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P RACTICE M A G A Z I N E

A BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE P U B L I C AT I O N »

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T H E B AC C O M M U N I T Y C E L E B R AT E S J U L I A H A L E VY ’ S LASTING IMPACT » 12

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS THE BAC? » 08

CONTRIBUTORS REPORT » 28

INTRODUCING GLEN S. LeROY TO BOSTON » 16


Practice Magazine » Fall 2015

Editor Allison Postlethwait

Associate Editor Molly Chase

Graphic Designer Erika Stigliano

Copy Editor Alyssa King

Contributing Writer Shannon Buckley

Photography Bonica Ayala Molly Chase Roger Farrington Tom Klein Liz Linder Allison Postlethwait Sam Rosenholtz

Vice President of Institutional Advancement Evan Gallivan, MBA, CFRE

Director of Development Lindsey Cimochowski

Practice is published for the Boston Architectural College community. © 2015. Like this magazine and want to hear more from us? Update your information by visiting us on the web at the-bac.edu/alumni or emailing us at alumni@the-bac.edu

LETTER FROM THE EDITORS Dear BAC Community, We are excited to bring to you the next generation of Practice. It is an exciting time here as the BAC launches into its next chapter. Whether you are an alumnus, student, staff or faculty member, firm, donor, or friend, we hope you will use Practice as a resource to stay connected with the College. This re-envisioned publication strives to highlight and celebrate the distinct energy of the BAC community. As you all know, the College is an urban center with many moving pieces—an active student body; an engaged and devoted faculty, staff, and governing body; a successful alumni base; compelling lectures and exhibitions; modern events; interactive coursework; and more. Our goal is to bring everything together here between the two covers of this magazine. The voices of our community are what make the BAC a special place to study design. We invite you to participate in future issues by contacting us with news at communications@the-bac.edu.

Sincerely,

Allison Postlethwait and Molly Chase Communications and Media Producers


CONTENTS 02

Around the College

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Five-Minute Exper t: Chair Challenge 101

23 Commencement

08

Where in the World is the BAC?

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Celebrating the BAC’s First-Ever Homecoming

10

Fast Facts about the BAC

26

Dana C. Rowan Takes on Leadership of the Board

11

Student Life Snapshots

28

Contributors Repor t

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From Provost to Acting President: The BAC Community Celebrates Julia Halevy’s Lasting Impact

16

Introducing Glen S. LeRoy to Boston

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The Grad Show 2015

2015 Grad Winners

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AROUND THE COLLEGE BAC STUDENTS O ­ PTIMIZE DESIGN OF BAY COVE HUMAN SERVICES May 2015 Students in the BAC’s Master of Design Studies in Design for Human Health (DHH) program worked closely during the Spring 2015 semester with Bay Cove Human Services, Inc. in Boston, MA to create a healthy small group home for cognitively challenged older adults who have developed Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Nadia Sophia, Adrienne Jones, and Janet Roche, students in the DHH program, tackled the unique d ­ esign challenges as they redesigned the group home for these

aging residents, who are also experiencing high levels of fear and anxiety due to their restricted awareness of the subtle changes that accompany the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease. The students, led by Dak Kopec, BAC’s director of Design for Human Health, used first-hand experience and careful consideration to determine the most effective design solutions for the residents. They personally met with all of the Bay Cove Human Services occupants to discuss what they would like to see in their rooms and what design changes would make them happier and more comfortable.

“Working, as opposed to just theorizing, on a real project in our first year of the Master of Design Studies in Design for Human Health has been an incredible experience. Communicating and interacting directly with clients in a real-life setting is something I will never forget,” said Janet Roche, DHH student. “The final designs that we are creating combine the feedback we gathered from the patients with our own design ideas from our observations onsite to ultimately create a healthier environment for everyone, from patients to staff to neighbors.” The students are also addressing needs that go beyond the residents as they consider how the design improvements could


AROUND THE COLLEGE

TOP POST ON FACEBOOK

benefit housemates, staff, and neighbors in close proximity to this urban home. While ensuring the patients have a safe and enjoyable home is one of the project’s main goals, using design to improve the lives of staff and neighbors is also a priority. For example, the DHH students are working to contain sound levels within the house.

“Great to see the BAC’s Green Alley included in @RupaShenoy’s @wgbh segment on #water”

BAC PARTNERS WITH ­BOSTON ARTS ACADEMY TO ADVANCE SHARED MISSIONS April 2015 The BAC welcomed students from Boston Arts Academy (BAA), a collaborative project between the Boston Public Schools and the ProArts Consortium, to campus to explore the College’s exhibition Obento and Built Space: Japanese Boxed Lunch and Architecture. The students enjoyed a guided tour, examining the vibrant bento boxes, asking insightful questions, and gaining a new understanding of Japanese culture and how certain aspects of it relate to architecture. This exhibition visit, which exposed the students to Japanese traditions while drawing unexpected connections between bento boxes and design, is just one example of the BAC and BAA collaborating to enrich students’ learning. The two schools share a mission of educating students to respond to today’s challenges. The BAC works with

For more than 15 years, the BAC has partnered with BAA to uphold their shared missions of fostering artistic and academic innovation and preparing a diverse community for success in the classroom and in their careers.

BAC STUDENTS PARTICIPATE IN ASLA’S ADVOCACY DAY April 2015 Marcus Cantu and Anahita Kianous, recent graduates of the BAC’s School of Landscape Architecture, joined forces with advocates from across the country in Washington, DC, on April 22, 2015, to raise awareness of policy issues impor tant to the landscape architecture profession. Each year, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) hosts Advocacy Day, an annual lobbying event on Capitol Hill. While in Washington, DC, landscape architects participate in congressional visits, striving to raise the visibility of the profession with legislators and key staff, while educating them on the many ways that landscape architects provide solutions to a myriad of problems the country faces.

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JU LY 1 3 , 2 0 1 5

July 2015.

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TOP TWEET ON TWITTER

Boston Globe in a piece by Sasha Pfeiffer in

FALL 2015

The DHH students presented their recommendations, suggestions, and “wish list,” to the Bay Cove Human Services administration in June. They provided new floor plans and schedules and pricing for each recommendation. The students are eager to learn what the facility ultimately decides to use, given their budgetary constraints, and are e­xcited to

The Bay Cove Project was featured in The

BAA to ensure high school students reach academic success and graduate feeling ­prepared for their next endeavor.

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“One occupant is a Red Sox fan, so our idea is to make customized acoustic panels that resemble the ‘Green Monster’ of Fenway Park,” Janet explained. “These panels would bring him great joy, thus elevating his overall health, and the fact that they are acoustical panels help limit the noise he can hear from other patients, and they can hear from him. This simple design change would provide all occupants with the right to peacefulness.”

collaborate with Bay Cove on other projects that are coming down the pipeline.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

The design of group homes plays a major role in residents’ well-being and overall living experience. The BAC students examined the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of this Bay Cove home and will make changes ranging from lighting to colors to acoustics, ultimately providing a ­psychological sense of comfort.

