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THE MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE THEATRE ASSOCIATION OF SA INC VOL 28 NO 7 AUGUST 2013

NOW IS THE WINTER OF OUR DISCONTENT Tricky Dicky at Theatre Guild! Page 5

LATEST REVIEWS Phantom, Oliver, Hay Fever, Alice, Fox and Drinking Habits Page 7

Wildly funny, terribly serious Therry are staging Noel Coward’s “oh so stylish” Private Lives this month Imagine walking  out  onto  the  hotel  balcony  on  the  first  night   of  your  honeymoon  only  to  find  your  ex-­‐wife  is  in  the  room   next  door! Elyot  is  celebrating  his  second  marriage  to  Sybil  in  a  stylish   hotel  in  France.    In  the  adjoining  suite  his  former  spouse   Amanda  is  in  romantic  mood  with  her  new  and  much  younger   husband  Victor. The  scene  is  set  for  quite  a  fight  in  Noel  Coward’s  fast-­‐paced   comedy  Private  Lives,  which  is  being  directed  by  Barry  Hill  for   Therry  Dramatic  Society  from  August  22. John  Koch  and  Dianne  Lang  star  as  the  divorcees  forced  into   bickering  on  the  terrace  after  a  volatile  marriage  and  five-­‐year   separation  on  what  should  be  a  romantic  holiday  for  two! Elyot  and  Amanda  separately  beg  their  new  mates  to  leave  the   hotel  with  them  immediately,  but  both  new  spouses  refuse  to   cooperate  and  each  storms  off  to  dine  alone.   Realising  they  still  love  each  other  and  regret  having  divorced,   Elyot  and  Amanda  run  off  together  to  her  flat  in  Paris.    But  the   story  doesn’t  end  there. Written  by  the  master  of  acerbic  wit  in  1930,  the  play  includes   a  famous  love  scene  originally  regarded  as  too  risqué!      It’ll  be   fun  to  see  how  tame  it  appears  to  a  modern  audience  at   Adelaide’s  Arts  Theatre. The  original  production,   starring  Noel  Coward  himself   with  Gertrude  Lawrence  and   Laurence  Olivier,  received   mixed  reviews  yet  the   playwright  was  undeterred.

“the play includes a famous love scene originally regarded as too risqué.”

"The critics  described  Private  Lives  variously  as   'tenuous,  thin,  brittle,  gossamer,  iridescent,  and  delightfully   daring',”  he  wrote.

John Koch and Dianne Lang as Elyot and Amanda in Private Lives

“All of  which  connoted  in  the  public  mind  cocktails,  repartee  and   irreverent  allusions  to  copulation,  thereby  causing  a  gratifying   number  of  respectable  people  to  queue  up  at  the  box  office!” The  play  has  been  made  into  a  1931  film,  adapted  several   times  for  television  and  revived  at  least  a  half  dozen  times  each   in  the  West  End  and  on  Broadway  attracting  a  wide  range  of   actors  including  Richard  Burton,  Alan  Rickman,   Matthew  Macfadyen,  Elizabeth  Taylor,  Maggie  Smith   and  Kim  Cattrall.   Allison  Scharber,  Brad  Martin  and  Tamara  Bennetts  also   feature  in  Therry’s  production. What: Private Lives When: August 22-31 Where: Arts Theatre, Angas St, City How: 8296 3477 or 8410 5515 from August 19


ENCORE EDITORIAL August 2013

Under review

ENCORE MAGAZINE

The monthly publication of the Theatre Association of SA Inc.

Constructive criticism

Editor: Dave Simms E: encore-editor@tasaonline.org.au T: 0409 255 181

“Let’s face  it,  we  all  love  a  good  review,  and   hate  a  bad  one.    Frankly  many  of  us  are  glad   to  get  any  review  at  all!

Senior writer: Benjamin Brooker SUBMISSIONS AND DEADLINES: Members can provide flyers, photos, articles, media releases, notices by 15th of the month for free inclusion.

That’s one  of  the  reasons  we  include   reviews  in  Encore.

Please supply flyers or posters as in colour in portrait A4 shape. Colour photos should be at least the size of a postcard and between 500kb and 2MB.

As the  media  world  changes  many  groups   simply  won’t  get  a  review  apart  from  the   one  we  aim  to  provide. Editor Dave Simms

And as  part  of  our  TASA  charter  to   encourage  best  practice  in  non-­‐profit   theatre  we’re  renewing  our  focus  on  providing  reviews   which  offer  constructive  peer-­‐to-­‐peer  criticism.   Our  reviews  should  provide  you  with  praise  for  a  job   well  done  and/or  suggestions  for  improving  aspects  of   your  production.

To help  achieve  this  we’ve  expanded  our  team  of  reviewers   to  include  Janice  Bailey,  Paul  Davies  and  Lesley  Reed.     They  join  Kerry  Cooper,  Fran  Edwards,  Ceri  Horner,   Richard  Lane,  Jacqui  Mulady,  Dave  Smith,  Sally  Putnam   and  Dave  Smith.  All  our  reviewers  volunteer  their  time,  so   thanks  team! And  special  thank  you  to  Wendy  Mildren  who  bows  out   this  month.    Thanks  for  driving  to  all  those  shows,  Wendy.

NOTICEBOARD August 2013

Hopefully our  reviews  not  only  encourage  larger  audiences,   but  also  give  you  some  tips  to  get  even  better  next  time!”

