I didn’t think I could survive without anything like electricity, makeup or whatever, but you can. It’s not as hard as you think it is. “You talk to the people we went with, they wanted to go back, not because of the walking, but because they missed the nights that we got to sit together and just talk and not be distracted by technology and Facebook and whatever.” The Operation Flinders experience paved the way to an even bigger adventure last year when she went to Cambodia with RAW Impact for two weeks, staying at three different locations. “It was such a great experience,” says Jess. “We built houses completely made out of bamboo...Then we did agriculture stuff, so we made pots and built fences and stuff like that. “It does make me want to go back...Just because it was so rewarding. All the kids were so beautiful and so kind and it was so nice to be over there knowing that you are helping these people by giving them a home.”


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“I’M A ‘DAY BY DAYER’ – I’LL JUST TAKE IT AS IT COMES. I GUESS YOU CAN’T REALLY PLAN AHEAD BECAUSE YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT’S GOING TO HAPPEN... YOU’VE JUST GOT TO HOPE FOR THE BEST AND BE POSITIVE.”

- JESS HILL

Jess returned home from her Cambodian adventure on Christmas Eve and within a matter of days, found out she would be facing another challenge - the biggest she will ever need to overcome. “In January, before school went back, I was diagnosed with bowel cancer,” says Jess. It’s a cruel twist for the Year 12 student who turns 17 on March 21. She has what her family calls “some nasty genetics” that give her a 1 in 3 chance of getting cancer as a middle aged adult. Her maternal grandmother recovered from bowel cancer after contracting the disease at 42. However, Jess has an additional “rogue” gene which doctors believe has triggered issues at a much younger age. It means she has an adult cancer and will now undergo immunotherapy as part of a new trial which is showing positive results in adults with the same DNA defect. “There is plenty of evidence to back it – they’ve had

good results so far,” she says. Having already spent eight days in hospital undergoing tests, Jess says she’s gone through “every scanning machine there is” and has to smile at the situation. “I’m a ‘day by dayer’ – I’ll just take it as it comes. I guess you can’t really plan ahead because you don’t know what’s going to happen... You’ve just got to hope for the best and be positive.” The recent diagnosis will test Jess’ mental strength like nothing she has experienced before and as she begins treatment she has been “overwhelmed” by community support. Nuriootpa Netball Club, where she hasn’t missed a season since she was seven years of age, ran a special fund raising event in conjunction with the Footy Club and Angas Park Hotel resulting in $2,600 being collected in a massive show of support for the young Barossan who has always been there for others. “There was literally like standing room only,” Jess says.

“If you were to live in Adelaide compared to the Barossa I don’t think you would have seen that kind of support. “I was like wow, I don’t even know some of these people but they are still here for me, you know? They are here because they heard about my story. It makes you feel, I don’t know… loved I guess, and that there’s just a good community out there.” Geared up and remaining positive about her future, Jess is excited to be starting Year 12 and is thankful her school has been so flexible and supportive. She is as chatty and bubbly as ever and remains strong for her little siblings, six year old Jacob and three year old Charlotte whom she says “are fun to be around” and make her laugh. Jess is a great believer of laughter being the best medicine and is trying to convince her parents that she needs a Pug puppy. “I find them so funny! They are so therapeutic. Laughter is the cure to cancer and Pugs are just so funny to look at. I think I’d just laugh all the time!”

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34 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALICIA LÜDI-SCHUTZ

Organised. That’s the word that immediately springs to mind when describing one of the Barossa’s busiest volunteers. For Tanunda’s Debbie Miles, being organised is not only a necessity, it’s a way of life and one that has led to life-long friendships. “You have to be organised, that comes with being a Virgo doesn’t it, being a perfectionist?” she laughs. But Debbie is the last one to claim she is a perfectionist. She sees herself as “a quiet achiever” who simply likes things done “in an orderly manner”, joyfully volunteering “in the engine room” of community run groups. “I’m happy to be in the background, I’m not one that wants to be up the front - I’m happy to organise things and let other people take on the rest.” Debbie’s community involvement could fill a novel like those lining her living room shelves. She has what she calls “a little cheat book” squirrelled away in meticulously kept filing cabinets detailing all the years and dates spent on countless committees, be it secretary, treasurer or “chief bottle washer”. There are not many community groups this quietly spoken mother and grandmother has not given her time to at some stage, from being on the Swimming Pool committee for 20 years to a stint as secretary of the Tanunda Town Band, the organisations are as many as they are varied. Currently, Debbie is the secretary of the Tanunda Show, a position she has held for 28 events and also sits on the Central Districts Show’s Association committee. Recently, she became secretary/ treasurer of Meals on Wheels following her retirement

