Page 1

THE MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE THEATRE ASSOCIATION OF SA INC VOL 27 NO 11 DECEMBER 2013

TASA AGM Put the date in your diary for our AGM and awards Page 2

BUMPER REVIEWS All November’s reviews and there’s lots of them! Page 5

A cracker of a year! Our reviewers give top marks to the directors of 2013 They don’t  always  get  the  applause  so  Encore’s  reviewers  give   top  marks  to  our  talented  local  directors  for  creating  amazing   productions  this  year. Judy  Sampson  took  on  the  task   of  directing  over  70  young   performers  and  succeeded  in   keeping  them  active  and   focussed  throughout  Hills  Youth   Theatre’s  The  Wizard  of  Oz.   Gilbert  and  Sullivan  Society’s   The  Secret  Garden,  directed  by   Rick  Trevaskis,  was  worth  the   ticket  price  for  the  duets  alone! G&S Society’s The Secret Garden

Tea Tree  Players  showed  a  sure   understanding  of  the  purpose  of   rapid-­‐fire  farce  and   Theresa  Dolman’s  crisp   direction  kept  the   dialogue  and  action   flowing  in  Anyone  for   Breakfast.

Anyone for Breakfast at Tea Tree Players

Hayley Horton   assembled  a  stellar  cast  to   bring  God  of  Carnage  to   life  at  Stirling  Players. Galleon’s  thought   provoking  production  of   Accommodations  directed   by  Warren  McKenzie   was  set  against  the   backdrop  of  the  vibrant   1960s.

God of Carnage at Stirling Players

Under the  astute  direction   of  Fiona  De  Laine,  the  

Northern Light’s Little Shop of Horrors

strikingly talented  cast  of  thirteen  to  sixteen  year  olds  from   Adelaide  Youth  Theatre  pulled  off  a  Fringe  coup  with  You’re   a  good  man  Charlie  Brown. With  an  appealing  blend   off  oddball  humour,   horror  and  romance,  Ceri   Horner  put  together  an   energetic  cast  to  bring   Little  Shop  of  Horrors  to   life  at  Northern  Light. Brian  Knott  pulled   together  a  beautiful  and   sentimental  story  that  had   us  reaching  for  the  tissues   in  Visiting  Mr  Green  at   St  Jude’s  Players.    

Visiting Mr Green at St Jude’s Players

Dave Simms  provided  a   fluent  and  tight   interpretation  of  Dinner,   an  often  hilarious  yet   ultimately  disturbing   piece  at  Adelaide  Rep. CONTINUED P3

The Adelaide Rep’s Dinner


ENCORE EDITORIAL December 2013

Time for a rest! It’s been a long year - so take a break!

The monthly publication of the Theatre Association of SA Inc. Editor: Dave Simms E: encore-editor@tasaonline.org.au T: 0409 255 181

We all  deserve  a  rest!

Senior writer: Benjamin Brooker

Let’s face  it,  it  can  be  hard  work  being   involved  in  a  production.

SUBMISSIONS AND DEADLINES:

Whether you’re  planning  the  blocking,   having  production  meetings,  sewing   costumes,  painting  sets,  recording  sound,   hanging  lights,  learning  lines,  buying   props,  practicing  your  part,  scoring  the   Editor Dave Simms musical  or  designing  choreography,   there’s  must  more  to  putting  on  a  show   that  turning  up  for  a  rehearsal  or  performance! So  it’s  time  to  take  a  break.     Recharge  and  recuperate  so  there’s  plenty  of  creative   energy  ready  for  the  next  project  whenever  that  might  be. That’s  certainly  what’ll  I’ll  be  doing  in  the  coming  weeks.    In   fact,  I’m  taking  an  extended  break  as  I  need  some  personal   time.    So  I’ll  see  you  in  a  while. In  the  meantime,  take  time  to  be  kind  to  yourself,  reflect  on   a  job  well  done,  feel  satisfied  and  proud  of  your   achievements  and  make  the  most  of  the  friends  you’ve   made  through  the  year. I  know  I  will! Merry  Christmas  and  A  Happy  Theatrical  New  Year!

