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TheatreWorks S I L I C O N

V A L L E Y

FOR SCHOOLS


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INDIVIDUAL Anonymous (2) Toni Bassett Matty Bloom Joan Bowersock Stephen Carney Rebecca Carter Cheri Chapman Evelyn Comstock Frances Escherich Daniel Fourrier Alice Frayne Seth Leslie Bruce Lonie Russ Louthian Barbara McArthur Lewis Miller Guido Neels Sharon Perl Audrey Perlman Valerie Pierce Nancy Ruskin Judith Schwartz Frank Shifrin Debra Summers Lisa Walker Patricia Workman

“We don’t live for society. We live for what we have inside of us. We live to expand our minds. Fulfill our dreams. Engage in passionate exchanges.” Jo March, from the musical Little Women


Table of Contents For Teachers and Students • For Teachers: Using this Study Guide 4 • For Students: The Role of the Audience 5

Exploring the Play • Little Women: The Broadway Musical Plot Summary 6–7 • Understanding Plot: Sequencing Events 8 • Self-Discovery in Little Women 9 Activity: Role on the Wall 10 Activity: Cause and Effect 11 Activity: Bio Poems 12 • An Introduction to Musical Theatre 13 • Louisa May Alcott 14 • About the Setting: The American Civil War 15 • Adapting a Story 16 Activity: Adaptations: From Page to Stage 17 • Gender and Society 18 Activity: Gender Stereotypes: Then and Now 19

Resources • STUDENT/Student Matinee Evaluation • TEACHER/Student Matinee Evaluation

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For Teachers Student matinee performances of Little Women will be held on December 12 & 18, 2013 at 11:00 am, at the Lucie Stern Theatre in Palo Alto. The production is approximately 2 hours and 40 minutes, with one 15 minute intermission. The performance will be followed by a discussion with actors from the show. Student audiences are often the most rewarding and demanding audiences that an acting ensemble can face. Since we hope every show at TheatreWorks will be a positive experience for both audience and cast, we ask you to familiarize your students with the theatre etiquette described on the “For Students” pages.

How to use this Study Guide This guide is arranged in worksheets. Each worksheet or reading may be used independently or in conjunction with others to serve your educational goals. Together, the worksheets prepare students for the workshops, as well as seeing the student matinee of Little Women produced by TheatreWorks, and for discussing the performance afterwards. Throughout the guide you will see several symbols:

Means “Photocopy Me!” Pages with this symbol are meant to be photocopied and handed directly to students.

Means “English Language Arts.” Pages with this symbol feature lessons that are catered to California State English Language Arts standards.

Means “Theatre Arts.” Pages with this symbol feature lessons that are catered to California State Theatre Arts standards.

Means “Social Studies.” Pages with this symbol feature lessons that are catered to California State Social Studies standards.

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The Role of the Audience All the work that goes into a production would mean nothing if there wasn’t an audience for whom to perform. As the audience, you are also a part of the production, helping the actors onstage tell the story. When the performance is about to begin, the lights will dim. This is a signal for the actors and the audience to put aside concerns and conversation and settle into the world of the play. The performers expect the audience’s full attention and focus. Performance is a time to think inwardly, not a time to share your thoughts aloud. Talking to neighbors (even in whispers) carries easily to others in the audience and to the actors on stage. It is disruptive and distracting. Food is not allowed in the theatre. Soda, candy, and other snacks are noisy and, therefore, distracting. Please keep these items on the bus or throw them away before you enter the audience area. Backpacks are also not allowed in the theatre. Walking through the aisles during the performance is extremely disruptive. Actors occasionally use aisles and stairways as exits and entrances. The actors will notice any movement in the performance space. Please use the restroom and take care of all other concerns outside before the show. Cell phones and other electronic devices must be turned off before the performance begins. Do not text during the performance, as it is distracting to the audience members around you.

