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HARVEST TIME FOR WINEMAKERS 17

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A&E JOHN FAYHEE TELLS STORIES 26

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2012 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

FINDING PEACE ON PYRAMID PEAK SEE PAGE 23


BELLY UP ASPEN WHERE ASPEN GOES FOR LIVE MUSIC.

THU 9/27

FRI 9/28

GAME 6:20 SHOW 9:30 PM

SHOW 9:30 PM

NFL FOOTBALL:

BROWNS VS. RAVENS

NRC 365 MOUNTAIN NETWORK PRESENTS

DELTA RAE Six-piece band with four powerful vocalists singing blues, country & rock. They are signed by music industry legend Seymour Stein (responsible for Madonna & the Ramones), were selected by Rolling Stone part of its “Women Who Rock� competition.

STEPHEN MARLEY

W/SPRAGGA BENZ & JO MERSA

MEETING MOVIE: “TOO�

Son of reggae legend Bob Marley. Stephen has won ďŹ ve Grammy’s for his reggae work, including Best Reggae album in 2012.

NO COVER

SAT 9/29

BRIT FLOYD

SHOW 9:30 PM

SUN 9/30

GAME 6:20 SHOW 9:30 PM

ASPEN TIMES PRESENTS

NFL FOOTBALL:

ASPEN TIMES PRESENTS

NO COVER FOR GAME

BEARS VS. COWBOYS

GIANTS VS. EAGLES

THE WORLD’S GREATEST PINK FLOYD SHOW

MEETING MOVIES:PIRATE MOVIE 130%6$5*0/46/*26&t STANDARD FILMS – “2112� Fresh off Red Rocks, “blurs the distinction between tribute & real.�-York Press.

MON 10/1

GAME 6:20 SHOW 9:30 PM

TOMORROW’S BAD SEEDS W/THROUGH THE ROOTS

Mix of rock, punk-reggae & hip-hop. These Vans Warped Tour veterans have been selling out venues across the US including the Anaheim House Of Blues. They’ve supported UB40, 311, Pennywise & Smashing Pumpkins.

NFL FOOTBALL:

NO COVER FOR GAME

BUCKETHEAD

W/SAMPLES (AKA BEN SAMPLES)

Virtuose guitarist that is 8th on Guitar magazine’s “Greatest Guitar Shredders of All Time� list, was a member of Guns N’ Roses, has collaborated with Bill Laswell, Iggy Pop and Viggo Mortensen.

JUST ANNOUNCED: WED 10/3 SHOW 6 PM

ROCK ‘N’ ROLL BENEFIT FOR DAVID HARDING FEAT. THE ZIPPER CLUB BAND

Dan Sheridan, Estes & Harding, Haden Harding Hills & Hawes (H4), Poser, Starwood, and a special appearance by the Zipper Club Band—Bobby Mason, Bryan Savage and Dave, all who have had open heart surgery and lived to tell about it! Proceeds go towards David’s open heart surgery.

THU 10/4

GAME 6:20 SHOW 9:30 PM

t,3"%%: 10/5 t#6$, 10/20 t-&(&/%0'"")))4 10/30 t500545)&.":5"-4 6/1-6((&%"$0645*$5063 11/9

ASPEN TIMES PRESENTS

t8"54,: 11/10

CARDINALS VS. RAMS

t03$)"3%-06/(& 11/11

THE MAGIC BEANS Acoustic roots songwriting being sequed

t#&/40--&& t5)*&7&3:$031 12/29 t45&7&"/(&--0 12/30

NFL FOOTBALL:

NO COVER FOR GAME

into funk/electro based improvisation. They have supported members of the String Cheese Incident, Nashville greats Tyler Grant and Larry Keel and electro mainstays Bluetech, Eliot Lipp, & Bassnectar.

www.bellyupaspen.com | BOX OFFICE: 970 544-9800

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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ASPEN This is a 3.4 acre parcel with 1980’s home and cabin overlooking 310 acres of nature preserve and open space. It is a prime elevated North Star Preserve view property, with approved rights to build a 10,750 sq ft home or remodel the existing home, surrounded by an oasis of recreation space and quiet meditation at your doorstep. $4,600,000 Web Id#: AN125580

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TOWNHOME AT ASPEN MOUNTAIN

ASPEN At the foot of North Mill. River Bluff Townhome located just above the Aspen Art Museum and Red Mountain Road. This unit features extra living space, Aspen Mountain views, southern exposure, and designer tile. Walk to downtown or take the free shuttle. Sold furnished with some personal exclusions. $3,200,000 Web Id#: AN117092

ASPEN The location doesn’t get any better than this! This completely remodeled two-level townhome affords major views of Aspen Mountain, Glory Hole Park and is steps away from the gondola. The guest suites with outdoor terraces, elevator and underground parking garage complete this rare offering. $2,750,000 Web Id#: AN111918

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Carrie Wells 970.920.7375 | carrie@carriewells.com

thesource

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Only 3 weeks left - last day is Oct 13 Get ‘em FRESH!

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S e p t e m b e r 27 - O c t ob e r 3 , 2 0 1 2

W ater...more precious than gold.


AMERICA’S BEST VIEW ESTATE … ASPEN STYLE ASPEN Recently featured in the Wall Street Journal, this spectacular legacy estate is located on the private southeast side of Starwood with unbelievable views of the City of Aspen and all of its surrounding Peaks. Described by the Interior Designer as “a grand European country house” this posh property features luxurious finishes and sophisticated spaces. The infinity swimming pool, hot tub and adjacent outdoor entertainment area add to the allure of one of Aspen’s most impressive and unique properties.

Stunning top floor Master Suite with his and hers offices, spacious media/ family areas, wine room and 6 car garage are just a few of the numerous amenities.

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Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Avenue | 970.925.7000 Carbondale | 0290 Highway 133 | 970.963.3300 Redstone | 385 Redstone Boulevard | 970.963.1061 Glenwood Springs | 1614 Grand Avenue | 970.928.9000

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LN/Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

YT/MasonMorse1

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION

DEPARTMENTS 08 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION 12

LEGENDS & LEGACIES

14 FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE 17

WINE INK

18

FOOD MATTERS

23 COVER STORY 29 LOCAL CALENDAR 38 CROSSWORD

WINEINK

HARVEST TIME FOR WINEMAKERS 17

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A&E JOHN FAYHEE TELLS STORIES 26

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2012 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

26 A&E

27 AROUND ASPEN

As arts editor Stewart Oksenhorn learned this week, John Fayhee was born telling stories, and lucky for us, he just wrote a book.

Contributing editor Mary Eshbaugh Hayes celebrates her 60th year in Aspen at the Farmers Market.

FINDING PEACE ON PYRAMID PEAK SEE PAGE 23

ON THE COVER Cover photo by George Ryerson

EDITOR’S NOTE

give and take | On Sept. 24 and 25, The Aspen Times published

6

a two-part series by Rick Carroll about local nonprofits and the type of compensation a few of them pay their executive directors. The reaction online, compensation public in person and through for a reason. When social media was what you ask people to you would expect: give money, and our Anti-establishment country says it can be types used anything done relatively taxclose to excessive free, then there has as evidence that the to be transparency. RYAN SLABAUGH mission was being And in this case, there failed. Fortunately, has to be a public others were more nuanced. understanding of the size of More than one caller spoke to the organizations we are giving me about the concern for privacy to, so we all can measure those and wondered out loud about how donations against the positive the subjects of our story could effect being created. In 2007, remain in our community. One nonprofits were a 500 million worried about fear of retribution industry in the Roaring Fork against the people we wrote about Valley, and it is smaller but not by because it was now obvious they much today. were not poor. (I had to laugh So what to do? Solutions are at that one on my way home up to those who give and the one evening as I looked up Red board members who serve them. Mountain at all the big houses There are no federal guidelines staring peacefully down on the for nonprofit compensation — as rest of us. Specifically, define a total percentage of expense, “not poor.”) as many suggest — because the To report on this series, Rick mission of nonprofits are so vastly did quite a number of searches different. The art museum, for through open records, which example, does not provide food to make our nonprofit leaders’ starving children, and that is not

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why people give to it. The director of Lift-Up, we can assure you, sees every dollar possible into the mouths of the hungry. And that is exactly why people give to it. Rick’s reporting was solid, and he worked hard to ensure that every organization that was profiled had several days to respond to questions before the stories were published. His efforts were not to embarrass but to enlighten, and for that, he deserves credit for taking on this tough but important subject. To be clear, none of the nonprofit leaders did anything illegal, and many would argue they did not do anything unethical, either. After all, as Rick and I discussed one afternoon, making a lot of money, especially in a place like Aspen, is certainly not a crime. Instead, it is a force that attracts many of the wealthy to move here and to give here — and as Rick noted, not in small numbers. rslabaugh@aspentimes.com

VOLUME 1 ✦ ISSUE NUMBER 45

Editor-in-Chief Ryan Slabaugh Advertising Director Gunilla Asher Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott Design Afton Groepper Arts Editor Stewart Oksenhorn Production Manager Evan Gibbard Contributing Editors Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Gunilla Asher Kelly Hayes Jill Beathard Jeanne McGovern John Colson Contributing Writers Paul Andersen Hilary Stunda Amanda Charles Michael Appelbaum Warren Miller Contributing Partners High Country News Aspen Historical Society The Ute Mountaineer Explore Booksellers www.aspentimes.com Sales Ashton Hewitt Jeff Hoffman David Laughren Su Lum Louise Walker Classified Advertising 970-925-9937


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

VOX POP Q: What is your favorite local mountain or landmark? JOE JACKSON DETROIT, MICH.

My favorite local mountain is Conundrum. It is an awesome peak and a great hike up to it.

KATY LONG ASPEN

I really like Pyramid Peak. It is a really fun and challenging climb.

JESSE BOUCHARD SY R A C U S E , N . Y.

I really enjoy riding up on Ajax. You cannot beat the convenience and it is the mountain that I get to frequent most often.

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with ARI LEVAUX/WRITERS ON THE RANGE

The ‘truth’ about organic THE WAY headlines Another broke after a recent organophosphate Stanford study comparing pesticide, chlorpyrifos, organic food to food also poses a risk to grown on conventional the brains of children, farms, you’d think organic especially via prenatal had been shot and left exposure. A residential for dead. The New York roach-killer, chlorpyrifos ARI Times, for example, was banned for home LEVAUXRING announced that “Stanford use by the EPA in 2001, scientists cast doubt on but the chemical is advantages of organic meat and still permitted for agricultural use produce.” on fruit trees and vegetables, and Maybe the doubt was inferred is known by its Dow trade name from the study’s lukewarm synopsis: Lorsban. According to the EPA, “The published literature lacks 10 million pounds of it is applied strong evidence that organic foods annually in the U.S. are significantly more nutritious than Recently, chlorpyrifos was conventional foods. Consumption of found to stunt development more organic foods may reduce exposure in males than it did in females. to pesticide residues and antibioticA study conducted in New York resistant bacteria.” City and published in the journal But wait a minute: Organic food Neurotoxicology and Teratology has never been seriously touted as found that while the IQ scores of more nutritious or vitamin-rich than both boys and girls were lower conventional food. Nor is it the cure following exposure, the brains of boys for HIV, a recipe for immortality or were especially affected. Chlorpyrifos the preferred diet of unicorns. is just one of more than 1,400 Organic has always been defined pesticides regulated by the EPA. by what it isn’t, and the first rule Given our slowly evolving of organic food is that it’s free of scientific understanding of pesticide things like pesticide and antibiotic chemicals and the glacial pace of residues, as well as synthetic political change, the Stanford study hormones. The study confirms what results support the idea that eating organic supporters have long said organic food reduces our exposure to was the simple truth: Organic food things that we may someday realize is less adulterated by things you are bad for us, as well as things that don’t want to eat. we already know are bad, such as The organic watchdog group chicken and pork contaminated with Cornucupia Institute called the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Stanford study “biased” in a Sept. The Stanford report concluded 12 press release, which also raised with the kind of self-contradictory questions about the study’s funding. statement that embodies the Several of the authors are fellows general confusion the study has and affiliates of Stanford University’s generated: “The evidence does not Freeman Spogli Institute, which suggest marked health benefits has received funding from big-ag from consuming organic versus companies, including Cargill. conventional foods, although The study synthesized the organic produce may reduce results of 237 previously conducted exposure to pesticide residues and studies that had compared nutrient organic chicken and pork may and pesticide residue levels in reduce exposure to antibioticorganic and conventional food. resistant bacteria.” Although pesticide-residue levels In other words, organic isn’t any in conventionally grown food, as better, but it might be somewhat less compared with the EPA’s allowable worse. If the Stanford team’s idea levels, mostly complied with the law, of health includes adding pesticide Cornucopia complained that the residues and antibiotic resistant meta study failed to discuss any of the bacteria to my system, then I’d hate specific dangers posed by pesticides. to meet its criteria for sick. For example, a 2010 study in the journal Pediatrics found that children Ari LeVaux is a contributor to with organophosphate pesticides Writers on the Range, a service of in their systems were more likely to High Country News (hcn.org). He be diagnosed with Attention Deficit writes about the politics of food and Hyperactivity Disorder. agriculture in Placitas, New Mexico.