“We are tremendously pleased to JUN E 29, 2015 share the news that after a national search, Glen S. LeRoy, FAIA, FAICP, has been selected to lead the Boston Architectural College as our next president. . . . Mr. LeRoy stood out from a field of talented individuals for his commitment to practice-based learning, his great success at leading an urban design college during challenging times, and his creativity and ability to attract investment.”


AROUND THE COLLEGE

The group attended training sessions, then went to the Senate and House offices to participate in scheduled meetings, where Marcus and Anahita played active roles in making the pitches and joining the discussion.

CEU WEEKEND A ­ DDRESSES CRITICAL CHANGES IN ARCHITECTURE June 2015 The BAC welcomed 40 licensed architects to campus for two days of learning and lively exchange at the College’s annual CEU Weekend. Participants could earn 12 coveted health, safety, and welfare (HSW) learning units through six 2-hour workshops. The workshops encompassed a range of topics, provoking discussion between practitioners and presenters and challenging participants to address the critical changes affecting the practice of architecture.

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The trip was a networking and learning opportunity for Marcus and Anahita, as well as a chance to represent the BAC and the landscape architecture profession in a national setting. They were accompanied by ASLA Vice President of Government Affairs and BAC instructor Thomas Doolittle, as well as representatives from the Boston Society of Landscape Architects.

Some of these trending topics included: how the changes in Massachusetts code and the “stretch” code for communities throughout Boston are impacting design, changes in workflow on projects due to innovative use of digital technology, the influx of small ­micro-units for housing in cities along with the “tiny house” movement, adaptive reuse of historic mill properties into affordable housing, and more. The BAC’s Practice Department will continue to sponsor this decade-long tradition as well as develop a series of special CEU creditbearing workshops throughout the year.

THE BAC JOINS MOVEMENT TO ENHANCE MYLES STANDISH STATE FOREST March 2015 The BAC joined forces with the Southeastern Massachusetts Pine Barrens Alliance (SEMPBA) and the Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR) to make the riches of the Massachusetts Myles Standish State Forest, located in Plymouth and Carver, more accessible to the public. Through the BAC’s Gateway program, the BAC is helping to design a Pine Barrens Discovery Center that, when complete, will be the lens through which visitors observe and enjoy the region’s rare ecosystem, the Atlantic coastal pine barrens. The BAC became involved in the vision to illuminate Myles Standish State Forest in the spring of 2015 after connecting with Loni Plocinski, geographic information system specialist at the DCR. Loni had been looking to collaborate with a local college program, and the BAC’s Gateway initiative fit the bill. Together, the BAC, SEMPBA, and the DCR all share the same goals: to create a space that will showcase the unique aspects of the forest, including its history and ecosystem, and that will host meetings, classes, research, and other community gatherings. The partnership is expected to be longlasting, and the future is expected to hold continued BAC support to the Pine Barrens Discovery Center throughout its development and afterwards.

TOP TWEET ON TWITTER S E PT E MB E R 1, 2015

BAC STUDIO COLLABORATES WITH CAMBRIDGE ARTS COUNCIL TO MAKE ARTS MORE VISIBLE & ACCESSIBLE March 2015 BAC advanced master of architecture ­students stepped outside of the classroom and into the community to make the arts more visible, relevant, and accessible. Under the instruction of David T. De Celis, a principal at DCM Design, students in Architecture Studio 4 developed proposals for a charter school and community center for visual and performing arts in Central Square in Cambridge, MA, during the Spring 2015 semester. BAC students met with local visual and performing art leaders at the Cambridge Arts Council for a design charrette to brainstorm a wish list for an ideal urban center for the arts. Participants broke into discussion groups led by BAC students to examine what spatial elements work well in public art spaces, what image an arts school needs to project, how to build a space that brings joy to the arts experience, and how to make arts more visible in Cambridge. Students incorporated ideas from the charrette into a design proposal for Central Square, exploring the flexibility of spaces, specifically how different disciplines, such as art, dance, design, and music, can be infused within the building. Members of the community gathered to participate in a round robin review of the proposals at the end of the semester.

“Proud to announce the BAC has been chosen by @NCARB to participate in its Integrated Path Initiative #architecture”


AROUND THE COLLEGE

TOP POST ON INSTAGRAM

BAC ACCEPTED INTO NCARB’S INTEGRATED PATH TO ARCHITECTURAL LICENSURE INITIATIVE September 2015

“It’s a beautiful night after today’s storms! #Boston”

WITH WATER COMPETITION January 2015

INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE PROGRAMS EARN CIDA RE­-ACCREDITATION

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Contributed by BAC Practice Department and School of Architecture.

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NCARB’s Licensure Task Force commended the BAC for its substantial effort in creatively incorporating experience and examination into the existing NAAB-accredited Master of Architecture curriculum, synthesizing pregraduation academic coursework, internship requirements, and access to all divisions of the Architect Registration Examinations® (ARE®). This recognition enables the BAC to introduce a series of progressive educational changes that stand to benefit all BAC architecture students by eventually reshaping the College’s architecture curriculum.

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Earning CIDA accreditation attests to the quality of the BAC’s Interior Architecture program, and parents, students, and employers can be assured that the program meets the rigor of peer review and develops the skills and knowledge required to practice interior design. The accreditation process provides the program with valuable input for continued development and assists the program in adapting to meet evolving professional requirements as CIDA u­ pdates standards.

The BAC School of Landscape Architecture’s submission, entitled “Open Circuit: Traveling Water,” was named a People’s Choice Award in the Site 2: Neighborhood, 100 Acres category. The design proposal reconnects the city to the water that surrounds it, allowing water to flow through the Fort Point Channel’s urban district while responding to changes in sea level rise over the next century. The design’s strategy reframes the dichotomy of life in the city and its separateness to water by reconnecting the sounds and smells of the ocean, the tide, and the plants which thrive along the shoreline to become present throughout this new landscape. In the design, water becomes a unified element of urban life.

FALL 2015

The BAC is pleased to announce its Bachelor and Master of Interior Architecture degrees meet Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) Professional Standards and have been awarded accreditation for a term of six years, effective August 2015. Achieving accreditation is a strong signal of a program’s commitment to delivering a quality professional-level education that prepares students for entry-level interior design practice.

As the only school in New England to earn recognition in NCARB’s Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure, the BAC aims to reconfigure the graduate architecture degree program, accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), to be able to offer students the opportunity to qualify for architectural licensure at the time of graduation. The College’s accepted proposal demonstrates the strong alliance that exists between practice and academics. It was crafted by a team of two deans, Len Charney, dean of Practice, and Karen Nelson, dean of the School of Architecture— along with key staff—Beth Lundell Garver, director of foundation instruction in practice, and Kyle Sturgeon, director of advanced architecture studios and building technology.