NOTICEBOARD December 2013

ENCORE MAGAZINE

Members can provide flyers, photos, articles, media releases, notices and more by 15th of the month for free inclusion. Please supply flyers or posters as in colour in portrait A4 shape. Colour photos should be at least the size of a postcard and between 500kb and 2MB. We invite submissions for publication. Any material received will be taken as permission to publish. The Editor reserves the right to reject or edit all contributions. Expressions of opinion by any contributor must not be considered to be the opinion of the editor or of the association and no responsibility will be accepted for any matters arising therefrom. Advertisers are advised that all advertising copy is their responsibility under the Trade Practices Act and the Copyright Act. Information is assumed to be correct at the time of printing and no responsibility is taken for any errors or omissions. THEATRE ASSOCIATION OF SA INC. PO Box 187 PARK HOLME SA 5043 Affiliated with Association of Community Theatres, NSW

tasaonline.org.au facebook.com/TheatreAssociationofSouthAustralia

The TASA Committee: President: Fran Edwards; Vice-President: Laraine Ball; Secretary: Jacqui Mulady; Treasurer: Patsy Thomas; Committee members: Aaron MacDonald, Paul Rodda, Dave Simms.

TASA AGM FOR ALL IMPORTANT NOTICE MEMBERS

Hotel. held at the Caledonian The TASA AGM will be after us. ked loo venue and they It is a comfortable central ruary 10 2014 The date: Monday Feb rwards for an invitation to join us afte The time: 6.30pm with dinner and drinks! e President, to vote on electing a Vic IMPORTANT: Members . ers mb me tee mit com Treasurer and at least two MusiCAL 2013 DramatiCAL and the of Plus announcement awards. rton's Restaurant Caledonian Hotel & Ba 219 O'Connell Street st & O’Connell Street cnr Barton Terrace We 6 North Adelaide SA 500

AUDITIONS Auditions Re-scheduled DATE: December 11 by appointm ent VENUE: St Elizabeth Anglican Chur ch, Crew Street, Oaklands Park SHOW: The Maid of the Mountain s COMPANY:  SA Light Opera Society DIRECTOR:  Pam Tucker   MD Pete r Potts SEASON: April 24-27 Rehearsals Wed and Fri  7.30 - 10.0 0 ROLES: 4 male, 4 female singing principals  Some speaking parts and chorus Information, appointments 8294 6582 www.salos.websyte.com.au

2


CONTINUED FROM P1

The Hills  Musical   Company  produced  a   rousing  version  The   Producers  very  well   directed  by  Steve  Rudd.  

The Producers at Hills Musical Company

It is  always  a  bold  move   to  put  on  a  show  as  well   known  as  Brigadoon,  but   The  Met’s  director   Leonie  Osborn  pulled  it   off  brilliantly  complete   with  pipers! Directors  Ken  and  Chris   Melville  assembled  a   large,  mostly  young  cast   and  with  good  music  and   sharp  choreography,   they  succeeded  with   High  School  Musical  at   Murray  Bridge.

High School Musical at Murray Bridge Players and Singers

Fox on the Fairway at St Jude’s Players

Marie Clark  Musical   Theatre  picked  a  winner   with  How  to  Succeed  in   Business  Without  Really   Trying;  director  Ben   Stefanoff  cast  the  piece   well. Director  Hayley  Horton   ensured  that  the   relationship  between   the  central  characters   was  clear  yet  nuanced  in   Little  Women  for   Therry. St  Jude’s  rFox  on  the   Fairway  directed  by  Ian   Rigney  (affectionately   known  as  the  Master  of   Mirth)  was  all  a  farce   should  be  with  cues   picked  up  promptly  to   create  the  fast  pace.

Independent Theatre’s Far from the Madding Crowd

Theatre Guild’s Richard III

There were  many  things   to  admire  about  Rob   Croser’s  Independent   Theatre  production  of   Far  from  the  Madding   Crowd,  for  a  start  it   looked  wonderful. Megan  Dansie  set   Richard  III  in  a   contemporary  place  and   time  and  costumed  it  in  a   way  that  didn't  jar  with   the  language  at  Theatre   Guild.  