What to bring with you: Introspection Curiosity Questions Respect An open mind What to leave behind: Judgments Cell phones, etc. Backpacks Food Attitude

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Plot Summary Little Women: The Broadway Musical It is January 1865 in New York City. In the bustling boarding house run by Mrs. Kirk, Jo March receives her 22nd rejection letter from a story publisher. In the letter, the publisher advises her to “Return home and have babies. That is what women are made for.” She asks her neighbor, Professor Bhaer, if she might read her story aloud to get his feedback. She does so with dramatic flair, acting out all of the characters and events. Professor Bhaer interrupts Jo and asks, “What is it you are writing here?” Jo tells him that she’s written a “blood n’ guts” story, which is all the rage. Professor Bhaer asks why someone so unique would want to write trendy “blood and guts” stories. Frustrated, Jo wonders whether her writing was better when she was home with her sisters, and she’s catapulted into memories of home. The action jumps back in time two years, to December 1863. The March household in Concord, Massachusetts is bustling with energy on Christmas Eve. Amy, the youngest sister, complains of being picked on at school and of how sad it will be to spend Christmas without their father. Meg, the oldest, laments her role as a governess, believing it is keeping her from meeting eligible men. Beth, the second youngest, tells her sisters that Jo has a surprise for them; Jo’s written an Operatic Tragedy and they are going to perform it on Christmas day. On top of this, Jo has decided to become a worldrenowned writer: “I shall write great books and earn barrels of money. And I’ll give you all everything you’ve ever dreamed of!” The sisters are skeptical at first, but quickly become absorbed in rehearsal. Jo plays the dashing Rodrigo and saves the family Christmas by chopping down a Christmas tree across the street. Unfortunately, she chops down a tree on grumpy Mr. Laurence’s property. Marmee, their mother, returns home and is shocked to discover what Jo has done. Mr. Laurence arrives, furious that Jo has stolen a tree from his property. Jo agrees to plant twelve more trees and to chop firewood for him for the next few weeks. The girls notice a young man with Mr. Laurence who introduces himself as Theodore Laurence the Third, or Laurie. He has come to live with his grandfather, Mr. Laurence. Jo asks Laurie to deliver the Christmas tree

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LITTLE WOMEN ON BROADWAY

to the Hummels, a less fortunate family who live in the neighborhood. Laurie happily agrees. When peace is restored, Marmee reveals a letter from their father. Mr. March is away serving in the Civil War as an army chaplain for Union forces, and he deeply misses his wife and daughters. The letter makes the March sisters miss their father even more, and Marmee cheers them by reminding them of the Operatic Tragedy they are going to perform. Once alone, Marmee tries to respond to her husband’s letter and reveals how sad she is without him. Next we jump to January 1864. Jo arrives at Aunt March’s stately house, and Aunt March scolds her for being late to work. Jo helps her aunt with chores around the house and she reads books aloud to her. Aunt March bemoans Jo’s unladylike behavior, telling her that she’s headed in the wrong direction. “You are what happens to a girl when she has no father,” she scolds. Aunt March doesn’t approve of Jo’s father serving in the war. She wants Jo to marry well and be powerful in society, but Jo doesn’t want to marry, ever. Aunt March reveals that she had considered taking Jo to Europe, but now she knows Jo isn’t ladylike enough for such a trip. Devastated, Jo quickly works to convince Aunt March otherwise. She dreams of traveling the world like all great writers do. Aunt March says she will Hayden Tee, Maureen McVerry, & Mindy Lym / Photo by Tracy Martin reconsider if Jo demonstrates that she can be a lady.


Plot Summary, continued Now it is the evening of February 14th, 1864. The March household is bustling again as Meg and Jo get ready to attend their first ball. Amy is furious that Jo gets to go the ball instead of her, because Jo hates dances and doesn’t care about society. Nervous, Meg asks her mother what she should do if someone asks her to dance. Marmee replies, “Just smile and say, ‘I’d be delighted.’” At the ball, Meg meets Laurie’s tutor, John Brooke, and is instantly smitten. Laurie tells Jo he needs a friend and asks her to “take a chance on me.” She does! Upon returning home, Jo discovers that Amy has burnt her story in retaliation for not getting to go to the ball. Jo is furious and ignores Amy for days. Then, one fateful afternoon, Amy follows behind Jo and Laurie as they go ice skating and the ice breaks beneath her. Laurie saves her, she and Jo reconcile, and Jo makes Laurie an honorary member of the family. Everyone swears to stay together and sings, “We’ll be five for all forever from now on!” Time marches on and Marmee learns that their father is very ill. Jo sells her hair to finance Marmee’s trip to Washington, D.C., where she will take care of her husband. Aunt March is appalled by Jo’s unladylike behavior and tells her she will not be taking her to Europe. Amy readies herself to go live with Aunt March while Marmee is away, and John Brooke proposes to Meg. Jo realizes that her sisters are slowly leaving her. On top of all this, Laurie visits Jo a few weeks later to tell her that he’s leaving for college and that he wants to marry her. Jo is appalled by his proposal, telling him that she never, ever wants to marry. She had considered him her friend and doesn’t know what to make of his behavior. Laurie leaves, heartbroken. Act II begins in June, 1864 in New York City. Jo bursts into Mrs. Kirk’s boarding house with the wonderful news that Weekly Volcano Press has agreed to publish her Operatic Tragedy. We learn that she took Professor Bhaer’s earlier feedback and made her story better.