from the Tanunda Netball Club committee where she spent 23 years, 21 of those as secretary. She remains secretary of the BL&G Netball Association and helps with all sorts of Barossa events when the need arises. Debbie’s unwavering commitment to community is as obvious as the love she has for her family who are at the heart of “absolutely everything” she does. Eldest daughter of Lin and the late Shirley Kowald of Tanunda, Debbie’s talent in administration was discovered and nurtured from an early age by a prominent Tanunda businessman. “Malcolm Hage took me out of school before I was actually able to leave,” she says. “I started work in 1974, I wasn’t technically 14 when I started, I was only 13 and turned 14 a couple of weeks later.” She concedes that her father, who was also working at Hage Holden at the time, put in a good word for her saying, “It’s not what you know”. During her ten years working at the car dealership she met the love of life, Brian. “We met roller skating at the Rec Centre...I was a hopeless skater!” Married in 1979, Debbie and Brian lived in Nuriootpa and Angaston before settling in Tanunda. Young family now in tow, they began raising the next Miles generation including son Jeremy and daughters, Talia and Makarla. When an opportunity to buy a business arose, Debbie and Brian took it. “We had a furniture and floor covering business in Tanunda because Brian is a carpet layer by trade.

Miles’ Furnishers in the old Schrapel’s building next to St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. “I was lucky because mum helped with the kids, she loved that.” Hard economic times were beginning to loom on the horizon and after nine years in business it was “time to get out”. Brian started working in the wine industry and for Debbie, the old adage of “It’s not what you know but who you know” kicked in once again. So when she asked the Tanunda Hotel publican if there was any work available, the response was a resounding “Sure, can you start tomorrow?” “I did waitressing, I’d never done that before but it was lovely. I loved the people contact.” But life took a cruel turn in 1998 after youngest daughter Makarla, who was now 18 years of age, contracted a fatal illness. “She was pregnant and she started having problems,” Debbie explains openly. “The doctor said to put her in hospital to keep her happy basically...they found out she had contracted e-coli. Within 32 hours we had lost her. “The baby tried to abort itself to escape the disease and they flew her down to the Royal Adelaide and gave her an emergency caesarian section but the baby had already passed and was stillborn... the e-coli had spread so quickly.” The sudden and unimaginable tragedy had a profound effect on the Miles family with grief rippling into the wider community. “It brought us a lot closer...we were always close, but


TH E BAROS SA M AG | 35

it just brought us closer - Jeremy and Talia, they are very close. “We had such a good network of people, family and friends.” Describing that period in her life as “just horrible”, Debbie reflects on the harsh reality she had to come to terms with. “You get a different appreciation of life in general, you just don’t take things for granted.” she says. “That’s a tough lesson to learn... Parents aren’t expected to lose a child.” Debbie dragged herself forward, deciding to change jobs to something with more family friendly hours. “Because waitressing was mainly nights and weekends and Jeremy and Talia were quite young and I was struggling a little bit, I decided I needed to get a daytime job. “It was just weeks after Makarla had passed and I saw a job advertised at Barossa Toyota...It was meant to be, I just kept going, I didn’t have a break.” A strong work ethic along with her dedication to her children meant she wanted to support them in every pursuit they showed interest in. When Talia started to play netball, Debbie returned to the court herself and ended up playing 100 games before retiring. “Mature players love coming back and paying a social match! I enjoyed it,” she laughs. Helping out at the Tanunda Football Club was how she supported Jeremy’s sporting interests while delivering Meals on Wheels was something she loved sharing with her parents,

especially her mother who passed away just last year after suffering a stroke. But Debbie has learned that life goes on and now that she has retired from the workforce, she is focused on helping her father and enjoying her grandchildren, Rubi, Imogen and Ariana who bring laughter and fun to each and every day. She is aware of the example she sets for them as she strives to continue her important roles within the community. “I hate to think when the term volunteer is lost in the community and you’ve got people who put their hands up wanting to get paid for doing things,” she says. “It’s important to volunteer, I’ve tried to instil that into my kids. There is a need to get involved in your community because you look at how many things happen in the Barossa, how many community events and organisations? They are all run by volunteers, otherwise they just wouldn’t be there. “I find it really interesting and rewarding.” Ultimately, volunteering is about making the Barossa a better place for her family and she has always had 100 per cent support from Brian in everything she puts her hand up for. Whilst she can’t say for sure what she’ll volunteer for next, it won’t be anything that takes her out of her comfort zone. “I’m not too adventurous,” she giggles. “I don’t even like flying! I won’t go on the Ferris Wheel or anything like that at the Show, even if Rubi wanted to go on it, she’d be going on it by herself!”