VOX POP COMPILED BY MAX VADNAIS


? r e t n i W r o f y d a e R

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A Sotheby’s homecoming.

After  successful years in real estate, Robert Ritchie still

A realtor returns to his roots.

his additional experience as a developer and contractor give him a

loves what he does! There’s something about the property business – and Aspen real estate in particular – that satisfies him, and he’s quick to give the credit to his clients: “I get to work with the smartest, most successful people in the world. It’s a privilege.” Trained as a particle physicist, Bob has smarts of his own, and significant edge when evaluating property and advising clients. The resulting numbers speak for themselves: almost $750 million in sales, with numerous price records along the way – at $2 million, $4 million, $5.5 million, $16 million, $23 million and $46 million. As Bob joins our Aspen Snowmass Sotheby’s team, he does so with significant history within the organization. He was involved in the creation of Sotheby’s International Realty in London in the early 1980s, and for 20 years he pioneered one of its first and most successful Sotheby’s affiliates in Aspen. Now, Bob returns to Sotheby’s for a fundamental reason: the Sotheby’s

ROBERT RITCHIE 970-379-1500 robert.ritchie@sothebysrealty.com

program provides the best sales platform available for both his buyers and sellers. And that makes the broker very happy to be back.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

SEEN, HEARD & DONE

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

FIVE THINGS CHEERS&JEERS

JEERS | To the local bus system seeing a 4 percent decrease in ridership this year. Whether the reason was the recession, fewer local jobs or more cars on the road, none of those are good. One thing to consider: The ridership to the Maroon Bells has increased dramatically, and that is partly because it is forced.

O5

Turning normally passive NFL players into rage-aholics … oh, wait

O4

Allows ESPN to practice “journalism”

JEERS | To the language used by that one construction worker behind our office. Now, we hear some filthy stuff in the newsroom, but what’s going on behind us at the Jerome? Dear lord. Sarcastically, only one thing truly complements a cacophony of saws, hammers and doorslamming: The F-word in a joke about domestic abuse.

O3

Less national talk about elections, abortion

O2

CHEERS | To the 7.5 percent decrease in local food assistance through LIFT-UP. It’s another sign that our local economy is ticking back up and people are getting back to work. That said, LIFT-UP Executive Director Mike Powell said it all in the Times this week, when he put the demand in perspective: “It’s like saying, ‘You got hit by 10 nuclear bombs, now it’s just nine nuclear bombs. Do you feel better?’”

Fun watching coaches run in circles

O1

Better conversation than why Broncos lose

CHEERS | To the community conversations driven by citizens, including a series in Basalt that is covering heavy topics like land use and oil and gas. This, our friends, is democracy in action. And the presidential debates we will soon see on television? Well, that’s television.

According to Aspen Times columnist Paul Andersen on Monday morning, “I was on top of Mount Hayden yesterday getting pelted by the first flakes of the season. There’s gotta be a foot of new up there!”

BUZZ WORTHY B A S A LT

WAS IT A BASS?

Four years after anglers started hauling in perch from Ruedi Reservoir, a seasoned fisherman caught what he believes was a bass there in late August. Marco de la Espriella said a juvenile fish, maybe 5 inches long, aggressively went after a spoon lure that was about half the fish’s size. At first, he thought it was a tilapia but after reflection, he suspected that it was a bass. “I’ve been fishing for 25 years, and I definitely know my fish,” de la Espriella said. “I can assure you it’s not a trout.” De la Espriella was fishing with his mom where the Upper Fryingpan River enters Ruedi Reservoir, on the far eastern side by Dearhamer campground. De la Espriella threw the fish back in the

water. They didn’t take a picture of it. He and his mom researched freshwater fish via the internet and concluded that the fish he caught most likely was a smallmouth bass, based on the jawline. — Scott Condon

ASPEN

MOOSE ARE ON THE LOOSE

A trio of moose are attracting as much attention as the fall colors at Maroon Lake near Aspen these days. The moose are spotted regularly at and near the lake and its famous peaks, the Maroon Bells, keeping Forest Service personnel busy trying to keep onlookers from getting too close to the unpredictable animals. The task

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POST US YOUR TOP FIVE THINGS rslabaugh@aspentimes.com

STAY IN THE KNOW — CATCH UP ON RECENT NEWS & LOCAL EVENTS may become part of their jobs for the long term — once moose find a spot they like, they tend to stay, according to wildlife biologist Brandon Diamond of Colorado Parks and Wildlife in Gunnison. “Once they do find a spot, they show pretty strong fidelity to it, which is apparently what’s happening now,” he said. “As time goes by, people around Aspen are going to see more and more moose.” — Janet Urquhart

PITKIN COUNTY

COUNTY EXPECTS POT BUSINESSES TO GET LICENSE

Pitkin County is giving medical marijuana businesses 30 days to submit an application for a required local license though the operations

“GREG LOOKED AT ME AND SAID, ‘THAT WAS A BIG GUST OF WIND.’ THEN A SECOND LATER, ‘NO, THAT WAS AN AVALANCHE.’ THEN IT HIT US.”

10

TOP 5 REASONS THE NFL SHOULD KEEP THE REPLACEMENT REFS

are technically out of compliance with county regulations at the moment. A letter signed by Jon Peacock, county manager, is being sent to businesses of which county officials are aware, informing them of the need for a local license and how to get one. The approach will give operators time to comply before any enforcement action is taken, Peacock said. Prompting the action was a letter to the county from the Medical Marijuana Enforcement Division of the Colorado Department of Revenue, which is processing applications for two operations in unincorporated Pitkin County. The applicant for both of them is K.I.N.D. Wellness Center, doing business as Stash, according to the state agency. — Janet Urquhart

— PRO SKIER GLEN PLAKE, ON AN AVALANCHE LAST WEEK IN NEPAL

PHOTO BY PAVEL OSIAK


THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

GUEST OPINION COLUMN

by SCOTT MILLS/GUEST COLUMNIST

Fixing deed-restricted houses without taxpayer dollars THE ASPEN PITKIN County Housing Authority (APCHA) has a daunting task facing them at the upcoming housing summit. One of the problems that they will be looking at is how to deal with the rehabilitation of aging deed-restricted housing (DRH). Deed-restricted housing was designed as an affordable way for the local worker to be a part of the fabric of Aspen and to live within the county. An unintended consequence of income caps, resale price controls, etc. is that any unforeseen building problems become a financial drag to the homeowners who have little if any discretionary income to pay for major repairs. What is needed is a long-term solution that will address the need for rehabilitation and financial security for both APCHA and DRH. An example of problems for DRH can be seen with the Centennial homeowners. Both Centennial homeowners and APCHA agree that poor workmanship of the original construction has created a need for major rehabilitation. APCHA estimates that the work can be done for 7,000 per unit, Centennial homeowners 100,000 per unit. The cost will be somewhere between 644,000 and 9,200,000. Either way the question is ‘who’s going to pay for it’? APCHA cannot pay for it because it opens the door to having to pay for all of their building stock. Centennial homeowners cannot afford assessments that will financially cripple them and there are no financing options available. To secure the long-term health of DRH and APCHA a funding mechanism is needed that can pay to rehabilitate all of APCHA housing and will not burden homeowners or taxpayers with unsustainable debt. Energy efficiency is a massive and relatively untapped resource that reduces pollution, creates jobs, bolsters economic activity and lowers homeowner’s utility bills. Deep energy retrofits with bond financing is one answer to that question. Deep energy retrofits (the reduction of primary energy use

THINKSTOCK PHOTO

by 50 to 90 percent), can reduce homeowner expenses (mortgage plus utilities) to a level that can pay for long-term financing. Aspen and Pitkin County could provide bondfunding homeowners would pay back with interest from the utility savings at no cost to taxpayers.

3.3 percent interest (current bond interest rate) the cost is only 3,000 per month, with the addition of utilities (2,400 average per unit times 92 units equals 248,000) the final monthly cost jumps to 23,500. A deep energy retrofit at 30,000 per unit (10,000 rehab plus 20,000

costing taxpayers a dime. With the state of the building industry in our county, this is a way to jump start economic development. There are nearly 3,000 deed-restricted homes in Pitkin County, by investing 30,000 into each home that would bring 90

Deep energy retrofits are achieved by turning a building into a thermos. Seal it from air infiltration, insulate the exterior and add heat recovery ventilation for fresh air. A simple illustration is putting on a down coat and zipping it up. To understand how the financing works, we need to do the math. (I will be rounding off to simplify the examples.) Using the APCHA number of 7,000 to do only rehabilitation of Centennial’s 92 units will cost 644,000 with a 30-year note at

retrofits) will cost 2,760,000. For 30 years at 3.3 percent, the monthly cost is more than 12,000, but with utility reduction of 70 percent to 74,500 per month, the final cost is 18,200 per month, a monthly savings of 5,200 compared to doing a simple rehab. By using building science and smart financing, we are now able to invest in the long-term repair of our aging deed-restricted homes, give our workforce a healthier more comfortable home while keeping more cash in their pockets, without

million (paid for by homeowners not taxpayers) into our county. As that money recirculates through the economy, it will grow to hundreds of millions dollars with each transaction sending sales taxes to our government coffers. This is a win/win proposition that needs to be seriously looked at by the city, the county and APCHA. Richard Scott Mills is a passive house trained energy consultant with Energy Tech. Contact him at richardmills422@ aol.com, or at 970-456-8099.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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LEGENDS & LEGACIES

CLASSIC ASPEN

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

Aspen merchants such as Tomkins Hardware were as happy about hunting season as were the tourists who came from out of state to hunt in the Elk Mountains.

DEER COUNT UP; FISH COUNT DOWN optimism reigned at the opening of the 1912 deer-hunting season.

The short season that put meat on the table for most Aspen families lasted from Oct. 1 through Oct. 6. As The Aspen Democrat-Times noted, “Half the able-bodied men of Aspen will be in the hills for the next few days.” Nonresidents paid 10 for a hunting license, but locals purchased a combination hunting and fishing license for only 1. RENOWNED ASPEN hospitality and the Elk Mountains’ reputation for abundant game attracted hunters from other states. The state fish and game commissioner, James Shinn, claimed the deer population in 1912 was “the largest in 20 years.” Sheep grazing in Wyoming had erased deer feed, pushing elk and deer into Colorado. In the first decade of the 20th century, Colorado engaged in an acrimonious debate over the Theodore Roosevelt-Gifford Pinchot plan to save forests from rapid decimation. Opposition came chiefly from cattlemen and miners, but by the end of the decade there was sufficient support for national forests to set aside timber reserves. The link between timber reserves and game populations created conservationists in the mountain counties that sought tourist dollars.