AUDITIONS DATE: Sunday August 4 at 1.30pm VENUE: Bakehouse The atre, 255 Angas St, AD ELAIDE SHOW:  Thief of Time COMPANY:  Unseen Th eatre DIRECTOR:  Pamela Mu nt  SEASON:  November 8-2 3 REHEARSALS: Tue, Thu . Sun evenings, from Aug 26 ROLES: Susan (DEATH 's granddaughter, and a school teacher) (stage age 20' s) (7 scenes), Madame Frout (Headmistress) (middle aged) (1 scene only), Mrs . War (nagging wife of WAR) (middle aged) (2 scenes only), Famine (any age over 18 or gen der) (2 scenes only), Pes tilence (preferably male, any age over 18) (2 scenes only) Contact the director – pamela@unseentheatre .com.au

GUIDE AWARDS ADELAIDE THEATRE ber 14 from 6.30pm DATE: Saturday Septem ELAIDE , 262 Carrington St, AD ntre Ce ian VENUE: The Ital s ard SHOW: Curtain Call Aw rse meal, drink on arrival, Ticket includes three cou ons. n Call Awards presentati entertainment and Curtai . kets are $80 Dress code is formal Tic om/49734 Bookings: trybooking.c

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We invite submissions for publication. Any material received will be taken as permission to publish. The Editor reserves the right to reject or edit all contributions. Expressions of opinion by any contributor must not be considered to be the opinion of the editor or of the association and no responsibility will be accepted for any matters arising therefrom. Advertisers are advised that all advertising copy is their responsibility under the Trade Practices Act and the Copyright Act. Information is assumed to be correct at the time of printing and no responsibility is taken for any errors or omissions. THEATRE ASSOCIATION OF SA INC. PO Box 187 PARK HOLME SA 5043 Affiliated with Association of Community Theatres, NSW

tasaonline.org.au facebook.com/TheatreAssociationofSouthAustralia

The TASA Committee: President: Fran Edwards; Vice-President: Laraine Ball; Secretary: Jacqui Mulady; Treasurer: Patsy Thomas; Committee members: Therese Hornby, Aaron MacDonald, Paul Rodda, Dave Simms.

WCOMER MBLE ROLE -SUIT NE YOUNG MALE ENSE ious roles in ing lad’ needed for var ROLE: 20s/30s fit ‘strapp er, tak der Un Ambulance Man, ensemble cast - Lout, Would suit s. role ing eak -sp non small Workman, various other to learn. n kee and but enthusiastic someone new to theatre Van SHOW: The Lady in the yers COMPANY: Stirling Pla DIRECTOR: Dave Simms 9 SEASON: October 4-1 rs Thu , Tue LS: SA AR REHE Dave Simms at Contact the director 181 com or call 0409 255 ac. @m davemixedsalad

NEWS FROM M ARIE CLARK M USICAL THEATR E It gives us great ple asure to announce that after a Special General Meeting, it was voted to ke ep Marie Clark aliv decided that we e. It was will put our major production for the half of this year (As second pects of Love) int o recess, but spen efforts fund raisin d our g. We are hoping that after 6 month can re stage this s off we production in 2014 . Stay tuned for mo re info and how yo u can be involved the coming week over s. More info: marie clark.asn.au


PREVIEWS August 2013

The waltz master’s musical feast SALOS presents The Gipsy Baron - Johann Strauss II’s comic operetta

Native American lore and music Pocahontas arrives in Stirling

SALOS prepare to enjoy the wonderful music of the immortal Strauss.

“The Gipsy  Baron  is  a  perfect  example   of  why  Johann  Strauss  remains   regarded  as  a  master  of  the  waltz,”   says  Pam  Tucker  who’s  in  the   director’s  chair  for  the  SALOS   production  of  the  comic  operetta   which  opens  on  August  22.   The  delightful  tale  is  set  in  Hungary  in   the  summer  of  1850  and  tells  of  the   love  between  Saffi,  the  gipsy  princess,   and  Sandor   Barinkay.   Returning  from   “A lively band Hungary  after   the  death  of  his   of gipsy women flirt exiled  father,   with the men.” Barinkay   resumed   ownership  of  his   family’s  castle  and  estates,   both  of  which  are  inhabited  by  gipsies.   Barinkay  then  took  the  title  of  the   Gipsy  Baron. Czipra,  the  queen  of  the  gipsies,  gives   news  of  Barinkay’s  imminent  arrival   to  Kalman  Zsupan  who  owns  the   adjoining  property.   Complications  arise  as  his  daughter   Arletta  and  housekeeper  Mirabella   plot  to  attract  the  attention  of  their   new  neighbour  and  marry  him,  thus   inheriting  the  gold  rumoured  to  have   been  hidden  in  the  castle.  Kareska,  the  

Royal Commissioner,  is  another   plotting  to  acquire  the  treasure. Such  well-­‐known  songs  as  Gipsy  Love,   The  Treasure  Waltz  and  Danube,  River   of  Dreams,  are  highlights  of  the  show,   while  popular  duets  Dare  I  Believe  My   Heart  and  Love  Can  Be  True  will  take   those  who  remember  back  to  the  good   old  days  of  Jeanette  MacDonald  and   Nelson  Eddy.     Red-­‐coated  hussars  will  make  a   colourful  entrance  as  they  march   triumphantly  home  from  the  war  and   tell  of  their  experiences  In  the  Army. The  lead  roles  will  be  played  by   soprano  Katrin  Treloar  and  tenor   James  Murphy,  whilst  newcomers   Ashleigh  McFadden  and  Chris  Evans   will  add  to  the  comic  element  provided   by  baritone  Matthew  Holding. A  lively  band  of  gipsy  women,  led  by   contralto  Spring  Whenan  and  soprano   Victoria  Williamson,  will  light  up  the   stage  as  they  flirt  with  the  men. Other  roles  will  be  played  by   contraltos  Sandra  Fameli  and  Joy   Bishop,  baritone  Noel  Carthew,   soprano  Christine  Southby  and  bass   Greg  Paterson. What: The Gipsy Baron When: August 22-25 Where: Tower Arts Centre, Pasadena How: 8294 6582 or salos.websyte.com.au