36 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

Goldfinger BY IAN FLEMING

WORDS BY TODD KUCHEL While stuck in the Miami Airport dwelling over his last mission, secret agent James Bond is approached for help to divulge how a millionaire named Auric Goldfinger has been ruthlessly cheating at cards. On his return to London, Bond investigates Goldfinger; discovering that he is the richest man in England and is in possession of twenty million pounds in gold bars that have been stolen from England. With this information, he is assigned the case to uncover Goldfinger’s criminal activity. Bond’s next encounter with Goldfinger takes place at Royal St. Mark’s Golf Club in Kent, where, after a well-written round of golf, Bond uncovers Golfinger’s fraudulence and leaves him humiliated. In one of the best driving scenes ever written, Bond tails Goldfinger’s Rolls Royce Silver Ghost in an Aston Martin DB 3 across Europe to where Bond uncovers Goldfinger’s smuggling operation

and his plan the rob fifteen billion in gold bullion from Fort Knox. The book reaches its climax in spectacular military fashion. Although this story sounds much like the 1964 movie we all know and love, Ian Fleming’s novel, first published in 1959, is very different. Remembering that the old James Bond movies were competing against films of their era, they were given all kinds of additions and alterations; like car chases, boat chases, villains with distinctive abnormalities, cheesy one-liners, science fiction style lairs and an overall different feel. They were great movies of their time that still stand in high regard today, but the novels were different. However, in 2006, after a long legal battle for the film rights, Ian Fleming’s first novel ‘Casino Royale’ was finally able to be adapted for film and used to relaunch the franchise, thus giving a movie to match the feel of the books. With Daniel Craig as 007, the world was reintroduced to the more relatable, no nonsense agent that Ian Fleming had written. This is why I feel that now more than ever, with the popularity of the previous four Bond films; there is a strong audience for these books. Those awaiting the fate of the next Bond movie, if you have not yet read Ian Fleming’s novels, remember there are 14 fantastic adventures already waiting inside the pages of those books. All 14 Ian Fleming 007 novels available from the Raven’s Parlour book store, Tanunda.

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38 | T H E BAROS SA MAG


TH E BAROS SA M AG | 39

Ruby and Rachael

showi ng thei r love i n action WORDS BY HEIDI HELBIG PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETE THORNTON

A dozen eggs, a handful of zucchini or a sprig of fresh herbs placed with care on Ruby Stobart’s doorstep is a small window into the love-filled enterprise filling stomachs and hearts around the Barossa. Behind the Barossa’s Kind Hearted Kitchen are two very big-hearted founders, in Ruby and Rachael Braunack, whose not-for-profit food venture has been embedded into the fabric of the Barossa community. But while the initiative has surpassed their wildest expectations, the pair is quick to point out that the Kind Hearted Kitchen is, indisputably, a community enterprise. “Both Rachael and I feel it’s an achievement for sure, but it’s a collective achievement,” says Ruby. “I honestly didn’t know how giving and loving the Barossa community is – to realise that about your community is so heart-warming.” Ruby is referring to the hundreds of people who have embraced the Kind Hearted Kitchen and its “love in action” mission to deliver nourishing meals where

they are needed most. The idea was born of Ruby and Rachael’s own challenges in their journey from career women – Rachael is a chef and Ruby is a marketing manager – to mums. “Rachael and I both studied wine marketing at university and ended up living in the Barossa,” recalls Ruby. “Time passed and we started families; both being ring-ins, we didn’t realise how hard it can be without a lot of support, so we were there for each other, taking a meal around or having friends who helped in the same way. “We thought, if we have supportive husbands and the means to get by and we are struggling, how are others coping?” In that quintessentially Barossan way, people who knew people got talking, and the dots were soon connected. “We were put in touch with Libby Schwarz at Cross Roads Family Learning Centre and she said, “We have been gifted a commercial freezer”; we said

“We’re willing to fill it for you’,” recalls Ruby. “I don’t think we really knew exactly what we were doing – we just knew we wanted to help.” And so the Kind Hearted Kitchen was born, with a handful of volunteers coming together to create 400 meals in mid-2015 for people facing challenging times. By the following year the output had almost tripled thanks to a groundswell of community support, coupled with a more streamlined and self-sufficient business model and a mobile coolroom – the result of a community led fundraising campaign. The project unearthed generosity in all corners of the Barossa, from friends in the hospitality industry to wholesalers, service clubs, primary schools, likeminded business people and backyard gardeners. “The Barossa is full of people who have vegie patches and eggs and lambs,” says Ruby. “We have people saying, “I want to drop off a dozen eggs” or working out what we are lacking and dropping it off on our doorstep.” Volunteers are also the backbone of the cook-ups