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August 2015

The BAC’s School of Landscape Architecture was recognized as a People’s Choice Award winner in the Boston Living with Water competition. Boston Living with Water is an international call for design solutions envisioning a more resilient, more sustainable, and more beautiful Boston adapted for endof-the-century climate conditions and rising sea levels. The competition seeks leading planners, designers, and thinkers to help the City of Boston and local businesses and residents develop and apply new concepts and strategies, including designing with water principles, to increase the city’s sustainability and climate change resiliency.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

BAC TRIUMPHS IN LIVING

The BAC was accepted by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) for participation in the inaugural launch of the Integrated Path to Architectural Licensure Initiative, validating the College’s longstanding tradition of integrating in-class and experiential learning in architectural ­education.


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AROUND THE COLLEGE

POPULAR BAC HASHTAGS

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PRACTICE MAGAZINE

#BACIntensive #BACCityLab #BACOrientation15

SCHOOL OF DESIGN STUDIES ANNOUNCES NEW DIRECTORS September 2015 The School of Design studies is pleased to announce the start of two new directors in fall 2015. Eleni Glekas has been appointed director of Historic Preservation, and ­Michael Fiorillo has been appointed director of Sustainable Design. Eleni is a preservationist and urban planner with experience both in the US and abroad. Eleni previously worked as an adjunct faculty member at the BAC since 2012. Prior to joining the BAC, Eleni worked as an urban planner at a boutique real estate development company in Charleston, SC, where her projects were located in the city’s historic city center. Michael has been a faculty member at the BAC for over 10 years. He has taught in most of the subject areas at the College, overseeing the development of students from their first year through graduation. In addition to his work at the BAC, he founded and managed the architecture and landscape architecture firm Fiorillo Architects in Cambridge, MA. The firm focuses on design that connects people to larger systems. In their new roles, Eleni and Michael will oversee the graduate and undergraduate programs in Historic Preservation and ­Sustainable Design. P

LOOKING FOR A GOOD READ? Here is the list of the top 20 checked-out architecture and design publications from the BAC library:

1.

Shaping Structures: Statics (1998) Waclaw Zalewski and Edward Allen

2.

Croquis Magazine

3.

Key Houses of the Twentieth Century: Plans, Sections and Elevations (2006) Colin Davies

4.

Structures (2008) Daniel L. Schodek

5.

Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods (2009) Edward Allen and Joseph Iano

6.

Design Drawing (1997) Frank Ching

7.

Visions of the Real : Modern Houses in the 20th Century (2000) a+u

8.

Physics for Architects (2009) Yehuda Salu

9.

Heating, Cooling, Lighting: Sustainable Design Methods for Architects (2009) Norbert Lechner

10. GA House Magazine 11. Architecture, from Prehistory to Postmodernity (2002) Marvin Trachtenberg 12. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods (2004) Edward Allen and Joseph Iano 13. Image of the City (1960) Kevin Lynch 14. Architectural Acoustics (1988) David Egan 15. Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice (2001) Joseph A. Demkin 16. Architecture, Form, Space & Oder (1996) Frank Ching 17. Form and Forces: Designing Efficient, Expressive ­Structures (2010) Boston Structures Group / Edward Allen 18. Mies van der Rohe: Barcelona Pavilion (1993) Ignasi de Solà-Morales, Cristian Cirici, Fernando Ramos 19. Le Corbusier Archive (1982) Fondation Le Corbusier 20. Architecture and Interior Design through the 18th Century: an Integrated History (2002) Buie Harwood Designers (ASID).


evaluate a total of nine different chairs. The manufacturers we tested were Haworth, Steelcase, Herman Miller, and KI, all of which were instrumental in helping us find the best chair for our unique needs. Location plays a role when taking new furniture for a test drive. For this project, we tested the chairs in one of our 951 Boylston Street studios for one week and then moved them to our 320 Newbury Street building for the second week of testing. Some chairs were tested for a greater length of time.

CHAIR CHALLENGE 101 B Y D E N I S E RU S H The quest for upgraded chairs around the BAC campus started in the fall of 2014, and as director of Undergraduate Interior Architecture, I lead the journey.

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The process didn’t end there. The next step was material, color, and finish selections. I ended up choosing a black upholstered seat to hide dark soiling and nine different supportive chair back colors in gray, black, red, royal blue, apple green, orange, bright purple, and sable. Not only are the new chairs comfortable and adjustable, they add a bright pop of color in the studios. After all of the research, testing, and decision-making, the new chairs arrived on our campus over the summer, just in time for the fall ­semester. P

ABOUT DENISE RUSH Denise Rush is the director of the Undergraduate Interior Architecture Program at the BAC. Denise is a registered/ licensed interior designer and a National Council for Interior Design Qualification certificate holder. Her project work encompasses several practice areas: commercial office, education, healthcare, and residential from small to large scale and local to international. In July 2015, Denise was appointed to the Board of Directors of the American Society of Interior Designers.

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After I made the initial selections and received the demos, I collaborated with the thesis and degree project students to test and fully

After in-depth testing by a wide variety of students, I prepared a summary report complete with pricing, and we gained the necessary approvals of the chairs that gave us the greatest value and comfort. It was an exciting moment!

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Drawing on my deep FF&E (Furniture, Fixtures, & Equipment) knowledge, I knew the first step was to immediately reach out to furniture manufacturers for demo chairs, which are loaned out for a customer to sit in for a thorough end-user evaluation. To receive these demos, I visited the furniture showrooms to make the appropriate selections.

From the criticisms to the praises, this type of brutal honesty is what will ensure we pick chairs that will best serve the audiences who will use them the most.

FALL 2015

Since all chairs are not created equal, finding the perfect ones was a challenge. With the right strategy, however, researching and choosing the right chairs for our organization was a lot of fun and a rewarding experience.

“Arms don’t fit under table” “Just feels cheap, not comfortable” “Rolls with ease” “Nothing good to report” “This is my favorite” “Can we keep this?”

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The goal was to find suitable chairs to replace the worn and broken chairs in our dedicated studios for architecture, landscape architecture, and interior architecture in both the College’s 951 Boylston Street and 320 Newbury Street buildings. The main requirements were that the chairs must have arms and must be height adjustable, comfortable, and, of course, budget sensitive.

Here are a few of the anonymous student comments:

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

FIVE-MINUTE EXPERT:

The selection of an individual office chair can be very personal. In selecting a chair that will serve a wide variety of users, it is always important to collect a variety of responses, thoughts, and feedback on the demo chairs.


CANADA Dak Kopec, director of Design for Human Health at the BAC, was selected as a panelist at the 2015 BUILDEX Conference in Vancouver, Canada, in February 2015. Dak participated in the featured Interior Design Keynote Panel Presentation, focusing on designing for health and wellness.