Barry Hill  beautifully   brought  out  the   indulgent  yet  glamorous,   the  passionate  yet  awful   rekindled  relationship   between  Elyot  and   Amanda  in  Private  Lives   for  Therry.  Nobody  does   Coward  better! Dave  Simms’  confidence   as  a  director  and  his   ability  and  that  of  all  his   whole  cast  and  crew   shone  out  from  Stirling   Players’  stage  for  The   Lady  in  the  Van.     Bringing  Reservoir  Dogs   to  the  stage  was  a  brave   move  for  veteran   director  Matt  Byrne,  but   he  and  his  fellow  cohorts   delivered  an  energetic   display  of  drama,   delusion  and  nail-­‐biting   theatre. Holy  Day  is  a  brilliantly   constructed  and  brutally   confronting  murder   mystery  directed  by   John  Graham  with   excellent  pace,     maintaining  the  required   tension  throughout  at   the  Theatre  Guild.

Private Lives at Therry Dramatic Society

A CRACKER OF A YEAR December 2013

A cracker of a year!

The Lady in the Van at Stirling Players

The Met’s Grease

Amanda Rowe  gathered   a  team  of  wonderful   young  performers  and   melded  them  into  an   amazing  ensemble  for   Grease  at  The  Met. Despite  Williamson’s   very  wordy  script,  Vicky   Horwood  kept  the  pace   tight  for  Galleon’s   entertaining  production   of  The  Club.

Matt Byrne Media’s Reservoir Dogs

Kate Anolak’s   production  of  the  quirky   musical  A  Little  Night   Music  was  another  Hills   Musical  success. Guided  by  the   experienced  hands  of   Kym  Clayton,  St  Jude’s   Players’  production  of  A   Chorus  of  Disapproval   was  simply  hilarious.

Holy Day at the Theatre Guild

Here’s to  the  awards  and  doing  it  all  again  in  2014!

3


REVIEWS November 2013

DAVID WILLIAMSON’S

THE CLUB

CORPSE! Therry Dramatic Society

Galleon Theatre Group

Review by Lesley Reed October 31 2013

Review by Fran Edwards November 7 2013

David Williamson’s  satirical  play  about  a  1970’s  VFL   Australian  Rules  football  club,  still  resonates  with  audiences   today  because  its  bitter  back-­‐room  dealings,  power  struggles   and  the  personal  foibles  of  players  and  officials  remain  real-­‐ life  issues  in  the  current  AFL  era.

Therry chooses  good  scripts  and  this  one  is  no  exception!  

Galleon Theatre  Group’s  production  of  the  play  had  much  to   offer  audiences,  in  particular  the  performance  of  Andrew   Horwood  as  Jock  Riley.  

This production  handled  the  difficulties  presented  by  this   script  really  well,  including  cooking  on  stage.  The  well   designed  set  worked  well,  although  I  would  have  liked  to  see   more  evidence  of  wealth  in  Rupert's  flat  to  increase  the   contrast  in  the  brothers'  circumstances.  It  looked  a  little   minimalist  and  modern.

Andre was  screamingly  funny  as  he  embodied  a  man  intent   on  vindicating  his  own  passionate  belief  that  he  is  the  best   player,  coach  and  official  the  club  has  ever  had.   Peter  Smith  shone  as  club  president,  Ted  Parker,  a  man   passionate  about  a  game  he  has  never  played  and  desperate   to  justify  his  position  by  winning  a  premiership.     Warren  McKenzie  produced  a  strong  performance  as  the   proud  coach,  Laurie  Holden.   In  probably  the  most  difficult  role  in  the  play,  Aldo   Longobardi  downplayed  administrator  Gerry  Cooper  as  a   pleasant  bloke  doing  a  decidedly  dirty  job.  However,  Gerry   has  his  own  agendas  and  Longobardi  could  have  let  a  little   more  of  the  manipulative  Gerry  shine  through. As  he  strutted  the  stage  as  a  larger  than  life  stereotype,  Hal   Bruce  looked  like  Warwick  Capper  without  the  bleach.   This  was  a  very  funny  portrayal  of  Geoff  Hayward,  the   talented  footballer  who  has  discovered  women  and  dope  are   his  true  passions.  