40 | T H E BAROS SA MAG that take place in various local commercial kitchens – the next at Elli Beer’s kitchen – overseen by Rachael’s professional eye. “We have young people, retirees, people who can come just for two hours and people who will help for the entire day – and we are grateful for each one of them,” says Ruby. “It’s beautiful to see how people have embraced it and are contributing with their own skill set.” At the end of a 15-hour day, it’s into the ute to deliver the meals to schools, emergency relief and community outreach centres like Cross Roads, Lutheran Community and House of Hope. It’s hard to say whether it’s the food or the gesture that nourishes most. “People often ask, ‘how do you qualify for a meal?’,” says Ruby. “There’s no qualification process – you need a meal, you get a meal. “People think it’s so wonderful that a stranger cared.” Much like the produce at the heart of the Kind Hearted Kitchen, the initiative continues to grow organically and sustainably. “We didn’t necessarily sell the story but let it evolve and all of it has been by word-of-mouth. “So many people have embraced it and continue to share the story so the pool can grow,” Ruby says. With the next cook-up scheduled for March 5, Ruby and Rachael will once again find themselves juggling the Kind Hearted Kitchen and public speaking opportunities with careers, motherhood and other commitments – and they wouldn’t have it any other way. “I guess you just manage to add more and re-prioritise and balance where you can,” says Ruby. “It’s a lot of work but personally I love that we are giving people a channel for giving, because I believe that people naturally want to help each other – it’s that love in action.”


TH E BAROS SA M AG | 41

“PEOPLE OFTEN ASK, ‘HOW DO YOU QUALIFY FOR A MEAL?’, THERE’S NO QUALIFICATION PROCESS – YOU NEED A MEAL, YOU GET A MEAL.” - RUBY STOBART


42 | T H E BAROSSA MAG

WORDS BY KRISTEE SEMMLER THE BAROSSA NURSERY We all know that regular exercise such as running, going to the gym, cycling swimming, etc. is important for our health, wellbeing and longevity. But did you know that gardening is also considered to be a great form of exercise? Not just for the body but also the mind. There is so much more to this healthy hobby than meets the eye. Exercise and fitness: Gardening will often use most of the major muscle groups – legs, arms, abs, back, neck, bottom and shoulders – a whole body workout! 30-45 minutes of moderate to intense gardening (such as mowing, weeding, digging, planting or hoeing) will burn 150-300 calories! Not to mention improve your balance and flexibility – who needs a gym when you have a garden? Reduce your risk of stroke and heat attack: A large Stockholm study showed that regular moderate level gardening can cut your risk of stroke and heart attack by 30%!

The healthy hobby! Vitamin D: Vitamin D is important for growing bones and general bone health as it helps our body to absorb calcium. Ten minutes of sunshine per day will help reduce your risk of osteoporosis and other bone density disorders. Reduce the risk of Dementia: Gardening uses many different parts of the brain and body functions. Sensory (smell, touch), strength (muscle workout), memory (when to plant, what position, how much to water etc), learning (different plants have different requirements), problem solving (what plant pest, disease or fungus is that?). Different studies have shown daily gardening can reduce your risk of dementia by 36%! Increased immunity: Getting dirty and exposing your body to soil microbes and bacteria, not to mention the simple fact of getting out in the fresh air, all help to stimulate a boost our immunity. Depression and mental health: Anyone who loves

gardening can tell you that a stint in the garden makes you feel better and increases mood and sense of wellbeing. Its nature’s therapy! As gardening is a great form of exercise, it keeps the mind and body fit and active which helps to reduce stress and depression. The saying, “Gardening is cheaper than therapy, and you get tomatoes” really rings true! We also hear of many people who have turned to the garden for solace after the death of a loved one and found peace. There are so many health benefits of gardening and many more not listed here. Not that we need an excuse to get out in the garden, but if in doubt, just remember how truly amazing getting out in our gardens are to our mind and bodies. “We may think we are nurturing our garden, but of course it is really our garden nurturing us”.

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TH E BAROS SA M AG | 45

WORDS BY LEE TEUSNER GO VITA TANUNDA Disclaimer: Some information has been extracted from the Go Mag.

If you didn’t know your age would you feel older or younger? Ageing doesn’t have to be a dreaded decline into disease and disability. Be better every birthday with steps that put you in your prime all the time. The body constantly regenerates to reverse the ravages of time. Rapid cell renewal allows the liver to replicate in six weeks, the skin three weeks, stomach lining four days and eyes every two days. Cells age faster from smoking, sugar, excess alcohol, oxidised fats, chemicals, deficiencies, overeating, pollution and stress. Fend off free radical damage with fresh air, antioxidants, organic food, monounsaturated fats and relaxation. Meditation increases cell repairing telomerase. Get a full check up after 40 years. As Theodore Roosevelt remarked, “Old age is like everything else. To make a success of it, you’ve got to start young.” Increase the life in your years and the years in your life with the following: Heart Get emotions off your chest, sidestep stress and sugar to decrease arterial damage. Have high fibre food and fish or omega-3 fatty supplements which protect the heart and reduce the rate of Alzheimers.