CUBA

MEXICO Since 2006, BAC students have been traveling to Mexico to explore the country’s art, culture, and architecture. The College has established strong connections with students and faculty from institutions like TEC de Monterrey, with whom the BAC has had formal exchange agreements. In the spring of 2015, students from Mexico and from the BAC participated in an educational exchange as part of their end of studies degree project. The trip focused on liberal studies and studio learning. Students explored the cities of Guadalajara and Mexico City, experiencing the work of Mexican icons including architect Luis Barragan, painter Jose Clemente Orozco, and writer Juan Rulfo.

Image courtesy of Valeriana Solaris via Creative Commons

During Summer 2015, alumni and friends of the BAC traveled to Cuba to explore Cuban architecture. BAC travelers learned about the unique styles and design of the country’s architectural history as well as the restoration trades.

COLOMBIA Students and faculty from the School of Landscape Architecture traveled to Medellín, Colombia, for 10 days in August 2015 to participate in a studio on social urbanism in collaboration with the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana. A studio will follow the travel intensive on campus during the Fall 2015 semester. Experience their trip through #BACmedellin on Instagram and Twitter.


The Boston Architectural College has students representing over 40 different countries from around the world. The BAC spans its impact across the globe. Initiatives range from school trips to design conferences.

MALTA In June 2015, a group of interdisciplinary BAC students and faculty traveled to Malta to take part in a two-week intensive comprised of innovative coursework, studios, and research. Experience their trip through #BACmalta on Instagram and Twitter.

PAKISTAN The School of Design Studies welcomed the first cohort of exchange students and faculty from the National College of Arts in Rawalpindi, ­Pakistan, in Fall 2014. The two Pakistani students and faculty member, Ali Ahmed Shah, arrived on campus, signifying the first stage of a three-year partnership made possible by a grant from the Public Affairs Section, US Embassy, Islamabad, Pakistan. In Fall 2015, the BAC welcomed the second cohort of three students and one faculty member to campus.

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS THE BAC?


MINORITY POPULATION WHITE POPULATION

FEMALE POPULATION MALE POPULATION

OF 2013–2014 BAC GRADUATES WERE ALREADY EMPLOYED IN THE DESIGN FIELD AT THE TIME OF COMMENCEMENT:

DEGREES OFFERED:

OF MASTER’S RECIPIENTS

OF UNDERGRADUATES

MASTER + BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE

BACHELOR OF DESIGN STUDIES SPECIALIZATIONS:

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE MASTER + BACHELOR OF INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE MASTER + BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE MASTER + BACHELOR OF DESIGN STUDIES

THE BAC CURRENTLY HAS

ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

ACTIVE ALUMNI

HISTORIC PRESERVATION DIGITAL DESIGN + VISUALIZATION

AN ALUMNUS = 4 CONSECUTIVE SEMESTERS AT THE BAC

DESIGN HISTORY, THEORY + CRITICISM

MASTER OF DESIGN STUDIES SPECIALIZATIONS

LAST YEAR, THE BAC LAUNCHED NEW PROGRAMS:

FAST FACTS

MASTER OF DESIGN STUDIES, DESIGN FOR HUMAN HEALTH MASTER OF SCIENCE IN INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

ABOUT THE BAC

The BAC is constantly evolving and adapting to current trends. How well do you know the BAC as it is today?


CITYLAB NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION

HOMECOMING 2014

SPRING INTO DESIGN 2015

STUDENT LIFE SNAPSHOTS PARTI 2015

IIDA FASHION SHOW

WE’RE SOCIAL:

BAC student life

@BACstudentlife

blog.the-bac.edu


FROM PROVOST TO ACTING PRESIDENT:

THE BAC COMMUNITY CELEBRATES JULIA HALEVY’S LASTING IMPACT BY M OLLY CHA SE

Julia admits, however, that as she accepted and began the position as provost, she was unsure of how long her tenure would be. She knew she would encounter all of the expected chaos that comes with starting a new job, but in a leadership position with responsibilities encompassing curriculum, faculty, budgeting, institutional planning, and more, it was going to be a particularly full plate.Yet, all it took was just a little bit of time before the BAC culture worked its magic and proved to Julia that this was a place worth committing to for the long haul.

“I was struck by the energy, commitment, and common sense of joy here, which exude from the people.” professional, and social networks that will serve them in their academic endeavors and design careers. It allows students to learn basic design skills in a collaborative learning environment and to expand their

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School of Architecture. “By elevating this aspect of our mission, Julia clarified the direction that the College needed to take, and this will be her lasting legacy.”

A crucial addition to the curriculum was the Foundation Year, which all students in the onsite degree programs in architecture, landscape architecture, interior architecture, and design studies share. The 27-credit program enables students to begin developing intellectual,

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Julia has been an asset to the College and a beloved friend and mentor to her colleagues.

“The new curriculum is a clear manifestation of the College’s goals and values,” explained Julia. “It prepares students to engage creatively with their work and to understand their own affinities and talents.The BAC’s students are best prepared for professional success when they are engaged in learning processes that teach them to become flexible, critically thinking, collaborative, and life-long learners who expect and embrace ongoing change while holding to their central values and relying on their finest strengths.”

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“Julia recognized that design for social justice is at the core of the BAC’s mission and education,” said Karen Nelson, dean and faculty,

It was this focus on the students’ needs that led to the planning and implementation of a new curriculum, which Julia spearheaded after joining the College as provost in 2009 and stands as one of her greatest accomplishments during her tenure. Creative and flexible, the new curriculum, launched in the fall of 2013, ensures that students are exceptionally prepared for their careers. It is reviewed on an ongoing basis to keep up with the rapid changes within architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture, and design studies so that graduates can meet the new challenges they face as professionals.

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Six years ago, after serving as Lesley University’s dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences for five years and serving Antioch University at its graduate campus in Keene, New Hampshire, for 21 years, The Boston Architectural College’s mission caught Julia’s eye. Its commitment to social justice and equality through providing accessible design education drew Julia into our doors, and those who had the opportunity to be at the BAC during her time are thankful it did.

“Within six months, I was hooked. I was struck by the energy, commitment, and common sense of joy here, which exude from the people,” Julia reminisced. “I was instantly impressed by the BAC’s focus on its students. The staff and faculty’s commitment to them is consistent, unquestioned, and acted upon. The students’ needs, satisfaction, and well-being permeate everything.”

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

The Boston Architectural College (BAC) recently bid farewell to an invaluable leader, Julia Halevy, whose lasting impact on the College will be felt long after her departure. Julia joined the BAC family in 2009 as provost and went on to serve as acting president in 2014, instilling a sense of optimism and trust in staff, faculty, students, and the broader community. From spearheading the development of the new integrated curriculum to helping the BAC earn the recognition it deserves in both the design and higher education communities, Julia has been an asset to the College and a beloved friend and mentor to her colleagues.