The rhythmic  beat  of  tom-­‐toms  will  be   heard  the  length  and  breadth  of   Avenue  Rd  in  Stirling  from  August  10. The  senior  students  of  the  Hills  Youth   Theatre  are  staging  the  dramatical   musical  Pocahontas. A  delight  for  all  age  groups,  this   charming  musical  adventure  written   by  Vera  Morris  with  music  by   Scott  Deturk  will  be  directed  by   Judy  Sampson. Pocahontas  is  the  daughter  of  the   mighty  Algonquin  Chief  Powhatan.     The  princess  delights  in  playing  with   Raven,  Wolf  and  Squirrel.     Pocahontas  has  also  made  friends  with   the  English  settlers  of  Jamestown,  a   community  struggling  with  starvation   and  sickness.     This  enchanting  musical  is  graced  with   a  wonderful  cast  of  characters:    Little   Running  Rabbit,  Brave  Eagle,  Aunt   Morning  Star,  Forest  Spirits,  Mother   Earth  and,  of  course,  the  people  of   Jamestown.     Filled  with  Native  American  lore  and   beautiful  music,  this  play  is  true  to  the   original  legend.    Audiences  will  be   swept  away  with  DeTurk's  original   music,  featuring  such  songs  as  Live   Forever,  No  Common  Ground  and  the   beautiful  Your  Heart  Always  Knows. What: Pocahontas When: August 10-18 Where: Stirling Community Theatre How: 8339 3931

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PREVIEWS August 2013

Meet my husbands Multiple hubbies and mistaken identities at Tea Tree Players! If you  want  to  get  ahead  in  advertising  you’ve  got  to  be  good   enough  to  sell  ice  to  the  eskimos.      Or  sausages  to  the  Swiss! But  bangers  aren’t  the  only  thing  that  need  some  creative   spin  in  Meet  My  Husbands,  a  Fred  Carmichael  farce  at   Tea  Tree  Players  from  August  21. Advertising  executive  Elaine  Scott    is  in  Florida  to  meet   the  Mulgrews,  some  European  clients  who  she  has  to   convince  to  adopt  her  agency’s  campaign  for  Swiss   Mountain  Sausages.   She’s  going  to  need  all  her  powers   of  persuasion  to  convince  this   tough  cookie! “Can Elaine’s Mr  Mulgrew    insists  the   campaign  and  all  those   connected  with  it  must  reflect   wholesome  family  values,  so   Elaine  desperately  needs  to  find   an  on-­‐the-­‐spot  husband  to  help   with  the  sales  pitch.    

campaign to boost banger sales survive? Can she save the sausages?

She sets  her  sights  on  beach  bum  Tim  Billings  -­‐  who  she   hires  to  pose  as  her  spouse. In  true  farcical  style  her  real  husband  arrives  unexpectedly   at  the  hotel  and  chaos  ensues.    

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Brendon Cooney, Selena Britz, Adrian Heness and Ben Kempster

The balcony  between  their  hotel  suites  becomes  a  comic   causeway,  as  they  try  to  find  out  why  a  newspaperwoman  is   prying  about,  who  Tim  Billings  really  is,  and  why  Elaine’s   opportunistic  former  husband  has  appeared  on  the  scene. Can  Elaine’s  campaign  to  boost  banger  sales  survive?  Can   she  save  the  sausages? Selena  Britz  stars  as  Elaine  Scott,  with  Nick  Hargreaves  as   Mulgrew,  Brendon  Cooney  as  Tim,  plus  Adrian  Heness,   Chris  Galipo  and  Ben  Kempster  among  the  cast. Damon  Hill  directs  this  hilarious,  fast-­‐paced  comedy  from   the  writer  of  more  than  40  plays. What: Meet my husbands When: August 21-31 Where: Tea Tree Players Theatre, Yatala Vale Rd, Surrey Downs How: 8289 5266


Benjamin Brooker previews Adelaide University Theatre Guild’s production of Shakespeare’s favourite villain Richard III. Richard III  remains  amongst  the  most   frequently  performed  of  Shakespeare’s   histories.  Though  historically  dubious,   its  nature  as  a  star  vehicle  and  its   themes  of  guilt,  betrayal  and  power  at   all  costs  have  seen  it  re-­‐imagined  by   successive  generations  of  film  and   theatre  makers.  It  has  spawned  two   immortal  silver  screen  performances  –   by  Laurence  Olivier  in  1955,  and   Ian  McKellen  in  1995  in  a  version   which  transported  events  to  an   alternate,  fascistic  Britain  in  the  1930s.  

PREVIEWS August 2013

I am determined to prove a villain, and hate the idle pleasures of these days

Director Megan  Dansie  is  bringing  her   unique  vision  of  the  play  to  the   University  of  Adelaide  Theatre   Guild  this  month.   One  reason  for  the  seemingly   unflagging  interest  in  the  play,  she   opines,  is  its  adaptability. “I  saw  a  very  good  English  production   twenty  or  twenty-­‐five  years  ago  which   had  Richard  as  a  shaven-­‐headed   businessman,”  she  smiles. Megan’s  starting  off  point  for  this   production,  however,  was  not  the   corporate  world  or  the  boardroom,  but   imagining  the  effects  of  40  years  of  civil   war  on  a  contemporary  society.   “In  the  early  stages  of  rehearsals,  we   had  discussions  about  the  London   riots,  about  what  has  gone  on  in  Egypt   and  Syria…” Shakespeare’s   play,  the  last  in  a   “our Richard is a cycle  of  four   psychological, history  plays,   not physical begins  after   monster” decades  of  civil   war  between  the   House  of  York  and   the  House  of  Lancaster  have   ended  with  peace  under  the  reign  of   King  Edward  IV  and  the  victorious   Yorks.    Edward’s  younger  brother   Richard,  however,  resents  the  King’s   power.  Ambitious  and  bitter  about  his   physical  deformity,  Richard  aspires  to   the  throne  and  is  determined  to  kill   anyone  who  gets  in  his  way. The  historical  accuracy  of  the  play  has   been  hotly  contested  over  the  years.    It  