Sadly, her joy is interrupted by a telegram saying that Beth has fallen ill with scarlet fever. Jo rushes home. That summer Jo endeavors to take good care of her sister. Mr. Laurence gives Beth his piano, and the two sing and play together while Jo writes Professor Bhaer a letter telling him how things are and asking him how he is doing. She uses her small earnings from her writing to take Marmee and Beth to the Cape Cod seashore. While on the beach, Jo assures Beth that she will heal and recover, but Beth sings, “Some things are meant to be.” The two have a moving conversation about how much they love each other. We jump to winter 1865 and learn much has changed. Meg and John Brooke, married, are expecting their first baby. Beth has passed. Amy and Aunt March return from their European tour with many stories to tell and with Laurie in tow. Jo learns that Amy and Laurie are engaged. Laurie tells her he was “never meant to fly on golden wings” like Jo most certainly is. Jo goes up to her old writing space in the attic and is filled with deep sadness at having lost Beth. Marmee consoles her and tells her, “You must fight to keep her there within you.” At this, Jo sits down to write her first novel, Little Women. The story pours out of her. Now, we find ourselves in Spring of 1866 on Amy and Laurie’s wedding day. The March house is again bustling with energy and life. We learn that Meg and John have had twins and that Mr. March is coming home today in time for the wedding. It is a happy scene. Jo is surprised when Professor Bhaer pays her a visit, not knowing that it is her sister’s wedding day. They talk at first about the weather and then Professor Bhaer professes his love to Jo, and she does the same. They discuss the ways in which their love is unique and not like other examples of love. They argue and disagree, but they ultimately admire each other’s individuality. “Though we are not at all alike, you make me feel alive,” they sing. In a moment to herself before the wedding, an incandescent Jo wonders at how astonishing life can be.

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Understanding Plot: Sequencing Events Little Women is a story that jumps around in time and place. Read the plot summary included in this guide, and underline the 6 most important events in the story. Then number them 1-6 and assign them to a box. Draw a small picture of the event in the box and write a description in the lines below.

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Self Discovery in Little Women Throughout Little Women, many characters change and discover their true selves. Jo discovers that though she wishes she could be with her sisters all the time, she can’t. Laurie discovers that he wasn’t meant to live happily ever after with Jo. Aunt March generously decides to leave her house to Jo. Explore the idea of identity with your students. Here are two lesson plans to do with students, one for elementary grades and one for middle and high school grades. The worksheets are on the following pages.

Elementary: Role on the Wall Time: 60 minutes (can be extended into two days) Materials: Role on the Wall worksheet 1. Ask students to define the word “identity.” You might ask the following questions: • Who are YOU? • What are the things that make up “you,” inside and out? • What things in your life, whether it be your parents or a book or movie, influence you and point you in a certain direction? • Is there anything in your life that inspires you to act? 2. Hand out the Role on the Wall worksheet. Using the answers to the questions above, have students fill in words and pictures that describe them. Inside the body outline, students should write internal information ––hopes, dreams, likes, dislikes, etc. Outside the body outline, students should write external information––where they live, who their family members are, etc.

Middle/High School: Cause and Effect

3. Have students present these poems and drawings to the class.

2. For actors an important part of character research is understanding what events caused changes in characters. Have your students do some character research by completing the Cause and Effect worksheet. They should identify the specific events that caused measurable changes in particular characters.

EXTENTION: Do this for each character at the beginning of the play and at the end of the play and then compare/contrast the two. Who changes the most? Who changes the least?

Time: 60 minutes (can be extended into two days) Materials: Cause and Effect and Bio Poem worksheets 1. Discuss the characters in the play. Who changed and who stayed the same? Make a list of who changed and who didn’t change.