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Conservationists won. The most threatened species of 1912 was antelope. Newly elected Gov. Elias Ammons, who had sided with the cattlemen in 1907

modeled his solution after the successful elk preserve in Yellowstone. Like much of the West, Colorado in the early 1900s had experienced

LIKE MUCH OF THE WEST, COLORADO IN THE EARLY 1900S HAD EXPERIENCED A RAPID DECLINE IN GAME ANIMALS. RESIDENTS OF ASPEN, ATTEMPTING TO BUILD A SUBSTANTIAL TOURIST ECONOMY, BECAME PART OF THE MOVEMENT TO FIND A BALANCE BETWEEN ATTRACTING HUNTERS AND FISHERMEN AND REBUILDING GAME STOCKS. and was rewarded with a banquet by the Roaring Fork Cattlemen’s Association, shifted his position by proposing a 20,000-acre game preserve for antelope. Ammons

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a rapid decline in game animals. Residents of Aspen, attempting to build a substantial tourist economy, became part of the movement to find a balance between attracting

hunters and fishermen and rebuilding game stocks. The state monitored herds and developed strict hunting seasons for declining species. Eliminating licenses to hunt mountain sheep for several years increased their numbers; the Fish and Game Department estimated by 1912 that the mountain sheep population had grown to equal the deer population. The deer population had been stabilized previously by shortening the hunting season for them. In addition, declining numbers of fish caused concern. Even though 11.2 million fish had been stocked in Colorado streams, officials became concerned about anecdotal reports of reduced catch size. Fishing season lasted from May through October and limited fishermen to 20 pounds a day (rather than by number of fish), and the minimum length was set at 7 inches. Some fish loss was attributed to increased irrigation because fish that entered irrigation ditches often ended up dying in the fields. In the early 1900s, mining pioneers still resisted reserving federal land from timber harvest, although many Aspen mines had converted to hydroelectric power, reducing the demand for fuel wood to drive the engines. Nevertheless, local businessmen recognized the economic value of the sightseers, hunters and fishermen who had begun to arrive by the trainload. Hunting season signified more than a time for stocking up on venison — it promised a boost in retail sales. Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn@schat.net.

A D F R O M A S P E N D E M O C R AT- T I M E S


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

A CARBONDALE CELEBR ATION

1911 P O TAT O DAY

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

THE THIRD ANNUAL Potato Day celebration in Carbondale was a great success, according to the Aspen-Democrat Times in October 1911. As the paper noted, “The people of Carbondale were the hosts Saturday of about 2,500 people, the largest number ever assembled within the gates of that prosperous town for a Potato Day celebration. The crowds began arriving on the early morning trains, in automobiles and vehicles of all description and a steady stream poured into the town. At 11 o’clock the football game between Aspen and Glenwood was in full swing. The Aspen boys did themselves proud. The Carbondale people were with the Aspenites, yelling like mad and cheering our home team as they made touchdown after touchdown.” (Editor’s note: Potato Day is Sept. 29.)

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GEAR of the WEEK

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

NEED TO KNOW

149

• Iguana technology • Asymmetric lacing • Single-shell construction • Gore-Tex tongue • PU shock absorbers

MAMMUT REACT GTX MEN’S/WOMEN’S Take a shoe, add Gore-Tex, and throw in a little Kevlar, extra cushioning and a mesh ventilation layer, and you might have the perfect shoe. In this case, Mammut’s put all sorts of innovative technology together. So much so, in fact, it’s kind of annoying trying to describe it all. Anyway, to the aforementioned items, you can add foot-mapping soles, a speed-lace system, shock-absorbers … and on and on.

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— Ute Mountaineer staff

PHOTO COURTESY MAMMUT


G DO WEEK

Gus

THE

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www.aspentimes.com 970-925-3414 A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

by GUNILLA ASHER

NEED TO KNOW

COCKTAIL: COSMO ARTARITA

1.5 ounces Arta Silver 1 ounce cranberry juice 0.5 ounce Triple Sec 0.5 ounce lime juice Served in a martini glass

DOWNTOWN ON THE Hyman mall the other day, I met a new friend, Erica, who works at Arta Tequila. First, we watched a bear scamper out of a tree. Then, she told me a great story about the spirit. Her boss, Tony, and his father used to go hunting in Mexico every year. While they were there, they would drink Arta, which was his father’s favorite tequila. A few years ago, Tony’s father passed away, and Tony shortly thereafter went to Mexico and bought the company. It is now based in Denver and becoming quite popular. Gunilla Asher grew up in Aspen and now is the comanager of The Aspen Times. She writes a drink review weekly in the spirit of “She’s not a connoisseur, but she is heavily practiced.”

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PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK


WINEINK

WORDS to DRINK BY

by KELLY J. HAYES

HARVEST IS WELL UNDER WAY IT IS HARVEST SEASON throughout the Northern Hemisphere, and in vineyards from Burgundy to Napa, the most exciting moments of any vintage are about to take place. This is the time of year when winemakers and vineyard managers discover whether they have been able to weather the weather. They find out if the decisions they made in the spring and summer about irrigation, canopy management and all of the other intricate issues that can affect the vintage were correct. KELLY J. Sleepless nights give way HAYES to sleepless mornings as those who make the call as to when the time is just right for the workers to descend into the fields stress over those decisions. In France, the harvest has already begun. More than 50,000 laborers have moved into the vineyards and have begun to pick what is expected to be the smallest harvest in at least a decade. According to some analysts, including the agricultural minister, it’s the smallest since 1991. Spring frost, hailstorms and a cool, wet summer all have taken a toll on the vines. The

Champagne region was particularly hard hit by hailstorms, and yields are expected to be a third of what they were in 2011. Of course, the French, particularly the Bordelaise, always tend to put a positive spin on a difficult vintage. Quality, they say, improves as yields diminish. We’ll see. While Germany seems to have had fewer issues with the climate, the Italians are grappling with a

P H O T O S C O U R T E S Y J A C K S O N F A M I LY W I N E S

different problem. Too much heat and not enough rain mean that they are expecting the second-smallest crop since the 1950s, according to the Association of Italian Oenologists. Mamma mia. Here in North America, things are looking a lot better. Moving from north to south, Washington state appellations look like they are primed for a great year in terms of both quality and quantity. The Washington State Wine Commission reports that there are expectations to surpass the

the grapes are thin and particles can penetrate. But as the grapes evolve, they become thicker, and it is more difficult for smoke to permeate the grapes. Only after the crush will vintners be able to determine if there has been any taint. In Oregon, sunny conditions have smiled upon the Willamette Valley. Pinot producers have already begun to harvest the earliest-ripening whitewine grapes, and the Pinot Noir in colder regions are beginning to be harvested, as well. But throughout the

dampened by the rainy weather. This year, the harvest got under way the third week in August as the sparkling-wine makers began to pick the white grapes with the lowest sugar content. Chardonnay and some Pinot Noir were picked early. But the real action will get going this week and into October as the red grapes get a little extra hang time thanks to the perfect conditions. The Central Coast also has seen exceptional weather, and the harvest has been slow to take

record vintage of 2010 in terms of tonnage and that the perfect growing season has produced perfect fruit. Consider that Seattle, a city that is know for rain, was dry for 48 days before it got a shower early last week. Not a drop fell during August. The smoke from the huge fires in Washington that has descended upon us here in the Rockies could have an impact on the grapes in Washington, as well. Generally the grapes are most vulnerable to contract “smoke taint” earlier in their growth process when the skins of

region, harvest festivals are under way as growers look to leave the grapes on the vines as long as possible. And in California, the outlook is extremely promising for an exceptional autumn harvest. Both the Sonoma and Napa valleys have benefited from a season that has blessed them with perfect conditions for grapes. Days that have seen temperatures rise to the high 80s and drop into the 40s and 50s at night have been the norm. There has been very little rain, and as the harvest season has begun, the conditions for picking have been very favorable. That is a sharp contrast to the rainsoaked harvest season of last year. Many have called the 2011 Sonoma harvest the worst on record, and both quality and yields were significantly

flight. Winemakers there also are anticipating heavy numbers and high quality, particularly when compared with last year, when a late April frost decimated much of the vintage. This year, though, it is wait-andsee, particularly for varietals such as Syrah, Zinfandel, Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. As long as the weather stays fine, and the forecast says it will, then those grapes can pick up a little more sun, a little more sugar and a lot more flavor. We will be enjoying this vintage for years to come. Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soon-tobe-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and a black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@wineink.com.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

FOOD MATTERS

MEETING OF THE MASTERMINDS THE PULLMAN’S JOHN LITTLE AND CROOKED STAVE’S CHAD YAKOBSON COLLABORATE TO CREATE A MEMORABLE NIGHT OF CUTTING-EDGE FOOD AND DRINK

IT ALL STARTED out with an email invitation to the Crooked Stave Beer Dinner at The Pullman in Glenwood Springs, featuring a selection of sour beers. I was hesitant. I’d had sour beers in the past, and the last one I tried, I didn’t get through the second sip. But chef John Little, a selfprofessed “beer nerd,” promised the Crooked AMIEE WHITE Stave experience would BEAZLEY change my mind. “If you still don’t like sours after trying,” Little wrote, “I will be happy to comp your meals.” I had nothing to lose. I am happy, to put it mildly, that I took Little up on his invitation to try, what I believe, is a totally new concept in beverages. Not quite beer, not quite wine, lying somewhere between, sour beers, a longstanding tradition in Belgium and other parts of Europe, are the next big thing stateside. (Avery’s last Sour BeerFest sold out in two minutes, if you need an indicator.) And at the head of the craft-sourbeer movement is a young Denverite, Chad Yakobson, the visionary behind Crooked Stave, the only beermaker putting out a year-round 100 percent Brett beer. This Colorado native moved to New Zealand to study winemaking, and while he learned of the disasters Brettanomyces yeast caused in wine, he recalled how much he loved what the wild yeast strain does to beer. That’s when he first started deviating from winemaking. He eventually moved to London to work as a sommelier but then found himself traveling the world tasting beer. Finally he enrolled in the International Centre for Brewing and Distilling in Edinburgh, Scotland, where his dissertation turned into the Brettanomyces Project, an opensource website detailing the research and results on various species of the yeast. The Brettanomyces Project morphed into his own Denver-based brewery, Crooked Stave, which released its first brews this spring, a

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seasonal series called American Petite Sours. “Petite Sour is a very conceptual beer with some interesting twists,” Yakobson said. “Through blending various Old World brewing techniques and some of our progressive brewing ideas, we have made a beer that is uniquely Crooked Stave. It falls somewhere between a Berliner Weisse and tart farmhouse almost saison. ... The beer is a relatively clean, light, tart wheat beer with aromas of lemon, passion fruit and overwhelming tart cider/ green apple. The flavor has a

saison, it has mellow ‘funk,’ balanced by the sour from both lacto and Brett fermentation. Very drinkable especially on a hot summer day. “My favorite thing about Chad’s beer, and sour beer in general, is the acid

tart cider character with more of the Brettanomyces playing through with citrus, tart wheat notes and lemony tart, dry finish. “It’s meant to be of all things a late-spring/summer, early-fall sessionable beer. Quite easy to drink, it’s not overpowering with flavor and therefore lends itself very well to food as it can complement instead of trying to steal the show. “This beer has been a huge project for me. I’ve spent countless hours conceptualizing the process and philosophy behind the beer and how and why I make it.” Crooked Stave caught the attention of Little, who waxed poetic about the discovery. “This is a very well-balanced sour blend,” he wrote in another email. “Mostly in the style of a farmhouse

content that they have. Usually when we put these beer dinners together, we taste, and I use acid on the determining factor on what order we will pair these beers and the order that we pair them. It’s common that we will have two out of five beers that can pair well with a heavier dish, usually entrees. Beers that don’t have the acid content will be completely lost any time they come in contact with butter, cream or anything else that coats your tongue. “Also these beers are fun to try with winos. Our general manager and wine guy is not a huge fan of big beers. Then one day I tasted him on some sours, and it changed its opinion. They are very wine-ish in the way they can pair with food. It was very fun watching his face turn from disbelief to ‘Wow, this is tasty.’” The beer dinner at The Pullman was

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a sellout, with a room full of “wow” faces. Masters of their craft, Little and Yakobsen led us through an evening of perfected pairings. The meal began with the Cuvaison, a saison blended with oak-aged Brett beers, served with oysters on the half shell with cucumber gelee, heirloom tomato, avocado and jalapeno. The second course was Sentience, sour Belgian quadruple ale aged in bourbon barrels, served with grilled peaches, house-cured salumi, local greens and mint julep vinaigrette. The third was Wild, Wild Brett Blue Indigo, a 100 percent Brett ale fermented with blueberries, served with confit of duck croquette, ginger chevre mousse, local beets and a blueberry vin. (I thought I was over croquettes, but certainly not after these. Perfect balance of consistency and taste, so yeah, I’m back on board.) The fourth course featured Surrette Reserva, a five-grain saison soured in oak barrels, with roasted porchetta over smoked mozzarella grits, fennel agro dulce and a smear of pear butter. Last but not least was Batch 1, barrel-fermented Burgundy ale with raspberries, served with the chef ’s downright ridiculously delicious dessert of frozen Mexican chocolate mousse, a raspberry crisp, lemon whipped cream and white chocolate crumble. Each pairing worked incredibly well. Some, like the second course, made the beer pop with flavor. Other courses, like the Surrette with porchetta, enabled the sour to cut right through the fat content of the meat and grits, helping each bite become even more complex. This beer dinner, a finale of sorts for Little, made the entire room look to these young masterminds with admiration and awe. Crazy, young genius is always so damn exciting to watch, taste and experience. Amiee White Beazley writes about food-related travel for the Aspen Times Weekly. She is the editor of local food magazine edibleASPEN. Follow her on Twitter @awbeazley1, or email awb@awbeazley.com.


by AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

MOVING ON NOW FOR THE BAD NEWS: At the end of November, The Pullman’s chef de cuisine, John Little, is packing up his knives and moving to Denver with his girlfriend, who will attend nursing school. So get to The Pullman now, where Little’s fingerprints, both figuratively and literally, are all over this inspired menu. While he has no professional plans yet, Little surely will go on to do exciting things in the big city. Keep an eye out for him. “I’m really going to miss this valley,” he said. “The people here are second to none. Hopefully we might be back some day, but for now a new chapter opens and an adventure begins.”

