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THE IMPACT REPORT


Practice Magazine » Fall 2016

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT

Editor Allison Postlethwait

Copy Editor Alyssa King

Graphic Designer Erika Stigliano

Dear BAC Community, As I reflect back on my first year at the BAC, I want to express my gratitude to our remarkable community. Each of you—students, faculty, staff, alumni, trustees, and friends— have made my move to the College and to Boston a warm and seamless one. I am privileged to be among you, and I am excited about the great future that lies ahead of us.

Contributing Writers

Over the past year, I have talked with many people and had the opportunity to get to know the

Shannon Buckley Alyssa King Catalina Rojo Ianetta

BAC and what truly makes us a distinctive design school. We provide a superior education, and our graduates are accomplished and leaders in our discipline. As you read through this issue of Practice, I hope you are as proud as I am of all the BAC commu-

Proofreader Shannon Buckley

Photography Molly Chase Roger Farrington Tom Klein Allison Postlethwait Catalina Rojo Ianetta

nity’s accomplishments and good work. I want to point out a few that are particularly significant. • Very important to creating a distinctive program for our students and enriching their employment opportunities, the BAC is one of only 18 schools in the country—and the only one in New England—accepted by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) to implement an Integrated Path to Licensure (IPAL) program. The IPAL allows students to complete the requirements for architectural licensure at the time of graduation. • Our Master of Interior Architecture program was ranked #8 in the United States for

Vice President of Institutional Advancement Evan Gallivan, MBA, CFRE

Director of Development Lindsey Cimochowski

2016 by DesignIntelligence in their annual report America’s Best Architecture and Design Schools. We enjoy the company of Savanah College of Art and Design, Pratt Institute, and Rhode Island School of Design. • It was an honor to have world-renowned architect Moshe Safdie, our honorary doctorate recipient, deliver an inspiring address as our 2016 commencement speaker. • We have reduced the length of time it takes our students to graduate and clarified our path of studies in response to NCARB’s reduction of practice hours required for

Practice is published for The Boston Architectural College community. © 2016. Have comments about this issue? Email the editors at communications@ the-bac.edu. Update your information by visiting us on the web at the-bac.edu/alumni or emailing us at alumni@the-bac.edu.

architectural licensure. We have accomplished this while maintaining the high standards of our curriculum I have only touched on our achievements so far. I am elated by the progress we’ve made together and am eager to see what is in store for us next. I encourage every member of our community to get involved, stay involved, and reach out with creative ideas and opportunities for engagement! Sincerely,

Glen S. LeRoy, FAIA, FAICP President


The above image and front cover showcase work by student Darguin Fortuna. The back cover features work by student Steve Hebsch. Both are past students of the “Skyscrapers and Superheroes” course highlighted on page 12.

CONTENTS 02

Around the College

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The BAC Celebrates 2016 Commencement

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5-Minute Exper t: Nor thern Avenue Bridge Edition

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Featured Grads

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Concrete Visions

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Spring Awards 2016

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PARTI Lights Up 320 Newbury Street

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Looking Back at the Grad Show 2016

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BAC Community Tours New Canaan, Connecticut

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Catching Up with Alumni

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Landscape Architecture Students Receive National Accolades in Spring 2016

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Connected at the BAC

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Skyscrapers + Superheroes

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The BAC Impact Report

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Students Win Prestigious ACSA Design Competition

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PRACTICE MAGAZINE

AROUND THE COLLEGE BAC PILOTS COMPETENCYBASED LEARNING C ­ OURSES TO HELP REDUCE COSTS AND PROGRAM LENGTH FOR STUDENTS

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January 2016

In January 2016, the BAC was accepted to participate in the US Department of Education Title IV Experimental Sites Initiative related to Limited Direct Assessment of Competency Based Education (CBE). This initiative formally recognizes forms of learning other than the traditional semester-long study. The BAC can now pilot CBE courses without students losing federal aid eligibility. CBE courses measure a student’s knowledge of a subject not by time, but by direct assessment. In simple terms, students who enroll in a CBE course work at their own pace until they can pass an assessment test to prove their knowledge of the subject. It could take one week, or the full length of the semester, depending on the student’s previous experience. This method allows students to receive credit for knowledge they acquired elsewhere, such as at a firm or junior college. In the long term, these types of courses will help reduce costs of education and length of time of programs for students. The BAC has a long history of assessing student learning beyond the context of course performance, and the College is fully prepared to launch CBE courses. In Summer 2016, the BAC piloted the

CBE equivalent of two core Design Media courses: AutoCAD 1 and Autodesk Revit. Many students have encountered this software as part of their work lives or foundation coursework, and the new courses allow students to use a competency demonstration method to receive credit for these courses rather than duplicating their knowledge in a semester-long class.

MASTER OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PROGRAM RANKED TOP 10 IN US

BAC DIRECTOR NAMED TO BOARD OF THE INSTITUTE FOR HUMAN CENTERED DESIGN May 2016

Denise Rush, ASID, IIDA, director of Undergraduate Interior Architecture, was named to the Board of the Institute for Human Centered Design (IHCD). Based in Boston, IHCD is an international non-governmental educational organization committed to advancing the role of design in expanding opportunity and enhancing experience for people of all ages and abilities through excellence in design. The institute’s work balances expertise in legally required accessibility with promotion of best practices in human-centered or universal design. While Denise currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID), as well as the ASID Foundation, IHCD is her first local board position.

The BAC’s Master of Interior Architecture program was ranked #8 in the United States by D ­ esignIntelligence. The annual report, entitled America’s Best Architecture & Design Schools, ranks undergraduate and graduate programs from the perspective of leading practitioners. This year, the BAC made the top 10 list of best graduate programs in interior design.The list highlights the schools that best prepare students for a future in the profession and designing a sustainable future.


AROUND THE COLLEGE

SCHOOL OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN ASLA’S ADVOCACY DAY May 2016

A team of Boston Architectural College students, lead by Dak Kopec, director of

Design for Human Health at the BAC, submitted their design ideas to Autism Speaks House to Home, a design competition for the development of housing for young adults who have been diagnosed with autism. BAC students Laura Shrestha, Amela Bejleri, and Jonathan Ehlers teamed up with Dak to research the symptoms and behavioral manifestations associated with adult autism and develop ways that operational costs of this type of special housing could be reduced through design. Dak and the students also considered design strategies that could help reduce or mitigate the symptoms of autism. The goal of designing housing for young adults with autism is to help these individuals learn how to thrive on their own while receiving support from peers who share similar experiences. The design submitted by the BAC team is very customizable and personalized to accommodate a variety of needs, interests, and comfort levels. It allows the individual to choose between single living or cohabitation, which offers a level of freedom and personal choice. The team also incorporated private rooftop parks and ground level outdoor seating areas that allow the individuals to choose their desired integration levels. SPRING INTO DESIGN 2016 EXCEEDS EXPECTATIONS AND RAISES RECORDBREAKING $360,000 April 2016

The Boston Architectural College welcomed over 400 guests to its largest fundraiser ever, the second annual Spring into

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#bostonmarathon

April 2016

#WLAM2016

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Runners making the turn onto Hereford St and passing the BAC before making one last left and finishing the Boston marathon. Congrats to all the runners on this incredible accomplishment

BAC TEAM DESIGNS FOR YOUNG ADULTS WITH ­AUTISM

Tomorrow: public lecture w/ renowned landscape architect Chris Reed!

FALL 2016

APR I L 18, 2016

Read more about the BAC marathon team’s impact on page 36.

APRIL 28, 2016

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TOP POST ON INSTAGRAM

2016 marks the second year that the BAC has fielded runners for the Boston Marathon. Crandon Gustafson, dean of the School of Interior Architecture, and Juan De Loera, Master of Architecture candidate, completed the historic race on Monday, April 18, and collectively raised thousands of dollars toward the BAC Fund.

TOP TWEET ON TWITTER

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Erica Quigley and Judy Timpa, Master of Landscape Architecture students, were chosen to participate in Advocacy Day 2016 in Washington, D.C. to raise awareness of policy issues important to the landscape architecture profession. Each year, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) hosts Advocacy Day, an annual lobbying event on Capitol Hill. While in Washington, D.C., advocates sent by ASLA from across the country work to raise the visibility of the profession and educate lawmakers about how landscape architects improve people’s lives through design. At this year’s Advocacy Day, two congressional bills were on the agenda: one that secures future funding for park services and one that would discontinue the green support networks along federal highways. Erica and Judy asked them to support the first bill that would provide funding for the National Parks and to reject the amendment that would prohibit federal funds from supporting green infrastructure on transportation projects. The main goal of Advocacy Day is to inform Congress what landscape architects do and to encourage Congress to take advantage of landscape architects as a resource for research, design, creativity, and methods to improve public wellness and the ­environment.

DEAN AND STUDENT RUN 2016 BOSTON MARATHON TO BENEFIT THE BAC


AROUND THE COLLEGE

PULITZER PRIZE–WINNING ARCHITECTURE CRITIC DELIVERS 24TH CASCIERI LECTURE

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Focusing on sustainability and featuring food and beverage tasting tables around the venue, the event is unlike traditional galas, minimizing the waste without sacrificing glam. All of the food and beverage sponsors were local and sustainable-minded. Read more about the gala’s impact on page 32.

BAC HOSTS BOSTON PRESERVATION ALLIANCE 2016 ANNUAL MEETING March 2016

The BAC was excited to host the annual meeting of the Boston Preservation Alliance (BPA) on Tuesday, March 15. This event coincided with the launch of the College’s exhibition, Concrete Visions, which celebrated the history of Boston City Hall and the BAC’s flagship building. The annual meeting featured guest speaker Stephanie Meeks, president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. She shred insights into current trends, successes, and challenges in historic preservation throughout Boston and nationwide.

Eleni Glekas, director of Historic Preservation at the BAC, joined the Young Advisors Board of the BPA in the spring and worked closely with them on organizing this event. She invited students and faculty to attend the meeting and network with members. THE BAC REDUCES CARBON FOOTPRINT WITH GREEN POWER February 2016

The BAC reduced its carbon footprint by using green power as part of its partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The BAC is using

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Design gala, on April 21, 2016, at the Seaport District’s Innovation and Design Building. The event, which was completely sold out in March, exceeded all expectations and raised a record-breaking $360,000 for the College. In only its second year, the Spring into Design gala doubled its attendance while significantly boosting sponsorships to a grand total of 73 sponsors, 15 event partners, 53 auction partners, and 21 food and beverage partners.

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Blair Kamin, Pulitzer Prize–winning architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune, visited campus on Thursday, April 28 to deliver the 24th lecture in the Dean Arcangelo Cascieri Lectureship in the Humanities. In his lecture, Blair explored the lore and legacy of Harvard’s gates, as featured in his new book The Gates of Harvard Yard, which was released this spring.

TOP TWEET ON TWITTER A P RI L 1 9 , 2 0 1 6 #BACGala is Thursday!

Our sponsors including @genjisushibars, @tazachocolate, @IslandCreek & @pavementcoffee will make the event delicious!

Students enjoying the BAC Spring into Design gala.


AROUND THE COLLEGE

nearly 2 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green power annually, which is enough green power to meet 100 percent of the College’s electricity use. These efforts demonstrate the BAC’s proactive choice to move away from traditional sources of electricity generation and support cleaner, renewable energy alternatives.

TOP POST ON FACEBOOK

STUDENTS MAKE SPOONS IN ONE-DAY INTENSIVE WORKSHOP February 2016

The “Let’s Spoon!” workshop is part of a larger campaign to increase student fabrication on campus.

Emily Wolf, an instructor in the College’s Master of Design Studies in Historic Preservation program, presented at the seventh National Forum on Historic Preservation Practice at Goucher College in March. Emily’s paper was one of only 15 to be selected for the presentation. With 2016 marking the 50th anniversary of the passing of the National Historic Preservation Act, the conference explored the future of the historic preservation field within the context of five significant drivers: demographics, economics, environment, technology, and education. Emily spoke in the technology section, specifically addressing how historic preservation can capitalize on emerging digital tools to improve the dissemination of publications, data, and ideas within the field. P

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Give a shout out to the BAC or find us online.

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A utensil in the making—a student maps out his spoon

March 2016

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Students who participated in the workshop started off by researching and formulating their ideas, followed by sketching and collaborating with other participants. Once the profile of cuts was drawn onto the wood, students moved into the woodshop,

HISTORIC PRESERVATION INSTRUCTOR CHOSEN TO PRESENT AT NATIONAL FORUM

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David Morgan, Bachelor of Architecture candidate at the BAC, led the workshop's planning and promotion in partnership with Section Cut, a design resources website and network of teachers. Together, the BAC team and Section Cut hosted a lively event that offered support and instruction to students so that they could leave with the knowledge and confidence to continue their academic careers as makers.

where they brought their ideas to life. Taking a realistic approach to design, the workshop supplements what students are learning in the classroom, as well as at their internships and jobs.