3. Have students choose a character from Little Women and complete the Bio Poem worksheet from his or her perspective. 4. Students perform their Bio Poems for the class as monologues or spoken word pieces.

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Role on the Wall

External Characteristics Examples: Who are his/her family members? Where does he/she live? What is his/her job?

Internal Characteristics Examples: What are his/her likes? What are his/her dislikes? What are his/her hopes and dreams?

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Cause and Effect The characters in Little Women experience many transitions during the play. But none of these changes happen on their own. There are several agents throughout the play that move the characters to change. Below, examine some of these events—what happens and how does it change the character?

CAUSE

Jo chops down Mr. Laurence’s tree.

EFFECT

The March family meets the Laurence family when a furious Mr. Laurence pays a visit.

fl fl fl fl 11


Bio Poems Choose a character from Little Women and answer the following questions based on that character’s perspective. If you can’t find the answer, use your imagination and creativity to imagine what your character might be like.

(Line 1) First name (Line 2) Four words that describe you (Line 3) Important relationship (son/daughter/sister of...) (Line 4) Resident of (place where you live) (Line 5) Who reads (four books) (Line 6) Who likes (three things you like) (Line 7) Who loves (three things you love) (Line 8) Who wishes (three things) (Line 9) Who admires (Line 10) Who needs (Line 11) Who aspires to (Line 12) Last name

Example: Jo Bold, Ambitious, Independent, Energetic Daughter of Marmee Resident of Concord, Massachusetts Who reads Much Ado About Nothing, Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet, and Macbeth Who likes blood and guts stories, dreaming, writing Who loves her family, imagining, theatre Who wishes to publish a book, meet famous writers, have a job Who admires authors Who needs to write Who aspires to travel in Europe March

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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An Introduction to Musical Theatre

There are several types of songs in the score of a musical and each serves a different purpose. For example, character identification songs tell who a character is and what they want. Chorus songs usually set the scene and give exposition. There are also comic songs and love songs that can be about a specific individual or love in general. But why perform a musical as opposed to a play? Within a musical the emotions are heightened by the score. Like in Shakespeare, the emotions of the characters can be so large, so explosive, only poetry or song will express their feelings. Musicals create a heightened reality and can move in and out of poetry very easily. There are many styles of musicals and these days almost any subject can be the basis for a musical. Little Women is traditional and classic, but you may also see a revue where the works of a single composer or a period are combined in a piece with little or no plot. There are also shows like Rent and American Idiot called rock operas due to their use of rock and roll music.

JUSTIN BUCHS AND SHARON RIETKERK / PHOTO TRACY MARTIN

Theatre is generally divided into two categories, plays and musicals, each with many subdivisions. Each type of show can have a great deal of music, but in a musical, the music not only supports the play, but major emotional moments are sung.

CONNECTION: Break off into small groups or pair groups. Recall the musical moments from stage shows or movies or from TV shows like Glee. Have one person for your group record these moments along with a short phrase describing why the character is singing. Try to answer the following questions in your group: • How are musicals and plays different from each other? • Generally, which do you like better: musicals or plays? Why? • What benefits does telling a story as a musical give to a writer? What disadvantages? • Because it is a musical, what features do you expect to see in Little Women? • Based on its subject and themes, what do you expect the music for Little Women to sound like? • What moments in Little Women would you expect to have songs added to them?

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Louisa May Alcott Louisa May Alcott was born on November 29th, 1832 in Germantown, Pennsylvania, but she grew up in Boston and in Concord, Massachusetts. Alcott had much in common with her fearless protagonist, Jo March. She, too, was the second oldest of four sisters, and she, too, was a tomboy. It is rumored that Alcott once said, “no boy could be my friend till I had beaten him in a race,” and “no girl if she refused to climb trees, leap fences…”. Her father was a Transcendentalist philosopher, abolitionist, and teacher, and he educated all of his daughters. Transcendentalism was a literary and philosophical movement popular in the 19th century and grounded in the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson. It sought to defy and question Victorian societal norms and to explore spirituality and religion in a world that was becoming more and more materialistic. Though not considered a Transcendentalist, poet Emily Dickinson was a huge fan of Ralph Waldo Emerson, and he of her. Though Alcott’s father valued education, her family struggled with poverty throughout her life. She found solace in her writing. Just like the March sisters, Alcott and her sisters would enact her melodramatic stories for fun. Her first novel, Flower Fables, was published when she was only 22, and she went on to publish thirty books and collections— quite a remarkable feat for a woman during this time.