Julia welcoming Thomas Menino, former mayor of Boston, to the BAC’s McCormick Gallery as he explores the exhibition about Roxbury’s Dudley Square

abilities by bringing together different ways of thinking. Beginning with CityLab, which is a unique introduction to the BAC and to Boston, the students in first-semester Foundation learn to integrate fundamental design and critical thinking skills with reading, research, and design representation. Equally important, they prepare to be successful in the BAC’s unique concurrent educational model, learning to work collaboratively and to communicate their ideas about design with confidence and resolve. “The curriculum is rejuvenated and relevant and resets the bar with an interdisciplinary approach to preparing the next generation of spatial designers,” said Len Charney, dean of Practice. “More than ever before, we are an institution that truly integrates learning inside and outside the classroom, emphasizing community engagement, collaboration, and civic engagement through service learning.” And, while the new curriculum itself is impressive, how it all came to be is meaningful in its own right. As is Julia’s style, she took the time

“The BAC community is indebted to Julia as someone who has re-calibrated and strengthened the moral compass and permanent legacy of what defines and distinguishes the BAC.” to have conversations with the community in order to set common goals before any part of the implementation phase took place. “One of Julia’s biggest strengths is her inclusivity,” said James Ryan, vice president of Enrollment Management. “She is able to ensure that everyone contributing to an organization or project is valued, regardless of his or her role within the hierarchy. She engenders participation at all levels and fosters genuine buy-in from the entire community.

This goes a long way towards developing community and creating a culture of inclusion and collegiality.” While a “quick fix” change to the curriculum may have been the ­easier route, Julia’s commitment to long-term strategy and the students’ experience at the BAC and after they graduate ensured the new curriculum would be one that was here to stay. It grew out of a large, organized initiative that engaged BAC faculty and staff, with reviews and critiques from the College’s wider community. The process involved conversations, goals and vision setting, week-long retreats, and large group meetings, making it a truly collaborative and inclusive experience from start to finish. The improvements to the curriculum that Julia spearheaded elevated the BAC in so many ways. As Len Charney adeptly expressed, “The BAC community is indebted to Julia as someone who has re-calibrated and strengthened the moral compass and permanent legacy of what defines and distinguishes the BAC.” The curriculum is only the start of Julia’s legacy; an entirely new chapter of her BAC career began in 2014 when she stepped up as the College’s acting president. In many ways, the BAC’s “comeback” story is already underway, the introduction being written after Julia took on the responsibilities of her new role in a time of change and challenge. “Leadership transitions are never easy, but when Julia took over as acting president, she was determined to instill confidence in the BAC community by conveying transparent leadership,” said Evan Gallivan, vice president of Institutional Advancement. “With every new challenge she faced during the transition, she partnered with the senior administration to make the right decisions for the College. It is quite amazing how much we accomplished in such a short period of time, but Julia’s unique leadership style paved the way for this kind of ­monumental success.” Under Julia’s leadership, the BAC has earned the recognition it deserves within the higher education community, s­ pecifically


with the US Department of Education, New England Association of Schools and Colleges, and the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning. The College has claimed a substantial place and voice in academia and earned national recognition as a leader in the integration of classroom and experiential learning and, as a result, in competencybased education.

The year was about to get even better for the BAC. Shortly after getting the news of the Carnegie Community Engagement Classification, the College received the first Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) award in New England, for its curriculum of learning through practice. Specifically, the College’s Practice Department was recognized by CHEA with its 2015 Award for Outstanding Institutional Practice in Student Learning Outcomes. The Practice Department earned the award for creating and overseeing an effective partnership, or “learning contract,” between educators, students, and practitioners, including thorough documentation of experiential learning. Established in 2005, the CHEA Award for Outstanding Institutional Practice in Student Learning Outcomes recognizes institutions that have been exceptional in developing and applying evidence of student learning ­outcomes to improve higher education quality and accountability.

Under Julia’s leadership, the BAC has earned the recognition it deserves within the higher education ­community.

To continue the successful winter, the BAC was also named an experimental site by the federal government to allow the institution of competency-based education alongside credit-based offerings in degree-granting programs.

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Julia enjoying the BAC’s first annual Spring Into Design Gala with colleague Diana Ramirez-Jasso, interim provost

Julia, the BAC community bursts with gratitude for your dedication to the College, and all members of the staff, faculty, and student body look forward to welcoming you back to campus as a guest many times in the future.Your commitment to improving the BAC, elevating its reputation, and listening and collaborating with your colleagues is irreplaceable, and for all of that and more, we thank you. P

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All that Julia did for the College during her tenure was productive, purposeful, and long lasting, and it is impossible to know exactly where the College would be now without her positivity and passion. She left a lot to be proud of behind her as she addressed the faculty and staff for the last time in August. But, now that the very full, often overflowing, plate that came with leading the College is in the past, she looks forward to spending more time with her family—and her children and grandchildren are thrilled. She also looks forward to dedicating more time to researching and writing books and working on a project to start an institute for large-scale intellectual pursuits.

FALL 2015

In addition to elevating the BAC’s reputation in academia and the design communities, Julia also strengthened relationships with key organizations. This type of relationship building is important for the longevity of any higher education institution, but especially one as deeply engrained in the city of Boston as the BAC. Under her guidance, the College solidified collaborative partnerships that were already in place with the ProArts Consortium, re-established its relationship with the Boston Arts Academy and Boston Public Schools to attract more local students, and established a further partnership with Fisher College to ensure ongoing access to dorms, expansion of availability of classroom space without cost, and international recruitment. The College looks forward to further collaborating with these ­organizations in the years to come.

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In 2015, the BAC was awarded a Carnegie Community Engagement Classification, selected among colleges and universities nationwide as a campus that is improving teaching and learning, producing research that makes a difference in its communities, and revitalizing its civic and academic mission. The classification recognizes the BAC for its community engagement, which the Carnegie Foundation defines as collaboration between institutions of higher education and larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity. The honor is an elective classification, involving data collection and documentation

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

“Julia has positioned the College to present itself as a fresh face to demonstrate the power and effectiveness of competency based, applied learning,” Len Charney explained. “At a time when education institutions are all looking for examples of how learning through experience makes a difference, Julia has held up the mirror for those of us engaged in this approach to better communicate what we do to a larger, diverse audience. The recognition we have received in this arena is directly tied to Julia’s insistence on our telling the story in a compelling way.”

of important aspects of institutional mission, identity, and commitments, a significant project that Julia led.


INTRODUCING GLEN S. LeROY TO BOSTON BY ALLISON P OSTLETHWA IT

In June 2015, the Board of Trustees named Glen S. LeRoy, FAIA, FAICP, as the next president of The Boston Architectural College. As many soon discovered, you would be hard pressed to talk to anyone in the architecture and design community who does not believe in LeRoy’s ability to be a transformative leader at the BAC. He has the kind of curriculum vitae that serving as the president of a practice-oriented design school demands, with over 30 years of professional and academic experience collectively, as well as fellowships in both the American Institute of Architects and the American Institute of Certified Planners, accomplishments only earned by a few. “To put it simply, Glen LeRoy is included among the most respected practitioners in his profession,” said Michael Swann, associate dean

of the School of Architecture, Design, & Planning at the University of Kansas. “The high esteem in which he is held derives partly from his success as a professional architect, but mostly it is based on the knowledge that many have of his ability to bridge the gap between academia and practice. He understands that, especially in architecture, the two worlds must sustain and nourish each other in order to remain vital.” These parallels between practice and academia began early in LeRoy’s career. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in architecture from Tulane University and master’s degrees in architecture and city planning from University of Pennsylvania. “When I was a freshman in college, I looked up to the professors and admired what they were doing. Many of them were practitioners and


teachers, and I loved the notion of that lifestyle,” LeRoy reflected. “The great secret of teaching is that it makes you a much better professional.”

e­ ntrepreneurial and growth-oriented approach to both his professional and academic work.”