Live life, age well Skin More than 10 minutes sun daily may damage our delicate skin. Wear a hat, sunscreen and avoid midday sun. Exfoliate and moisturise with plumping aloe vera, jojoba or hyaluronic acid. Create collagen and banish dark circles with beauty sleep and rosehip oil. Vitamin A, D, E, C, zinc, collagen and fatty acids promote supple skin. Chromium lowers blood sugar which can increase skin wrinkling. Eyes Protect eyes with sunglasses, chemical free makeup, fennel tea and eye exercises. Supplements lutein, bilberry, bioflavonoids, zinc and vitamin A are documented to improve eyesight. Hair Preserve your hair colour and thickness with chemical free products, coconut oil and scalp massage. Iron, B vitamins and protein are essential for healthy hair. Hormonal hair loss can be reduced with internal saw palmetto or fenugreek and rosemary essential oil externally. Teeth Prevent painful teeth problems by swilling sesame oil, flossing, taking calcium, magnesium and boron.

Bones Weight bearing exercise, sufficient calcium, magnesium, protein and vitamin D3 all build healthy bones. Avoid depleting caffeine, soft drinks, sugar, acidic foods and excess protein. Brain Boost brain function with study, word games, conversation, exercise, meditation, fatty acids, vitamin B complex, selenium, zinc, brahmi and ginkgo. Stress, smoking, alcohol and depression destroy brain cells. Curcumin may help counteract Alzheimers by blocking beta-amyloid in the brain. Reproductive Keep your hormone fountain flowing with bio-identical HRT, phytoestrogens, ginseng, withania and natural lubricants. These can improve libido, lubrication, skin, bone density and menopausal symptoms. Muscles If you move it, you won’t lose it. Stay balanced with pelvic floor exercises, pilates, yoga and qi gong. Weight training treats stooped posture and trembling of the elderly due to motor neuron death or senile sarcopenia. Magnesium supplements are known to reduce muscle tension, lessen pain associated with migraines, improve sleep and help manage anxiety.

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46 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

WORDS BY CATHERINE HARPER BAROSSA AND KAPUNDA VETERINARY CLINIC The traditional fare of our canine companions has been raw meat and bones to chew, but with modern science and changing views, this is often not the case. Our current pet dogs did descend from wolves, but a very long time ago and so their dietary needs are quite different from what they once were. Bones are great for most dogs, but what is important to determine is the sort of ‘chewer’ your dog is. Some dogs will destroy anything (outdoor furniture included), others like to chew, but will not destroy, while some of our smaller breeds won’t chew at all or just quietly munch around the edges. The risks involved with chewing bones are that they

“Give a dog a bone” an old adage, but is it true?

can break a tooth, get an upset stomach or get bits stuck. There are three rules I encourage people to follow: • Choose a bone of an appropriate size for your dog – big dogs, need big bones, not the small off cuts from the supermarket they can swallow. Long bones from the butcher are probably best, while the smaller off cuts would be fine for a dog under 10kg who just likes to gnaw away. • NEVER feed cooked bones – when you cook a bone it changes its chemical nature and makes it much more harsh and brittle. Not only is it harder to digest, but it is more likely to splinter and get caught.

• Bones are treats and should be given for 24 hours and then thrown away – bones sitting on the lawn can go rotten, get baked in the sun or be the centre of conflicts with visiting dogs or small children. So, if your dog is a sensible chewer and you understand that there are some risks to feeding bones, go ahead and let them enjoy a meaty treat, but if they tend to devour and swallow things whole, then best to stay clear and divert their energy to other pursuits. Any questions, please email us at info@barossavetservice.com.au.

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Independent Retirement Living New accommodation available soon Support services and facilities Quality lifestyle choices For all enquiries, call Carolyn Redden, Independent Living Coordinator, 8563 7709 or 0417 351 123 | ilu@tlhome.com.au


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TH E BAROS SA M AG | 49

WORDS BY ADAM HUNT PHIL HOFFMANN TRAVEL BAROSSA VALLEY European River Cruising is one of the most sought after holidays, and for good reason. It’s the undeniable convenience, allowing you to un-pack once and go on a journey through Europe’s most picturesque cities and villages, some iconic and some that coach tours will never touch on. Enjoy culinary delights, included beverages and immersive sightseeing experiences – all from your floating hotel that docks in the heart of town, and with the support of a dedicated Cruise Director, a specialist attending to any needs that may arise. Whatever your style or budget, if you like the concept, there’s a product to suit you. My team at Phil Hoffmann Travel Barossa Valley have experienced river cruising themselves and we love to share our own personal experiences and recommendations, as well as the amazing feedback we receive from all our past clients. I encourage you to have a relaxed coffee and chat