Paul Duldig, Bart Csorba and Celine O’Leary

is widely  believed  the  play  was  written   to  demonise  Richard,  and  turn  his   successor,  Henry  VII,  into  a  hero. “I’m  definitely  of  the  ‘Richard  is   innocent’  school,”  Megan  agrees. “I  mean,  the  play  is  basically   Tudor  propaganda.”       The  one  thing  that  everybody   remembers  about  Richard  III  is  that   limp.  Olivier’s  rendering  of  Richard’s   deformity,  described  by  Professor   Richard  Harrison  as  “the  slit-­‐eyed,   snaky,  deformed  embodiment  of  evil”,   has  passed  into  theatrical  legend  and   remains  the  play’s  most  enduring  image.   Megan  says  her  Richard,  to  be   portrayed  by  Bart  Csorba,  will  be   quite  different,  though  she  is  reluctant   to  reveal  too  much. “Bart  has  really  built  the  character   from  the  inside  out,”  she  says.    “We   have  had  discussions  about  scoliosis   and  so  on,  but  our  Richard  is  a   psychological,  not  physical  monster.”         One  of  the  key  difficulties  Megan  has   faced  is  the  play’s  enormous  cast.   “We  have  22  actors  and  over  90   costumes,”  she  says  with  a  mixture  of   awe  and  weariness,  “and  that’s  after   compressing  numerous  roles,   removing  some  altogether,  and  cutting  

about 800  lines!”   Megan  is  playing  her  cards  close  to  her   chest  in  regards  to  the  play’s  staging,   but  warns  audiences  not  to  expect  an   elaborate  set.   “We’re  definitely  going  to  use  the  Little   Theatre  space  to  its  fullest,”  she   enthuses,  “but  lighting  and  sound  are   going  to  be  far  more  important.”   A  street  artist  has  been  commissioned   to  contribute  to  the  production’s  design.   “I  can’t  say  too  much,”  Megan  says  in  a   hushed  tone,  “but  I  can  promise  you   the  whole  thing  is  going  to  look  and   sound  incredible!”     In  addition  to  Bart,  the  large  cast   comprises  a  diverse  range  of  new  and   experienced  faces  including  Alex   Antoniou,  Rachel  Burfield,  Tony   Busch,  Gina  Cameron,  Joshua   Coldwell,  Bart  Csorba,  Peter  Davies,   Geoff  Dawes,  Paul  Duldig,  Alice   Edgley,  Gary  George,  Miriam  Keane,   Steve  Marvanek,  Imogen  Nicholas,   Celine  O’Leary,  Vanessa  Redmond,   Cate  Rogers,  Sam  Rogers,  Tim   Williams,  Jamie  Wright,  Jonathan   Zagler  and  Amin  Zargarian. What: Richard III When: August 3-17 Where: Little Theatre, University of Adelaide How: adelaide.edu.au/theatreguild or BASS

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INSTANT INTERVIEW August 2013

ENCORE INSTANT INTERVIEW Director and performer Pam Tucker answers our quick fire questions about her theatrical life ★What’s your  happiest  theatre   memory?  Playing  Marianne  in  The   New  Moon  and  secretly  singing  One   Kiss  to  my  husband  who  was  sitting  in   the  audience. ★What  was  your  worst  theatre   moment?  When  I  forgot  the  words  in   Ruddigore  and  made  up  a  whole  verse   about  nothing. ★The  best  lesson  I  ever  learned  was… Never  panic,  even  when  your  costume   comes  adrift.    Keep  looking  at  the   audience  and  pretend  that  all  is  well! ★What’s  the  trickiest  thing  you’ve   attempted  in  theatre  ?  Ad  libbing  with   Pooh  Ba  in    The  Mikado  for  three   minutes  while  waiting  for  Yum  Yum   and  Nanki  Poo  to  come  on  stage.    They   were  watching  the  show  from  back-­‐ stage  eating  ice-­‐creams! ★The  time  I  get  most  nervous   is.....Just  before  going  on  stage,  or   when  the  crits  are  about  to  come  out.

★What is  your  most  treasured   theatre  memento  or  gift?  A  letter  of   thanks  from  the  cast  of  Pirates  of   Penzance,  after  directing  my  first  show. ★My  theatre  superstition  is..Don’t   say  ‘Break  a  leg.”  I  did,  just  before  a   show,  skiing  at  Falls  Creek. ★What’s  a  secret  or  tip  you  can   share?  Record  all  your  lines  and  songs   and  play  them  back  in  the  car. ★The  person  I  admire  most  is…The   wonderful  musical  conductors  (Peter   Potts,  Helen  Loveday)  who  have   control  of  the  show  once  it  starts. ★What  was  the  last  play  you  saw  or   read  and  was  it  any  good?     St  Judes’  The  Fox  on  the  Fairway.    It   was  very  funny. ★What’s  your  biggest  theatre  gripe? Performers  who  don’t  turn  up  for   rehearsals. ★  What’s  the  biggest  challenge  in  

your current  project?  Getting  the   humour  and  excitement  of  The  Gipsy   Baron  through  to  the  audience. ★  The  show  I  dream  of  doing  is… Annie  Get  Your  Gun ★What  are  you  doing  next?Directing   the  SALOS  Christmas  show  –  the  200th   show  I  have  performed  in/directed. Pam Tucker directs The Gipsy Baron for SALOS When: August 22-25 Where: Tower Arts Centre, Pasadena How: 8294 6582

Hills Youth Theatre proudly presents

Pocahontas Written by Vera Morris. Music by Scott DeTurk. Directed by Judy Sampson.