PHOTOS BY AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Wildcat Ranch - Homestead Seven s .ESTLEDINTHEHEARTOF7ILDCAT2ANCH (OMESTEAD3EVENBORDERSAND OVERLOOKS7ILDCAT,AKE s 0RIVATEWILDERNESSOFACRES HEAVILY TIMBEREDWITHPINEANDASPENTREES s 3PECTACULARVIEWSINEVERYDIRECTION s BEDROOMS BATHS  SQFT s #OMFORTABLYCONTEMPORARYWITH MOUNTAINELEMENTS s $ETACHEDGUESTCABINWITHBEDROOMS s 2IDING HIKING lSHING BOATING    0ENNEY%VANS#ARRUTH\ New Listing

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Starwood Estate With Views

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New Listing

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Рюд

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STILLNESS AT THE TOP by GEORGE RYERSON

forgive me for crowing about

finally climbing Pyramid Peak. Right up until the day, Aug. 11, 2012, I still wasn’t sure I ever would. Everybody I had talked to during some 10 to 15 years, probably more, said it’s not an easy mountain to climb. Gerry Roach of “Colorado Fourteeners: From Hikes to Climbs” fame says about it, “… steep, exposed, loose rock makes this a dangerous climb.”

TOP: Pyramid Peak, dusted by a small amount of snow. BELOW: George Ryerson, the author of this story, takes a break along a ridgeline.

PHOTO BY GEORGE RYERSON

MY FORMER DENTIST and a long-time mountain rescue principal said, “It is my least favorite climb.” Everybody said, “Don’t go alone.” And members of my family put the fear of God in me, intimating that the risk of my life somehow would impact their lives’ adversely. So, understandably, I had myself all but talked into trying to focus on other pursuits, other mountains to climb. But the idea seemed to never quit. I would forget about it for weeks and months and years, but it didn’t help A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Pyramid Peak, at 14,018 feet, is the 47th highest mountain peak in Colorado.

that my niece had done the climb just before heading off for medical school, longer ago than I can remember. People at work had said they made it up without too much trouble. And a coworker once said as she looked at Pyramid, she wished she could do it eventually. I had “done” 37 other fourteeners up to this point, though the easy ones. What should stop me from going further? Most people who get the bug set their sights on all 55. And many I know of have done this. I have experienced a single bypass in the spring of 2008 and a mild stroke in the fall of 2010. My cardiologist once said that though my tests are just where he wants them, “running up mountains is for younger men.” And I just turned 65. But that’s on the other side of the coin, too. If I waited any longer, I would be too old to try Pyramid. I just retired this past spring. Freedom gets short shrift. Almost for the first time in my life, I can do exactly what I have always wanted to do. Having been studying and practicing meditation, as taught by Paramahansa Yogananda, of “Autobiography of a Yogi” fame and founder of the hugely successful SelfRealization Fellowship headquartered in Los Angeles, Calif., I now have time to be able to do a one-hour meditation twice daily and a threehour meditation on Fridays without fail. And that’s the significant thing.

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If we would only learn to relax, to become still in body and mind, the rest is play. We learn to avoid distractions like fighting with people, like spending much time at all with people who like to fight, like hanging on the news. None of this matters. When we learn to practice stillness, things begin to come easily. Like this dilemma: Whether to climb a some-say dangerous 14,00-foot mountain or not. It will be or it won’t be. How to tell? It’s the stillness. It’s always the stillness. We need to recognize it in ourselves, and when it’s absent. It’s peace; as is said in, “The peace of God, which passeth all understanding …” (Philippians 4:7). It’s being still; as is said in, “Be still and know that I am God.” (Psalms 46:10) We should never go anywhere without it. Because this stillness is a guide. It‘s our God, how it is said, “have you made your peace with God?” What this means is to become still of body and mind so that your spirit can awaken. And when it does, you find yourself climbing mountains, whether figuratively, or literally as in my case. Not Everest, not Denali, not even the biggest, meanest fourteeners in Colorado. Just this one. One of the trip reports I read in preparation for this climb — always at least interested whether I would eventually do it or not — said, “It’s definitely doable.” I tested this over several days and a number of only-apparent problems,

one even involving a neighbor who told me to go to hell by email. Was I up to this? Would I be up to anything unless I made the choice? Did I have a choice? I had it in mind a week or two to just consider doing this climb. I had included it on a list. All depended on whether this stillness I am talking about would appear, or actually awaken. I had been praying it would, and repeating words to this effect every day and night. You know when we wake up at night to go to the bathroom and you can’t fall back asleep? With a stillness in place, I planned to wake up at 4 a.m., take a shower, do my meditation, send an email to a family member that I would check in with him at 4 p.m., and set off in my car to Maroon Lake. And that’s just what I did. I arrived at the Maroon Lake parking area at 6 a.m., and started hiking up the Crater Lake Trail. Something caught my eye just past the signs that warn people about climbing the Bells. It was a small black feather a bird had just dropped to the ground in front of me. I picked it up without hesitation. It was at least a good sign that everything would turn out fine, just as envisioned. My legs felt good. I made quick progress up to the cairn (a man-made pile or stack of stones) indicating the trail to the Pyramid Peak approach. And equally good time arriving up to the lip of the amphitheater, when you

PHOTO BY GEORGE RYERSON


A few friends George Ryerson met along the trail up Pyramid Peak.

get your first look at the peak pretty much up close. Calmly chewing their cud, two Rocky Mountain Goats stared at me. I paused to take their pictures. Then continued on and up. I hadn’t realized it (but I should have) that the amphitheater was full of rocks. Millions or maybe trillions of them all told. And there is no trail. As I walked up the talus (broken rock fragments), I heard, or thought I heard voices. Maybe I was wishful thinking. I hoped I would run across some others to tag along with and make the day a success. Other than the goats, the place seemed a little desolate. I had a “Plan B” in mind. I would turn back if nobody else was around. I had done this once before on a mountain for this same reason: safety in numbers. But, eventually, I woke up to the insight that I was hearing water gurgling down through the rocks. Of course, that’s what water does as it finds the course of least resistance and keeps hikers company if they’re listening. Over the middle of the high point of the talus, I then saw some hikers. The place seemed a lot friendly right away. Maybe, this trip would have a happy ending. There were three of them. And as I watched, one-by-one they started up the 1,000 foot trail of loose rock debris to the northeast ridge. And I went right on up behind them. I could see the last one was struggling, but was not dismayed for some reason. If he could do it, I could do it. Soon enough, I caught up to him just near the ridge and came across his friends. And then, I saw a fourth guy hiking up behind us. And in this miraculous manner, I had my climbing partners for the remainder of the day. My niece has since said, and I quote, “I am glad God provided you company and that your journey was safe!“ Several hours later, as we were heading

down the trail of scree from this saddle, I had heard a shout, “Rock!” And a rock a little smaller than the size of my head sailed past my right knee, just as I ducked, or just before; it happened so fast. And my partner coming down above me called out, “I guess somebody’s looking out for us today!” But, you know, in the way I see it, “His stillness was with me, and everyone else on the mountain.” I said this, and I asked my climbing partners about this, because I felt none of the willies you sometimes experience when encountering the sheer drop-offs on this climb. The weather was threatening as the pictures show. But it never materialized into anything but a sprinkle here and there. There were occasional bursts of wind. But they never amounted to anything either. We found the few landmarks the guide books tell of: The saddle at 12,980 feet, the smaller saddle a little higher up, the “leap of faith” (which turned out to be nothing serious; a gap between rocks you had to climb around or jump over), the notorious shelf with its narrow place, the green wall (which looked to be too smooth to climb, but actually had ample handholds and foot rests), and the twisty-turny route finding of the man-made cairns interspersed by admittedly steep rock walls. There were only two or three “Fourth Class” moves the all way up and down. But, even with my limited experience, I felt confident. “Exposure” could be defined that if either of your hand or foot carrying your weight slips or the rock crumbles under you, you could fall. And that feeling of falling is the sense of exposure. I didn’t have that feeling the entire climb on Pyramid Peak, as crumbly as the going is, and as steep the walls tend to be. You learn that when

you are focusing on your present footstep, or your current handhold, you don’t tend to do a lot of looking around, or below you where the danger tends to lurk, if it does. ‘Asking for trouble in the way of looking down near-vertical walls is a waste of energy and a risk that might make you get scared, and get the “willies”. So, the experienced climber doesn’t play around with that. He consciously keeps his focus on the job at hand and foot. And this is what people call “being in the zone.” Being right where you need to be, to do the right thing at the right time, every time. So, we made it to the top at about 11 a.m. Significantly, having congratulated each other with arms raised and voices shouting, we exchanged names and handshakes. Dave is from Steamboat Springs, , and Matt is from Missouri. And I am from Aspen. In a sense, with our names, we became real. We made it. Worthy of knowing one another’s names. I can’t really speak for them, but I really noticed that I hadn’t been a bit scared the whole time going up, nor was I afraid about the descent, or even standing up on the relatively small platform of the summit of Pyramid, maybe about two- to three-yards wide and six- to seven-yards long. Maybe I had gone into this having made that choice to begin with. Maybe, I’d never have set out without this being established in my mind, practiced in body and awakened of spirit. Maybe that’s the real mountain. And the three of us, maybe, we saw it from the top, this time, that day and in that spirit. That’s my feeling about it anyway. Aum. Peace. Amen. George Ryerson lives and writes in Aspen, Colorado. And he can be reached at gryerson@q.com.