This comedy  thriller  by  actor  Gerald  Moon  has  been   performed  on  the  West  End  and  Broadway  because  it  is  so   well  written  and  clever.    It’s  set  in  1936  on  the  night  the   uncrowned  King  abdicated.

Adam Tuominen  did  really  well  as  the  twins,  Evelyn  and   Rupert  Farrant,  his  two  characters  were  well  defined  and   the  audience  was  in  no  doubt  about  which  brother  they   were  viewing.   Peter  Davies  did  an  exceptional  job  as  Major  Ambrose   Powell.  Powell  is  so  easy  to  overplay  and  make  a  caricature   and  Davies  resisted  the  temptation.   Sue  Wylie  as  Mrs  McGee  and  Simon  Lacione  as  Hawkins   were  good,  with  Wylie  providing  many  laughs,  but  the   stage  belonged  to  Tuominen  and  Davies,  who  work  very   well  together. Marie  Dineen  gave  us  costumes  that  look  authentic  and   Norman  Caddick's  direction  kept  the  pace  up  with  smooth   and  minimal  set  changes.

Myles Teakle  produced  a  genuine   performance  as  players’  representative,   Danny  Rowe. Despite  Williamson’s  very  wordy  script,   director  Vicky  Horwood  kept  the  pace   tight,  particularly  in  the  second  act. Galleon  produced  an  entertaining  production   of  The  Club,  staged  on  an  ideal  boardroom  set,   where  the  walls  are  decorated  with  the  photos   of  players  and  officials  who,  in  more  ways  than   one,  have  long  since  played  their  best  game.

4

Another highlight of 2013 was Matt Byrne’s dramatic looking production of Phantom of the Opera


PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD

Hills Musical Company

Independent Theatre

Butterfly Theatre/Burnside Players

Review by Dave Smith November 8 2013

Review by Dave Smith November 8 2013

Review by Paul Davies November 13 2013

In recent  years  the  Hills  Musical   Company  has  successfully  taken  on   some  challenging  works.  Kate   Anolak’s  production  of  this  quirky   Sondheim  and  Wheeler  musical  was   another  such  success.

Director Rob  Croser  has  once  again   tackled  a  meaty  and  challenging  piece  of   theatre  and  in  most  ways  did  it  justice.

David Mamet’s  Victorian  tale  of  lust,   lies  and  love  was  directed  with  panache   by  Geoff  Brittain.  

The box  set  of  the  western  Irish   shebeen  looked  authentic  and  allowed   the  cast  the  clear  use  of  the  broad   Odeon  stage.  

It’s a  true  joy  to  witness  a  confident   trusting  trio  go  about  being  nasty   to  one-­‐another  and  doing  it  with   such  style!

The action  was  well  led  by  William  Cox   as  the  enigmatic  Christy  Mahon.  He  had   a  quietly  compelling  presence  from  his   first  entrance  and  gradually  grew  in   intensity  as  the  play  progressed.  

The Wheatsheaf  Hotel  is  noisy  for  a   theatre  venue;  there’s  the  sound  of  the   bar  next  door  and  the  occasional  plane   going  overhead.    Many  productions   would  not  have  got  past  those  things,   but  with  these  actors,  and  with  this   play,  it  was  not  a  problem.

Musical Director  Mark  DeLaine’s   experience  and  surety  were  evident   throughout.  In  all  parts  of  the   demanding  score  he  ensured  the  cast’s   confidence  and  clarity. While  there  were  examples  of  sensitive   acting,  this  being  a  Sondheim  piece,  the   mood,  plot  and  back-­‐stories  came  to  us   chiefly  through  the  songs.  There  were   several  high  points.   Matthew  Randell  and  Bronwen   James  as  Fredrik  and  Desiree   combined  tension  and  humour  in  You   Must  Meet  My  Wife,  Rod  Schultz  as   Carl-­‐Magnus  was  powerful  in  In  Praise   of  Women  and  Myfanwy  May  as   Madame  Armfeldt  was  wickedly   reflective  in  Liaisons.