Performance times August 2013

Sat 10th @ 5.30pm. Sun 11th @ 2.30pm. Friday 16th @ 7.30pm. Sat 17th @ 5.30pm. Sun 18th @ 2.30pm.

BY WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Kids, come dressed asite your favour story bookr a fo character age walk on st At the Stirling Community Theatre, 7 Avenue Road, Stirling Tickets available from 22 July 2013 at Matilda Bookshop, 8 Mt Barker Road, Stirling. Ph: 8339 3931

MEGAN DANSIE RICHARD PARKHILL With BART CSORBA as Richard Directed by

Adults $15.00, Child/Concession $12.00 Family $48.00 (2 adults, 2 children) $1.50 per each ticket booking fee

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Lighting Design by

SAT 3, TUES-SAT 6-10 & 13-17 AUGUST 2013, 7.30PM LITTLE THEATRE The Cloisters (Off Victoria Drive), University of Adelaide TICKETS $28 Full / $23 Concession BOOKINGS www.adelaide.edu.au/theatreguild* or BASS 131 246* (*fee applies)

The Theatre Guild acknowledges the generous support of the University of Adelaide as its principal sponsor


2061 A SPACE IDIOCY

Matt Byrne Media

Tea Tree Players Youth

Review by Dave Smith July 4 2013

Review by Dave Smith July 11 2013

Review by Ceri Horner July 19 2013

Having taken  the  courageous  decision   to  tackle  The  Phantom  of  the  Opera,   director  Matt  Byrne  succeeded  in   capturing  its  essential  darkness  and   mystery.  Rodney  Hrvatin  added  to   that  with  his  adept  handling  of  the   concealed  orchestra.

The Tea  Tree  Players  do  a  lot  of   things  well.  Developing  young   performers  is  certainly  one  of  them.   Furthermore,  they  retain  them,  often   for  many  years.  Consequently  their   youth  and  junior  groups  have  a   pleasing  balance  of  experience.  

Based on  the  classic  Charles  Dickens   novel  Oliver  Twist  this  musical  was   adapted  in  1960  with  book,  music  and   lyrics  by  Lionel  Bart.

The set  and  costumes  were  striking   and  effective  in  bringing  the  right  mood   to  the  piece.  This  production  did  well  to   adapt  them  to  the  Arts  Theatre’s   relatively  restricted  performance  area.

That was  obvious  in  their  production  of   2061  A  Space  Idiocy,  a  comic,  far-­‐ fetched  space  musical,  co-­‐directed  by   Penny  and  Michaela  Phillips.

Although well  known,  the  story  needs   to  be  clearly  portrayed  and  this   production  managed  that  well.   Michael  Bates  was  a  commanding   figure  as  the  Phantom  and  he  grew  in   confidence  and  power  as  the  play   progressed,  bringing  a  broad  dramatic   and  vocal  range  to  his  performance.   Ellonye  Keniry  provided  a  vulnerable   foil  to  Michael’s  character.    She,  too,   brought  an  increasing  depth  to   Christine’s  character  through  the   course  of  the  action. Will  Daniels  looked  the  part  as  Raoul   and  carried  himself  well.  David  Gauci   as  Piangi  and  Dione  Baker  as  Carlotta   were  splendidly  satirical  as  the   company’s  opera  leads,  while  James   McCluskey-­Garcia  and  Michael   Williams  worked  well  with  each  other   as  the  owners.   While  there  were  some  early  problems   with  hesitation,  pitch  and  timing,  the   company  worked  well  to  bring  unity   and  purpose  to  the  production.   They  handled  the  ensemble  singing   well.    Prima  Donna  was  a  hit,  as  was   Masquerade  which  opened  Act  2.   Sue  Pole’s  tight  choreography  was   prominent  in  that  piece  too. All  power  to  Matt  Byrne  Media  for   taking  on  the  challenge!

The cast  generally  handled  the  puns   and  corny  sight  gags  with  ease  even   when  the  audience  didn’t  quite  get   them.  Other  jokes  were  obvious,  such  as   the  ‘Show  some  guts’  line,  and  drew  both   laughs  and  good-­‐humoured  groans. There  were  several  impressive   performances.  The  cleaning  ladies,   Ethel  and  Hazel,  played  by  Zach  Taylor   and  Rhiannon  Shapcott  set  the  mood   with  life  and  humour.  Ethan  Dight  was   solid  as  the  Captain,  as  was  Lachlan   Blackwell  as  Spook.  Kelly  Campbell   looked  and  sounded  the  part  as   Princess  Barbie,  while  Joshua   Brownlie  as  SPC,  Jeremy  Smith  as  IXL   and  Coby  Hefford  as  Homebrand  were   lively  and  funny.   Caleb  Bond  stood  out  as  the  irritating   Spotsworth.  His  voice,  nervous  energy   and  mannerisms  were  reminiscent  of   Frank  Spencer  and  he  had  a  similar   effect  on  the  audience.  His  was  a  very   capable  and  confident  performance. The  choruses  worked  well,  especially   the  Silver  Androids  who  were  well   rehearsed.  The  recorded  music  was   well  balanced  with  the  voices  which,   refreshingly  enough,  did  not  need   amplification  for  either  individual  or   ensemble  singing. In  all,  Tea  Tree  Players  did  well  with   this  breezy  musical  comedy.