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Despite it being 9 am on a Saturday, the BAC’s woodshop was buzzing with excitement as students gathered to participate in the “Let’s Spoon!” workshop. The one-day intensive workshop introduces students to a concept-to-production workflow and the BAC woodshop, CNC router, and 3D scanner through crafting beautiful, functional, objects—in this case, spoons.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Congratulations graduates! Today was a very special day for the BAC, celebrating JUN E 29, 2016 its 2016 Commencement. In keeping with tradition, a jazz band accompanied the grads (in the disciplines of architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture, and design studies) in a procession through Boston’s Back Bay. Once everyone was inside Copley Square’s Old South Church, renowned architect Moshe Safdie delivered the commencement address and gave the grads an inspiring send-off. Wishing the best of luck to the Class of 2016!

According to the EPA, the BAC’s green power use of nearly 2 million kWh is equivalent to avoiding the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of nearly 300 passenger vehicles per year, or the CO2 emissions from the electricity use of nearly 200 average American homes annually.


5-MINUTE EXPERT: NORTHERN AVENUE

We are living in a time that many urban planners are characterizing as the ‘back to the city’ movement. The two largest demographic groups, Millennials and Baby Boomers, are now moving back downtown. It is not just for the convenience of being able to walk to the nearest grocery store or bike to work, but also for the exposure to the unique cultural and architectural heritage that defines their neighborhood. This demographic trend is putting historic preservation in the forefront for many American cities. Living in an old brick factory building has become as desirable today as a suburban home was in the 1950s.

BRIDGE EDITION

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Rendering courtesy of Darya Namrata from the Northern Avenue Bridge Competition.

CULTURE, PRESERVATION, AND THE EXPANDING CITY By Eleni Glekas As Boston’s urban growth presses forward, its skyline is rapidly changing from its low-scale, nineteenth-century look to a city of modern glass skyscrapers. Growth and change are unavoidable in any city; Boston is no different from anywhere else. But now as the city is going through its largest building boom since the 1960s, the public is becoming more interested in celebrating the unique characteristics of our city and taking a new approach to urban growth.

One example of this trend is the preservation effort surrounding the Northern Avenue Bridge in Fort Point. Recently, both the City of Boston and the BAC hosted design competitions to solicit ideas for the preservation and reuse of the bridge. The Northern Avenue Bridge is one of the last surviving swing bridges of the early 1900s and was an integral part of Boston’s industrial boom during that time. It has also been an iconic part of South Boston, as its unique design and engineering characteristics have made it one of the most easily recognizable landmarks in the city. However, time has taken its toll, and over the years it has become unsafe for traffic and pedestrians alike.

ABOUT ELENI Eleni Glekas is the director of Historic Preservation at The Boston Architectural College. Eleni is a preservationist and urban planner with experience both in the US and abroad. She holds a master’s degree in city and regional planning from Pratt Institute and a Master of Conservation of Monuments and Sites from the Raymond Lemaire International Center for Conservation (RLICC) at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in Belgium. Prior to joining the BAC, Eleni worked as an urban planner at a boutique real estate development company in Charleston, SC, where her projects were located in the city’s historic city center. She also spent several years in New York City working as a preservationist and project manager for a variety of clients. In 2008, Eleni was awarded a position in the US/ ICOMOS International Work Exchange Program where she traveled to Lithuania to work as a preservation planner for Lietuvos Paminklai, Lithuania’s equivalent of the National Parks Service. Since then Eleni has also worked in India and Jordan on heritage based planning and documentation projects for DRONAH and UNESCO.


The desire to create a culturally unique place was reflected in the design competition submissions. The City’s competition was open to the public, and submissions ranged between cutting edge landscape design and those that celebrated the bridge’s history. BAC students took the same approach, and their ideas included creating multifunctional open space, improving waterfront access, using the bridge as a sustainable design tool, and highlighting the bridge’s unique engineering features. One common theme amongst all competition entries, however, was that the bridge was not to be a museum piece frozen in time for the public to view from afar, but rather should take on a new identity as an active part of Boston’s future and integrate fully into the city’s built fabric.

PROVOCATIVE IDEAS WITH A REALM OF FEASIBILITY By Aidan Ackerman

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The Northern Avenue Bridge physically spans the Fort Point Channel, offering a fascinating examination into the role of infrastructure in 21st-century public space. Preservation of the bridge has long been debated, with many believing that it is an important remainder of the Fort Point Channel District’s industrial heritage. We hoped that the competition would offer BAC students a chance to sensitively handle the bridge’s heritage, while also opening up new creative ideas about urban space, infrastructure, ecology, transit, and development. From a landscape perspective, the bridge’s physical connection to the Harborwalk, the Rose Kennedy Greenway, and the Fort Point Channel itself formed the basis for several considerations that all participating teams were asked to tackle. Through their design process, teams had to address many of the central issues faced by modern landscape architects: ecological impacts of their design as related to the sensitive ecology of the channel and the Boston Harbor; social aspects of their design as related to issues of circulation, connection, experience, and program on an urban scale; and economic issues of mixed-use building

Aidan’s professional and academic work has focused on the intersection of computer technology and landscape architecture design process. He is a faculty member at The Boston Architectural College, where he is the director of Digital Media and faculty in the School of Landscape Architecture. Prior to joining the faculty at The Boston Architectural College, Aidan worked with ArtScience Labs as a design mentor. He has worked as part of the Research Computing Environment at the Harvard/MIT Data Center, has been named a research fellow by the Landscape Architecture Foundation, and was a teaching fellow at Harvard University. His love of computing is built on six years of experience in information technology, beginning as a hardware technician and advancing over several years to become a senior systems engineer. Aidan maintains an independent computation design and visualization practice, developing models and graphics for international firms within the disciplines of landscape architecture, architecture, interior design, and graphic and industrial design. He holds a master’s degree in landscape architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Alfred University.

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Boston’s rich history is evident in the many layers of physical space which residents and visitors encounter daily. The Northern Avenue Bridge is a perfect example of such layering: it was built in 1908, and was fully operational until it closed to vehicle traffic in 1999. It was then used as a pedestrian bridge until 2014, when it was closed due to structural issues which posed a safety issue. Several plans for the bridge have been explored in recent years, from restoring it to removing it entirely. The area around the bridge has seen significant development, such as the Rose Kennedy Greenway, the Harborwalk, and the Seaport District itself. Its role and relationship to the City of Boston has evolved over time, yet it is currently in a stalled state of existence, while its immediate surroundings continue to adapt and respond to 21st-century urban life. As the bridge is currently a major focus of conversation among designers and preservationists in Boston, we in the BAC’s School of Landscape Architecture felt that it was the perfect catalyst for students to explore interdisciplinary design ideas as part of a team.

ABOUT AIDAN PRACTICE MAGAZINE

On a larger scale, the Northern Avenue Bridge competition is also reflective of the future of historic preservation in the United States. Historic preservation has a reputation for being a profession that cares only about monumental architecture and little about community and the recent past. The attention surrounding the Northern Avenue Bridge is a sign of a significant shift in the field as it is moving towards community development, sustainable urban practices, and investment in cultural capital.

and harbor front development, as well as adaptive reuse of the bridge itself. The competition vision came together through several conversations between Sy Mintz and the BAC’s School of Landscape Architecture, and the competition launched in mid-March. From the very beginning it was critical that this be an interdisciplinary competition seeking provocative ideas with a realm of feasibility, with the aim of generating dialogue about ways that the Northern Avenue Bridge could might evolve alongside its surroundings. We invited several outside experts from Boston’s design and preservation community to jury the competition finalist presentations in June. Four excellent projects were presented, all of which posed fascinating questions and showed true innovation in their responses to the competition’s guidelines. We look forward to seeing how ideas generated by this competition contribute to the ongoing dialogue in Boston surrounding the bridge. P


On the 50th anniversary of the 320 Newbury Street building, the BAC opened Concrete Visions, a new exhibition that celebrated heroic architecture and two prominent design competitions of the 1960s–the BAC and Boston City Hall. The exhibition was curated by BAC students, faculty, and alumni, in partnership with local design firm over,under. Concrete Visions is part of a history and theory class that ends with a student-curated exhibition. Concrete Visions unearthed many aspects of both competition processes, such as their aspirational competition briefs, imaginative but unchosen submissions, as well as wide-ranging

professional and public reactions.The narratives told throughout the exhibition provided deeper context for understanding the visions that were ultimately selected and built and that contributed to the making of the new Boston. Concrete Visions opened on March 4 with over 150 guests in attendance, including past BAC Board of Directors President H. Morse Payne, who was leader of the BAC during the design competition. Anastasia Lyons, BAC alumna, as well as Chris Grimley, principal of over,under, gave gallery talks at the opening in celebration of the collaboration of work between the BAC and a local design firm.


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Right: Karen Nelson, dean of the School of Architecture, and H. Morse Payne.

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Above: Community leaders, students, faculty, and staff enjoy the opening celebration for Concrete Visions at McCormick Gallery.


PARTI Lights Up 320 Newbury Street

For the first time ever, PARTI was held at the BAC’s 320 Newbury Street. The Office of Student Life, student government, and volunteers organized the event and fully transformed the building into a club atmosphere for the night. Students and alumni celebrated the end of the semester and danced the night away in Cascieri Hall.

BAC COMMUNITY TOURS NEW CANAAN, CONNECTICUT On Friday, June 24, 2016, BAC President Glen S. LeRoy led a group of BAC alumni, faculty, students, and community members on a special day-long trip to New Canaan, Connecticut, to visit three architectural icons: Grace Farms, Philip Johnson’s Glass House, and the Eliot Noyes House. The group enjoyed behind-the-scenes tours of each of the three properties, lunch at Grace Farms, and a private reception at the Eliot Noyes House.


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS RECEIVE NATIONAL ACCOLADES IN SPRING 2016

OLIVIA FRAGALE SELECTED AS 2016 NATIONAL OLMSTED SCHOLAR FINALIST

Tom Klein

Tom Klein, former Master of Landscape Architecture student, was one of five individuals throughout the nation to be awarded a fellowship by The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF), serving as the inaugural fellow for the TCLF-Sasaki Fellowship during the summer of 2016. Tom worked at Sasaki’s headquarters in Watertown, MA, contributing to the What’s Out There Cultural Landscapes Guide to Boston, an interactive online guide being developed by TCLF and the National Parks Service (NPS) in celebration of the 100th anniversary of NPS’s founding. P

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TOM KLEIN AWARDED INAUGURAL FELLOWSHIP FROM CULTURAL LANDSCAPE FOUNDATION

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Erica Quigley, Master of Landscape Architecture candidate, was selected as the 2016 recipient of the Steven G. King Play Environments Scholarship from the Landscape Architecture Foundation. The Steven G. King Play Environment Scholarship recognizes a student who has high potential in the design of play environments. Erica embodies the spirit of the scholarship. Prior to arriving at the BAC, she worked as an environmental educator with Mass Audubon, where she discovered a passion for play spaces. She finds herself inspired by the way design creates opportunities for people to play, connect, and find enjoyable ways of living. This passion brought her to study landscape architecture at the BAC, and she currently works as a landscape/playscape designer at studioMLA Architects in Brookline, MA.

FALL 2016

ERICA QUIGLEY NAMED RECIPIENT OF STEVEN G. KING PLAY ENVIRONMENTS SCHOLARSHIP

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The Landscape Architecture Foundation selected Olivia Fragale, Master of Landscape Architecture candidate, as a 2016 National Olmsted Scholar Finalist. Olivia was recognized as one of six finalists amongst a national pool of candidates. Named for Frederick Law Olmsted, the Olmsted Scholars Program is the premier national award program for landscape architecture students. It recognizes outstanding student leaders from each accredited landscape architecture program in the United States and Canada and supports students with exceptional leadership potential who are using ideas, influence, communication service, and leadership to advance sustainable design and foster human and societal benefits. Olivia joins a community of nearly 400 past and present Olmsted scholars. Each year one graduate student and one undergraduate student are named National Olmsted Scholars, and up to six finalists are selected by an independent jury of leaders in the landscape architecture profession.

“Spinning Hut” Secret Shelters Competition Winner, designed by Erica Quigley and Ross Miller

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Olivia Fragale


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Skyscrapers Superheroes


+ PRACTICE MAGAZINE

By Allison Postlethwait

Âť FALL 2016 Âť

What do Batman, the Hulk, Darth Vader, and Walter White all have in common? You might be surprised to discover they have all been central figures within student projects for an advanced design studio at the BAC. Conceived by instructor Mark Urrea in 2009, this studio, entitled Skyscrapers and Superheroes, has quickly risen to be one of the most popular studios at the BAC.

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Utilizing the qualities of superheroes or villains, this studio seeks to show students what it means to introduce a small change to an ordinary system and challenges them to explore how the intervention has the potential to radiate and change the perception of the existing structure. Specifically, students examine the iconic glass tower in Copley Square formally known as the John Hancock Tower.

student Darguin Fortuna's rendering of the tower (left) and structural symbiosis at work (right).

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Fortuna showcases interior vs. exterior

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Teachers Richard Yeager + Mark Urrea

Skyscrapers and Superheroes brings the imagination of comic books to urban design. Above is Fortuna's rendering.

Just like a bite from a radioactive spider gives Peter Parker super powers, students explore how a small change they propose to the Hancock Tower can have the power to fully transform its inner workings and current state completely. Students must propose a 45,000 square foot observation area or public zone to incorporate into the public tower.