He was  matched  by  the  skillful   characterisation  of  Catherine  Hancock   as  Pegeen  Mike.  She  developed  an   admirable  range  of  emotions  and  used   them  sensitively,  none  more  tellingly   than  her  final  tortured  line  following   Christy’s  exit. Tracey  Walker  was  a  commanding   and  sensual  Widow  Quin,  while  David   Roachbrought  his  wide  experience   to  bear  in  the  role  of  Christy’s  father   Old  Mahon.  

At Fredrik  and  Desiree’s  climactic   reconnection,  Bronwen’s  singing  of  the   well-­‐loved  Send  in  the  Clowns  was   exceptional  –  pertinent  and  deeply   moving.  In  all,  the  pair  handled  their   gradual  rediscovery  very  sensitively.

The four  village  girls,  so  readily  in  awe   of  the  newcomer  Christy,  were   energetically  played  byAnna  Bampton,   Grace  Berwald,  Georgia  Penglis  and   Emma  Bleby.  Their  ensemble  work  in   that  small  group  was  a  strength.

Ian Andrew  was  a  vulnerable  and   credible  Henrik,  Karina  Jay  delighted   as  Anne  andRachel  Rai  added  zest  as   Petra,  particularly  in  her  Act  2  solo.     The  chorus  quintet  held  the  narrative   together  with  well  articulated,   harmonious  commentary.  

The play  looked  very  good,  and  the  cast   successfully  maintained  the  pace,   humour  and  tension  of  the  various   interactions.  The  Irish  accents  were   both  a  strength  and  weakness  of  the   production.  While  they  were   universally  sustained,  they  occasionally   made  the  dialogue  indecipherable.  

The costumes  were  splendid.  They   established  the  mood  and  era  precisely   and  while  the  set  was  functional   enough,  it  lacked  the  detail  and   authenticity  of  the  costumes. This  was  a  tight,  nuanced  production   which  truly  did  the  company  proud.

In total,  though,  the  production  readily   captured  the  beliefs,  attitudes  and   mores  of  early  twentieth  century  rural   Ireland,  and  the  turmoil  of  the   perplexing  presence  of  the  Playboy.

BOSTON MARRIAGE

REVIEWS November 2013

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

In fact,  the  bohemian  nature  of  the   whole  experience  only  added  to  the   Fun;  one  feels  like  a  groundling  at   The  Globe! At  first  I  thought  that  there  was  a  lot  of   movement  of  the  actors,  lots  of   standing  up,  sitting  down  and  moving   for  no  apparent  reason.  Then  I  finally   realised  that  there’s  a  bright  red   support  pillar  right  in  front  of  the  stage,   and  that  the  movement  helped. Bronwyn  Ruciak  and  Cheryl  Douglas   had  some  great  lines,  and,  as  expected,   don’t  hold  back  with  any  of  them.  “Go   away  or  I  am  going  to  have  you  killed.”   was  my  personal  favourite.   While  Genevieve  Williamson  could   get  laughs  with  just  a  look,  not  as  easy   to  do  as  she  made  it  seem. A  new  company  is  probably  held   together  with  bits  of  string,  sticky-­‐tape   and  will-­‐power.   There’s  been  a  lot  of  doubling  up  of   tasks,  and  a  lot  of  help  and  goodwill   from  other  companies,  but  it  has  paid   off.  I  trust  we  shall  see  a  lot  more  from   Butterfly  Theatre.

5


REVIEWS November 2013

A CHORUS OF DISAPPROVAL

LOVE RIDES THE RAILS

THE MYSTERY OF THE HANSOM CAB

St Jude’s Players

Blackwood Players

Adelaide Repertory Theatre

Review by Lesley Reed November 14 2013

Review by Janice Bailey November 15 2013

Review by Richard Lane November 21 2013

Guided by  the  experienced  hands  of   director  Kym  Clayton,  St  Jude’s   Players’  production  of  Alan   Ayckbourn’s  play  within  a  play,  is   simply  hilarious.

Erik Strauts  returned  to  the   Blackwood  Players  to  direct  a  well   cast,  entertaining  production.

The Rep’s  current  production  is   identical  in  format  to  one  they  did  three   years  ago.  A  turgid  yet  quaintly  funny   melodrama  interspersed  with    popular   old  -­‐fashioned  singalong  songs.