CONNECTION: Alcott wrote Little Women when she was 35, right after the Civil War. Her publishers wanted a story that would appeal to young girls, and so she wrote the first half of the novel that we know today. However, her fans loved the book so much that they requested another installment that chronicled what happened to the sisters and who they married. Alcott then wrote Good Wives, giving her fans exactly what they wanted. Both installments are now combined into one novel, Little Women. Jo March is one of the first female protagonists in American literature, bravely daring to follow her heart rather than societal norms. Because of this and many other reasons, Little Women has remained a beloved classic for over a century. Unlike Jo March, Louisa May Alcott never married. She died in 1888, two days after her father passed away.

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Break off into small groups to discuss the similarities and differences between Louisa May Alcott and Jo March. What are some similarities between Alcott and Jo? Do you feel Alcott was writing about her own family in Little Women? What would you say are differences between the character Jo March and Alcott? Why do you think Alcott decided to write Little Women?


About the Setting: The American Civil War Little Women takes place in Concord, Massachusetts and in New York City from Winter 1863 to Spring 1866, at the end of the Civil War. The Civil War was one of the deadliest wars and one of the most important events in American history, beginning in 1861 and lasting four years. Six hundred thousand lives were lost in this war in which the southern Confederate states sought to secede, or break away, from the Union. Though many events lead to the Civil War, slavery was a root cause of the war. Though we don’t hear many details of the war during Little Women, we know that Mr. March is serving in the war as an army chaplain for Union forces. On Wednesday, December 6th, 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment is ratified by the States and slavery is abolished—this is around the time that Amy returns from her European trip. The next spring, Mr. March returns from the war in time for Amy and Laurie’s wedding. Here are some of the most important historical events taking place during Little Women: • November 8th, 1864: Abraham Lincoln is reelected to presidency • April 8th, 1865: Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate army, surrenders to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomatox Court House. • April 15th, 1865: President Abraham Lincoln is assassinated. Vice President Andrew Johnson becomes president. • December 6th, 1865: The Thirteenth Amendment is ratified by the States. • December, 1865: The Black Codes are established in Southern states, restricting the rights of African-Americans. • April, 1866: The Civil Rights Act of 1866 grants citizenship to African-Americans and guarantees equal rights.

CONNECTION: Using the events above that take place during Little Women, break into groups and discuss how Jo and her sisters might react to each of these events. Would they be aware of the events? Would their father send a letter discussing any of these events?

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Adapting a Story Many of the movies and plays you see today are actually adaptations, meaning they are based on a story already written. An adaptation may simply present the characters and plot points of a novel or play as they were originally written, or it may change the setting and situation of the story. For example, the musical Little Women is an adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s 1868 novel of the same name, but with music added and some events omitted. The steps below outline how a writer might go about creating an adaption for stage or screen. Identify what grabbed you emotionally about the story. Before you start to form the plot and characters, decide the feeling you want to invoke in the audience. Decide when and where you’re setting your adaptation, if you’re departing from the original. Changing the setting to modern times may make a story more accessible to today’s audiences, while maintaining the original setting can teach us important things about the history and context of that time. Pare down the story to only the most important plot points. When you’re writing for the stage or screen, you must be able to tell your story in roughly two hours. If your source material is a novel you may have hundreds of pages of story that must be condensed. Which parts of the plot are the most important? What is extra, and might be cut out? Decide which characters and locations are needed to tell the story. The number of characters in a stage or film production should be kept small. Hiring more actors is not only costly, but too many characters can be confusing to the audience in a story only two hours long. If a character has a minor part and doesn’t affect the story much, leave that character out. When writing for the stage, do the same thing for locations: only use the most essential settings. A play can be very successful in only one place—no need for set changes! Films have a little more freedom because scenes can be shot in many different locations. Consider the conventions of your medium. A novel is not likely to include songs, but a musical adaptation certainly would. If you’re writing a screenplay, you might show the passage of time through a montage. Keep in mind the different ways that you can convey emotion or plot points that are different from the way they’re presented in a book.