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/LITERATURE

by STEWART OKSENHORN

A VOICE NEAR THE WILDERNESS M. JOHN FAYHEE’S TWO NEW BOOKS M. John Fayhee wanted “The Colorado

Mountain Companion,” his 10th book, to be factbased, reliable, authoritative — in other words, something very different than the barstoolbased observations and tall tales he spins in his Smoke Signals column in the Mountain Gazette magazine. “I didn’t want it to be overwhelmed by my voice,” Fayhee said of “The Colorado Mountain Companion.” WHICH, YOU MIGHT note, is not the same as saying, “I want it to read as straight and narrow as an encyclopedia.” That canoe left the dock ages ago, and if Fayhee can still prevent his writing from being “overwhelmed” by his voice, he probably couldn’t stop his distinctive writer’s tone from being heard if he were merely jotting down directions to the nearest beer store. Fayhee has a style that is his own: rambling, off the cuff, irreverent. And to use a word that Fayhee has self-applied, but that still makes him chuckle when he hears it used to describe his writing, loquacious. “There’s a lot of words out there. The English language is the biggest in the world. So why not take advantage of it?” Fayhee said. “I’m proud of having a big vocabulary.” Fayhee traces this pride to geographical heritage. Born in England, raised in eastern Virginia, Fayhee was never taught the virtues of a tight word count. “Both of those places are bastions of storytelling,” said Fayhee, who grew up in a Colonial house — not colonial style, but built before the creation of the United States — in the county where George Washington’s troops were stationed during the Battle of Yorktown, the final battle of the Revolutionary War. “You weren’t just rehashing information; you were aware of how the story was told. Every writer has to create his own voice. That’s how we make a living.” For the last four years, Silver City, N.M. has been Fayhee’s home, and among his friends there is Philip Connors, the author of “Fire Season,” a prize-winning account of his work in a fire lookout in New Mexico’s Gila National Forest. Connors was raised in Minnesota, where the conservation of words was practiced. “He thinks you should use the fewest

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words and the simplest words possible,” Fayhee said. “We good-naturedly argue about it. I respectfully disagree.” Fayhee’s way with words gets demonstrated in two new books. “Smoke Signals: Wayward Journeys Through the Old Heart of the New West” collects and expands on his Mountain Gazette columns, and “The Colorado Mountain Companion.” As much as style, the books — which will be the subject of a talk and reading on Oct. 4 at Explore Booksellers — reveal the essence of Fayhee’s writing, a passion for the stories, characters and places that mark the Rocky Mountains. “The Colorado Mountain Companion,” which Fayhee calls his favorite of his books, arose from the sort of liquor-abetted banter that one imagines is Fayhee’s daily bread. There are sections about what Colorado town sits at the highest elevation, how Coloradans turned down the chance to host the 1976 Winter Olympics, and

NEED TO KNOW M. JOHN FAYHEE THURSDAY, OCT. 4 AT 5:30 EXPLORE BOOKSELLERS

M. John Fayhee will appear Oct. 4 at Explore Booksellers for an event introducing his two new books, “The Colorado Mountain Companion” and “Smoke Signals

Fayhee, who lived in Colorado for 24 years, said. “What I didn’t want to have happen was turn this into a book of trivia.” Instead, the “Companion” is filled with color, and a sense of Colorado triumphalism. “I want people to understand what a truly special place Colorado is, to swell the very justified pride of people who live in the high country, on a level that transcends the obvious, the scenery and skiing,” said Fayhee, who was near Leadville while he spoke, in sight of Colorado’s two highest peaks. “The Colorado mountains are sometimes considered culturally superficial. If you’re in Winter Park or Summit County, it’s easy to consider Colorado a John Fielder photo

“THERE’S A LOT OF WORDS OUT THERE. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE IS THE BIGGEST IN THE WORLD. SO WHY NOT TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT?” FAYHEE SAID. “I’M PROUD OF HAVING A BIG VOCABULARY.” who can rightfully claim the title as the “Ice Box of the Nation.” Thanks to Fayhee’s obsessive quest for the history behind the facts, these questions are far more complex than one might imagine. The “Companion” was inspired by early encyclopedias, whose subject matter consisted of whatever was of interest to the particular writer. But far from a dry recitation of the facts, Fayhee’s “Companion” is loaded with arguments and counter arguments, humor, local character and numerous side trails. “It would have been very easy to make that a sterile, voiceless book,”

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book. This is a place that’s produced music, movies, an amazing history of American Indians, and a completely unique way of speaking.” While Fayhee was careful not to spotlight his voice in the “Companion” (it’s a close call on whether he succeeded), “Smoke Signals” is Fayhee in full. There is a loving column on the demise of his decades-old canoe, with asides into old cabins, old cars and old memories, and “Big Bob and the Beer Math Saga,” about how a basic math calculation (how quickly would buying a personalized mug at the

Dillon Dam Brewery pay for itself in discounted Dam Straight Lager?) led to a complex relationship with a prisoner from Cañon City. Much of Fayhee’s writing has appeared in newspapers. His first paid job was at the El Paso Times, while he was still attending Western New Mexico University. “You can’t have a better first job — lots of interesting people doing crazy things. And it was just at the time when first-person participatory writing was being allowed in a newspaper,” he said. He freelanced in Denver, was the first reporter hired at the Summit Daily News, and in 2007 did a six-week stint at The Aspen Times, filling in for a reporter who vanished under circumstances that remain mysterious (a curious thing for a newspaper, admittedly.) A devoted hiker and river rat, Fayhee was also a contributing editor to Backpacker magazine for 12 years. Fayhee says he is done with newspapers and with magazine assignments (though he is still editor of Mountain Gazette). “I’m 56 and I’ve gotten to the point where I only write the kinds of things I want to write,” he said. “I don’t have much tolerance for a 24-yearold editor telling me my sentence structure is wrong. “At a reading in Crested Butte, a third-grade teacher castigated me about the liberties I take with the English language. But that’s the way we speak when we tell stories around the campfire. I’m at the point in my life where I think I know my writing better than anyone.” PHOTO BY MARK FOX


AROUNDASPEN

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

ASPEN FARMERS MARKET THE ASPEN SATURDAY MARKET is not only a fabulous place to purchase fresh vegetables and fruit, and handmade arts and crafts ... it is a social gathering every week for Aspenites and out-oftown visitors. Everyone walks along, munching on popcorn or muffins or goodies or an apple or pear, talking and MARY laughing and meeting ESHBAUGH HAYES old and new friends. And if you have a booth, it’s even more fun as you get to see people all day. Undercurrent … This month I observe my 60th year of living in Aspen, and my 55th year of writing this Around Aspen column (I took five years off when my five children were little). I came to work for Ruth and Verlin Ringle as a reporterphotographer for the Aspen Times in September 1952 and continued to work for Bil Dunaway, who bought the newspaper from the Ringles in 1956. Through the years I worked as a reporter-photographer, editor and columnist for the paper. I’ll never forget that first week in Aspen, taking the No. 1 chairlift to the Sundeck on Sept. 27 (my birthday) and walking down Aspen Mountain with the golden aspen leaves all around. This week is always the most beautiful autumn week in Aspen.

MARKET Zia Hucks sells leather bracelets with stones at her Pure 2H booth.

MARKET Jeff White mixes up a batch of his popular Aspen Kettle Corn.

MARKET

Lana Trettin sells her jewelry at her Preshana Art booth.

MARKET Missen sells her handmade creations at her Baubles-N-Stone booth.

MARKET MARKET Dan Lareau at the Zephyres Farm in Paonia sells vegetables and flowers.

P H OTO S B Y M A RY E S H BA U G H H AY E S

Cheyenne Stoner and her mother, Chris Stoner, sell honey and bee pollen from their Wild Bear Bee Farm of Snowmass. The hives for the bees are all on local ranches.

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MARKET Jess Bates and her mother, Mary Eshbaugh Hayes, at their booth where Bates sells her Hayes aspenleaf jewelry and MEH sells her books, photographs and Aspen Door notecards.

MARKET Trevor Washko handmakes leather goods at his Cold Mountain Craft.

MARKET A family at the Farmers Market are Ami and Patrick Flynn with daughter, Linnea Flynn and baby Liam Flynn in the buggy.

MARKET

MARKET Jim and Debbie Rahmen with Banjo and Cowboy their Leonbergers. Everybody takes their dogs to the Saturday Farmers Market.

Boyd Billings and his mother, Hattie Billings, make their casadeas fresh every Saturday at the Farmers Market.

MARKET Jack Paley with his dad, Douglas Paley, sell Jack’s Aspen Crunch, a healthy snack food. Jack is a High School entrepreneur and is a junior at Aspen High School.

MARKET Diana Baker sells children’s clothing at her Low Flying Angels booth. Eleven percent of proceeds goes to orphans in Haiti.

MARKET At the Avalanche Cheese booth are Sarah Meserve, left, with Becky Bruening.

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P H OTO S B Y M A RY E S H BA U G H H AY E S


CURRENTEVENTS

SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 3, 2012

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 “Get Out of Town”: A Travel Series 6 p.m. - 7 p.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. A family Christmas in southern Patagonia. Two tiny cars. Six expectations. One family’s journey. From the shores of the Atlantic to the peaks of the Andes and back again. Pictures and stories by Jocelyn and Dave Durrance. Call 970-429-1900. Karaoke 10 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Live karaoke with Hugh. Call 970-925-9955. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 Boo Coo 7 p.m. - 11 p.m., St. Regis ResortAspen, Shadow Mountain Lounge. Live local music on Friday and Saturday nights, featuring local duo Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-920-3300. Live Music Fridays 8 p.m. - 11 p.m., Riverside Grill. Join us for a fun time at Riverside Grill every Friday night with live music by popular local bands. Late night happy hour specials also available. Call 970-927-9301. Stephen Marley with Spragga Benz and Jo Mersa 10:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Few people were surprised when Stephen Marley’s long awaited debut solo album, “Mind Control,” premiered at No. 1 on the Billboard Reggae Album chart in March 2007. It was bestowed with the Best Reggae Album Grammy in 2008 while its unplugged version, “Mind ControlAcoustic,” was similarly honored in 2010, increasing Stephen’s Grammy Award total, earned from his various roles on assorted Marley family projects, to seven, a recordsetting number for a Jamaican artist. Call 970-544-9800. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 Boo Coo 7 p.m. - 11 p.m., St. Regis ResortAspen, Shadow Mountain Lounge. Live local music on Friday and Saturday nights, featuring local duo Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-920-3300. Brit Floyd “The World’s Greatest Pink Floyd Show” 11 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. This Aspen debut features a brand new Brit Floyd show, “A Foot in the Door,” created by musical director Damian Darlington to celebrate the release of the official Pink Floyd “Best Of” album, “A Foot In the Door.” The performance will include all of Pink Floyd’s best work, track by track and as selected by Pink Floyd band members themselves. The show will also include a 23-minute rendition of “Echoes,” taken from Pink Floyd’s classic 1971 album, “Meddle.” Call 970-544-9800. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 9 p.m., The Brick Pony, 202 Midland Ave., Basalt. Live music on Saturdays. Call 970-279-5021. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 Live Poetry Night 6:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Victoria’s Espresso & Wine Bar, 510 E. Durant Ave., Aspen. Sponsored by the Aspen Poets’ Society and featuring live music with singer/songwriter John Harrison, open mic for poets and featured poet Karen Glenn. Open to all poets and listeners. No fee. Call 970-379-2136. Tomorrows Bad Seeds with Through The Roots 9:30 p.m. - 11 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Tomorrows Bad Seeds is a five-piece band from Hermosa Beach, Calif., and Southern California influences helped yield their unparalleled sound — a mix of rock-pop, punk-reggae and hip-hop. Call 970-544-9800.

WATCH The Australian musical “The Sapphires” shows as the opening-night film at Aspen Filmfest on Oct. 2 at the Wheeler Opera House. MONDAY, OCTOBER 1 Buckethead with Samples 9:25 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Buckethead is a virtuoso guitarist, and multi instrumentalist who encompasses several genres of music. He has released 30 studio albums, four special releases and an EP. He has performed on over 50 more albums by other artists. His music spans such diverse areas as progressive metal, funk, blues, jazz, bluegrass, and avant-garde music. With Ben Samples to open. Call 970-544-9800. Open Mic Night 9:30 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Check out what Aspen’s songwriters and musicians have to offer. Call 970-925-9955. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2 Haden Gregg and Friends 7 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., L’Hostaria, 620 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen. Live music every Tuesday. Call 970-925-9022. Movie Night: The Avengers 7 p.m. - 9 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Marvel makes cinematic history as it unites the super hero team of Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), The Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) and Thor (Chris Hemsworth) in this action-packed blockbuster. No cover charge. Call 970-544-9800.

THE ARTS THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 Sign-up: Demystifying Encaustic — Collage & Paint 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. Registration in progress for course led by K. Cesark for adults (all skill levels), to be offered Nov. 3 and 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Registration is required. Tuition is $170 plus $30 studio fee; members receive 10 percent off. For more information and to register, visit www. wylyarts.org. Call 970-927-4123.

COURTESY THE WEINSTEIN CO.