The Pendon  Amateur  Light  Operatic   Society’s  production  of  The  Beggar’s   Opera  is  beset  by  envy,  infidelity  and   innuendo.  Mix  in  a  constant  need  for   casting  changes,  an  irresistibly   attractive  new  actor,  as  well  as  a  touch   of  corruption  and  you  have  a  recipe  for   side-­‐splitting  laughs  and  bedlam. Andrew  Clark  was  superb  as  the  opera   society’s  frenetic,  proudly  Welsh   director,  Dafydd  Ap  Llewellyn,  a  man   who  has  an  opinion  about  each  of  his   actors  but  in  reality  notices  nothing. James  Spargo  was  excellent  as  Guy   Jones.  A  fine  singer,  James  is  also  a  good   actor,  displaying  naivety  and   bemusement  as  his  character  struggled   to  deal  with  the  intrigue  and  lust   seething  under  the  surface  of  the   opera  society. Another  standout  was  Georgia  Bolton   as  the  rebellious  teenager,  Linda   Washbrook.  She  embodied  the  role  in   her  every  expression  and  gesture  and   possesses  a  beautiful  singing  voice.   Bernadette  Abberdan  was  delightful  as   enthusiastic  Society  member  and  Linda’s   doting  mum  and  Lindsay  Dunn  was   wonderful  as  melodramatic  actor,  Ted.   Megan  Humphries  produced  a   nuanced  and  funny  characterisation  as   the  director’s  vulnerable  wife. Maxine  Grubel  and  Anthony  Clapp   were  terrific  as  the  swinging  couple   and  David  Lockwood  was  equally   good  as  Jarvis  Huntley-­‐Pike.     Anthony  Vawser  stood  out  amongst   the  remaining  strong  cast.

6

If you  love  a  good,  old-­‐fashioned   melodrama  where  you  can  hiss  and  boo   the  villain,  and  sigh  with  the  heroine,   you  would  thoroughly  enjoy  this   production,  as  I  did.   Opening  night  attracted  an  enthusiastic   audience  representing  a  range  of  ages,   even  including  a  baby  who  joined  in   with  the  audience  interaction!    The   table  seating,  which  allowed  the   audience  to  enjoy  a  drink  or  a  coffee,   added  to  the  pleasure  of  the  evening. Damien  White  was  suitably  sleazy  and   convincing  as  the  dastardly  Mr  Simon   Darkway,  with  James  Barbary  as  his   equally  despicable  side-­‐kick  also   delivering  a  strong  performance  –  he   would  have  been  equally  at  home  in   Oliver  Twist  or  Fiddler  on  the  Roof.     Rosie  Williams  as  Miss  Prudence   Hopewell  was  well  suited  to  the   heroine  role,  injecting  an  air  of   vulnerability  and  innocence.  

As with  all  melodramas,  the  plot  is  shot   full  of  holes,  but  it  centres  around  the     mysterious  disappearance  and  death  of   Owen  White  who  went  for  a  trip  to   Glenelg  in  a  Hansom  cab  and  was  never   seen  again.  Enter  Felix    the  dastardly   villain  whose  evil  doings  are  soon   revealed. Director  Gary  Anderson,  stepping  in   after  the  original  incumbent’s  illness,   has  produced  a  funny  show  with  many   belly  laughs  and  some  “blue”  lines  from     a  wonderful  stand  -­‐up  scene  from  Ethel   Schwartz  (Is  that  really  who  it  is?)   That  said,  melodrama  should  played   way  over  the  top  so  that  we  can  laugh   at  the  play  and  also  at  a  form  of  theatre   once  taken  so  seriously.   Penni  Hamilton-­Smith  couldn’t  have   been  any  “bigger”  and  was  marvellous   in  her  role  as  Sal  Rawlins.

The remaining  main  players  -­‐  Jarrod   Chave  as  the  hero,  Mr  Truman   Penedennis,  Kay  Kelly  Lindbergs  as   Mrs  Marigold  Hopewell,  Anita  Canala   as  Madam  Carlotta  and  Annie  Gladdis   as  Fifi  were  all  convincing  in  their   character  portrayal.  