For their projects, students have the opportunity to propose any superhero or villain of their choosing. They are forced to make a connection between storytelling and the design process. Students must identify the key quality of their superhero or villain and center their design intervention around it. For many, this course is a dream come true—a test to


create an ­architectural expression based on a favorite childhood character. “To me it was a time to take fantasy, fiction, and urban planning to another level,” reflected former student Darguin Fortuna. “It was the ecstasy and synthesis of what I learned as a young kid from my favorite Marvel comics bonded with my growth as a young designer to solve real urban and architectural problems.”

“In the first half of the semester, we encourage students to be as crazy as possible with their ideas,” said Mark Urrea. “Then, in the second half, we harness their creativity and challenge them to problem solve in order to develop an elegant and structurally feasible final project.”

Over the years, the course has developed into a multi­ faceted experience. The studio begins with a creative exercise where students design a lair for their chosen character, keeping in mind everything from what city the lair resides in to what types of resources will be needed to fight crime. The students must design a full physical model as well as a board of drawings and sketches to explain their concept. From here, students explore the Hancock Tower, creating a full site analysis and model to build their final project around. One of the main learning goals of the course is for students to learn how to respond to context and to know the community. It is critical that a designer grasp the importance of the site to the community it is surrounded by. Students research the past, present, and future of the community and learn how to formulate a design that is sensitive to its surroundings and influential to its future.

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“To me it was a time to take fantasy, fiction, and urban planning to another level”

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This contrast is exemplified by the relationship between Mark and his co-instructor, Richard Yeager. Everything comes down to students building a strong About four years ago, Mark asked Richard to join sense of the design process. The complexity him in teaching this course. Richard of the project at hand challenges was previously Mark’s supervisor students to be patient with at Boston College, where their process, to learn that Richard currently serves limiters actually enas the assistant direchance their ideas, to tor of Planning and constantly test their Design Capital Projdesigns, and to ultiects Management. mately decide what They have since works to complete joined forces to coa sophisticated final teach the class and project. This is apstudents line up to parent by the impressee their presentations —Darguin Fortuna sive work that students at the studio lotteries each present at the end of each year. Their dynamic personsemester. alities help to foster creativity among their students as well as ground “This class helped all of my classmates them throughout the course. and myself to understand how amazing designs are put together,” said Darguin. “The entire class ended “Their passion and talents are unlike any other inwith incredible portfolios and expressions worthy of structors I have had,” reflected Darguin Fortuna. design awards. It is not every day that one gets to “They were always there, willing to help either as design for and with an urban scale like such.” critics or as design partners. I remember Richard and Mark coming to my desk and saying ‘What Projects from the course have been locally recognized. can we do to help you push your design to the next Jose Gonzalez, a former student in the studio, was level?’ When I was frustrated with my own process,

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Halfway through the semester, students have the opportunity to travel to New York City for a daylong field trip. They travel over 12 miles, fully immersed in a culture surrounded and shaped by skyscrapers, leaving students inspired to tackle their final projects through the second half of the semester.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Throughout the years, students have come up with many creative and unexpected characters, from Dr. Who, to Dr. Jean Grey, to Hercules. One of the most notable projects from the class featured the villain Venom from Spiderman. Venom is required to bond with Spiderman for his very survival, creating a symbiotic relationship. The designer of the project, Darguin Fortuna, developed a symbiotic intervention to the Hancock Tower that bonded and blended itself with the tower and enriched the building with urban spaces dedicated to the public and tenants of the building.

having a team of instructors like them was a dream come true. They both complemented each other very clearly and gave insights that one alone could have never arrived to.”


named a winner at the annual Student Design Showcase and Competition, sponsored by the Membership Enrichment Committee of the Boston Society of Architects. His project drew inspiration from Hercules to develop a creative intervention that solved the problem of wind surrounding the area of the tower.

“I would highly recommend this studio,” commented Steve Hebsch, a student in the Spring 2016 studio. “Mark and Richard’s energy did not end at lottery. Their camaraderie and commitment to the success of their students carried through until the end of the semester, resulting in projects that have enriched my own portfolio of work. If you are looking to enjoy an engaged, yet humorous classroom setting, this is the studio you’re looking for.” “The studio environment was amazing, and until this day I consider my classmates my best critics and partners,” stated Darguin. “We helped each other out and talked through our design problems. I believe this class was one of my best, if not my best, studio experience at the BAC.” P

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Beyond the slick finished projects and awards, however, lies the true heart and soul of the class, which is the studio environment. This is the reason students flock to the course each year. It is a unique exploration of creativity that has made a powerful impact on each student who has gone through it.

Student Steve Hebsch's floor plan

Hebsch's rendering of the tower


STUDENTS WIN PRESTIGIOUS ACSA DESIGN COMPETITION A grand vision to open up more of the Boston waterfront realized in steel and lots of late nights has earned Boston Architectural College students John Berger and Sasha Francoeur first place in the Associate of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and the American Institute of Steel Construction design competition.

Using the competition also as a project in their class, the two classmates focused on creating a plan that opens up a portion of the North End of Boston’s waterfront to create public access along with a park. The idea is a floating park and begins at the Boston Common and leads to the harbor, where there is a Coast Guard parking lot and little else.

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“It was an iterative process,” explained Sasha. “We had lots of models, sketches and we constantly challenged each others’ ideas.” P

FALL 2016

In their design, the steel structure is lifted 25 to 30 feet off the ground, like a suspended bridge. Their design includes a building that is elevated above street level. As a pedestrian travels along the bridge, it’s like walking in a park. John and Sasha developed a

complete design for the bridge including the building systems. The work ran well past the end of the semester.

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The classmates took their project personally. “We asked ourselves, ‘Walking down to the waterfront, what would we want to see?’”said John. Steel is flexible, and John said because of that flexibility they had latitude in how far they could push the whimsy of their design.

Boston is organized by an urban spine that snakes through its entirety only to abruptly fade at its North End waterfront. Privatized and confined by the US Coast Guard, the site is used solely as a parking lot. The intervention activates the waterfront airspace by extending a bridge across Commercial Street and into the North End, a dense bustling urban environment known for its likeness to European pedestrian-friendly streets. A new cultural plane redefines the existing node system, bringing urban life to the waterfront. Typical steel framing rises up from the Boston Waterfront North End Pier allowing the US Coast Guard to assume business uninterrupted. The column grid rises 25–30 feet giving way to an ensemble of steel and park space activating the unused space for the Boston public. Through a series of steel acrobatics, three tectonically layered display spaces elevate themselves above the groundscape. As you rise up from the city, walking up a steel pedestrian bridge, you are greeted with three layers of intervention. A column grid to reduce disturbance, a floated groundscape to activate the waterfront for the public, and a diverse array of public display spaces clad in elegant steel systems composed of nuanced tectonic assemblies. These assemblies express steel’s beauty, rigidity, and flexibility.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

The pair won in the “Open” category where they were challenged to explore a variety of design issues related to the use of steel design and construction. The two architecture students started at the BAC at the same time and have been in several classes together. They admired each other’s work, so when they had the opportunity to collaborate on a project together they took it.

JOHN AND SASHA’S STATEMENT

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John and Sasha's award-winning design.


Rita Doummar, valedictorian of the master’s program, delivers address to crowd

THE BAC

2016

COMMENCEMENT

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CELEBRATES

The Boston Architectural College celebrated its 2016 Commencement on Friday, May 20 at Old South Church in Copley Square. The College graduated 159 students in the disciplines of architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture, and design studies.

Rita Doummar, Master of Architecture, was awarded Valedictorian of the master’s program and Hannah Smith, Bachelor of Interior Architecture, was awarded Valedictorian of the bachelor’s program. Both Rita and Hannah had the opportunity to address the crowd and reflect on their unique and meaningful BAC educations.

In keeping with BAC tradition, a jazz band accompanied the graduates, special guests, and members of the Board of Trustees in a procession through Boston’s historic Back Bay. Under a clear and sunny sky, they all walked in full regalia from the BAC’s iconic building on Newbury Street to Copley Square’s Old South Church. Graduates excitedly high-fived and waved to bystanders as they proudly made their way to the ceremony, where their friends and families were waiting.

Rita concluded her speech with some lighthearted advice to her fellow graduates. “Class of 2016, welcome to the real world, welcome to a new start, welcome to the next chapter. As a word of advice, don’t settle, keep pushing, and do what you want,” she said. “Don’t let anything or anyone stop you, live and don’t take life too seriously…life is short and it’s up to you to make it sweet. Most importantly though, always remember to back up your hard drive.”

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 2016, AND BEST OF LUCK TO ALL OF THE GRADUATES IN THEIR FUTURE CAREERS!


RENOWNED ARCHITECT MOSHE SAFDIE DELIVERS COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS

Marc Pelletier, trustee, receives honorary degree

Moshe Safdie, renowned architect, urban planner, educator, and theorist delivered the commencement address. Safdie received the 2015 AIA Gold Medal and will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2016 National Design Awards of the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum this fall. Throughout his celebrated career, he has continued to inspire the theory and application of ideas about housing, mixed use, and high density in cities around the world. “All of you in some way will deeply affect our environment. You will have a direct impact on the lives of people; it is an enormous responsibility,” Moshe said in his keynote address. “Staying curious is the most important thing. Use your eyes, and be a critical observer.” The BAC awarded Moshe an honorary doctorate in recognition of his contribution to the architecture and design professions.

LONGTIME BAC SUPPORTERS HONORED AT CEREMONY G. Neil Harper, overseer emeritus and past Board member, and Marc Pelletier, BAC alumnus and past Board chair, received honorary doctorates for their years of service to the College during the 2016 ceremony.

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“So this is it—your final journey through the BAC. Courses, portfolio reviews, practice assessments, and capstone projects are all behind you,” BAC President Glen S. LeRoy said as he opened the commencement ceremony. “For the future, you should continue what has gotten you to this point. Follow your dreams, have faith in your own abilities, and care well for those around you.”

FALL 2016

G. Neil Harper, overseer emeritus, is presented with honorary degree

Marc Pelletier is a business development and marketing professional in the built environment marketplace. As a BAC alumnus, he has committed himself to advancing the BAC’s mission and providing leadership and support to the College. Marc has served on the Board of Trustees since 2008, serving as vice chair from 2009–2013 and chair from 2013–2015. During his tenure, Marc served on nearly all board committees and has been active and engaged with the BAC’s student body, providing networking seminars and attending school events. In 2014, he was honored with the Selfless Labor Award, given to a member of the BAC community who has worked tirelessly for an extended period of time to advance the College’s mission.

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Hannah Smith, valedictorian of the bachelor’s program, shakes hands with President Glen LeRoy

G. Neil Harper is an accomplished engineer and businessman who has been a leader in the BAC community for more than 25 years. Since joining the Board of Trustees in 1988, Neil has been an invaluable resource for the College. While on the Board, he served as treasurer and chair of the finance committee and currently serves as an overseer emeritus. In addition to his service, he has been a strong philanthropic supporter of the College. In 1995, he established the Harper and Shuman Faculty and Staff Development Fund, which allows staff or faculty members to pursue professional development opportunities.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Moshe Safdie delivers commencement address


FEATURED GRADS Anya Wilczynksi, Bachelor of Design Studies in Historic Preservation, stands beside her thesis board

What was your greatest achievement while studying at the BAC? Receiving the Architecture Thesis Commendation and the Edwin T. Steffian Centennial Best Thesis Award were my best and greatest achievements at the BAC. I was so honored to have Rayford Law as my advisor and my mentor through my last three semesters and my thesis journey. What piece of advice do you have for a future BAC student? Discover what you are most passionate about. The BAC gives you a chance to work on studios and projects that could help you to discover your future path. Don’t waste this opportunity.

ANYA WILCZYNSKI How did the BAC prepare you to start your career? The BAC pushed me

into the workforce whether I wanted to or not—and I mean that in the best way possible. Thanks to their practice requirements, I was motivated to get myself out into the field early on.

Looking back, what was one of your favorite moments during your time at the BAC? I was on a

Ahmed Aly proudly received his Master of Architecture

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AHMED ALY

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There is no question that the BAC is a challenging school, but that is what makes it so rewarding. I also would have never thought that I would have a full-time job as a designer so early in my career. The fact that BAC students have experience is what distinguishes us from other graduates. Upon graduation, we have a promising careers and an extended professional network.

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Looking back, what was one of your favorite moments during your time at the BAC? When I think of the BAC, I think of the sense of community; we are like a family. Everyone is supportive of each other regardless of experience or age, and that is hard to find. It’s a place to grow, explore your interests, and challenge yourself.

Hannah Smith, Bachelor of Interior Architecture, photographed with Denise Rush, director of Undergraduate Interior Architecture

HANNAH SMITH What was your greatest achievement while studying at the BAC? My greatest achievement at the BAC was finishing! I survived and live to tell the tale.

What piece of advice do you have for a future BAC student? Take every single opportunity that comes your way. Even the opportunities that you don’t think are going to be rewarding, take them. I got two jobs through volunteering at a Christmas House Tour. You never know w ho you are going to meet and what doors are going to be opened. Take the intern position, do the volunteer work you don’t have time for, whatever it is, make it happen. It will be worth it in one way or another.

walking tour of Back Bay, and our teacher was challenging us to figure out the date of construction for certain buildings. He pointed out that on older buildings, the date is usually carved into a stone or is on a plaque located near the door. So we started to play “who can guess the date of the building quickest” (a very historic preservation-y game!). It turned into quite the competition that my HP friends and I still play to this day when we’re together.