OLIVER! G & S Society

REVIEWS July 2013

PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

This terrific  production  was  performed   by  a  very  capable  and  talented  cast,  with   direction  and  choreography  by  David   Lampard  and  a  precise  and  tuneful   orchestra  conducted  by  Peter  Johns. Opening  night  featured  Jack   Raftopoulos  as  a  sweet  and  innocent   Oliver,  making  a  great  contrast  to   Isaiah  Fabro  playing  a  confident  and   cheeky  Artful  Dodger. The  adults  in  this  show  are  also  well   cast.    Rod  Shultz  has  a  voice  that  you   never  tire  of  hearing  and  showed  his   versatility  as  the  conniving  Fagin  who   managed  to  steal  a  scene  or  two! Emma  Bargery  was  perfect  as  the   cheap  and  cheerful  Nancy.    She  knows   how  to  sell  a  song  and  the  energy  lifted   every  time  she  lead  the  chorus. Paul  Talbot  was  wonderfully   menacing  as  Bill  Sikes,  creating  a   dangerous  and  disturbing  presence   every  time  he  loomed. There  were  also  great  performances   from  John  Greene  as  Mr  Bumble,   Wendy  Rayner  as  Old  Sally  and  David   Lampard  and  Vanessa  Lee  Shirley  as   Mr  and  Mrs  Sowerberry. Technical  elements  were  also  spot  on,   with  lighting  design  by  Daniel  Barber   working  extremely  well  with  the   brilliant  set  and  adding  to  the   dangerous  feel  of  industrial  London.       The  flawless  audio  was  designed  by   Matt  Curtis  and  operated  by  Jamie   Mensforth. The  director’s  interpretation  didn’t   have  the  energy  or  choreography  that   you  might  expect  in  the  big  musical   numbers,  and  the  projected  video  was   used  on  the  set  with  mixed  success.

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REVIEWS July 2013

HAY FEVER

FOX ON THE FAIRWAY

DISNEY’S ALICE IN WONDERLAND

St Jude’s Players

Adelaide Youth Theatre

Review by Lesley Reed July 20 2013

Review by Wendy Mildren July 25 2013

Review by Lesley Reed 26 July 2013

This comedy  of  manners  in  which  the   eccentric  and  self-­‐obsessed  Bliss  family   host  a  motley  assortment  of  house   guests  was  described  by  Noel  Coward   as  “one  of  the  most  difficult  plays  to   perform  that  I  have  encountered”.  

St Jude’s  latest  production  is  a  rollicking   farce  written  by  Ken  Ludwig  and   directed  by  Ian  Rigney  (affectionately   known  as  the  Master  of  Mirth).    

Curiouser and  curiouser…  how  did   Adelaide  Youth  Theatre  mount  such   a  disciplined,  delightfully  different   production  with  just  seven  full  days   of  rehearsals?

Blackwood Players

Congratulations to  Blackwood   Players  for  being  brave  enough  to   stage  it  with  a  generally  inexperienced   cast.  While  there  were  some  good   moments,  the  production  fell  short  on   several  fronts. The  writing  is  economical  and  razor   sharp,  so  pace  matters.  The  pace  on  the   night  I  saw  this  production  was  very   slow  and  the  set  was  disappointing;.    It   consisted  of  a  rundown  and  clearly   uncomfortable  two-­‐seater  together   with  other  assorted  furniture  on  a  bare   stage  which  did  not  achieve  the  relative   minimalism  director  Damien  White   wanted,  nor  did  is  suggest  the   privileged  life  of  the  Blisses. Rosie  Williams,  as  daughter  Sorel   Bliss,  was  the  most  successful  in   portraying  the  Coward  style.    Nicole   Seal,  as  mother  and  West  End  star,   Judith  Bliss,  was  solid,  but  less   shrillness  and  more  predatory   sexuality  was  needed.  Ben  Todd  didn’t   quite  hit  the  mark  in  the  difficult  role  of   the  cynical  author  and  father,  David   Bliss.  Mitchell  Lowe  was  clearly   nervous  in  his  role  as  Simon  Bliss  and   needed  to  develop  more  ‘brat’  as  the   spoiled  son. Scott  Brokenshire  and  Mikhaila   Dignam  successfully  portrayed  the   underlying  sense  of  confusion  and   belittlement  experienced  by  the   visitors.    Their  scene  together  when  the   hosts  deserted  them  was  delightful.  

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Paul Hutchison,  as  Sandy  Tyrell,  drew   giggles  from  the  start  and  Miffy  Davis,   as  Myra  Arundel,  was  suitably   sophisticated.

The show  is  all  a  farce  should  be  with   cues  picked  up  promptly  to  create  the   fast  pace. The  president  of  Quail  Valley  Gold  and   Country  Club  has  roped  in  a  star  golfer   in  a  desperate  bit  to  win  a  tournament   his  club  has  lost  five  years  running.     The  opposing  president  goads  him  into   a  $200,000  side  bet  then  gets  the  star   golfer  to  switch  sides! Andrew  Horwood  as  president   Bingham  was  splendid  using  his   expressive  face  and  body  wonderfully   well.    Lindsay  Dunn  played  Bell,  the   opposing  president,  well  complete  with   bilious  jumpers  and  annoying  little   giggle.    Shelley  Crooks  who  played   Pamela  Peabody,  the  Club  Secretary   was  superb,  and  nearly  stole  the  show   spitting  out  her  lines  with  great  venom   and  timing. Brady  Lloyd  used  his  gangly  body  to   great  effect  bringing  immense   athleticism  and  energy  to  the  role.     Charlotte  Batty  who  played  the  love  of   his  life,  Louise  Heinbedder  was   sufficiently  hysterical  and  girly  and   Joanne  St  Clair  as  Muriel  Bingham  was   great  as  the  strong  militant  woman   with  a  hidden  feminine  side. Ian  Rigney’s  direction  was  first  class   and  extracted  every  ounce  of  humour.     This  reviewer,  however,  is  not  a  great   fan  of  farce  and  the  opening  scene   where  everyone  is  running  in  and  out   of  doors  was  about  five  doors  too  many. The  set,  designed  by  Robert  Aust  and   built  by  a  cast  of  millions,  was   spectacular  and  dressed  to  perfection.     Lighting  and  sound  were  done   smoothly  and  efficiently.