Adult Intermediate Ballet Class 9 a.m. 10:30 a.m., Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, basement of Colorado Mountain College, 0245 Sage Way, Aspen. $16 per class for drop-ins. A punch card good for 10 classes is $140. Call 970-925-7175. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 Trunk Show 5 p.m. - 8 p.m., Healthy Horse Boutique, 489 Rose Lane, Carbondale. Healthy Horse Boutique hosts a Trunk Show, offering complimentary beverages and appetizers to attendees while they shop. Call to RSVP or email hhboutique@gmail.com. Call 970) 309-4223. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 Studio Art Sale 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Willits Town Center, 850 E. Valley Road, across from Whole Foods, Basalt. Dick Carter’s Epic Studio Art Sale on Sept. 29 and 30 features works of all sizes and periods. Percentage of sales will benefit the Wyly Community Art Center in Basalt. Free and open to the public. Call 310-344-4750. Future Foodies Art Event 11 a.m. - 12 p.m., The park at Whole Foods Market, Basalt. A one-of-kind art project with Wyly Community Arts Center, for ages 6-12. Participants will be doing produce stamping on custom future foodie bags while learning about nutrition and color in one’s palate. Classes at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. The limit is 25 kids per one-hour session. Sign up now. Call 970-927-1500. MONDAY, OCTOBER 1 Signup: Boys Art Club II, Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. Led by Nicole Nagel-Gogolak, for ages 6-11, on Tuesdays, Oct. 16-Nov. 20 from 4-5:30 p.m. (drop off and open studio from 3:30-4 p.m.). Free preview on Oct. 16. Registration is required. Tuition is $110 plus $25 studio fee, members receive 10 percent off. Visit www.wylyarts.org for more information or to register. Call 970-927-4123.

Signup: Girls Art Club II, Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. Led by Nicole Nagel-Gogolak, for ages 6-11, on Wednesdays, Oct. 17-Nov. 21, from 4-5:30 p.m. (drop off and open studio from 3:30-4 p.m.). Free preview on Oct. 17. Registration is required. Focusing on learning basic drawing, painting and sculpture, participants will learn concepts of space, line, proportion, and scale. Tuition is $110 and $25 studio fee, members receive 10 percent off. Visit www. wylyarts.org for more information and to register. Call 970-927-4123. Signup: Pre-School Art Romp 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. Registration in progress for Pre-School Art Romp: Imagination Station, Choo Choo with Langford Barksdale, for ages 3-5 (parents must be present with 3- and 4-year-olds). Class is on Tuesdays, Oct. 16-Nov. 20 from 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free preview on Oct. 16. Registration is required. Participants will develop their imaginations as they create paper cutouts, collage them together and create masks of train faces. For more information and to register visit www. wylyarts.org. Call 970-927-4123. Story Art 10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. A fun, free event where art and stories come together. Children leave with an art project to take home. For ages 3-5 years. Co-sponsored by Aspen Art Museum and Pitkin County Library. Call 970-429-1900. Beginning/Intermediate Ballet 10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Third Street Center, 520 S. Third St., Carbondale. Beginning to intermediate ballet class taught by faculty of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet. Call 970-925-7175.

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YOGA & EXERCISE THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 Vinyasa Flow Yoga Class 6:15 p.m. - 7:15 p.m., Coredination 520 S. Third St., Carbondale. Certified yoga instruction in Vinyasa flow with a synthesis of postures (asanas) designed to increase range and build core strength. Accentuate and balance fitness goals with this class. Call 970-379-8108. Tai Chi/Qigong 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Aspen Historical Society, 620 W. Bleeker St., outside in the garden. Gentle flowing movements to energize, relax, refocus and restore. All levels are welcome. Call 970-925-1130. Seniors Yoga Series 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Aspen Health and Harmony, El Jebel. In this series, explore different aspects of the body and mind through seated postures in a chair, balance postures using the chair, and kneeling and prone postures. Students must be comfortable going from a standing position to a kneeling position to lying on the back on their own. Experience improved balance, flexibility, strength and gain a sense of mental clarity and spiritual peace. The class is open to all experiencing physical limitations, who wish to begin yoga in a gentle and safe way. Call 970-704-9642.

Candidate Forum on Water 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Calaway Room, Third Street Center, 520 Third St., Carbondale. The Roaring Fork Watershed Collaborative and Roaring Fork Conservancy are hosting a Candidate Forum on Water for Eagle, Pitkin and Garfield county commissioner candidates. Aspen Public Radio’s Carolyne Heldman will moderate. Learn from the candidates their views on local watershed and river issues and how, if elected, they will work to protect the Roaring Fork Watershed. This will also be aired live on KDNK — at 88.1, 88.3 and 88.5 FM in the Roaring Fork Valley and at KDNK.org. Call 970-927-1290. Holistic Wellness Clinic 7:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m., Woody Creek Community Center, 0006 Woody Creek Plaza. Free medical assessments with Dr. Jody Powell, naturopath; Heidi Stoeckl, acupuncturist; Ricki McKenna, nutritionist; and Brendan Roberts, acupuncturist. Walk-in appointments, open to all. Call 970-922-2342.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 Pumpkin Patch 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Fun for the family. Kids can choose and decorate a pumpkin and enjoy climbing Straw Mountain, navigating the straw maze, taking a hayride, bobbing for apples and honing their skills at “pumpkin” golf, ring the pumpkin and more. Open Fridays from 1-4:30 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Food available. Call 970-984-3850. Fiesta de Tamales 5 p.m. - 9 p.m., Basalt Middle School, 51 School St. Colorful dancing, thousands of dollars in prizes and tons of tamales at English in Action’s annual fundraiser. Fiesta de Tamales celebrates the cultures that enrich the Roaring Fork Valley, while raising money and awareness for a local nonprofit. The evening features a performance by Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s Folklorico dancers, entertainment from magician Doc Eason, DJ Tyler Tucker, a local choir, and more than 1,000 tamales and pupusas to energize attendees. $15 per adult and $5 per child. Call 970-963-9200.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 Aspen Skating Club Signup 4 p.m., Aspen Recreation Center/Aspen Ice Garden. Learn to skate with Aspen Skating Club; enroll now for the 2012-13 season. Classes offered every Tuesday and Friday at 4 p.m. and Sundays at 5:15 p.m. All ages and all ability levels are welcome. Private and group instruction available. For additional information, contact Teri Hooper at hoopertk@comcast.net or call. Call 970-379-5900. Bike Tour 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m., Wheeler/ Stallard Museum, 620 W. Bleeker St., Aspen. Enjoy a pleasant tour by bicycle that begins in Aspen’s Victorian West End, loops through the grounds of the Aspen Institute, and winds through town to the original Lift One. $15 per adult, $12 per senior and free for children, age 12 and younger. Offered by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721. Yoga For Lunch 12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m., Aspen Health & Harmony, El Jebel. Community yoga class. Call 970-704-9642. Yoga Retreat 4 p.m. - 6 p.m., Aspen Meadows, Aspen. Hatha Yoga with long-time Aspen instructor Joann Connington. Three yoga classes and Saturday lunch at Platos restaurant included for $195. Call 719-256-5129. MONDAY, OCTOBER 1 Aikido at CMC 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Colorado Mountain College, Aspen campus. Aikido is an effective self-defense as well as a fun and dynamic work out. Class offered Mondays and Wednesdays. Beginners welcome. Try the first class for free. Call 970-379-4676. Beginning Pole Dance 6 p.m. - 7 p.m., Honey’s Pole Fitness, Basalt. Beginninglevel pole dance workout. Learn basic lifts, spins, dance, floor work and safety. No experience necessary. At 7 p.m., it’s Pole Dance Workout, focusing on the strength and flexibility needed to pole dance. Call 970-274-1564.

THE COMMUNITY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 Sign-up: Demystifying Encaustic — Collage & Paint 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. Registration in progress for course led by K. Cesark for adults (all skill levels), to be offered Nov. 3 and 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Registration is required. Tuition is $170 plus $30 studio fee; members receive 10 percent off. For more information and to register, visit www. wylyarts.org. Call 970-927-4123.

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LISTEN H4: Haden, Harding, Hills and Hawes is among the bands that will perform in a benefit concert for local musician David Harding on Oct. 3 at Belly Up. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 Journaling & Meditation: Two Keys For Your Creativity And Health 7 p.m. - 9 p.m., Bonfire Coffee 433 Main St., Carbondale. Journaling & Meditation are two key practices that contribute to health and well-being, and support you in living a life of peace and joy. Elizabeth Welles will share her experience and wisdom from her lifelong exploration with journaling, creativity and meditation, and she will read from her book, Journaling for Well-Being & Peace. Sponsored by Davi Nikent and Bonfire Coffee. Call 323-682-4025. Rock ‘n’ Roast 6 p.m. - 10 p.m., PAC3, Carbondale. A benefit for area early childhood programs, including Children’s Rocky Mountain School, OUR School, Growing Years and Mt. Sopris Montessori School. Event features games, music, silent auction and a drawing for prizes. Food will be provided by local “roasters,” including Epicurious, Hickory House, SIX89, Slow Groovin BBQ and Smoke. Must be at least 21 to attend. For more information or to purchase tickets ($35 in advance or $40 at the door), call 970-963-3506 (ext. 2).

S e p t e m b e r 27 - O c t ob e r 3 , 2 0 1 2

Thompson Divide Coalition and John Fielder 5 p.m. - 8 p.m., T Lazy 7 Ranch, Aspen. Featuring local food, music, dancing and a fireside chat with John Fielder. Tickets are $100 per person, available at www. savethompsondivide.org. Call 970-355-4223. MONDAY, OCTOBER 1 Mac Monday 12 p.m. - 1 p.m., Basalt Regional Library. Get all your questions answered about the world of Mac. Call 970-927-4311. Monday Gathering 8 a.m. - 9:30 a.m., Pitkin County Republican Headquarters, Eighth and Main streets, Aspen. Stop by for complimentary coffee, fresh pastries and good conversation. Call 970-925-2810. West African Dance Class 7 a.m. - 8:30 p.m., Carbondale Community School, 1505 Satank Road. Join live drummers for a fun, energetic dance class that is differentiated for all ages and abilities. This progressive six-week series will focus on one or two dances and will build a foundation for the style and movement of African dance. Come all six weeks ($60) or just drop in a time or two ($12 per class). Call 970-404-0305.

PHOTO BY STEWART OKSENHORN


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Get them lining up for you! Increase your business with little effort!

Advertise in the

SERVICE DIRECTORY! Call Zach to get your ad started!

925-9937

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Did you know vacation-home sales accounted for ten percent of real estate transactions in 2010? Advertise your property in the Real Estate Photo Ads and reach vacation-home buyers who are visiting town or visiting our Web site. Call 866-850-9937 or e-mail classiямБeds@ cmnm.org.

$SFBUFBOENBJOUBJODMJ FOUTQFDJGJDPOMJOFNBS LFUJOHTUSBUFHJFTGPSDMJ FOUTVTJOH(PPHMF "E8PSET 4PDJBM.FEJB &NBJM.BSLFUJOH 4&0 '5 (84&NBJMSFTVNF UP IS!CMJ[[BSEJOUFSOFUDPN

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

33


3FBM &TUBUF 1IPUP"ET

ASPEN

ASPEN

ASPEN

Aspen Starter Home! #FTUEPXOUPXOMPDBUJPO IJHIFTURVBMJUZ -PXFTUQSJDF$POUFNQPSBSZ  SFNPEFMFE TUVEJPCBUIXJUICJH"TQFO .PVOUBJOWJFXT FYUSBTUPSBHF JOUPXOQBSLJOH

*OUIFSFOPWBUFE$SBOEBMM#VJMEJOH CMPDLTGSPNUIF(POEPMB TGUP TGDPOUJHVPVT (SFBUWJFXT HSFBUMPDBUJPO

$2,595,000. Brokers protected. 970-925-6840 or 970-948-2186.