What piece of advice do you have for a future BAC student? “If you’re

going through hell, keep going.” It’s a Winston Churchill quote that got me through the BAC. After my first day of classes, where I was introduced to courses that I was less than eager to take, I was actually pretty convinced that I wasn’t going to stay in school. As I stood in line at Blick, debating if I should buy $200 worth of supplies when I wasn’t sure I even wanted to stay at the BAC, I saw that Winston Churchill quote on a greeting card. It resonated so well with me; this new challenge may seem awful, trying, and exhausting, but keep going—it will be worth it.

ALUMNI, WANT TO SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE?

Submit your post-BAC story to alumni@the-bac.edu.


PLEASE JOIN US IN CONGRATULATING ALL AWARD WINNERS: Alumni Association Scholarship Jeremey Henrickson, Bachlor of Science in Architecture Christine Banister, Master of Architecture Philip Reville III, Master of Architecture Architecture Degree Project Studio Commendations Joshua David Butkus, special commendation for programming research Milton Castro José Leandro Comprés Robert James FitzSimmons, special commendation for material investigation Darguin Fortuna Martinez, special commendation for fully imagined and inhabited spaces Cory Michael Mills, special commendation for urban vibrancy Stan Poreda, special commendation for representation Matthew Logan Richardson Jamaaluddin Siddiqui

Award for Landscape Architecture Thesis Excellence Michael J. Sadler Master of Design Studies Commendations: Historic Preservation Stephanie Lowe Benjamin James Pearson Mollie Campbell Simpson Patricia Marie Vaughn Master of Design Studies Award: Historic Preservation* Benjamin James Pearson

Interior Architecture Degree Project Studio Award* Hannah Louise Smith

Master of Design Studies Award: Sustainable Design* Ana Ramirez

Landscape Architecture Degree Project Commendations Michael J. Hussey Luis A. Perez Demorizi

Distinction in Practice Awards Pooja Bhangadia Olivia M. Fragale Kirsten Louise Soderlund Anya Ruth Wilczynski

Architecture Thesis Commendations Jonathan Edward Gish Clarence D. Olsen Telicious Robinson Laura Smith Benjamin James Walters Award for Architecture Thesis Excellence* Jonathan Edward Gish Interior Architecture Thesis Commendations Nehal Ghazi Alharbi Renee Bissonnette Soramy Le Baraah Adnan Muqaddam Laura Elizabeth Tomlinson

Henry Adams Certificate of Merit: Master of Architecture Daniel J. Wilder Henry Adams Medal & AIA Certificate: Bachelor of Architecture Darguin Fortuna Martinez Henry Adams Certificate of Merit: Bachelor of Architecture Stan Poreda Certificate of Academic Merit: Distance Master of Architecture Jonathan Edward Gish Certificate of Academic Merit: Master of Design Studies Donald R. Ambrosio Alpha Rho Chi Medal Anesu M. Dhliwayo Clarence D. Olsen

* Funded through the generosity of the Edwin T. Steffian Centennial Scholarship Fund

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Edwin T. Steffian Centennial Thesis Award Ahmed Aly

Henry Adams Medal & AIA Certificate: Master of Architecture Rita Joseph Doummar

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Architecture Thesis Commendations Ahmed Aly Aysegul Mutluay Bilgic Kathryn L. Fiedler Elizabeth C. Hall Jing Wei Li Kirsten Louise Soderlund Daniel J. Wilder Thiti Yokyongsakul

The John Worthington Ames Scholarship Alternate Anesu M. Dhliwayo

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Design Studies Degree Project Award* Brien Drenckhahn Anya Ruth Wilczynski

The John Worthington Ames Scholarship Niusha Aghdaii

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Design Studies Degree Project Commendations Brien Drenckhahn Lori Hancock Pritchett Daniel Alejandro Martinez Diaz Alexi Nix Anya Ruth Wilczynski

Excellence in Applied Learning through Practice Award Darguin Fortuna Martinez

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Interior Architecture Degree Project Studio Commendations Hannah Louise Smith

David F. Jaquith, ’69 and Sara E. Bourque, MLA ’14 Landscape Architecture Award Luis A. Perez Demorizi

Please join us in congratulating the members of the Class of 2016 who were honored at the annual commencement eve awards ceremony on Thursday, May 19 for their hard work. Graduating students celebrated with family, friends, and members of the BAC community at the opening reception of The Grad Show in McCormick Gallery followed by ceremonies for undergraduate and graduate students.

Landscape Architecture Thesis Commendations Gavin Dolan Normandeau Michael J. Sadler

Master of Design Studies Commendations: Sustainable Design Donald R. Ambrosio Polly E. Daugherty Ana Ramirez Jennifer Erin Stevenson

Architecture Degree Project Studio Award* José Leandro Comprés

SPRING AWARDS 2016

Award for Interior Architecture Thesis Excellence* Soramy Le


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Was appalled was captivated by. Was appalled plants [what] strategy [how] site three care [stigma] ntervention [why] a #(hashtag) can jump onon board a #(hashtag) theythey can jump on board a #(hashtag) they can jump board 33cue toto55years. Its structural properties make years.for Itsstructural properties makeititananearthquake earthquakeresistant resistantmaterial material site two 50% visable 25% visable 75% visable that resident(s) could let this house that resident(s) could let this house that resident(s) could let this house with and a way to to put faces to to thethe with and a and way put faces to the with ato way put faces ething should happen here”. hing should happen here”. mething should happen here”. site two (and-[what] 50% visable site three 25% visable Cars suitable for shelters in tropical climates. If Bamboo is planted and treated plants strategy [how] cue for care [stigma] hy] suitable for shelters in tropical climates. If Bamboo is planted and treated (and accompanying things) accompanying things) sit sitsit (and accompanying things) Past History Past History Past History implied support a building in in peril implied support of a of building in peril implied support of a building peril vacant to to rot without a care. “The vacant to rot without a care. vacant rot without a “The care. “The properlyits itsefficiency, efficiency,strength strengthand anddurability durabilitycan cangenerate generatehigh highperformance performanceand and of of being lost. Doesn’t actually solve of being lost. Doesn’t actually solve plant community approach properly being lost. Doesn’t actually solve thing’ that should happen. hing’ that should happen. ething’ that should happen. abandonment melancholy” abandonment waswas melancholy” asclepias syrica - milkweed abandonment was melancholy” ultra-economic any problems doesn’t a way problems andand doesn’t havehave ahave way any problems and doesn’t a way ultra-economicbuildings buildingstotohelp helpalleviate alleviatethe thelow-income low-incomehousing housingdemand demandinin This was nono way to dry treat someones plant communityany approach was no way toway someones This was to treat someones to to promote future use. to promote future use. promote future use. sitesoil two conditions - This full sun -treat soil developing developingcountries. countries. sun - dry home...a place where lifelife happened. home...a place where life happened. home...a place where happened. s

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Empowering people to create sustainable bamboo lowincome housing in tropical-rural areas for developing countries TOLERANT DROUGHT TOLERANT countries DISTURBANCE ADAPTED DROUGHT 3

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1. Student Drop-Off material material be hashas been 2. Rooftop Green House organize commun organize comm bamboo building bamboo buildin 3. Primary School Playground 93 resid commercial/ re 4. Learning Wetland commercial/ thethe prejudice of bo prejudice 5. Learning Grove efficient homes w efficient homes their quality of life 6. Secondary School Playground their quality of Environmental EnvironmentalAdvantages Advantages natural disasters. natural disaste Bamboo is is a high-yield renewable, fast growth “lignifying grass” (Graminae). Bamboo a high-yield renewable, fast growth “lignifying giant grass” (Graminae). 7. giant Arts Plaza/ Main Basin AsAs anan example Guadua Angustifolia grows with a speed of approximately 20 example Guadua Angustifolia grows with a speed of approximately 20 Trail/ Open Lawn 8. Urban Stream cmcm per day. Within the first 6 to 7 months, it reaches itsits final height of of 2020 to to per day. Within the first 6 to 7 months, it reaches final height 9. Woody Trail Guadua angu Guadua ang 3030 meters. The photosynthesis in in culm and leaves decreases with increasing meters. The photosynthesis culm and leaves decreases with increasing 10. Great Meadow age. The bamboo lignifies within 5 to 8 years until thethe conducting fibers getget age. The bamboo lignifies within 5 to 8 years until conducting fibers To elaborate on th blocked. (Conbam 2005) when this happens, lichens on11. thethe culms start to appear blocked. (Conbam 2005) when this happens, lichens on culms start to appear To elaborate on Artesian Plaza angustifolia kunth angustifolia kun and bamboo is is fully mature and ready to to harvest. Based onon a study made in in and bamboo fully mature and ready harvest. Based a study made 12. Great Lawn information about information ab Colombia, bamboo can produce between 2 to 4 tons of of biomass perper hectare Colombia, bamboo can produce between 2 to 4 tons biomass hectare instructed by Jorg 13. Mainrhizome South Grove yearly, which helps toto improve thethe structure of of soil. The extensive system yearly, which helps improve structure soil. The extensive rhizome system instructed by Jo

asclepias syrica [what] - milkweed plants strategy cue for care [stigma] vention [why] [what] strategy [how] cue for[how] care [stigma] erosionplants control coronilla varia - crownvetch asclepias syrica - milkweed chichorium intybus - chicory 9 aster pilosus overseeding edge mow community approach - white heathplant aster community plant approach chichorium intybus - chicory erosion control This Thisresearch researchshows showsexamples examplesininIndonesia Indonesiaand andColombia Colombiawhere wherebamboo bamboo constructions constructionshave havebeen beenerected erectedtotodemonstrate demonstrateitsitsflexibility flexibilityand andbeauty. beauty.The The author authorofofthis thisresearch researchhad hadthe theexperience experienceofoftaking takinga abamboo bambooconstruction construction workshop workshopininthese thesetwo twocountries countriesand andshe shecompares comparesthe thetechnology technologyused usedininboth both cases. cases.InInaddition, addition,the thebamboo bamboouse useasasa aconstruction constructionmaterial materialbybyunprivileged unprivileged people peopleisisstudied studiedininColombia Colombiaasasaacase casestudy studyand andshows showswhy whyit ithas hasnot notbeen beenused used effectively. effectively.The Thedesign designofoftheir theirself-made self-madehouses houseslacks lacksfunctionality, functionality,construction construction knowledge, knowledge,aesthetics, aesthetics,and andsustainability. sustainability.Climate Climateconditions conditionssuch suchasashot hot temperatures temperaturesduring duringthe theday, day,relative relativeair airhumidity, humidity,airaircurrents, currents,and andexposure exposure totorain rainare arenot notcarefully carefullyaccounted accountedfor forthe thedesign designeither. either.Consequently, Consequently,during during disasters, disasters,these thesepeople peopleare arecritically criticallyimpacted. impacted.

Historic Historic ssisisis HP HP HP Historic overseeding design layer edge mow Preservation Preservation Preservation overseeding edge mow design layer Placemaking Placemaking Placemaking This Thisisisis PM &&& This PM PM design plug plants bird house 10 layer 1:250

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coronilla varia - crownvetch trifolium pratense - red clover coronilla varia - crownvetch pilosus - white aster trifoliumaster repens - white cloverheath asclepias syrica - milkweed asclepias syrica - milkweed aster pilosus - white heath aster colonizer soil building trifolium pratense - red clover leucanthemum vulgare - oxeye daisy The Thequantitative quantitativedeficit deficitofoflow-income low-incomehousing housingininrural ruralareas areasisisalmost almost50% 50%ofof intybus - chicory - redchichorium clover the PERSPECTIVE OF ENTRY chichoriumtrifolium intybuspratense - chicory thetotal totalnational nationaldeficit deficitininColombia. Colombia.The Thesubsidized subsidizedhome homebybythe thegovernment government trifolium repens - white clover lathrus latifolius - perennial sweetpea programs programsisisusually usuallyaasmall small32 32SM SMmodel modelthat thatisisoften oftenmade madeofofunappealing unappealing wildlifecolonizer habitat concrete concreteboxes, boxes,designed designedtotosupply supplya aroof roofthat thattemporarily temporarilyprotects protectsthe the osion control trifolium repens - white coronilla clover varia - crownvetch occupants. occupants.The Thedesign designisisnot notassociated associatedwith withthe theneeds needsofoftheir theirlifestyle lifestyleorortheir their hieracium canadense - canada hawkweed coronilla varia - crownvetch leucanthemum vulgare - oxeye daisy need needtotobe beconnected connectedwith withnature natureand andthe theneed needfor forsocial socialinteraction. interaction.For Forallall function layer these reasons, the goal ofofthis research isistotoeducate people ininrural areas leucanthemum vulgare - oxeye daisy these reasons, the goal this research educate people rural areashow howtoto plug plantsplant bird house daucuslathrus carota - pilosus queen anne’s lace heath asterlatifolius - white aster bamboo locally and sustainably empowering their villages totobebeself-reliant perennial sweetpea plant bamboo locally and sustainably empowering their villages self-reliant aster pilosus - white heath aster wildlife habitat and plug plants bird house andcontrol controltheir theirown ownshelter shelterneeds. needs.People Peoplewill willbebeable abletotogrow growthe thematerials materials lathrus latifolius - perennial sweetpea for soil building fortheir theirown ownhome, home,build buildit,it,helping helpingtotoreduce reducethe thedepletion depletionofofthe theforests forestsand and at hieracium - canada hawkweed contribute trifolium pratense red clover and Place Saving is aacombination placemaking and historic preservation; Place Saving iscanadense aiscombination of-of placemaking historic preservation; Place Saving combination of placemaking and historic preservation; contributewith withthe thesocio-economic socio-economicinfrastructure infrastructureofoftheir theirvillages. villages.Bamboo Bamboowill will pratense red clover not only provide a safe shelter that will respond to natural disasters, but also will LISTtrifolium SELECTION CRITERIA function layer Rice-Barton School Campus intaglio fencing not only provide a safe shelter that will respond to natural disasters, but also will - learns canada hawkweed places / /spaces ublic places / hieracium spaces spublic public places spaces canadense connect people with nature to restore the way of living of their older generations. it from the downfalls and capitalizes on the strengths of each. it learns from the downfalls and capitalizes on the strengths of each. it learns from the downfalls and capitalizes on the strengths of each. daucus carota - queen anne’s lace connect people with nature to restore the way of living of their older generations. must serve (3) functions This capstone will provide a Bamboo prototype design for a HomeKit with a function layer trifolium repens -can white clover This capstone will provide a Bamboo prototype design for a HomeKit with a Where historic preservation can be alienating because of architectural Where historic preservation be alienating because of architectural easive Where historic preservation can be alienating because of architectural & ve&relevant &relevant relevant approach including a protocol manual with a guide to teach people of any trifolium repens white- queen cloveranne’s lace A TALE OF GRADIENTS holistic daucus -carota holistic approach including a protocol manual with a guide to teach people of any