Ably directed  by  Tori  Handley,   together  with  Serena  Martino-­ Williams’  fine  musical  direction,  the   assured  performances  of  the  7-­‐13-­‐ year-­‐old  Diamond  junior  cast   captivated  the  capacity  audience.   As  Alice,  Tanisha  Kirk-­Demetri  sang   beautifully  and  has  genuine  star   quality.  Nathan  Stafford  was  a  scene   stealer  with  his  charismatic  and  cocky   take  on  Caterpillar.  Elisabeth   Anderson  and  Amelia  Sanzo  were   delightful  as  Tweedle  Dum  and   Tweedle  Dee.  Bella  Baggio,  Eliza   Waterhouse  and  Mimi  Stanbury  had   great  comic  timing  as  the  disconnected   parts  of  the  Cheshire  Cat.  Jayden  Prelc   was  a  fine  White  Rabbit,  while  Paige   Dobie,  Montana  Vincent,  Hannah   Heading  and  India  Lumbers  sparkled   as  a  sassy  group  of  flowers.  Jacob   Maiolo,  Onor  Nottle,  Kieley   Donhardt  and  Rory  Adams  produced   terrific  characterisation  in  their   respective  roles  of  Mad  Hatter,  March   Hare,  Doormouse  and  DoDo  Bird.  Lucy   Grear  was  great  as  the  Queen  of   Hearts,  contrasting  well  against  the   sweet  King,  played  by  Richard   Mayfield.    The  ensemble  of  additional   young  performers  was  disciplined   and  energetic.     Technically  the  production  was  very   good,  despite  some  sound  issues.   Alexandra  Cornish’s  choreography   was  innovative  and  costumes  and   makeup  were  excellent. The  director,  musical  director  and   choreographer  are  youngsters   themselves,  such  is  Adelaide  Youth   Theatre’s  amazing  depth  of  talent.


DRINKING HABITS Venture Theatre

There IS such a thing as bad publicity! Rod Lewis, Glam Adelaide’s Arts Editor, shares his top tips for getting your show’s press release featured online or in print. There are  two  key  things  you  should  know  about  successful  publicity:   Be  interesting.  Be  helpful.  If  you  can  be  unique,  that’s  a  bonus.

Review by Kerry Cooper July 26 2013

Luke Wagner  has  taken  on  the  task  of   directing  eight  actors  with  differing   experience  in  a  show  sure  to  tickle  the   funny  bone.   Drinking  Habits  is  a  delightful  comedy   written  by  Tom  Smith.   The  action  takes  place  in  the  main   room  of  a  tiny  convent.    The  audience   enter  to  an  open  curtain  and  witness   Sisters  Philamena,  played  by  Leanne   Albers,  and  Augusta,  played  by   Shelley  Carman,  busily  sewing.  Both   actors  fared  well  in  their  roles. In  an  act  of  desperation  the  sisters   take  it  upon  themselves  to  make  wine   and  sell  it  in  a  bid  to  ease  the  convent’s   financial  pressures.    This  is  made  all   the  more  difficult  as  Mother  Superior,   played  by  Lee  Glasson,  is  opposed  to   even  the  mention  of  the  word  alcohol.   Their  secret  is  further  threatened  with   the  arrival  of  visiting  nuns  and  two   undercover  reporters.   Reporter  Sally,  brought  to  life  by   Christie  Molloy,  is  confident  and   determined  to  find  out  whether  she   has  stumbled  on  the  source  of  the   award  winning  wine.  Her  partner  in   work  Paul  is  played  by  Jaye  Toetu,   who  stammers  through  his  dialogue   with  comic  genius.   Kyle  Hopgood  as  Father  Chenille  was   exceptional.  Lucy  Marshallsay  gave  a   solid  performance  as  visiting  nun   Sister  Mary  Catherine,  as  did  David   Giles  as  George. A  madcap  chase  scene  at  the  end  of  Act   One  was  a  highlight  of  this  chaotic  farce.   At  times  lines  were  lost,  but  this  could   be  put  down  to  opening  night  jitters.   All  in  all  this  latest  offering  from   Venture  is  just  plain  fun!

There are  two  key  things  you  should  know  about  editors:  they  value  your  efforts   and  they  don’t  have  time  for  you. Like  you,  most  Arts  Editors  and  writers  nowadays  are  volunteers.    If  you  can  make   their  life  easier,  they  are  more  likely  to  give  you  the  coverage  you  want.     My  tips  are  very  simple,  but  they  can  make  the  world  of  difference.    Let’s  start  with   articles  and  press  releases. Write  an  article  not  a  press  release. • Editors  usually  don’t  have  time  to  write  an  article  for  you.  If  you  want  forward   publicity,  you  have  to  write  it  for  them.    A  three-­‐paragraph  promo  is  not  an   article  and  often  goes  straight  into  the  trash.  So,  write  an  actual  article,  at  least   300-­‐500  words  long  and  check  your  grammar! Write  it  from  the  third  person. • When  an  editor  prints  your  story  the  article  will  coming  from  their  publication   or  website,  not  from  you,  so  make  sure  your  article  is  written  in  third-­‐person  so   it  doesn’t  have  to  be  rewritten: Good  example:  “The  Community  Players  are  pleased  to  present  “No  Show”.  The   Players  are  Adelaide’s  most  recent  community  theatre  troupe  who…” Bad  example:  “We  are  pleased  to  present  “No  Show”.  Our  company  is  the  most   recent  theatre  troupe  to…” Let  them  copy  and  paste. • Never  send  your  press  release  as  an  image  because  that  would  mean  the  editor   has  to  retype  the  whole  thing.    That’s  not  going  to  happen,  unless  it’s  a  very  slow   day!    Send  your  press  releases  as  a  Word  document  and/or  in  the  body  of  your   email  so  the  editor  can  copy-­‐and-­‐paste. Send  two  photos. • Most  outlets  need  at  least  one  photo  to  accompany  any  article  or  review,  so  have   two  prepared  –  one  for  your  press  release  and  one  for  a  subsequent  review.   • Your  poster  doesn’t  count.  If  you  don’t  include  a  photo,  your  story  may  not  be   considered.  In  today’s  age,  images  are  often  turned  into  thumbnails  (very  small   copies)  so  anything  with  text  on  it  looks  dreadful.   • With  your  press  release,  send  a  photo  that  can  be  used  -­‐  rehearsals,  a  head-­‐and-­‐ shoulder  shot  of  the  director  or  a  cast  member,  etc.  Then,  when  you  confirm  a   reviewer  booking,  send  a  different  photo  that  can  be  used  with  the  review. Start  with  a  bang. • Your  first  sentence  should  grab  attention  –  create  a  question,  mystery  or   controversy  that  will  make  people  want  to  read  more.    Once  you’ve  done  that,   you  can  expand  on  the  actual  details.     Bad  example:  “The  Community  Players  are  presenting  Oscar  Wilde’s  popular   comedy,  The  Importance  of  Being  Earnest..” Good  example:  “To  lose  one  parent  may  be  regarded  as  a  misfortune  but  to  lose   both  looks  like  carelessness.    A  Wilde  time  is  in  store  at  ...” And  obviously,  always  include  booking  information  and  contact  details  in  case   they  need  to  chase  you  up,  including  a  telephone  number  and  an  email  address.  