AABC 3 Bedroom Condo 5PQGMPPS CFESPPNDPSOFSVOJU$POWF OJFOUMPDBUJPOOFBSEPXOUPXO"TQFO MFTTUIBONJMFT BOEMPDBMTLJBSFBT SFNPEFMJODMVEJOHOFXQBJOU BEEFE XJOEPXT 1FSHPGMPPSJOH OFXDBCJOFUT BOEDPVOUFST TUBJOMFTTTUFFMBQQMJBODFT BOENPSF"TTJHOFEQBSLJOH $485,000 TOM CARR 970-379-9935 Leverich & Carr Real Estate XXXBTQFOSFJOGPDPN

$349,000 Call Tim Estin 970-309-6163 State of the Aspen Market www.EstinAspen.com Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

970-948-0001 Bob Langley Joshua & Co. bob@joshuaco.com

ASPEN - OPEN HOUSE

ASPEN

BASALT

BASALT

BASALT

Saturday 2 to 4. 430 West Main Street .JYFEVTF[POFE7JDUPSJBO DPNQMFUFMZSFTUPSFEJO 5PUBMPG TRGUPOB TRGUMPU .VMUJQMFEFWFMPQNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFT JODMVEJOHIJTUPSJDMPUTQMJUBOE5%3hT )JHIWJTJCJMJUZ$3,250,000 Ruth Kruger 970-404-4000 / 970-920-4001 Kruger & Company XXX,SVHFSBOE$PNQBOZDPN

Top Floor Downtown Condo -BSHFUPQGMPPSPOFCFESPPNDPOEP0OMZ CMPDLTUPUIF(POEPMB1MFOUZPGOBUV SBMMJHIU1SJWBUFEFDLGBDJOHOPSUIXJUI WJFXTUP4NVHHMFS3FE.PVOUBJO 8PPECVSOJOHGJSFQMBDF HSBOJUFDPVOUFST BOEIBSEXPPEGMPPSTUISPVHIPVU $649,500 TOM CARR 970-379-9935 Leverich & Carr Real Estate XXXBTQFOSFJOGPDPN

Aspen Junction- Mountain Views (SFBUWBMVFGPSNJEWBMMFZCFESPPN TJOHMFGBNJMZIPNF.BHOJGJDFOUQBO PSBNJDWJFXTPWFSMPPLJOHUIF&NNB WBMMFZ3FNPEFMFELJUDIFO OFXDPVOUFS UPQT DBCJOFUT BOENPSF 4PVUIGBDJOH XJUIQMFOUZPGTVOBOEMJHIU $449,000 TOM CARR 970 379-9935 Leverich & Carr Real Estate XXXBTQFOSFJOGPDPN

LOWEST PRICE IN BASALT &NQMPZFF)PVTJOH/0-055&3:CE 8% SBEJBOUGMPPSIFBU FOEVOJU MJHIU BOEBJSZ"UUBDIFETUPSBHFVOJUQFU BMMPXFE-PX)0"EVFTBOEVUJMJUMFT(SFBU %FBMFNBJMGPS)PVTJOH&MJHJCJMJUZQBDLBHF LBUISZOQFOO!BPMDPN

Older home with 5+Acres TVCEJWJEFEJOUPMPUTXJUIBQQSPWBMT JOQMBDFGPSVOJUT 0WFSMPPLTCVDPMJDFNNB MFTTUIBO NJOVUFTUP8IPMF'PPET

COMMERCIAL - ASPEN

COMMERCIAL - GYPSUM

EL JEBEL

420 &430 West Main Street .JYFEVTF[POFEDPNNFSDJBMQSPQFSUJFT 5IJTQSPQFSUZIBTNBOZEFWFMPQNFOU PQUJPOTJODMVEJOHQPTTJCMF5%3hT )JTUPSJDBMMPUTQMJUXJUI TRVBSFGFFU PGUPUBMEFWFMPQNFOUQPUFOUJBM 7JDUPSJBODVSSFOUMZVTFEBTPGGJDFCVU NBLFTBXPOEFSGVMGBNJMZIPNF 5IFPOMZWBDBOUMPUPO.BJO4U $6,950,000 Ruth Kruger 970-404-4000 / 970-920-4001 Kruger & Company

Commercial Development

ASPEN

1270 Snowbunny Lane -PWFMZSFNPEIBMGEVQMFYPOPQFOTQBDF XJUIHPSHFPVTWJFXT1SJWBUF RVJFU TQF DJBMTQPU.PWFJO OPEFGFSSFENBJOU CFE CBUI BQQSPYGU

&YDFMMFOUEFWFMPQNFOUPQQPSUVOJUZ GSPOUJOH)JHIXBZOFBS$PTUDPJO "JSQPSU(BUFXBZ$FOUFS BDSFTPGGMBUIJHIMZWJTJCMFMBOE

$1,399,000

Please call Chad Brasington, Prudential Colorado Properties DIBE!WBJMOFU

XXX,SVHFSBOE$PNQBOZDPN

Great deal on a starter home *O4PQSJT7JMMBHF-BSHFMBOETDBQFEMPU XJUIEFUBDIFEHBSBHF-PUTPGSPPNGPS UIFXIPMFGBNJMZ/JDFMPDBUJPO XJUI QBSLBDSPTTUIFTUSFFU Just $299,000! Call Drew Kitchell 970.379.7777 McKinley Sales, Inc www.SearchAspenRealEstate.com

Commercial Condos for Sale

$148,000

970 379-5904 FSBO

Just $399,000! Call Kim McKinley 970.379.4559 McKinley Sales, Inc Www.SearchAspenRealEstate.com

SOUTHERN COLORADO

WILLITS

Near Colorado City On I-25 35 Acres - $35,000. Electricity and road Camp, hunt, fish, retire Financing - $263.60 mo. 719-210-9339 mdinvestors@aol.com

Fantastic Location! XJUIJOXBMLJOHEJTUBODFUPUIFOFX 8IPMFGPPET'VODUJPOBMIPNFJOQMBDFPS VTFUPCVJMEZPVSESFBNIPNFPOBGMBU CVJMEJOHTJUFJOUIFIFBSUPG8JMMJUT"MTP MPPLJOUPUIFQPTTJCJMJUZPGB1MBOOFE6OJU %FWFMPQNFOUPQQPSUVOJUZXJUITVCEJWJE JOHUIFUXPQBSDFMTJOQMBDF $ 1,399,000 Call Drew Kitchell 970.379.7777 McKinley Sales, Inc www.SearchAspenRealEstate.com

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34

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SFQSFTFOUJOHUIFMFHBMIPMEFSPGUIFJOEFCUFEOFTT JT 4UFWFO'-FUPGTLZ -FUPGTLZ%PNCSPXTLJ10#09 '3*4$0 $0  "UUPSOFZ'JMF 5IF"UUPSOFZBCPWFJTBDUJOHBTBEFCU DPMMFDUPSBOEJTBUUFNQUJOHUPDPMMFDUBEFCU "OZJOGPSNBUJPOQSPWJEFENBZCFVTFEGPSUIBU QVSQPTF 1VCMJTIFEJOUIF"TQFO5JNFT8FFLMZPO"VHVTU  4FQUFNCFS    <>

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DIVISION 5 WATER COURT- AUGUST 2012 RESUME 6. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW131 PITKIN COUNTY. ROARING FORK RIVER. John A. Buck II Trust, c/o Patrick, Miller & Kropf, P.C. Scott C. Miller, Esq. and Laura C. Makar, Esq., 730 E. Durant Ave., Suite 200, Aspen, CO 81611, (970) 920-1028. APPLICATION FOR CHANGE OF WATER RIGHTS AND TO AMEND PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION. Decreed water rights for which change is sought: Name of structure: Gibson Pump and Pipeline. Case No., Court, and date of original and relevant subsequent decrees: Case No. 01CW326, District Court, Water Division 5, June 9, 2003; Case No. 09CW69, District Court, Water Division 5, September 18, 2010; Case No. 09CW67, District Court, Water Division 5, October 10, 2010. Legal description of structure as described in the most recent decree: NE1/4, NW1/4, Section 16, Township 9 south, Range 85 west, 6th P.M. at a point 1260 feet south of the north section line and 1990 feet east of the west section line of said Section 16 (Pitkin County, Colorado). Decreed source of water: Roaring Fork River, tributary to Colorado River. Appropriation date: June 1, 2001. Total amount decreed: 0.033 c.f.s., absolute; 0.187 c.f.s., conditional. Decreed use or uses: Irrigation and delivery of water into storage for irrigation, recreation and piscatorial purposes. Amount of water that applicant intends to change: 0.033 c.f.s., absolute; 0.187 c.f.s., conditional. Name of structure: Gibson Pond. Case No., Court, and date of original and relevant subsequent decrees: Case No. 01CW326, District Court, Water Division 5, June 9, 2003; Case No. 09CW69, District Court, Water Division 5, September 18, 2010; Case No. 09CW67, District Court, Water Division 5, October 10, 2010. Legal description of structure as described in the most recent decree: NE1/4, NW1/4, Section 16, Township 9 south, Range 85 west, 6th P.M. at a point 2100 feet east of the west section line and 1300 feet south of the north section line of said Section 16 (Pitkin County, Colorado). Decreed source of water: Roaring Fork River via deliveries from the Gibson Pump & Pipeline, tributary to Colorado River. Appropriation date: June 1, 2001. Surface area: 0.5 acres. Maximum depth: under 10 feet. Active capacity: 1.0 acre-feet. Dead capacity: 1.5 acre feet. Decreed use or uses: Irrigation, recreation and piscatorial purposes. Amount of water that applicant intends to change: 2.5 acre-feet, conditional. Name of structure: Plan for Augmentation, including appropriative right of exchange. Case No., Court, and date of original and relevant subsequent decrees: Case No. 01CW326, District Court, Water Division 5, June 9, 2003; Case No. 09CW69, District Court, Water Division 5, September 18, 2010. Structure Augmented: Gibson Pump and Pipeline. Applicant has water rights to be used for augmentation pursuant to Allotment Contract No. 405a issued by the Basalt Water Conservancy District. Detailed description of proposed change of water rights: Applicant seeks to change and enlarge the place of use for the Gibson Pump and Pipeline and the Gibson Pond to include an additional 0.916 acres in the N1/4, Section 16, Township 9 south, Range 85 west, 6th P.M for a total of 1.566 acres of irrigation. Applicant seeks to change the terms of the plan for augmentation, including appropriative right of exchange, decreed in Case No. 01CW326, District Court, Water Division 5, June 9, 2003, as amended in Case No. 09CW69, District Court, Water Division 5, September 18, 2010, to allow for an enlarged area of irrigation under the Gibson Pump and Pipeline. As amended, the plan for augmentation allows for irrigation of 0.65 acres. As described in paragraph 3.A., Applicant seeks to change and enlarge the place of use for the Gibson Pump and Pipeline to include an additional 0.916 acres for a total of 1.566 acres of irrigation. Applicant seeks to amend the plan for augmentation as required to augment the additional 0.916 acres of irrigation. Based on a total area of irrigation of 1.566 acres and the consumptive use rate of 1.84 acre-feet, the annual irrigation demand would be 3.60 acre-feet. The additional out of priority irrigation depletions will be replaced with water provided under Applicant’s Basalt Water Conservancy District Allotment Contract. Applicant has applied to amend Basalt Water Conservancy District Allotment Contract No. 405(a) to provide 3.82 acre-feet of releases to replace existing out of priority depletions and ten percent transit loss. In the event of a call on the Roaring Fork River above the confluence with the Frying Pan River, Applicant will cease diversions under the Gibson Pump and Pipeline water right. The name and address of owner or reputed owners of the land upon which any new diversion or storage structure, or modification to any existing diversion or storage structure is or will be constructed or upon which water is or will be stored, including any modification to the existing storage pool: Applicant. (10 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 7. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW132 GARFIELD COUNTY. ROARING FORK RIVER. Application for Change of Water Rights. Applicant: Roaring Fork Water & Sanitation District, c/o Scott Grosscup, Balcomb & Green, P.C., P.O. Drawer 790, Glenwood Springs, CO 81602; 970-945-6546. Background and Summary of Application: The Roaring Fork Water and Sanitation District (“District”) provides water and wastewater service to the Ironbridge subdivision. The District derives its source of supply from several alluvial wells. The Ironbridge subdivision receives its source of supply from some of these wells pursuant to the decree entered in Case No. 00CW019. This Application concerns a request to add additional alternate pt.s of diversion for the District’s alluvial wells and incorporate all of the District’s alluvial wells as pt.s of diversion for the Ironbridge subdivision. A map showing the pt.s of diversion is attached to the application as Exhibit A. Structures to be changed: Posy Pump and Pipeline, and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement. Decree info: Case No. 97CW236, Dist. Ct, Water Division 5, 3/22/1999. Subsequent decree awarding diligence, Case No. 05CW053, Dist. Ct., Water Division 5, 8/24/2006. Decreed location: Posy Pump and Pipeline: Government Lot 17 of Sec. 1, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. at a pt. whence the N.W. corner of said Sec. 1 bears N. 57 deg. 02’42” W., 3,799.13 ft. This structure can also be approx. plotted as being 2,290 ft. from the E. Sec. line and 2,300 ft. from the S. Sec. line. Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement: Westerly bank of the Roaring Fork River at a pt. whence the SE corner of Sec. 12, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. bears N. 27 deg. 56’ W. 2,788.14 ft. (The Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement has the same pt. of diversion as the Robertson Ditch.) Alternate pts of diversion: In Case No. 00CW019, the Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement water rights were decreed alternate pts of diversion at the Coryell Ranch Wells located as described in the following Table 1: Table 1 – Location of Coryell Ranch Wells 1-14 in T. 7 S., R. 88 W. of the 6 th P.M. Quarter Quarter Distance from Distance from Well No. Location in N. line of E. Line of Sec. 29 Sec. 29 Sec. 29 1 NE NE 1268.54 1021.95 2 SW NE 1849 2064.12 3 SE NE 2086.54 86.95 4 SE NE 1808.54 301.95 5 SE NE 1508.54 486.95 6 NE NE 1218.54 666.95 7 NE NE 928.54 966.95 8 NW NE 774 1284.12 9 SW NE 1469 1294.12 10 SW NE 1609 1604.12 11 SW NE 1739 1839.12 12 NW NE 879 1619.12 13 SE NE 1733.54 831.95 14 SE NE 1873.54 971.95 Approp. Dates: Posy Pump and Pipeline: 5/2/1997. Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement: 10/9/1997. Amt. Claimed: Posy Pump and Pipeline; Applicant owns an undivided 2 c.f.s. of the 7.5 c.f.s., cond. Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement: Applicant owns an undivided 2 c.f.s. of the 7.5 c.f.s., cond. Uses: Irr. of up to 201.3 acres total in conjunction with the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement. Land located in parts of Sec. 35, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M., and Sec. 1, 2 and 12, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. The above-referenced water right will be used for dom., delivery of water into storage, comm. for a golf course and related facilities, fire prot., and to serve as a potable water supply system for a golf course/residential development of up to 550 EQR’s. The Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement water rights, and their alternate pts of diversion, are water rights that are augmented pursuant to Case No. 97CW236. Applicant may divert no more than a total of 2 c.f.s. under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at any given time from their orig. decreed pts of diversion. Diversions of