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ofof the bamboos, found mainly in in thethe toptop layers of of soilsoil is one of of thethe main reasons the bamboos, found mainly layers is one main reasons in Colombi Locally in Colom forfor itsits positive effect onon soil stabilization and securing hydrological functions of of Locally positive effect soil stabilization and securing hydrological functions depending of its u depending of it catchments and rivers. This rhizome system and thethe biomass create a mesh that catchments and rivers. This rhizome system and biomass create a mesh that of to phenomenon works as biological detention wall that holds water, prevents soil erosion and rainrain phenomenon works as biological detention wall that holds water, prevents soil erosion and soil. Guadua maca Rice-Barton Community Camp soil. Guadua m areas butbut with goo areas with andand guadua cotud guadua cot

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farming level experience how to manage their own resilient bamboo forestry by farming level experience how to manage their own resilient bamboo forestry by

manifest destiny in the urban wild growing, propagating, harvesting and treating sustainable bamboo. This bamboo yms natives as possible ms decisions based decisions based ononon decisions based growing, propagating, harvesting and treating sustainable bamboo. This bamboo leucanthemum vulgare - oxeye daisy prototype and manual will provide the people of rural communities NT LIST SELECTION CRITERIA cultural, contextual, and emotional value that they have aacommunity cultural, contextual, and emotional value that they have inin aincommunity cultural, contextual, and emotional value that they have community eucanthemum vulgare - oxeye daisy intaglio design fencing design prototype and manual will provide the people of rural communities eed 2-3 foot height (safety) with a dignified, comfortable space for living. This dwelling prototype will be munity input unity input mmunity input with a dignified, comfortable space for living. This dwelling prototype will be water runoff. nts must serve (3) functions N CRITERIA concept very similar the heritage conservation movement). (a(a(a concept very similar tototo the heritage conservation movement). concept very similar the heritage conservation movement). repeatable to create clusters of dwellings and communal social areas surrounded plug plants bird house water runoff.

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plug plants birdbywater house permaculture gardens that support food consumption, planned channels for A TALE OF GRADIENTS by permaculture gardens that support food consumption, planned channels for athrus latifolius - perennial sweetpea nal invasive Additionally, where placemaking tends public spaces and ildlife habitat Additionally, where placemaking tends totofocus onon public spaces and Additionally, where placemaking tends tofocus focus on public spaces and unctions irrigation and conservation systems. bloom (aesthetic + biodiversity) ighter, quicker, cheaper hter, quicker, cheaper lighter, quicker, cheaper water irrigation and conservation systems. A TALE OF GRADIENTS manifest destiny in the urban wild civic buildings, Place Making is for any kind type. buildings, Place Making meant for any kind ofof building type. civic buildings, Place Making ismeant meant for any kind ofbuilding building type. many natives as possible noach stress tolerance (resilient) civic hieracium canadense - is canada hawkweed ch roach EXOTIC racium canadense - canada hawkweed exceed 2-3 foot(biodiversity) height (safety) manifest destiny inlayer the urban wild of plant families ssible function function layer lways permanent ays permanent always permanent ilable from seed (economic) daucus carota - queen anne’s lace NATIVE eight (safety) daucus carota - queen anne’s lace sonal bloom (aesthetic + biodiversity) conomic) NATIVE ge in stress tolerance (resilient) hetic + biodiversity) EXOTIC INVASIVE ety of plant families (biodiversity) ce (resilient) T SELECTION CRITERIA intaglio fencing EXOTIC intaglio fencing sst(biodiversity) serve (3) functions

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The leaves biomass also improves the fertility of the soil providing organic The leaves biomass also improves the fertility of the soil providing organic material and protecting the soil from direct sun exposure. These also provides material and protecting the soil from direct sun exposure. These also provides habitat for fauna. Bamboos often flourish in moist or tropical old-growth forests habitat for fauna. Bamboos often flourish in moist or tropical old-growth forests and have been associated with the livelihood of a number of plants and animals. and have been associated with the livelihood of a number of plants and animals. Bamboo provides a rich environment for insects, birds and some mammals. Bamboo provides a rich environment for insects, birds and some mammals. Insects find sufficient food in the bamboos, and they in turn act as food for Insects find sufficient food in the bamboos, and they in turn act as food for birds. For mammals in need of fruit, access to other types of forest is necessary. birds. For mammals in need of fruit, access to other types of forest is necessary. (Jensen 40) Since Bamboos are the world’s fastest growing plants (Rabik and (Jensen Since Bamboos are the world’s fastestthe growing plantscomponents (Rabik and Brown 16),40) more management is needed to control ecosystem Brown 16), more management is needed Therefore, to control the ecosystem components that affect bamboo positively or negatively. in order to promote this that affectmaterial bambooforpositively or negatively. Therefore, in order toLinda promote this renewable construction and protection of biodiversity, Garland, renewable material for construction and protection of biodiversity, Lindatwo Garland, founder of the environmental Bamboo Foundation in Indonesia suggested founder of the environmental Bamboo Foundation in Indonesia suggested simple guidelines: First, it must be appropriately preserved against pests and two simple guidelines: First, it must be appropriately preserved against pests and deterioration and second, the source of the bamboo must come from sustainable deterioration second, the source the bamboo muststands come release from sustainable bamboo forestryand techniques. (Rabik andof Brown iii) Bamboo 35% bamboo forestry techniques. (Rabikofand Brown iii) Bamboo 35% Guadua grows 20 more oxygen than equivalent stands trees and some bamboostands even release sequester Guadua older culmsgrows aroun equivalent stands of trees and some bamboo even sequester upmore to 12oxygen tons ofthan carbon the air per hectare. (bambocentral 2014). Bamboo takes Brien Drenckhahn older culms and makearo t up from to 12the tonsatmosphere of carbon the per hectare. (bambocentral 2014). Bamboo BDS: Sustainable Design CO2 andair through the process of photosynthesis turns it takes culms The building of simple homes is not just about improving the condition of culms and mak 2016 May Graduate slower pace). The CO2 from the atmosphere andtransforms through the process ofinto photosynthesis turns it into sugars. The bamboo plant these sugars the compounds that The building of simple homes is not just about improving the condition of shelter for the poor, it can become a catalyst for the further development slower arepace). used Tf into up sugars. Thefiber. bamboo plant transforms these sugars into theThe compounds that section make bamboo Half the weight of the bamboo is carbon. carbon shelter for the poor, it can become a catalyst for the further development of communities by creating local skill development, income generation and section aremore use is softer and make upatmosphere bamboo fiber. Half the weight of the bamboo is itself. carbon. The carbon from the is thus locked up in the bamboo fiber When that of communities by creating local skill development, income generation and infrastructure that will benefit the development of any country. And ultimately, it is softer is closer on and the m bo from the atmosphere thus locked up in the When that fiber is used to is construct buildings, thebamboo carbon infiber it is itself. sequestered infrastructure will benefit the development ofcrisis. any country. And ultimately, it bamboo can be a viable that alternative for solving the migration is closer on the structurally resista fiberof is the usedbuilding. to construct buildings,2014) the carbon it iscalculated sequestered forbamboo the lifetime (bambooliving It has in been in can be a viable alternative for solving the migration crisis. structurally between 14 to res 20 forCosta the lifetime of the building. 2014) It has calculated the Rican context that 70 ha(bambooliving of bamboo plantation are been sufficient to buildin between 14 to

Emotional Emotional Emotional EC EC ECwhoCaptial Captial Captial A TALE OF GRADIENTS A TALE OF GRADIENTS is the weed?

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The dynamic between ideas and practice in the community was the basis for the meaningful, critical design thinking exemplified in the exhibition. The work of our designers directly affects how we will live and envision the future. Our sincere gratitude goes to the faculty members and the practicing professionals who guide our students and who are committed to educational excellence at the BAC.

Section C

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Guadua Design Guadua Design

he main specie for construction Latin America, Guadua n specie for construction in LatininAmerica, Guadua h,uthor the author this capstone extracted the following of this of capstone extracted the following t this specie a workshop in bamboo construction pecie duringduring a workshop in bamboo construction gmStamm Cali, Colombia: in Cali,inColombia:

ia people recognized different phenotypes of Guadua ple recognized different phenotypes of Guadua and appearance: Guadua is the thickest bamboo. duse appearance: Guadua castillacastilla is the thickest bamboo. The The this that grows close to swampsrich with rich fertility e istype that is grows close to swamps fertility on theon the Sectionwith A

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od soil drainage. Guadua great to woven make woven drainage. Guadua cebollacebolla is greatisto make mats mats da is recognized by its sinuous cognized by its sinuous curves.curves.

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ws interrains steep terrains and mountains develops at a slower eep and mountains develops at a slower rate. rate. Starting with afrom classic form of a Hoyt Diagram, the pressures of modern urban development are time to mineralize the nutrients soil while mineralize and getand theget nutrients from the soilthe while ows in a perfect hummus close the grows rivers grows a according to how they bisect at risk, lower income neighborhoods away from active a perfect hummus close categorized to the to rivers like a like gets tooitthick, iturban becomes soft is commercial not suitable industry and uaGuadua gets too thick, becomes soft and is and not suitable for fordistricts. At risk populations in Boston Metro are identified. an andeasily crack and easily and less it has less resistant qualities nk shrink and crack it has resistant qualities for for s but can be used to produce woven mats for roofs and walls. an be used to produce woven mats for roofs and walls. ong the rivers and swamps and its presence is crucial for the e rivers and swamps andBelow: its presence is crucial for the ment of the close ecosystems around the swampy areas, but the close ecosystems around the swampy areas, but Landscape architecture stands poised to build the urban environment with the influence of spread out and climb to the mountain. These types are the out and climb to the mountain. These types are the advancements in landscape o be monitored and harvested for construction for its hightechnologies. This new paradigm of development allows municiple onitored and harvested for construction for its high groups to renegotiate the ways inherently space intensive programming adapts to an ever ical properties. operties.

expanding built / urban environment

stem of a sympodial bamboo is called a rhizome and is made of of a sympodial bamboo is called a rhizome and is made of t look like inter-connected umbrella handles (other rhizomes). like inter-connected umbrella handles (other rhizomes). ome buds) sprout off of these rhizomes, turn into shoots when ds) sprout off of these rhizomes, turn into shoots when m the soil and then into culms as the extend into the canopy. The oil and then into culms as the extend into the canopy. The n mother and offspring is small, and thus sympodial bamboos er and offspring is small, and thus sympodial bamboos Rabik and Brown 16) Guadua has 60 cms of sub terrain rhizome and Brown 16) Guadua has 60 cms of sub terrain rhizome of the culm sprouts new roots (70 cms long). culm sprouts new roots (70 cms long).

The hemp industry in the United States presents itself as one of the most potentially productive agricultural markets on plant earth and touches myriad market sectors. If public policy makers acknowledged the fundamental differences between cannabis and hemp the United States could see a miniature agricultural revolution in the 21st century.

Below: Agricultural markets that take advantage of raw materials like hemp set the stage for a reintroduction of entry-level, accessible jobs in communities awash with retail and commercial environments tailor developed for the high-revenue technology and science industries. This diagram illustrates which populations in Somerville might benefit from access to more democratic forms of job creation.