9


SPOTLIGHT ON YOU July 2013

> All aboard Matt Byrne’s Phantom of the Opera

< Rehearsing for Hay Fever at Blackwood Players

> The cast and crew of Richard III pose at the Little Theatre

< The cast of Coward’s Private Lives relax at Therry’s rehearsal rooms

10


November 8-16 PLAYBOY OF THE WESTERN WORLD

Noel Coward’s comedy classic BLACKWOOD PLAYERS, blackwoodplayers.org.au

SA Premiere of Lloyd Webber’s chamber opera MARIE CLARK MUSICAL, marieclark.asn.au

The greatest Irish comedy ever written INDEPENDENT, independenttheatre.org.au

July 25-August 3 THE FOX ON THE FAIRWAY

October 4-19 THE LADY IN THE VAN

November 8-23 THIEF OF TIME

SA Premiere of a side-splitting hole-in-one farce ST JUDE’S PLAYERS, 8270 4205

A quirky but true tale from Alan Bennett STIRLING PLAYERS, stirlingplayers.sct.org.au

It’s going to be Monday forever UNSEEN THEATRE, unseen.com.au

July 26-August 3 DRINKING HABITS

October 4-26 RESERVOIR DOGS

November 15-30 LOVE RIDES THE RAILS

Meet the wine making sisters of Perpetual Sewing VENTURE, venturetheatrecompany.com.au

Tarantino’s blood-soaked heist live on stage! MATT BYRNE MEDIA ,mattbyrnemedia.com.au

Morland Cary’s hilarious fast-paced melodrama BLACKWOOD PLAYERS, blackwoodplayers.org.au

July 26-August 3 FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD

October 5-19 HOLY DAY

November 19-23 A CHORUS OF DISAPPROVAL

Thomas Hardy’s haunting, brooding romance INDEPENDENT, independenttheatre.org.au

Andrew Bovell's mystery about survival THEATRE GUILD, adelaide.edu.au/theatreguild

Alan Ayckbourn’s take on the Beggar’s Opera! ST JUDE’S PLAYERS, 8270 4205

August 2-4 17th BALAKLAVA EISTEDDFOD

October 17-26 GREASE

November 21-30 MYSTERY OF THE HANSOM CAB

Bands, ensembles and a finale concert balaklavaeisteddfod.org.au

Grease is the word! THE MET, metmusicals.com.au

A comedy melodrama with a local twist! ADELAIDE REP, adelaiderep.com

August 3-17 RICHARD III

October 31-November 9 THE CLUB

November 22-December 7 CINDERELLA

Shakespeare’s favourite villain THEATRE GUILD, adelaide.edu.au/theatreguild

David Williamson’s footy classic GALLEON THEATRE, galleon.org.au

A traditional pantomime TEA TREE PLAYERS, teatreeplayers.com

August 10-18 POCAHONTAS

November 7-16 CORPSE!

November 22-29 DAD’S ARMY

Native American lore and beautiful music HILLS YOUTH THEATRE, sct.org.au/hyt/

A frightfully funny comedy about rival twins THERRY DRAMATIC SOC, therry.com.au

Don’t panic it’s the Home Guard! NTC, noarlungatheatrecompany.com.au

August 21-31 MEET MY HUSBANDS

November 8-23 A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC

A comic look at advertising and the media TEA TREE PLAYERS, teatreeplayers.com

Moving moments of regret and desire HILLS MUSICAL, www.hillsmusical.org.au/

What’s coming up next? Let us know davemixedsalad@mac.com

LE

D

EW N

October 4-12 ASPECTS OF LOVE

EL C AN C

July 19-August 3 HAY FEVER

WHAT’S ON LISTINGS August 2013

Who’s on first?

August 22-25 THE GYPSY BARON Popular Johann Strauss Musical SALOS, 8294 6582

August 22-31 PRIVATE LIVES Noel Coward’s wildly funny masterpiece THERRY DRAMATIC SOC, therry.com.au

September 5-14 VANITY FAIR Becky Sharp as you’ve never seen her before! ADELAIDE REP, adelaiderep.com

October 2-12 NANNA’S NAUGHTY KNICKERS Bridget and Grandma become roommates. TEA TREE PLAYERS, teatreeplayers.com

Charles Mayer and Alicia Zorkovic get serious in Independent’s Far from the Madding Crowd! Photo David Wilson

11


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