2018 - a huge year for Europe River Cruising

with one of us. You won’t experience any “hard selling” and will walk away with some great ideas and brochures. Why book so early? 2018 is shaping up to be a huge year for European River Cruising and at Phil Hoffmann Travel, we are in the middle of our pre-release sale season. This means special offers including travel in 2018 at 2017 prices and free flights. Now is the time to grab a great deal! By booking early, you also get first pick at your preferred itinerary, on the preferred date, in the preferred cabin (which we can offer advice on). The deals can be confusing, but that’s where we can help. Our focus is to give you the experience of a lifetime, based on your needs and priorities. Fully escorted from the Barossa in June 2018! Join Phil Hoffmann Travel Barossa Valley in Portugal on a fantastic 11 Day Scenic Douro river cruise.

Departing on June 16, this exclusive journey is fully escorted from Nuriootpa, including return airport transfers and the additional services of a Phil Hoffmann Travel staff member for the entire journey - all at no extra cost to you (details can be found on page 2). You also have the option to extend your stay in Europe, for further exploration after the cruise. The Douro is fast becoming one of the most popular rivers in Europe and sells out early every year. Free information session Whether you’re a first-time traveller, or just keen to see the latest Scenic offers and enhancements, why not join Phil Hoffmann Travel Barossa Valley and Scenic for a FREE information session, right here in the Barossa. Monday, March 20, at 6p.m. - bookings essential.

Electric bikes...experience the difference Want to know what the hype is about? Would you like to try before you buy? Just imagine riding through the beautiful Barossa Valley effortlessly on one of our dealer demo E-bikes. We offer top brands such as Merida and Lapierre fitted with the superior Bosch e-Bike Systems…

Book online: Test ride an E-bike today! Call Louis on 0400 537 770


50 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

CHICKEN, LEMON, BASIL & SPINACH SLAB PIE Serves: 6

RECIPE BY CLAIRE WOOD CARÊME PASTRY Photography by Martin Ritzmann

375g pack Carême all butter puff pastry, defrosted 40g unsalted butter ¼ cup plain flour 1 cup chicken stock ¼ cup dry white wine ½ cup thickened cream 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 cups chopped cooked chicken ¼ cup chopped basil 3 spring onions, finely chopped 3 cups baby spinach, wilted, drained and chopped 1 egg, beaten, for glaze Preheat the oven to 200°C fan-forced (200°C conventional) and line a baking tray with baking paper. Melt butter in a large saucepan over low heat. Add flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute or until mixture bubbles. Add chicken stock and wine, cooking for a further 2-3 minutes, whisking constantly to remove any lumps. Add the thickened cream and cook for a further minute or until the mixture boils and thickens. Remove from heat, add lemon zest, season to taste, cover mixture with plastic wrap and allow to cool completely. Add chicken, basil, spring onions and spinach to cooled white sauce stirring until combined. On a clean lightly floured work surface, roll pastry to a 38cm x 38cm square. Cut one rectangle 17cm x 38cm for the bottom and place on prepared baking tray, the remaining 21cm x 38cm rectangle is for the top. Spoon the cooled chicken mixture evenly over the pie base, leaving a 2cm border. Brush border with egg glaze. Carefully place remaining pastry over the chicken filling, pressing the pastry edges together to seal. Place in the fridge or freezer for at least 15 minutes to chill. Use a fork to crimp the edges. Brush all over with the beaten egg glaze and using a very sharp knife score along the top of the pie. Place baking tray in preheated oven and cook for 10 minutes, then reduce oven temperature to 180°C fan-forced (200°C conventional) and cook for a further 20 minutes or until pastry is puffed, golden and cooked through.

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TH E BAROS SA M AG | 51

PAN FRIED ZUCCHINI WITH ROAST GARLIC DRESSING & CAPERS

RECIPE BY SAM SMITH FINO SEPPELTSFIELD

Serves 4 4-6 small zucchini, mixed varieties gives a nice effect 4 zucchini flowers 12 good quality capers (we use Kolophon Capers from the Riverland) Handful of snow pea tendrils Tablespoon picked dill 1 lemon for zest 50 ml olive oil Salt & pepper to taste 1 head of roasted garlic. This will need to be prepared in advance, pop a whole head of garlic in the oven & roast on low until soft. For the roast garlic dressing Using a pestle & mortar squeeze the garlic from the skin & mix with the olive oil, season with salt to taste Cut the zucchini lengthwise into halves or quarters. Heat some olive oil in a heavy based skillet & pan fry on a medium heat, cut side down until nicely golden & just cooked. Toss in a bowl with the roast garlic dressing, capers, dill & snow pea tendrils. Gently tear the zucchini flowers & mix through, add salt & pepper to taste. Arrange on a plate & finish with freshly grated lemon zest.