2. Hannah Smith, Bachelor of Interior Architecture 3. Ana Ramirez, Bachelor of Design Studies in Sustainable Design 4. Michael Sadler, Master of Landscape Architecture 5. Benjamin Pearson, Master of Design Studies in Historic Preservation

Conclusions & Reflections Conclusions & Reflections Everybody deserves to have a decent, comfortable home. Nature provides Great Meadow + Urban Stream Everybody deserves to have alike decent, comfortable Nature powerful raw materials bamboo to supplyhome. people’s basicprovides needs. Education powerful materials like to supply people’s basictoneeds. Education andraw determination canbamboo guide unprivileged population build Demorizi, homes, promote Luis Perez BLA and determination can stability guide unprivileged population build homes, social, economic and fulfill their dreams.toBesides, it is January, anpromote empowering 2016 social,process economic stability and fulfill their dreams. Besides, it is an empowering to build one’s own home. It is imperative that the government of process to build one’s own home. is imperative thattothe government of such as developing countries provideItthe necessary aid promote projects developing countries provide the necessary aid to promote projects such as HomeKit to help alleviate the migration crisis and create adaptation plans that HomeKit to helpquicker alleviate migration crisis create plans that responds tothe climate change andand protect theadaptation environment. responds quicker to climate change and protect the environment.

During the 10th World bamboo congress held in Damyang, Korea, an inspiring Duringcall thewas 10th Worldby bamboo congress held in Damyang, Korea, an inspiring written the governor of Damyang County, Hyung-Sik, Choi , Executive call was writtenofbyWBO, the governor of Damyang Hyung-Sik, , Executive Director Susanne Lucas and theCounty, President of WBO,Choi Michel Abadie. This cms every day. Through the process of photosynthesis, the Director WBO, Susanne and the of WBO, Michel Abadie. This very day. Through the process of photosynthesis, the callofrequests hope forLucas the future of President the planet: nd produce and accumulate enough starch to feed the younger call requests hope for the future of the planet: duce and accumulate enough starch to feed the younger them grow their full height in 6 weeks (other species grow at “We, people of bamboo, invite all government leaders from all countries row their full height in 6 weeks (other species grow at e basal section of guadua known as culm base and the medial “We, people of bamboo, invite all government leaders from all countries of ourof our to recognize the essential contribution of bamboo in the fight against climate section of guaduaThe known aspart, culmwhich base and medial for construction. upper has athe smaller diameter, planet planet to recognize the essential contributionchange. of bamboo in the fight against climate Thefurniture upper part, hasThe a smaller diameter, estruction. suitable for andwhich utensils. distance of the nodes We testify that bamboo is onechange. of the best CO2 sequestrating agro-forestry plants, ble for or furniture andofutensils. TheThe distance nodes ottom basal part the culm. closer of thethe nodes the more We testify that bamboo is one of theprotect best CO2 sequestrating agro-forestry plants, that which is able to restore and lands from erosion and degradation, or of the culm. the nodes the more antbasal is thepart culm. In the firstThe 4 orcloser 5 meters, the nodes will be which bamboo is able tocan restore and protect lands from erosion andfrom degradation, that produce high quality woody fiber material a quickly renewable culm. In the first 4 orAt5 the meters, the nodes 0he cms of distance apart. top part, nodeswill arebe between 35 bamboo can produce high bamboo quality woody material managed from a quickly renewable resource, and that can befiber sustainably to provide economic f distance apart. At the top part, nodes are between 35

7. Jonathan Edward Gish, Distance Master of Architecture 8. Ahmed Aly, Master of Architecture 9. José Leandro Comprés, Bachelor of Architecture 10. Luiz Perez, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

23

n ustifolia and bamboo construction in Colombia lia and bamboo construction in Colombia

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tofneed of education the displaced, rural families to empower education for thefor displaced, rural families to empower antage of the potential and real qualities of bamboo when this of the potential and real qualities of bamboo when this n produced and treated properly. It is crucial that cooperatives uced and treated properly. It is crucial that cooperatives nity that spread the knowledge of lderbuilder trainingtraining centerscenters that spread the knowledge of techniques whichbeen haveproven been proven to create successful ques which have to create successful dential projects at different sociallevels class and levels andchanging start changing projects at different social class start bamboo rural household’s Training to build o in ruralinhousehold’s minds.minds. Training peoplepeople to build with bamboo notwill only will encourage communities to improve mboo not only encourage communities to improve e, but also will prepare rural sectors also will prepare rural sectors againstagainst climateclimate changechange and and

FALL 2016

The guadua prototype for low-income housing joins communities The guadua designdesign prototype for low-income housing joins communities and and ny widely as a construction material in developing countries used asused a construction material in developing countries reconcile the social of guadua and create a consciousness of respect the social vision vision of guadua and create a consciousness of respect in in ed for housing, but unfortunately, not effectively. plepeople for housing, but unfortunately, not effectively. Rural Rural reconcile people’s towards the environment and dwelling. their dwelling. Provides a functional people’s mindsminds towards the environment and their Provides a functional ve access the knowledge of treating bamboo and what ess to the to knowledge of treating bamboo and what and aesthetically appealing that will recover rural people’s dignity. appealing home home that will recover rural people’s dignity. eoid tothe avoid thedeterioration rapid deterioration their homes. In addition, and aesthetically rapid of theirofhomes. In addition, Improves the conditions living conditions and the self-made constructive systems. the living and the self-made constructive systems. and skilled local The labor. The design their self-made Improves nsartisans and skilled local labor. design of theirofself-made The conceptual the design emerged from observing the traditional The conceptual shapeshape of theof design emerged from observing the traditional way way tionality, construction knowledge, aesthetics, and sustainability. ty, construction knowledge, aesthetics, and sustainability. of gathering in Colombian families and the of need of creating an efficient modular in Colombian families and the need creating an efficient modular ted in several documents that the lifetime of an untreated of gathering several documents that the lifetime of an untreated that generates density. In addition, encourage interior relationships that generates density. In addition, encourage interior relationships as wellas well pole from variesone from to years threedepending years depending the climate shape shape aries toone three on theon climate as community alliance to the build the prototype. As a response to unite families alliance to build prototype. As a response to unite families and and eoftype of species used. The “non-engineered” structures species used. The “non-engineered” structures built builtas community join force labor to force to homes, build homes, a 2-story prototype was design to accommodate build a 2-story prototype was design to accommodate or common mistakes that weaken the structurejoin labor llyusually presentpresent common mistakes that weaken the structure two different families, an extended the second floor useupper the upper families, an extended familyfamily on theon second floor or useorthe ofhomes. their homes. thecommon most common mistakes, there hastwo different AmongAmong the most mistakes, there has dwelling as a source of income for a family living the lower dwelling as a source of income for a family living on theon lower floor. floor. at: The theisunits is comparable with the low-income units subsidized The size ofsize the of units comparable with the low-income units subsidized by by the government. The lower unit has a net area of 46.7 SM (501 SF) and the government. The lower unit has a net area of 46.7 SM (501 SF) and can becan be ested bamboo is not treated amboo is not treated againstagainst fungal fungal attacksattacks occupied by a family by a family of four.of four. boo structural members are directly exposed sun and rain occupied uctural members are directly exposed to sun to and rain Section B boo columns are installed in contact direct contact with soil and umns are installed in direct with the soilthe and sed to moisture moisture Arts Plaza boo columns not reinforced withrebar steel and rebar and poured umns are notare reinforced with steel poured rete attached when attached the footings. hen to the to footings. in earlier, non-engineered, bamboo buildings noints earlier, non-engineered, bamboo buildings used toused be to be d or pinned, andwould they would eventually come loose, nned, and they eventually come loose, as the as the ons changed from wet again, the expansion nged from wet towet dry to to dry wetto again, the expansion and and action loosened the joints. (Permaculture news 2015) loosened the joints. (Permaculture news 2015)

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4 5 Mid-Century Modern domestic architecture is an emerging topic in the world of historic preservation. Additionally, the aesthetics of the Mid-Century Modern period are gaining traction in the fields of interior design and in 8 the American real estate market. As many Mid-Century Modern properties reach the fifty-year National Register requirement, preservation efforts are an increasingly more vital step in protecting a form and style of architecture that fundamentally changed the way American houses function and are built. This workbook provides homeowners with the tools to document and preserve these historic building forms and materials while also adding real estate market value to their own houses, This gallery features a sample of thesis and degree projects from the ultimately preserving theClass architectural and of 2016 that received awards: cultural resources for future generations. 1. Brien Drenckahan, Bachelor of Design Studies 6. Anya Wilcyznski, Bachelor of Design Studies

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Boys + Girls Club

The BAC showcased the work of the Class of 2016 in the annual Grad Show in McCormick Gallery from May to August. The exhibition featured work from undergraduate and graduate programs in the Schools of Architecture, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Design Studies.


Megan Lorenz, M.Arch ’14, at work at Kenyon Woodworking

ALUMNA EMBRACES HANDS-ON SIDE OF ARCHITECTURE After graduating from the BAC, Megan Lorenz, M.Arch ’14, decided to embrace the hands-on side of the architecture field and pursue a career in woodworking. Shortly after commencement, Megan brought this aspiration to reality and landed a job at Kenyon Woodworking, where she initially spent most of her time sanding and learning the tricks of the trade. After some time observing her skilled coworkers and growing as a woodworker herself, Megan is now managing her own projects, constructing kitchens, built-ins, furniture, and more. Her education in architecture and her background with hands-on projects have given her a unique perspective on the design and detailing of fine woodworking. Megan, who is detail-orientated and brings creativity to all of her projects, is thrilled to have found a career path that allows her to pursue her passion of construction. A memorable project she recently worked on was Y2Y Harvard Square, a shelter serving a unique homeless demographic: 18- to 24-year-olds. Megan contributed to this project on top of her day job at Kenyon, so it was a true labor of love that required many late evenings. Gail Sullivan, managing principal of Studio G Architects, the firm that led the design of the shelter, asked Megan to assist with designing and constructing modular lockers for the shelter, given her experience constructing millwork at Kenyon. Megan, who had worked with Studio G during her time at the BAC, jumped at the opportunity.

CATCHING UP WITH ALUMNI

The design for the lockers was based on the donated materials, which were old, solid wood doors that had been reclaimed from a Harvard University building that was under renovation. While a warehouse in Allston served as the construction and storage headquarters, Kenyon Woodworking generously allowed the team to use the shop’s tools when needed. Since the lockers were modular, they cut all the parts at the shop and transported them back to the warehouse for assembly before taking them to the shelter for install at Y2Y Harvard Square. Megan did not stop after the lockers were finished. At that point, the directors of the shelter had put out a call for more skilled labor on the construction of the shelter itself, and Megan eagerly got involved. She ended up leading a project to clad a 50-foot-long concrete block wall in reclaimed wood flooring that was donated to the shelter. It was an opportunity to not only sharpen her skillset, but to also work with many different passionate volunteers.


DESIGN, ADVOCATE, TEACH: ALL IN A DAY’S WORK BAC alumna and faculty member Aimee Schefano MID ’12 wears many hats in the design community. Beyond her involvement with the BAC, she is a designer at Symmes Maini & McKee Associates (SMMA) and serves as the VP of Advocacy for International Interior Design Association New England Chapter (IIDA NE). Experienced and connected, Aimee has her finger on the pulse of the interior design world. At the BAC, she co-teaches Interior Design Studios 3 and 4 with Denise Rush, director of Undergraduate Interior Architecture. She previously taught the Non-Residential Studio for four semesters.

After graduation, she returned to the College as a faculty member as a way to give back and pass on what others taught her, remembering fondly the instructors she had as a student. In addition to teaching, Aimee is a designer at SMMA, a local architecture, engineering, and planning firm that specializes in education, advanced technology, commercial, and health sciences design. While there is no “typical day” for Aimee, her success strategy is to stay organized and focused, even when plans and priorities quickly shift. When Aimee is not at the office, she is an involved with IIDA NE, serving as the organization’s VP of Advocacy. In this role, she educates members and the greater community about the importance of

interior design legislation. In doing so, she also helps spread the word about important legislation that has already been passed and mold future goals. She attends school events, talks to firms, produces advocacy-focused literature, and maintains the advocacy page of IIDA NE’s website. As Aimee continues to educate others about the importance of this legislation, she hopes to also help people understand the value of interior design as a profession and how designers’ decisions impact the health, safety, and welfare of the public.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE ALUMNA TAKES ON LEADERSHIP ROLE AT ESPLANADE ASSOCIATION Years ago, a high school aptitude test told Elizabeth “Libby” Knott, MLA ’15, that she was destined for the design field or working outdoors. While she didn’t realize it at the time, this test almost perfectly predicted her future path in life.

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After over 20 years of working in a diverse set of jobs, from marketing, to social work, to café ownership, Libby decided to explore a completely new direction that provided a creative outlet. She found herself at the Landscape Institute, which eventually brought her to pursue a Master of Landscape at the BAC, and last month Libby found a perfect fit as director of operations at the Esplanade Association.

FALL 2016 25

The Esplanade Association has many projects slated for this year and beyond. This summer, Libby looks forward to working on restoring the Lotta Fountain, a granite fountain from the 1930s. This preservation and restoration project will be a challenging, educational, and fulfilling endeavor to kick off her new job. P

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When asked what attracted her to working at the Esplanade Association, Libby stated that its mission of making life better on the Esplanade said it all for her. While she started at the BAC with the ideal of building a career in designing new and beautiful spaces, the opportunities provided to her through the BAC revealed new possibilities. Her experience working in local internships and in the BAC’s Gateway program opened her eyes to how many existing spaces there are that have been over-burdened and neglected. From this, it was clear that her career trajectory was in cultural landscape preservation.