Upon graduating from college, two goals were clear for LeRoy: first, to become a licensed architect, which he managed within his first year after graduating from University of Pennsylvania, and second, to teach. He successfully pursued these goals, and for over 20 years, LeRoy worked as an architect and urban planner while teaching at the ­University of Kansas.

At Gould Evans Associates, LeRoy served on the firm’s management team. He founded several practice areas, including the Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning/Design Department. LeRoy was the principal-in-charge for many architecture, urban planning, urban ­design, campus planning, interior design, and graphic design projects.

“He is a rare blend of an experienced interdisciplinary professional and a respected professor and an academic leader,” said Robert Gould, FAIA, founding principal of architecture and design firm Gould Evans Associates, where LeRoy worked for 15 years. “He has an

Simultaneously, as a professor at the University of Kansas, LeRoy focused on community engagement in Kansas City. He singlehandedly founded and directed the university’s award-winning Kansas City Urban Design Program through his own networking and leadership.


“His career as a professor of architecture and as a practicing architect and urban planner is marked by the strong qualities of leadership that he has displayed over and over again,” commented Michael Swann of the University of Kansas. “He’s not afraid to show the passion and conviction he has for his work and his projects, and this inspires just about everyone who comes into contact with him.”

As his responsibilities and knowledge grew in both the firm and higher education, LeRoy worked tirelessly to bridge the gap between his two worlds. He worked with students to develop their ties to the professional world, and he inspired his design firm colleagues to value the role of academia by involving them in urban design and architecture studio critiques. Eventually, the increasing demands of the firm required LeRoy to leave his teaching position at the University of Kansas, parting ways with the full intention to return to academia. Now focusing all of his efforts on Gould Evans Associates, LeRoy played a major role in growing the firm from eight professional employees in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1980 into a substantial multi-disciplinary firm, with offices in Kansas City, Phoenix, Tampa, and other US cities. As an equity principal, LeRoy’s leadership was integral in the establishment and growth of many of those offices. After over 15 years of success in the private industry, LeRoy transitioned himself from principal of a firm to dean at a university. He had always admired the role of deans and the impact they had on design education. In 2005, LeRoy was offered the opportunity to serve as dean of the College of Architecture and De-

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“To put it simply, Glen LeRoy is included among the most respected practitioners in his profession.”

Glen LeRoy meeting students in the studios during his first week on campus

sign at Lawrence Technological University (LTU) just outside of Detroit, Michigan. At LTU, LeRoy was involved with student recruitment, enrollment, and retention—critical needs for the success of tuition-based colleges. He played a key role in recruiting and retaining students in a competitive environment and with a challenging economy, making great strides in both areas. LeRoy developed programs that supported a diverse student body. These included attentive student services, active student organizations, competitive athletics, improvements to physical facilities, a stronger and more accountable advising system, academic assistance and tutoring, a professional mentoring network, a laptop computer program, online education, national and international outreach, and a college-based student leadership council. During his tenure, LTU’s College of Architecture and Design grew to more than 850 students enrolled, and LeRoy worked actively to

“He is a rare blend of an experienced interdisciplinary professional and a respected professor and an academic leader.” mentor his students. He insisted on personally meeting with each student who was not achieving academic standards to help coach them through the challenges of earning a design degree. In his role as dean, LeRoy established a strategic direction and vision, including a long-range plan for the College of Architecture and Design to reposition itself in a competitive marketplace. As part of


1, 2015, Glen LeRoy assumed the role of president of The Boston Architectural College, ready to lead the College into its next chapter.

this plan, he grew the college significantly, expanding its offerings to 13 programs. He revamped the Master of Architecture degree program and created an online Master of Architecture, and he worked with the College of Engineering to initiate a new architectural engineering program. He also served on the university’s Strategic Planning Committee for 10 years, where he worked with many constituencies, including members of LTU’s Board of Trustees.

Throughout LeRoy’s career, his experience in strategic planning, as well as implementing a vision, is nationally known. He has received numerous awards from a variety of organizations and professional societies for strategic and comprehensive planning.

After 10 years, LeRoy left LTU with highly regarded professionally design-oriented programs, and the BAC was thrilled at the opportunity to select him as its next leader. On September

“From the start, I am pursuing my position at the BAC with a great deal of excitement that is easily derived from the enthusiasm of the College’s staff and leadership, the commitment of the faculty, the energy of the students and alumni, and the dedication of the Board of Trustees,” stated Glen LeRoy. “I feel that I have come to the right place at the right time. I expect great things to happen at the BAC!” We are all excited to see what his leadership and energy will bring to the College. Please join us in welcoming Glen LeRoy into our BAC community! P

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“Most of all Glen is a leader. Whether in the classroom or in the board room, Glen brings a dynamic energy and collaborative spirit that gets things done.”

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During his second week on the job, he was already out exploring downtown Boston with new students in the CityLab intensive, looking right at home while navigating the streets surrounding Chinatown and sharing a laugh with students and faculty in the program.

FALL 2015

“Glen LeRoy’s leadership style is reflective of his practical experience, working on projects at large and small scales from urban design to the interior of a room,” commented Amy Deines, interim dean, College of Architecture and Design at LTU. “He has the rare ability to both envision large projects and see the importance of getting the details right, as well.”

When asked where his passion for architecture started, without a pause he answered, “In fifth grade,” giving credit to the historic design and urban vitality of his hometown, New Orleans, for inspiring this lifelong career. He has lived in and had an impact on some of the greatest cities in America and now welcomes the opportunity to make as big of an impression on Boston, a city known for both its rich architectural history and innovation.

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One of LTU’s most successful programs, the Bachelor of Science in Transportation Design, was created under LeRoy’s vision. Taking advantage of the school’s location in the home of the US automotive industry, LeRoy worked directly with automotive leaders to design a program that met the needs of their companies. As a result, the program received significant financial support and positioned its graduates as extremely competitive within the marketplace.

LeRoy commented that becoming a president of a college was an unexpected career opportunity for him; however, it is arguable that there are few who are as well prepared to tackle and embrace the unique challenges of the BAC as he is.