Barry Hill  was  polished  as  the   villain  Felix,  but  could  have  been   more  menacing.  

The group  of  singers  enthusiastically   led  the  audience  in  some  well-­‐known   songs  of  the  era,  including  Meet  me  in  St   Louis,  Daisy,  By  the  light  of  the  Silvery   Moon  and  Clementine.    However,  I   would  have  preferred  they  had  learned   their  lyrics.

Others to  do  well  in  a  competent  cast   were  Jude  Hines  as  Mother   Guttersnipe,  Lindy  Le  Cornu  as  Rubina   Hamilton  doing  her  reprise  of  the   Balloon  Dance  and  Chris  Meegan, who  also  gave  a  lovely  rendition  of   Danny  Boy.

Good fun!

As Master  of  Ceremonies,  Joshua   Coldwell  was  masterful,  with  a   commanding  stage  presence  and  a   powerful  voice  to  jolly  us  all  along.


LUCK THE MUSICAL DAD’S ARMY

Tea Tree Players

Top of the Torrens Theatre Group

Noarlunga Theatre Co

Review by Paul Davies November 22 2013

Review by Kerry Cooper November 22 2013

Review by Janice Bailey November 22 2013

Be in  no  doubt:  I  am  a  fan  of  panto.   They  include  some  of  my  most   memorable  theatre  experiences,  I’m   sure  this  will  be  the  same  for  the  cast  of   Tea  Tree  Players’  thirty-­‐seventh   annual  pantomime.

There is  a  lesson  to  be  learnt  in  Top  of   the  Torrens  theatre  groups  latest   production  of  Luck  the  Musical.  

It was  wonderful  to  be  back  at   Noarlunga  Theatre  Company  for   the  opening  night  of  their  latest   production,  based  on  the  popular   television  show  written  by  Jimmy   Perry  and  David  Croft.  

Tina Cini  has  directed  a  cast  of  varied   abilities  who,  when  they  are  playing  to   their  strengths,  are  very  entertaining.  

Director David  Evans  has  assembled   an  enthusiastic  cast  to  breathe  life  into   the  story  of  good  versus  evil  or  in  this   case  good  luck  versus  bad  luck.   The  fractured  tale  begins  with  a  bet  to   see  who  is  more  powerful.  

The difficulty  with  pantomime  can  be   that  it  can  expose  your  weaknesses,  you   have  to  act  and  perform,  you  have  to   know  the  rules  so  that  you  can  break   them,  and  you  have  to  have  absolute   confidence,  even  if  you’re  faking  it!

Mazel (good  luck)  played  convincingly   by  Kate  Farrer,  takes  a  hapless  young   man  Tam  under  her  wing  bestowing  on   him  all  her  good  fortune  only  to  have   Shlimazeli,  (bad  luck)  try  to  undo  all   her  good  deeds  after  a  year.  

A large  cast  give  room  here  only  to   mention  the  stand-­‐outs.  

The contrast  between  these  characters   was  obvious  and  it  needed  to  be  for  the   story  to  be  believable.  

Hayley Mitchell’s  fairy  was  gentle,   likeable  and  strong:  perfect.  Taylah   Cini  as  the  Learner  Fairy  was  delightful,   and  the  part  my  five-­‐year-­‐old  daughter   most  identified  with.  Damon  Hill  and   Gabe  Steinhauer  as  the  Ugly  Sisters   were  so  obviously  having  a  great  time   their  interactions  with  the  audience   worked  well.  I  only  think  they  could   have  been  nastier  to  one-­‐another.   Amber  Platten’s  Cinderella  was   perfectly  lovely. The  microphone  was  not  needed  for   the  songs  in  this  space  and  the  big-­‐ screen  was  a  bit  of  a  distraction.  Amber   did  not  need  the  support.  Similarly  the   sing-­‐a-­‐long! The  set  was  brilliant.  I  wanted  to   applaud  the  forest!  The  script  worked   well,  and  rhyming  couplets  for  the  fairy   must  have  been  difficult  to  write,   although  a  little  more  updating  would   have  helped. The  most  important  thing  of  course  is   did  the  kids  enjoy  it?  The  answer  with   mine  was  an  unequivocal  “Yes”.  We’ll   be  back  next  year  for  panto  number   thirty-­‐eight!