BUDBURST STRAWBERRY RECIPE BY NEIL BULLOCK DAIQUIRI BAROSSA DISTILLING

45ml Budburst Gin (Barossa Distilling) 15ml Red Okar (Applewood). Campari can be used as an alternative. 15ml Simple Sugar Syrup (from a bottle shop or very easy to make your own) 5 Fresh Ripe Strawberry’s 5 Regular size ice cubes ½ Fresh Basil Leaf 2 (optional) Dashes of bitters – we have used Barrel Spiced (Australia Bitters Company) 1 Good Squeeze of fresh lime juice from a thick cut wedge To Garnish: 1 Strawberry 1 Saucer or rimming dish of coco powder or drinking chocolate 1 Fresh Basil leaf This has to be one of the easiest and delicious cocktails to make at home. Grab your blender and throw in all of the ingredients, except the chocolate! If your blender has the ice setting use that, otherwise just pulse everything up until the ice is no longer ‘clattering’ against the side of the blender. Grab the glass of your choice, we have used a Martini/Cocktail glass, but a wine glass or stemless tumbler could work just as well. Moisten the rim of your glass using a cut Strawberry or the discarded wedge of lime, turn the glass upside down and dip into your saucer of chocolate, give it a little twist to make sure the chocolate sticks to the rim. Now carefully pour your cocktail mix from the blender into the glass, pouring up to the level of the chocolate rim. Garnish with a strawberry and/or a fresh basil leaf and serve. Easy as that, Cheers! The quantities above will make 1 cocktail just double or triple the quantities to make 2 or 3 etc. Don’t tell anyone but you can also make fabulous Ice Lollies with this recipie. Simply make the same mixture and pour it into an Ice Lolly mould, freeze and in no time at all you can have Daiquiri dribbling down your arm.

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On sale Wednesday 13th July - Wednesday 27th July 2016. *Always read the label. Use only as directed. If symptoms persist consult your healthcare professional. ^Savings listed are calculated from suppliers recommended retail price (RRP) at the time of preparation and not necessarily previous in-store price. Due to our competitive pricing policy we may not have sold at RRP. #Value based on supplier’s RRP. ˚Incorrect use may be harmful. Terry White Chemists® reserve the right to correct printed errors. Terry White Chemists® is a registered trademark owned by TWC IP Pty Ltd ACN 136 833 611 and under licence by Terry White Management Pty Ltd ACN 136 833 620. TM12500

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TH E BAROS SA M AG | 53

Tara Vanderaa & Blake Burton MARRIED AT CHATEAU YALDARA LYNDOCH JANUARY 7, 2017

There’s one holiday spent in Tasmania that will always remain special for Tara and Blake. A walk in a national park with a beautiful rainforest which opened into a clearing containing a lake and picnic area set the scene for Blake to get down on one knee and propose to Tara. When Tara and Blake first met through friends in 2011 they hit it off immediately laughing at each others jokes. Their first date was spent watching horror movies and eating hotdogs. The happy couple went on to be married by Alice Colgrave at Chateau Yaldara, Lyndoch on January 7 before a reception for 94 guests in the Barrel Hall which was beautifully decorated with fairy lights by Barossa Function Hire. Tara looked elegant in an ivory A-line Sophia Tolli gown featuring lace, jewels and tulle. The brides attendants, Jasmin Bardsley (best friend), and Jessica Feast (sister) wore blush pink floor length dresses. Blake’s attendants were Travis Burton (brother) and Michael Linke (friend). Despite their wedding day being very hot, Tara and Blake said their day was filled with romance, laughter, dancing and time spent in the photo booth. Their parents are Michelle Vanderaa of Hewett and Mark and Patricia Burton of Nuriootpa.

T & B Burton Dress Sophia Tolli | Flowers Aster and Ivy | Photography Chantelle Renee Photography | Reception Chateau Yaldara Barrel Hall


O

n your perfect day... let us help your family & friends arrive and get home safely

With more than twelve years experience, Miss Maggies are specialists in wedding and event flowers. We take pride in providing top quality wedding flowers such as bridal bouquets, flower crowns, ceremony and reception florals and hanging installations all over the Barossa Valley. We also provide a wide range of vintage props and hire items and can help you with most of your wedding styling. We offer a full delivery and set up services and free no obligation quotes. Call us today to book a time to talk all things floral.