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Glen LeRoy touring downtown Boston with students and faculty during CityLab intensive

“Most of all Glen is a leader. Whether in the classroom or in the board room, Glen brings a dynamic energy and collaborative spirit that gets things done,” commented Mickey Jacob, FAIA, former national president of the American Institute of Architects and executive vice president at BDG Architects in Tampa, Florida. “I have admired his work and I look forward to seeing all the wonderful things he will do at the BAC and how he will positively affect the lives and career paths of so many young people.”


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Rachael Skye Sturm, Master of Architecture

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Ruthie Kuhlman, Master of Architecture

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Sean Carey, Bachelor of Architecture

4 Ekaterina Emelyanova, Bachelor of Architecture 5 Evan Hammond, Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 6 Anahita Kianous, Master of Landscape Architecture 7 Sarah Elizabeth Boisselle, Master of Interior Architecture 8

Rafael Diaz-Rivera, Bachelor of Design Studies

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Anne Elizabeth Tudryn, Master of Design Studies, Sustainable Design

10 Steven Michael Baron, Bachelor of Interior Architecture

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11 Sarah Marie White, Master of Design Studies, Historic Preservation

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THE GRAD SHOW 2015 7

The BAC was pleased to exhibit the work of the degree program graduates from the schools of architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture, and design studies. The Grad Show 2015 was on exhibition from May to August in the College’s McCormick Gallery. Its opening night was in conjunction with the annual commencement eve awards ceremony on May 21. This gallery features a sample of thesis and degree project from the Class of 2015 that ­received awards and commendations.

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CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR 2015 AWARD WINNERS: The John Worthington Ames Scholarship Erin S. Kim The John Worthington Ames Scholarship Alternate Niusha Aghdaii Henry Adams Medal & AIA Certificate Master of Architecture Angela Dominique Wyrembelski Henry Adams Certificate of Merit Master of Architecture Ruthie Kuhlman

PRACTICE MAGAZINE

Henry Adams Medal & AIA Certificate Bachelor of Architecture Johnson Osband Henry Adams Certificate of Merit Bachelor of ­Architecture Julianne Tavares Certificate of Academic Merit Distance Master of Architecture Rachael Skye Sturm Certificate of Academic Merit Master of Design Studies Julie M. Galluzzo Cheryl Laurine Miller Susan D. Pranger Alpha Rho Chi Medal Johnson Osband Rachael Skye Sturm

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Architecture Degree Project Studio Commendations Sean Carey Ekaterina Emelyanova John Edwin Matz III James Daniel Nall Johnson Osband Nicolas Schwertschlag Brandon Watson

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Members of the Class of 2015 were honored at the annual commencement eve awards ceremony on Thursday, May 21, where the BAC presented awards to recognize students’ hard work. Graduating students celebrated with family, friends, and members of the BAC community at the opening reception of The Grad Show 2015 in ­McCormick Gallery, followed by ceremonies for undergraduate and graduate award winners.

Edwin T. Steffian Centennial Thesis Award Christopher Whalen Dunn Architecture Thesis Commendations (Distance Program) Beatrice Mireya Ardila Christopher Elam Rachael Skye Sturm Amy Marie Winberg Award for Architecture Thesis Excellence Rachael Skye Sturm Interior Architecture Thesis Commendations Sarah Elizabeth Boisselle Rhisa Prince Maryna Schofield Elizabeth Doran Spatola Sarah Winston Strang Award for Interior Architecture Thesis Excellence Sarah Winston Strang Landscape Architecture Thesis Commendations Anahita Kianous Landscape Architecture Prize Anahita Kianous

Interior Architecture Degree Project Studio Commendations Steven Michael Baron Justine M. Perry Maria Andrea Rodriguez Rivera

Master of Design Studies Commendations LeeAnne R. Brooks Aaron Christopher Eldridge Julie M. Galluzzo Logan Kjep Cheryl Laurine Miller Susan D. Pranger Anne Elizabeth Tudryn Sarah Marie White Rafaela Candiago Zanatta

Interior Architecture D ­ egree Project Studio Award Steven Michael Baron

Master of Design Studies Award: Historic Preservation Sarah Marie White

Landscape Architecture Degree Project Commendations Marcus John Cantu Evan Hammond

Master of Design Studies Award: Sustainable Design Anne Elizabeth Tudryn

Landscape Architecture Degree Project Award Evan Hammond

Distinction in Practice Awards Alexander K. Balashov Sarah Elizabeth Boisselle Elizabeth Amy Knott Eric M. Smoczynski

Architecture Degree Project Studio Award Brandon Watson

2015 GRAD WINNERS

Architecture Thesis Commendations Niusha Aghdaii Poornima Balasubramanian Kyle Patrick Digby Christopher Whalen Dunn Wei Gao Ruthie Kuhlman Bradford Charles Pineau Michelle Kate Ungar Angela Dominique Wyrembelski Daniel Alfred Zeese

Design Studies Degree Project Commendations Alexander K. Balashov Rafael Diaz-Rivera Jennifer Sue Ierymenko Christopher J. Kirch Julianne Reno Design Studies Degree Project Award Rafael Diaz-Rivera

Excellence in Applied Learning through Practice Award Alex Kin Cheung Ho


FEATURED GRAD Rachael “Skye” Sturm studied at the BAC from Alaska, where she lives and works as a staff architect at Design Alaska, an architecture and engineering firm in Fairbanks. Skye chose to pursue her Master of Architecture through the BAC’s Distance Track because she wanted her thesis to focus on rural communities in her home state. Since there is no architecture school in Alaska, the BAC’s program allowed Skye to work and study in the place she is most passionate about, while providing an exciting urban perspective to her rural-focused thesis. As a student at the BAC, Skye effectively applied ideas from her thesis to a project she implemented with local students in Barrow, Alaska, in 2014. The objectives of the two-week Design Build Camp were for students to learn design and construction skills, build teamwork, and feel a strong sense of accomplishment. Skye led 14 high school students in designing and constructing mobile community pavilions and, at the end, donated the shelters to the City of Barrow for public use at the village playgrounds. Skye’s thesis and graduation from the BAC’s Distance Masters of Architecture program is the beginning of what she hopes will be a ­successful future career in architecture.

COMMENCEMENT The BAC celebrated 2015 Commencement on Friday, May 22, at Old South Church in Copley Square. The College graduated 170 students in the disciplines of architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture, and design studies.

In keeping with BAC tradition, a jazz band accompanied the graduates, special guests, and members of the Board of Trustees in a procession through the city of Boston’s historic Back Bay. They walked in full regalia from the iconic BAC building on Newbury Street to the church in Copley Square. Gianfranco Zaccai, B.Arch ’78, president and chief design officer of Continuum LLC and overseer of the College, delivered the Commencement address. He charged graduates to focus on making a true impact on the lives around them beyond wealth and fame. “You have received a lot of tools, insights, and skills that will help you practice your craft. Now is the time to hone your humility, to develop ever-greater empathy, a sensibility and a concern for others who are not necessarily like you,” said Gianfranco. “The ultimate objective of all design is to improve our experience of the world and each other.”