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Adaptations: From Page to Stage Little Women is just one example of a novel adapted into a stage production. Can you think of other examples of adaptations, either on stage, on TV, or in film? What stories might you like to see adapted into stage productions? Why?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Choose a book that you’d like to adapt into a play or musical. What would it be like? Make a list of ideas. Consider: • • • • • • •

What characters would be included? When would it take place? What would the set be like? What events would you include? What would you omit? What would the music/sound design be like? What kind of costumes would the actors wear? How would you want the audience to feel after seeing the production?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Working in groups of five, select one of your favorite books and choose five important scenes from the story Each member of the group will “direct” the others to create a tableau, or still image, of one of the scenes using your bodies and any props needed. Then perform your living tableaux for the class. After sharing, discuss the following questions: • Was it difficult choosing five scenes? If so, why? • Was it difficult making tableaux, or still images? If so, why?

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Gender and Society “My advice to you is to return home and have babies. This is what women are made to do.” – F. Putnam Throughout Little Women, Jo March constantly struggles with what society asks her to be and what she wants to be. Aunt March voices society’s expectations of women when she tells Jo, “With a good marriage, you can have power. You can take your place in society.” What similarities, if any, do you find between Jo’s stories and her life? What changes does Jo make to her tales of Rodrigo and Clarissa? Based on what you see and hear in Little Women, what does it mean to be a woman in 1860s America?

Elementary

Middle/High School: Cause and Effect

Time: 60 minutes (can be extended into two days) Materials: Gender Stereotypes worksheet

Time: 60 minutes (can be extended into two days) Materials: Gender Stereotypes worksheet, fashion magazines

Have your students complete the Gender Stereotypes Venn Diagram. Ask them to list stereotypes of men and women in 1868 that they notice in the musical. Then ask them to list stereotypes of men and women in 2013. Encourage them to explore similarities and differences between the two times.

1. Have your students complete the Gender Stereotypes Venn Diagram. Ask them to list stereotypes of men and women in 1868 that they notice in the musical. Then ask them to list stereotypes of men and women in 2013. Encourage them to explore similarities and differences between the two times. 2. Ask students to look through current fashion magazines and choose an advertisement they feel is geared toward women and an advertisement they feel is geared toward men. 3. Have students present their advertisements and explain why they feel the advertisement is genderspecific. Ask them to keep in mind: • Vocabulary used in the advertisement • Fonts used in the advertisement • Background images used in the advertisement • Colors and/or lighting used in the advertisement

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Gender Stereotypes: Then and Now


Student Matinees/ STUDENT Feedback Name____________________________________Grade_____________School_________________________________________ Performance Tasks based CA State theatre arts standards Select and complete one of the following activities:

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Rewrite the ending of the play. How would you like to see it end? Why?

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Pick a moment in the play that affected you. Describe the stage elements that created that moment for you (the script, acting, lighting, music, costumes, set design, sound design and/or direction).

3.

Write a review of the play or an actor.

4.

Describe something you would change in the production. Describe what benefit that change create in the production and why.

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Identify and describe how this production might affect the values and behavior of the audience members who have seen it.

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Write about any careers you learned about in attending this production. (example: stage hands, set designers, actors, etc.)

Assessment Survey No

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STUDENT evaluation (cont)

Finish the following statements: The most important thing I learned from this play was: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Besides getting out of school, the best thing about attending this student matinee is: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Learning through the theatre is different from my regular class because: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ If I could change something about attending a student matinee, I would: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ I'm going to use what I learned, saw, or experienced by: ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Student Matinee/TEACHER Evaluation Name_____________________________________________________________________School___________________________

Please rate your Student Matinee experience below:

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TheatreWorks maintained communication with me and/or involved administrators at my school

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It was clear to me that the production and study guide incorporated curriculum standards

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Planning I received sufficient and timely information from TheatreWorks before the matinee

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Matinee Workshops Supported other curriculum areas/subjects

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Engaged students' interest and attention

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The "Performance Tasks" were useful in helping my students understand their experience

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TEACHER Evaluation (cont) For your classrooms please list the strengths of watching a student matinee. _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ In terms of your teaching, did this particular Student Matinee give you any arts integration ideas for your curriculum? _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ We are very interested in your feedback. What worked for you about this experience? _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ What did not work for you? _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ Additional Comments: _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________________ TheatreWorks student matinees tend to fill up quickly. Information about next season will be available in February—keep us updated with your current contact information to receive show announcements and booking information. Also, let us know if you have friends who would like to be added to our mailing lists!


Little Women Study Guide