Anya Wilcyznski, Bachelor of Design Studies Jonathan Edward Gish, Distance Master of Architecture Ahmed Aly, Master of Architecture José Leandro Comprés, Bachelor of Architecture Luiz Perez, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

ALUMNI, WANT TO SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE? Submit your post-BAC story to alumni@the-bac.edu.


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CONNECTED AT THE BAC

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An education at The Boston Architectural College, and all of the studying, studio work, reviews, and exams that come with it, has been the first chapter of many great love stories and connections. Please enjoy these stories that only could have occurred at the BAC.

HEATH CODY, M.ARCH ’12 & ADRIANE CODY, M.ARCH ’11 From Adriane’s point of view, “We met while working on our undergrad degrees at the New England Institute of Technology 14 years ago. We’ve been pretty much inseparable ever since. After graduating we decided that going for our master’s degrees at the BAC would be the best next step for us. As most BAC students know, going to the BAC and working full-time can be a grueling process. It takes many years and a lot of effort, but the support we gave each other during this time not only made us better designers and stronger individuals, it also made us stronger as a couple. We made many great memories during those late nights working on our studio projects. We’ve been married now for 8 ½ years, work in Boston, and live in Chelsea with our two cats.”

BRIEN TAL-BAKER, M.ARCH ’13 & MAYA TAL-BAKER, B.ARCH ’12 As Brien tells it, “I met a cute girl in the BAC elevator in 2008, exchanged a few words about studio, and we got off on different floors. We didn’t see each other again for another year, then found ourselves on opposing sides of a design competition. After the initial phase of the competition, we came together as part of a larger team. We have been working together on projects ever since. Projects led to friendship, and the friendship deepened over the years to intimacy. We spent nearly all our time together, and two years after graduation were married and running our small architectural practice of two, Simple City Studio. We still have a strong connection to the school, and plan to teach a studio together in the near future.”


MARC PELLETIER & PENNY CARLHIAN As Marc explains, “In 1976 I got a fleeting glimpse of Penny Carlhian for the first time at the BAC; she had dropped off a message for someone in my group, and when I inquired about her identity, I was told, ‘Forget about it—she would never go out with any of us!’. Well, the following year, Penny and I started dating (she and I were both separately traveling back from the Vineyard, and shared seats on the ferry and bus). We went to see ‘New York, New York’ the next night, and within five months we were living together, going to classes at the BAC together, and then working together. Here we are, 39 years later, both still committed to the college and planning the next phases of our life. If not for a chance meeting at the BAC, our wonderful life together might never have started.”

Jamie explains, “We met in math class in 2007, our first semester at the BAC, but it wasn’t until the following semester in physics that we became friends. After spending more time together over the summer, we quickly became inseparable—a feat made more difficult by the demands of the BAC. But, we worked together tutoring at the LRC, spent late nights working on our studio projects together, and would run from one building on campus to the other to say hi between classes or shifts. We were married in the summer of 2010 and Ashley graduated from the BAC in 2013, and Jamie graduated in 2014. Now, we own a home in Chelsea, work in Boston and Cambridge, and have finally expanded our date venues outside of 320 Newbury Street.”

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

JAMIE SCHWADEL, M.ARCH ’14 & ASHLEY OWENS, B.ARCH ’13

» FALL 2016

FELICE SILVERMAN ’92, MID ’14 & DAVID SILVERMAN, B.ARCH ’94

SHARE YOUR STORY

alumni@the-bac.edu

27

There are no words to describe how important the BAC has been to our lives, not only because it brought us together, but because the BAC has given us our amazing design education, our professional network, and our design community. We’ve continued to be and always will be very involved in the BAC, as teachers, mentors, alumni, employers, in governance, and even as designers. We live in Arlington, MA, and Block Island, RI, and a few years ago we joined forces professionally, as partners in Silverman Trykowski Associates in Boston.”

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From both of them, “We first met in 1987, when we were in ‘Recycling Buildings’ together. Felice often jokes that she ‘stalked’ David until he noticed her, showing up diligently to class every week hoping he would be there! He finally did, and we’ve been together ever since. Our wedding was one week before Felice graduated from the Interior Design program, and David graduated Architecture 2 years later. We like to think that we represent the marriage of architecture and interior design!


Thank Y With your help, things have been looking up at the BAC! See for yourself:

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FALL 2016

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THE BAC IMPACT REPORT

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T HE BREAK DOWN WAS

FUND

$ 500K $ 400K

28% N OT E D

A

T HE

FY 15

FY 16

$

COLL EG E

$

BAC

$

R AI S ED

$785,488 TOTAL

I N

FY1 6

I N C R E A S E I N FY 1 6 OV E R FY 1 5

I T LOOK S LI K E THI S

Our students are grateful for your support. They couldn’t achieve their


Discover our accomplishments In this Impact Report you can learn about:

FUND

Page 30

SPRING INTO

DESIGN

2016

Page 32

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BOSTON

Page 36

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ou!

BAC

MARATHON

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$504,418 $504,418

$26,502 $26,502

U NRE U SNTRREI SCTTREI DC T E D

EN DO E N WDMOE W N T M E N T

$161,215 $161,215

$93,353 $93,353

R E S TRREI SCTTREI DC T E D

I N - K II N N -DK I N D

The BAC's fiscal year was from July 1– July 30.

dreams without you. Discover why they are thankful for your help. »


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PRACTICE MAGAZINE

THE BAC IMPACT REPORT

Above: Master of Landscape Architecture graduate, Luis Perez, poses with wife, Sarah, and daughter, Aurelia, at the Scholarships and Awards Ceremony. Right: Master of Architecture graduates Christine Capuano and Valedictorian, Rita Doummar, embrace.

“Every semester I give it my all, and supporters like you are even more of a reason


BAC Fund It’s no secret that making it through any college, especially The Boston Architectural College, is tough enough without having to worry about affording college tuition. The BAC Fund, the College’s annual fund, is there to help our students succeed.

E X H IEBXIEH TXI H O B INB T SI T O INOSN S HE EIX H T IL BID IBNTINT INS OI O NN S S H EE LXDH IEHBN LX EIDH IO LHR D E N LC DO M cHCEO M cH M M CLEcIO ID CR KIMN C IKC K RII N M CM O M c LR C cALM C O IR RYKRM IY CI C KK G AMLc LG EA R Y G LEO LRCEM G A LGLG AEA LRLLYEL R EY RY

P H Y SPI HCPYAHSLYI C SBIAO CLO AB K L O S BOT OK O OS K T S OT O P ITH Y CL YALC I CC AB LL OILLEO BLCO B K S OI+T O K TIK S O T+ O TP HH E YP TCSH HO E HS EISLECO LO TA N ETO C N OST N +O O EL ED O CLLE TELSC IC EA H ED CA O LC TCN ICO NS N E X PTAEHN XET ED PT XC E AH P NA D NLC E C D E D A SOCC T ET SI+ESO T S+O+ TO E X PEAX EN PBE A N EC EA SCSSKC T E SO S ST O TO PD NOD D EAE CKO E SS EX -A EO-D B KD -O SD BCA OO E - B EO-EO B KO SO O B- O KK S S

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55 555 5

1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500 1,500

N E W N CEN N WECW CRNO CCN UC T RE ORRUOTUE TR E R N( O EA C N CD RD O T IE W N EE N C RON ONC RN EUERN U TSR EI RS ( A NS EE (A C SCW N SW C DEC OCO N EU OIT SO SO C O NG D O E (OA C OESIIM N ENIC D O E SE07E1!I )7SI !S) C (OAM (SC IA N C GM GN2O 0 IN N 1ND I7N 2! O )0NI21N CC O MGM I NII N G COM I NO N GI2 N0 IN 1 27 02! 1)0 71 !7)! )

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Here are some examples:

L I B R LAI RB L YIRBAARRDAYD RE A YD DADDEDDE D L I B LR ILABI RR B YA RA RDYD A D ED RA Y AE DD DD ED

FALL 2016

I N G IRNAI N GT RGSARN+ATNS T + S + IN IR A GSLN G R A RL SA NSSN TH + SS TI H S+S SCH O SC LIGSN A H CN RO H O HAT I RP R P I+ P S C SW C L HEAA H O LD ST A L A R IS REPH SD SH IOPTI SPOS ASWC AHSA RO DA W DRRO A RH EO DD T A W A W A R W D A E A R D D R D E T D E O D T O T O D E S EDREV DSIEENSRGEVRI V N IGN G SSDETD ES R VT ESU ISR ENDV R ITNISN G S TD UE D N USET D NGEV TG S S T US D T S ET UN U D TD E SN EN TS TS

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$$$$$$ What did the $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 BAC Fund support in FY16?

By funding resources for curriculum development, student academic services, technology, investments in our faculty, and more, the BAC Fund immediately enhances our students’ design education. From scholarships to capital improvements, students experience the benefits from gifts to the BAC Fund every single day in their quest to improve the world as designers.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

The cost of a college education is more expensive than ever before, and it can be prohibitive to those who are economically disadvantaged. In order to keep tuition from drastically rising, the College must seek revenue from other sources. The BAC Fund is one of those vital resources. The BAC Fund provides critical support for essential resources that are not funded by tuition revenue alone, in addition to

fi­ nancial aid for our students. Unrestricted gifts to the BAC Fund help ensure that students’ tuition is not raised each year when the cost of running the College inevitably rises.

EW UTT DUEDNETN T N E W N SEN TWU DS ET SN N N E SIW ET D T SEEET U U DPT D EAEN ECN TE T LW IUSFC L IEFW EN P A L F E P SN A C L I F LE ILFSI EP FA ESCPSEA PA CC E E

11 11 1111 11 11

L E C TL UE LRCEETC SUTR HUEERSLEDH S EHL EDL D L E CC ELO UC EN RC TU ET U U RAPE R H SESEPSLU HDA H LSD ON OLATN M P C A CSM A MU SE SLEAD C O NRAFA N C C A U A M PO PAU U SO S RSU AR A S S P AOR NTPOA O P TM ROP T OU FO RSM FU RPUETA PLRCA R R FU R OESO USRU R L EPCATL EO ETT CFUSTTO R EO UO E R RIFSE EI R E S I E S L E CL TEL UC E RC T ET UU RS E R EE RSI ESE R ES IREI SE S

All of you helped us raise a record-breaking $504,418 for the BAC Fund in FY16—a 28% increase over FY15! That’s no small feat. Imagine the potential impact we could make on the lives of BAC students if we keep the momentum going and raise even more than that this fiscal year. Help our students move on up, and donate to the BAC Fund.

to push myself to do the best I can.” –Mehran Jahedi, Bachelor of Architecture


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“This unprecedented level of support for the College is incredibly important at this time,” said BAC President Glen LeRoy about the sold-out event. “It is heartwarming to see our community come together and celebrate the BAC’s achievements while looking ahead to its bright future.” The College made a concerted effort to ensure that as much donated funds as possible would go directly to deserving students while making the conscious effort to live up to the promise of a sustainable event. The BAC worked with valued community members such as the Boston Parks and Recreation Department, who lent potted flowers to decorate with instead of traditional cut flowers, and also partnered with local restaurants and businesses to provide food and beverages for the evening. The event is truly unlike any other traditional gala, minimizing the waste without sacrificing glam. Reclaimed wood and recycled mateFY15: FY15: rials were used to create the décor throughout the space. “I wanted 5$ 05 00 K0 K to support this$ event because the mission of the BAC mirrors our C A C SA HS H+ +I NI -NK- IKNI D ND mission of sustainability within events,” said Michael Nedeau, owner of PBD Events. “We were very proud to be a part of such a prestiFY16: FY16: $ 2$ 02 00 K0 K gious and collaborative event.”

Here is our final count:

FY15:

$244,290

$500K

CASH

FY 15

$450,621 $450,621

$

$

$

$450,621 $450,621

7373

IN-K IN D

$$

CASH

+

IN-K IN D

73

2121

Thank you to all of the Spring into Design partners, sponsors, guests, and volunteers who participated in this monumental event and who helped make the night so memorable!

1515

M SP

212

21 21

F O F O O D D+ +B EB VE EV RE A RG AG E E P AP R E RE SR S AT RN TN

MM OO NN E TE A TR A YR Y S PS O PO NN SO SO R SR S

21

$450,621

21

ME

15 15

ME

$

$

$

FY 16

73 73

All the food was provided by local, organic, and farm-to-table C A C SA HS H+ +I NI -NK- IKNI D ND F YF 1Y 51 5 F YF 1Y 61 6 restaurants and producers. The tasting tables offered guests the FY15: FY15: opportunity to try a variety of flavors and learn about local businesses. Backyard Farms sampled fresh hot-house grown tomatoes C A SCHA S+ H I N + from - IKNI N - their KDI N farm D in Maine. Island Creek Oysters shucked fresh oysters $ $ straight from their farm in Duxbury. Genji Sushi provided an array FY16: FY16: of rolled-on-site sushi using sustainable-caught fish.“Genji Sushi only uses seafood and fish products from sustainable farms, or hand line F O O F O D O+D B +E VB EE RV AE G R EA G E M OM NO E TNAE RT YA R Y caught suppliers,” the Genji promoter proudly said. P A RP TA NR ET RNSE R S C A SCHA S+ H I N + - IKNI N - KDI N D S P OS N P O SO N RS SO R S

+

FY16:

$200K

$244,290 $244,290

$244,290 $244,290 1 6

Thank you, partners and sponsors!