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CELEBRATING THE BAC’S FIRST-EVER

The Boston Architectural College hosted its first-ever Homecoming on Saturday, October 11, 2014. Members of the BAC community gathered on campus for a full day of events and together celebrated the history, evolution, and future of the BAC in honor of the College’s 125th anniversary. Over 100 guests were in attendance, including alumni, trustees, overseers, faculty, staff, and students. Homecoming opened with design lectures by BAC alumni focusing on trending sustainable design practices, along with a luncheon and a State of the College address from Acting President Julia Halevy. Guests also enjoyed open houses throughout campus, a walking tour of Back Bay, a presentation by Don Brown on Designed in Boston, and the opening reception of Convergence: 125 in McCormick Gallery,

featuring the work of many BAC alumni in commemoration of the 125th anniversary. Homecoming concluded with a cocktail reception and three-course dinner at the Harvard Club, where the 2014 BAC Alumni Awards were presented. Thanks to the overwhelming feedback received during and after the event, we are pleased to share that Homecoming will become an annual event at the BAC, taking place each fall on campus as a way to bring BAC community members and alumni back to campus to reconnect, network, and celebrate the BAC. P


­— THE BO S TON A RCHITECTURA L COLLEGE — ­

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION GIVE BACK

MEET THE ALUMNI BOARD

The generosity of BAC alumni provides invaluable support for the BAC’s most important programs and priorities. By making a gift to the BAC, you are supporting the future of the College and making an education in design possible for future BAC students.

The BAC Alumni Board serves to unify the BAC alumni in their personal and professional growth. Our goal is to establish a collective voice for the alumni, foster alumni participation in the College and its program, represent the diversity of the alumni, and act in support of and participate in the fundraising efforts of the BAC.

GET INVOLVED Reconnect with alumni, students, and friends on and off campus by participating in the fun and educational events hosted by the Alumni Association.

STAY CONNECTED

JOIN US FOR THESE UP COM ING EVENTS:

We want to hear from you! Share your

W E D N E S D A Y ,

accomplishments, news, and career up-

A BX RECEP TION

dates with us at alumni@the-bac.edu. Your news could be featured online or in future BAC publications. Visit the-bac.edu/alumni to update your information and hear about alumni and college news, upcoming events, and more!

F R I D A Y

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DANA C. ROWAN TAKES ON LEADERSHIP OF THE BOARD THE BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Dana C. Rowan, Chair Stephen M. Bell, Vice Chair Neal Glick, Secretary Chad J. DaGraca, Treasurer Joseph J. Albanese Howard F. Elkus Arthur J. Hurley III, ’15 (Hon.) Marcella A. Lancome Richard L. Martini, B.Arch ’84 Steven F. McDonald Michael G. Morris Marc W. Pelletier Jay Philomena Cynthia W. Smith Barbara J. Smith-Bacon Richard J. Snyder Carole C. Wedge, B.Arch ’90, ’08 (Hon.)

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The Boston Architectural College is pleased to announce Dana C. Rowan as the new chair of the Board of Trustees. Dana is Managing Partner of the Exeter Companies, a Boston-based real estate investment, development, and advisory firm. He brings more than 30 years of commercial real estate investment and development experience, as well his experience as a BAC Board of Trustees member for more than five years, to his new role as board chair. Dana has been on the BAC’s Board of Trustees since 2009 and has served as vice chair since 2013. He is a member of several board committees, including Development, Nominations, and Real Estate. In 2014, he formed the Committee on Engagement and Leadership, a board committee that develops practices and strategies to attract, orient, train, organize, motivate, and assess the performance of trustees and overseers.

Dana is also involved with other academic institutions, including serving as a member of the alumni steering committee of the Harvard University Real Estate Academic Initiative and serving as a national councilor of Dartmouth College’s Alumni Council. Dana is a former chairman of the Harvard Kennedy School’s global alumni association, a former director of the university’s Harvard Alumni Association, and a former advisory board member of Harvard’s Center for

“Dana has shown a strong commitment to The Boston Architectural College over the course of his impressive tenure at the College,” said Marc Pelletier, current Board of Trustees member and past Board of Trustees chair. “I proudly and with great confidence pass the responsibility of this role to Dana and look forward to working with him as a member of the Board of Trustees.”

“It is an honor to serve the BAC as chair of the Board of Trustees,” said Dana. “I am eager to work together with all of the trustees as well as the BAC community and beyond to lead and support the College during this exciting time.”

Dana is the former national chairman of National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP), as well as the former chairman of NAIOP’s Massachusetts Chapter. He is currently director emeritus of NAIOP, a former national chairman of NAIOP’s Tax and Finance Committee, and a founder and former director of NAIOP’s Research Foundation. He is also active with the Urban Land Institute, the Real Estate Investment Advisory Council, the International Real Estate Federation (FIABCI), and the Real Estate Finance Association.

State and Local Government and its Center for Business and Government. Dana holds a bachelor’s degree in geography from Dartmouth College, a master’s degree in finance and urban economic development from the Harvard Kennedy School, and an MBA from Boston University’s Questrom School of Business. He has been a resident of Back Bay in Boston for over 30 years. P


Wednesdays at 6 pm Free and open to the public Cascieri Hall, 320 Newbury Street

A U G U S T

1 1

Form and Format

M A RK PA SNIK

FOUNDING PRINCIPAL, over,under

FA L L 2015

L AT I T U D E S STUDENT LECTURE SERIES

A U G U S T

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Can Zoological Facilities Be Sustainable?

DA N OVERBEY

DIRECTOR OF SUSTAINABLE DESIGN PRACTICES, BROWNING DAY MULLINS DIERDORF

S E P T E M B E R

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Landscape Infrastructure: Transformation of Urban Centers

DAVID WA LKER

PARTNER, PWP LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

O C T O B E R

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Growing Objects

JESSICA ROSENKRA NTZ + JESSE LOUIS-ROSENB E R G CREATIVE DIRECTOR + CHIEF SCIENCE OFFICER, NERVOUS SYSTEM

O C T O B E R

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Spread the Word: Theory and Territorialization in Latin American Architecture

FLORENCIA ROD RIGUEZ

ARCHITECT, WRITER, AND FOUNDER, PLOT

N O V E M B E R

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Alive, On Earth

D REW SESKUNA S

CO-DIRECTOR, THE PRINCIPALS


Ever y effor t has been made to maintain complete accuracy in this publication. If any error is noted, please contact Evan Gallivan, vice president of Institutional Advancement, at 617.585.0281 or at evan.gallivan@the-bac.edu, and accept our sincere apologies in advance. Designing the Future: The Boston Architectural C ­ ollege’s 2015 Contributors Report is available in the print edition. To request a copy, email communications@the-bac.edu.


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Profile for Boston Architectural College

Practice Magazine Fall 2015  

A Boston Architectural College Publication

Practice Magazine Fall 2015  

A Boston Architectural College Publication

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