Sharryn Yelland  as  Shlimazeli  had   a  strong  voice  that  made  up  for  what   appeared  to  be  a  lack  of  energy   at  times. Younger  cast  members  Liam  Harding   and  Amelia  Noel  were  delightful  as  in   love  duo  Tam  and  the  princess.   Amelia  performed  with  confidence  and   her  musical  number  Goodbye  in  Act   Two  was  a  highlight.       Josh  Lamborn  as  Kamstan  was   excellent,  he  moved  effortlessly  across   the  stage  and  sang  with  confidence.   Other  standouts  were  The  King  and   Grillida,  played  respectively  by  Mal   Taylor  and  Lea  Rebane  as  well  as   the  ensemble  who  made  good  use  of   the  space.   Jenny  Spellacy  did  a  fine  job  fitting  the   cast  with  a  colourful  array  of  costumes. Musical  director  Paul  Sinkinson   should  take  a  bow  for  his  fine   soundtrack  and  multiple  sound  effects,   for  without  his  efforts  the  show  would   have  fallen  flat!

REVIEWS November 2013

CINDERELLA

Dad’s Army  was  a  long-­‐running  sitcom   about  the  Home  Guard  during  the   Second  World  War.   Stephen  Lee  continues  to  steer  this   successful  community  theatre,  the   enthusiastic  opening  night  audience   testament  to  his  and  others’  hard  work   and  commitment  to  bringing  theatre  to   the  local  community.   Brady  Gambling,  as  a  first-­‐time   director,  assembled  a  talented  cast  who   obviously  enjoyed  working  together.   The  set  worked  very  well  and  the   adaptation  of  ‘episodes’  of  a  television   show  translated  extremely  well  on   stage.  The  show  consists  of  three  very   funny  episodes,  The  Deadly  Attachment,   Mum’s  Army  and  The  Godiva  Affair. The  cast,  comprising  a  range  of  ages   and  varied  experience,  without   exception,  performed  their  roles   convincingly  and  with  enthusiasm. Notable  performances  included   Stephen  Popowski  who  certainly  did   justice  to  the  role  of  Captain   Mainwaring,  Archie  Barnes  as  the   comical  Scottish  Private  Fraser  and   Jake  Johnson  as  the  ingenuous  Private   Walker.   It  was  good  to  see  the  delightful  Linda   Lawson  ‘strutting  her  stuff’  in  dual   roles  of  Mrs  Fox  and  Mrs  Gray,  in  her   debut  at  NTC.   Congratulations  to  the  whole   production  team  and  cast  for  a   polished,  well  presented  and   thoroughly  enjoyable  show.

7


If undeliverable, return to:

PRINT POST

THEATRE ASSOCIATION OF SA INC PO Box 187 PARK HOLME SA 5043 Encore Magazine

Get your personal copy of ENCORE mailed each month! Everything you want to know, News from SA’s amateur theatre scene, Coming soon previews, Opportunities to audition or direct, Reviews of past shows, Every Month! For just $25 you receive 11 issues of Encore a year, PLUS a username and password for access to the members area of our website so you can read our reviews as soon as they are posted.

Sign up NOW at tasaonline.org.au

POSTAGE PAID AUSTRALIA

PP 535513/0007

PREFER SNAIL MAIL? Mail this form: TASA PO Box 187 PARK HOLME SA 5043, Enclose a cheque, or deposit the funds into the TASA bank account. Theatre Association of SA Inc BSB 105124 Account 457326840. Please advise us of your transfer at treasurer@tasaonline.org.au

Name ............................................................................................................. Address ......................................................................................................... ...................................................................................................................... Postcode ...........Email .................................................................................... Preferred phone .........................My membership is I am applying for

Group membership $75

renewal

new

Individual membership $25

Signed ..................................................Date ...................................................

Encore Magazine December 2013  

The Theatre Association's monthly magazine of news and reviews from South Australia's theatre community

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you