Catering for over 200 guests | Air-conditioned comfort Call or email us today to discuss your wedding transfer needs 08 8562 8092 gcbc@comcen.com.au

WWW.SARAHCRAKER.COM.AU image by zoe campbell photography and design

p:0431 812 962 e: maggie@missmaggies.com.au www.missmaggies.com.au


TH E BAROS SA M AG | 55

Bethany Rothe & Michael Hannay MARRIED AT YALUMBA WINERY JANUARY 7, 2017

Michael cleverly based his proposal to Bethany (owner of Viva the Flower Store) around flowers. He placed a flower order under an alias name with Bethany at Viva the Flower Store and ensured that she and not her staff was going to do the delivery. Bethany delivered the flowers to Barossa Pavilions where Michael was awaiting her arrival to surprise her with a room full of white flowers (her favourite) and a proposal. The couple celebrated the happy occasion with dinner at Hentley Farm that night. Bethany and Michael who met at Faith Lutheran College were married at Yalumba Winery, Angaston by Pastor David Gogoll on January 7. Their wedding rings were designed and made by Sarah Rothe Jewellery (Bethany’s sister). For her wedding Bethany looked beautiful in an Alex Perry dress in white textured fabric. Shona Joy gold dresses were worn by the bridesmaids, Gemma Harris (Bethany’s cousin), Rebecca Dolan, Abby Greening and Meggie Zerna (friends). Michael’s groomsmen were Michael Lubcke, Jonny Duval, Tom Bartholomaeus and Charles Adams (friends). The 40 degree day was perfect for a completely open air reception at Yalumba Winery. The white on white theme/style with variations of textures and elements included white flowers on mass in the highest quality sourced from all over the world, acrylic signage, coasters, gold cutlery, white vases and white linen looked absolutely stunning. Bethany is the daughter of Kay and John Rothe of Angaston and Michael is the son of Mary-Anne and John Hannay of Angaston.

B & M Hannay Dress Alex Perry | Flowers Viva the Flower Store | Hair and Make-up Sarah Craker Weddings Photography Bentinmarcs | Reception Yalumba Winery


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TH E BAROS SA M AG | 57

FRIDAY UNCORKED at Lambert Estate

1. Mark Garrard, Williamstown and Michelle Garrard, Gawler. 2. Rebecca Healey, Penrice and Kerry Cleopatra, Barossa. 3. Tammy Rosenzweig, Nuriootpa and Kon Sotirchos, Marion. 4. Jean O’Rielly, Nuriootpa; Andrew O’Rielly Nuriootpa; Anne Kroehn, Angaston and Felipe Loyola, Chile.

2. 1.

5. Sebastian Lambert, Kristy Curnow, Jacob Meyer, Stella Meyer and Jackson Pettitt. 6. John Geber, Pam Lambert, Evelyne Geber, Jim Lambert and Sebastian Lambert. 7. Pia Lanfranco, Peru and Vanesa Lambert. 8. Erica Vaughan, Tanunda; Chris and Ivan Schiller, Angaston. 9. Beverly Linke, Nuriootpa; Jo Ahrens, Vine Vale and Sandy Hahn, Stockwell.

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“Best Vanilla Slice in the Valley!” serving house made pies & pasties - 5 senses coffee - fresh cream cakes & slices - catering - baguettes - light lunches - open Monday - Saturday - special occasion & wedding cakes to order

36 Murray Street, Angaston, Barossa | Ph/Fax: 08 8564 2424 dmsbakerycafe@gmail.com | www.dmsbakery.com


58 | T H E BAROS SA MAG

NOODLE MARKET at Peter Lehmann’s

1. Natalie Seaman and Elizabeth Beard, both of Tanunda. 2. Dylan Schulz, Tanunda and Dani Loffler, Hansborough. 3. Caroline Monaghan, Tanunda and Michelle Mengersen, Kapunda.

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4. Harmony Chambers, Tanunda; Lauren Martin, Tanunda; Sarah Martin, Tanunda and Arlo Paloff, Nuriootpa. 5. Chelsea Geyer, Nuriootpa; Lauren Ziegeler, Kapunda and Courtney Wood, Tanunda. 6. Ben, Nigel, Matilda and Kate Osborne, of Tanunda. 7. Michelle Schulz, Tanunda; Sean Mickan, Tanunda; Kelly Brown, Lyndoch; Nicola Mickan, Tanunda; Ian and Carol Brown, Lyndoch and Amy Mickan, Tanunda.

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8. Hazel and Phil Cunningham, of Robe. 9. Ruth and Richard Ansoul, Tanunda. 10. Chelsea Linke, Tahlia Skipworth, Aidan, Greg and Roxanne Linke, all of Lyndoch. 11. Wendy Beisiegel and Margaret Redan, both of Stockwell. 12. Ingrid Promnitz, Angaston; Kym Obst, Angaston; Vicki and Lucy Summerton, Nuriootpa.

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