$

The Boston Architectural College’s second annual fundraising gala, Spring into Design, raised a record-breaking $360,000, all of which supports the BAC Fund.The special fundraising event celebrates the BAC community, sustainability, and the future of design practices.

$

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THE BAC IMPACT REPORT

5252

E V EE NV TE N T P A RP TA NR ET RNSE R S

AUC AT U ICOTNI O N P A RP TA NR ET RNSE R S

“I thank you for your care and recognition of the everyday achievements and

E VE P AP


PRACTICE MAGAZINE » FALL 2016 » 33

tenacity of BAC students.” –Aaron Tetzlaff, Bachelor of Architecture


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The Boston Architectural College gratefully recognizes the generous supporters that helped make the gala possible: Honorary Committee Sam Aquillano Corinne Barthelemy Marianne Bowler and Marc Pfeffer Janice Byrd Scott Harshbarger and Judith Stephenson Eric M. Haydel William Hodgins Glen S. and Susanne F. LeRoy S. Atyia Martin Taniya R. Nayak Michael Phillips Gail Ravgiala Elizabeth Chu Richter Dana C. Rowan Cheri Ruane Daniel and Kara Ryan Wendy Shattuck and Samuel S. Plimpton Gala Co-Chairs Howard F. Elkus Michael G. Morris Gala Committee Stephen M. Bell Lynn T. Cetrulo

Constance S. Kolman Michael Nedeau Marc W. Pelletier Jill M. Rothenberg Felice L. and David J. Silverman Brien W. Tal-Baker Platinum Sponsors Elkus Manfredi Architects Suffolk Construction Turner Construction Company Gold Sponsors Arthur J. Hurley Company Century Bank Commodore Builders

Erland Construction, Inc. John Moriarty & Associates, Inc. Patrick Ahearn Architect LLC Silver Sponsors Arup Bond Brothers, Inc. Boston Properties CBRE/New England Columbia Construction Company Consigli Construction Co., Inc. Finegold Alexander Architects Halvorson Design Partnership, Inc. Holland & Knight LLP

“We were psyched to be involved in this event. The room was filled with amazing restaurants, vendors, farms, and foodies from the area who are all supporters of a wonderful, sustainable cause!” –Emily Weedon of Island Creek Oysters, Food and Beverage Sponsor

JDL Corporate Interiors Longwood Security Services, Inc. NAI Hunneman Newmark Grubb Knight Frank Nixon Peabody LLP Perry and Radford Architects Shawmut Design and Construction Siena Construction Corporation Stephen J. Wessling Architects, Inc. Bronze Sponsors Acentech AHA Consulting Engineers AIS Archimedia Solutions Group, LLC Blue Front Telecom Group Bonneville Design Cambridge Seven Associates Cetrulo LLP DiCicco, Gulman & Company LLP Dimeo Construction Company

“Your graciousness is truly inspiring to me and I feel more motivated than ever to


Del Frisco's Double Eagle Steakhouse Design New England Dirty Water Distillery DJ Ryan Brown Egloo Howard F. and Lorna W. Elkus Estudi Moline Disseny S.L. The Fireplace Restaurant Flour Bakery + Café Freshii Frost This, LLC Genji Sushi Grill 23 & Bar Harpoon Brewery Harvest Huntington Theatre Company

Knoll, Inc. Constance S. Kolman Legal Sea Foods Glen S. and Susanne F. LeRoy Loud Bicycle Martignetti Companies MEM Tea Imports Michael G. Morris Pavement Coffeehouse PBD Events Posey Pose Post 390 Restaurant Recycled Paper Printing, Inc. Regatta Ginger Beer Judy Riola Ritz Associates Roffi Salon & Day Spa sagegreenlife

FALL 2016

“We wanted to support this event because the mission of BAC mirrored our mission of sustainability within events. We also respect the BAC’s ability to expand that throughout the design community. The final design was cohesive with our mission for sustainability and we were very proud to be a part of such a prestigious and collaborative event.”

» »

–Vanessa McLellan and Michael Nedeau of PBDEvents, Event Sponsor 35

In-Kind Sponsors Aesop Air Graphics

Allegheny Contract Flooring Allsteel Artisan Beverage Cooperative Babbo Pizzeria e Enoteca Back To The Roots Backyard Farms Batch Ice Cream Be Our Guest, Inc The Bertram Inn Blue Hills Bank Pavilion Boston Celtics Shamrock Foundation Boston Chops Boston Lyric Opera Boston Parks and Recreation Department Boston Symphony Orchestra

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Donovan Hatem LLP The Druker Company, Ltd. Dyer Brown Architects Ellenzweig Gilbane Building Company HMFH Architects, Inc. Jones Lang LaSalle Karas & Karas Glass Co. LeMessurier Consultants, Inc. Nutter McClennen & Fish LLP Perkins+Will RDK Engineers Charles F. and Patricia S. Redmon Reflex Lighting Ryan Construction, Inc. Shepley Bulfinch Silverman Trykowski Associates Skanska Stanley Elevator Company, Inc. Stantec Strategic Workspaces Symmes Maini & McKee Associates The Architectural Team Thornton Tomasetti Titan Roofing, Inc. ValleyCrest Landscape Development, Inc. Vanderweil Engineers Webster Bank Wells Fargo Advisors Weston Associates William Hodgins Inc. WinnCompanies Xquisite Landscaping Inc

Boston Teawrights Buca Boot Cambridge Repro-Graphics The Capital Grille Chive Events Commodore Builders Contract Sources Coolidge Corner Theatre Foundation CorePower Yoga Creative Office Pavilion

The Innovation and Design Building The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston Interface Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Island Creek Oysters David F. Jaquith and Sara E. Bourque Jubali Kerwin Group

Season to Taste Catering Richard J. and Marilyn Snyder South Boston Yoga Strategic Workspaces Tavern Road Taza Chocolate Tesla Motors TOTO Whole Foods Market

excel in the field of architecture.” –John J. Poillucci III, Bachelor of Architecture


The Marathon Team

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PRACTICE MAGAZINE

THE BAC IMPACT REPORT

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FALL 2016

Building off the success of our first-­ever, one-woman marathon team last year, this year the BAC was fortunate enough to have two runners in the 2016 Boston Marathon. Crandon Gustafson, dean of the School of Interior Architecture, and Juan De Loera, a Master of Architecture student, ran the 26.2 miles in support of the College, raising an impressive amount of over $11,000 for the BAC Fund from 200 gifts made by alumni, students, staff, faculty, trustees, and friends. After four months of training and fundraising, both Crandon and Juan reminisced on what it was like to cross the finish line:

Juan De Loera, Master of Architecture student

“The two best moments came just before the turn on Commonwealth and in front of the school on Hereford, when I passed and high-fived BAC students,” remembered Crandon. “I wasn't sure anybody would still be around. So I was smiling all the way to the finish line from there.”

Crandon Gustafson, dean of the school of Interior Architecture

efforts put in these last couple of months. It was an overwhelming moment filled with many emotions,” reflected Juan.“The energy throughout marathon weekend is amazing. It was an honor to run for the BAC.” The dedication of Crandon and Juan has been an inspiration to the entire BAC community. Both runners enthusiastically joined the team to help make a difference for the College. This year’s team members generated an astounding level of participation from their peers; 49 staff members and 21 students generously contributed more than one-third of the total amount raised by the team. Crandon’s and Juan’s determination highlighted the importance of philanthropy at the BAC and led to a significant increase in both staff and student giving participation this fiscal year.Above all, the team fostered a real community effort, bringing together all types of people in the BAC community to support a great cause.

“The experience is like no other. Crossing the finish line was a culmination of the

“You are helping a student with the spirit to fight for his dream to become an


202

D O NAT I O NS

$

$

$11,758

R AI S ED

I N

TOTAL

49

STAF F DON ORS

$

The Outcome:

$

$

144

DON ORS

21

STU DEN TS DON ORS

Below is a list of this year’s marathon supporters, whom we would like to recognize for their generosity:

37

architect one day.” –Jaime Bustos De Haro, Bachelor of Architecture

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Priestley + Associates Architecture Diana Ramirez-Jasso and Luis A. Montalvo Sylvia Y. Rodriguez and Jose Rodriguez Jr. Carol A. Roen Catalina L. Rojo Ianetta and Gerald M. Ianetta Kathleen C. and John H. Rood Sheri Rosenzweig Dana C. and Janice K. Rowan James P. and Brianne Ryan Thorleif Sandstad Gregory Scott Andrew Shenton Shepley Bulfinch Felice L. and David J. Silverman Richard G. Skinner and Patricia M. Houlihan Richard J. and Marilyn Snyder Marie Spicuzza Erika Stigliano Sarah W. Strang David M. and Elizabeth Stuhlsatz Toshika Suzuki Taniya Nayak Design LLC Titan Roofing, Inc. Lucca Townsend Gare Unnewehr Peter D. and Florence R.Vanderwarker Patricia M.Vaughn Tyler Vizard Janice T. Wilkos-Greenberg and Scott B. Greenberg Eleanor A.Yee Sabina Yesmin

FALL 2016

Glen S. and Susanne F. LeRoy Kristen Liberman George M. Livingstone Jr. and Hee W. Livingstone Beth Lundell Garver Sarah E. Lyman John Manory Maple Hill Architects Bianca N. Marchany Maria Martinez Romo Colby B. Mauke Steven F. and Donna M. McDonald Chuck McGuire Carolyn B. Meek Stephen A. and Lauren A. Messinger Madison Mitchell Ana Morales David M. Morgan Jeffrey Morris Michael G. Morris Joseph I. Mulligan III Karen L. Nelson Jennifer E. Newland Carl V. and Truth A. Nickerson Lisa J. and Christopher O'Connor Tim Ogawa Christina B. and David Oliver Brian E. Ortiz Patrick J. Ouma John Pasinski Marc W. Pelletier and M. Penelope Carlhian Finley H. Perry Jr. Jay Philomena Allison Postlethwait Heidi Pribell

»

Veronica De Loera Harry L. Dodson Bethany J. Fantasia Patricia Farino Michael W. and Michelle Fiorillo Francis K. Flynn Jennifer R. Frost and Robert W. Gilson Luis Galindo Ruiz Evan H. Gallivan Yiru Gan Barbara Gaviani Jillian Gaviani GE Foundation Steven Gibree Francesco and Carmela M. Gioioso Eleni E. Glekas Joseph C. and Linda Gloski Michael P. Gorman Grainger Matching Charitable Gifts Program Crandon C. and Sakae Gustafson Victoria Hallinan Jane M. Hassan Colleen E. Higgins Donald and Agnes Hunsicker Ivan & Son Trucking Ethel N. Kawesa Kristen Kearney Diane M. Kitchell Kris H. Kobialka L/R Construction Soramy Le Stephen Lea Amanda C. Lee Rand Lemley

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Aidan and Maura Ackerman Charles J. Agro Rony A. Aguilar Alan Ford Architects PC Joseph J. and Maria C. Albanese Carline Arcene Janna N. Atcheson BAC Students Stephen M. and Jill M. Bell Maria Bellalta Craig Bender Lauren M. Berk Tina Binazir Corky Binggeli Paul F. Blanchard Lisa C. Bonneville and George Davis Paul A. Brouillette and Neil Miller Shannon L. Buckley Sophia Bui Arthur C. and Patti L. Byers Jonathan Cave Tearar Chan Andrea Chavira Jennifer Cheng Lindsey Cimochowski and Bradley Rufleth Daniela Coray Troy Cox Holly B. and John C. Cratsley Richard J. and Pauline Crispi Nora Crocker Chad J. and Linda J. DaGraca J. Michael Daniels Ivan H. De Loera Juan F. De Loera


Thank You for Making an Impact!

48

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FALL 2016

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PRACTICE MAGAZINE

THE BAC IMPACT REPORT

We could not have done it without you! With your help, we raised a record-breaking $785,488 for The Boston Architectural College.Whether you made your first gift of $10 or give $10,000 annually, every gift builds upon the next to realize the impact on our students’ design education. Every effort has been made to maintain complete accuracy in this publication. If any error is noted, please contact Evan Gallivan, vice president of Institutional Advancement, at 617.585.0281 or at evan.gallivan@ the-bac.edu. The contributions acknowledged in the donor listing include: • Annual gifts received between July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2016. • Multi-year pledges, noted in the donor listing, received between July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2016. • Grants received between July 1, 2015 – June 30, 2016

Share why you are thankful for donor support at giving@the-bac.edu.


S AV E T H E DAT E

SPRING INTO

DESIGN

GALA

A P R I L 6 , 2 017


320 Newbury Street Boston MA 02115

Practice Magazine Fall 2016  

A Boston Architectural College Publication

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