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these water rights at their alternate pts of diversion at the Coryell Ranch Wells are further limited by the terms and conditions decreed in Case No. 00CW019, and incorporated in paragraph 6 of the app. Applicant requests alt. places of diversion to be located that the Aspen Glen Wells The Aspen Glen Wells 1 through 7 (the “Aspen Glen Wells”) are located in T.7S., R.88 W., 6th P.M., in Garfield County, Colorado, and are described as follows: Aspen Glen Well No. 1: SE1/4 SW1/4, Sec. 20, 660 ft. from the S. Sec. line and 1555 ft. from the W. Sec. line of said Sec. 20. Aspen Glen Well No. 2: NW1/4 NE1/4, Sec. 29, 768 ft. from the N. Sec. line and 2200 ft. from the E. Sec. line of said Sec. 29. (Well Permit No. 61405) Aspen Glen Well No. 3: NW1/4 NE1/4, Sec. 29, 508 ft. from the N. Sec. line and 1794 ft. from the E. Sec. line of said Sec. 29. (Well Permit No. 61406). Aspen Glen Well No. 4: NW1/4 NE1/4, Sec. 29, 788 ft. from the N. Sec. line and 2462 ft. from the E. Sec. line of said Sec. 29. (Well Permit No. 61407). Aspen Glen Well No. 5: NW1/4 NE1/4, Sec. 29, 703 ft. from the N. Sec. line and 2038 ft. from the E. Sec. line of said Sec. 29. Aspen Glen Well No. 6: NW1/4 NE1/4, Sec. 29, 393 ft. from the N. Sec. line and 2270 ft. from the E. Sec. line of said Sec. 29. Aspen Glen Well No. 7: NE1/4 NW1/4, Sec. 29, 447 ft. from the N. Sec. line and 2627 ft. from the W. Sec. line of said Sec. 29. Contemplated draft of water rights to be changed. The Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement water rights were decreed, in part, to provide a dom. supply to the Ironbridge development. Pursuant to the decree entered in Case No 97CW236, the development contemplated included in-house demands of 550 EQR’s, irr. of 6.3 of lawn and landscape from the potable system, 58 acres of dom. irr. from a non-potable system, 130 acres of irr. for a golf course, and evap. from ponds. The change in the pt. of diversion to the new wells located on the other side of the Roaring Fork River will not change the development that was contemplated to be served or the demand for water. Proposed terms and conditions: Consistent with the change of water rights decreed in Case No. 00CW019, which added the Coryell Wells as alternate pts of diversion, Applicant proposes the following terms and conditions apply equally to diversions of the Posy Pump and Pipeline or Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement water rights at either the Coryell Wells or Aspen Glen Wells (the “Alternate Pts of Diversion”) as described in app. No more than 1.77 cfs and 204 acre ft. annually of the subject cond. water rights shall be diverted at the Alternate Pts of Diversion. Water diverted at the Alternate Pts of Diversion shall be diverted for dom., irr., comm. and fire prot. purposes. Total diversions under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at the Alternate Pts of Diversion shall be limited to the Amts available to said rights in priority at the orig. decreed pts of diversion. Total diversions of the Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at any combination of the pts of diversion orig. decreed in Case No. 97CW236 and/or the Alternate Pts of Diversion shall not exceed 7.5 cfs at any given time. Diversions under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at the Alternate Pts of Diversion shall cease whenever senior water rights decreed for diversion through the Roberson Ditch are not fully satisfied. Exercise of the Posy Pump and Pipeline and Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at the Alternate Pts of Diversion shall be accounted for in the same manner as that established in the decree in Case No. 97CW236. Names and addresses of owners of the land upon which any structure is or will be located, upon which water is or will be stored, or upon which water is or will be placed to beneficial use: Applicant has easements over the property for which the structures are located. (9 pgs). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 9. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW134 GARFIELD COUNTY. ROARING FORK RIVER. Application for Finding of Reasonable Diligence and to Make Absolute, in Part. Applicant: Roaring Fork Water & Sanitation District, c/o Scott Grosscup, Balcomb & Green, P.C., P.O. Drawer 790, Glenwood Springs, CO 81602, 970-945-6546. Structure: Posy Pump and Pipeline. Orig. Decree, Case No. 97CW236, Dist. Ct, Water Division 5, 3/22/1999. Subsequent decree awarding diligence, Case No. 05CW053, 8/24/2006. Location: Government Lot 17 of Sec. 1, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. at a pt. whence the N.W. corner of said Sec. 1 bears N. 57 deg. 02’42” W. a dist. of 3,799.13 ft. This structure can also be approx. plotted as being 2,290 ft from the E. Sec. line and 2300 ft from the S. Sec. line. Alt. pts of diversion: In Case No. 00CW019, the Posy Pump and Pipeline water right was decreed alternate pts of diversion at the Coryell Ranch Wells located as described in the following Table: Location of Coryell Ranch Wells 1-14 in T. 7 S., R. 88 W. of the 6th P.M. Quarter Quarter

Distance from

Distance from

Location in

N. line of

E. Line of

Sec. 29

Sec. 29

Sec. 29

1

NE NE

1268.54

1021.95

2

SW NE

1849

2064.12

3

SE NE

2086.54

86.95

4

SE NE

1808.54

301.95

5

SE NE

1508.54

486.95

6

NE NE

1218.54

666.95

7

NE NE

928.54

966.95

8

NW NE

774

1284.12

9

SW NE

1469

1294.12

10

SW NE

1609

1604.12

11

SW NE

1739

1839.12

12

NW NE

879

1619.12

13

SE NE

1733.54

831.95

14

SE NE

1873.54

971.95

Well No.

Approp. Date: 5/2/1997. Amt: Applicant owns an undivided 2 c.f.s. of the 7.5 c.f.s., cond. Use: Irr. of up to 201.3 acres total in conjunction with the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement. Land located in parts of Sec. 35, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M., and Secs 1, 2 and 12, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. The above-referenced water right will be used for dom., delivery of water into storage, commercial for a golf course and related facilities, fire prot., and to serve as a potable water supply system for a golf course/residential development of up to 550 EQR’s. Applicant may divert no more than a total of 2 c.f.s. under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at any given time. A map showing the locations of the Posy Pump and Pipeline and alternate pts of diversion is attached as Exhibit A to app. Structure: Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement. Orig. Decree, Case No. 97CW236, Dist. Ct, Water Division 5, 3/22/1999. Subsequent decree awarding diligence, Case No. 05CW053, 8/24/2006. Located on the Westerly bank of the Roaring Fork River at a pt. whence the SE corner of Sec. 12, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. bears N. 27 deg. 56’ W. 2788.14 ft. (The Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement has the same pt. of diversion as the Robertson Ditch.) In Case No. 00CW019, the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement water right was decreed alternate pts of diversion at the Coryell Ranch Wells described in app. Approp. Date: 10/9/1997. Amt: Applicant owns an undivided 2 c.f.s. of the 7.5 c.f.s., cond. Use: Irr. of up to 201.3 acres total in conjunction with the Posy Pump and Pipeline. Land located in parts of Sec. 35, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M., and Secs 1, 2 and 12, T. 7 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. The above-referenced water right will be used for dom., delivery of water into storage, comm. for a golf course and related facilities, fire prot., and to serve as a potable water supply system for a golf course/residential development of up to 550 EQR’s. Applicant may divert no more than a total of 2 c.f.s. under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at any given time. A map showing the locations of the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement and alternate pts of diversion is attached as Exhibit A to app. A complete list of diligence activities are on file with this court. Applicant requests a finding that the following water rights are absolute through diversion and application to beneficial use. Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement through diversions at the Coryell Ranch Wells No. 11 and 13. Date water applied to beneficial use: 7/15/2011, delivery of potable water to the Ironbridge PUD commenced in June of 2003. Amt. and Place of use: 0.17 cfs by delivery to 195.3 EQRs within the Ironbridge PUD for

S e p t e m b e r 27 - O c t ob e r 3 , 2 0 1 2

dom. and comm. use at the Ironbridge golf course. Diversion Records for the Coryell Ranch Wells No. 11 and 13 are attached as Exhibit B to app. Names and addresses of owners of the land upon which any structure is or will be located, upon which water is or will be stored, or upon which water is or will be placed to beneficial use: Applicant has easements over the property for which the structures are located. (13 pgs). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 10. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW135(REF NO. 04CW85). GARFIELD COUNTY, GROUNDWATER TRIBUTARY TO THE ROARING FORK AND COLORADO RIVERS. Jennifer Dockery and the Springridge Place Homeowners Association, c/o Tom Kinney, Esq., Western Slope Water Rights, LLC, 0274 Crystal Park Drive, Redstone, Colorado 81623, (970) 963-3900 ext. 4. Application for Finding of Reasonable Diligence. Applicants request entry of a decree finding that they have shown reasonable diligence in completing the appropriation of tributary groundwater pursuant to the following-described water right originally decreed by the Water Court in Case No. 97CW177 and awarded partially absolute with the remaining conditional water right continued in full force and effect in Case No. 04CW85: Springridge Well No. 1, First Enlargement, 0.156 cfs with an annual diversion amount of 0.24 acre-foot of groundwater of which, 0.156 cfs with an annual diversion rate of 0.12 acre-foot, remains conditional, previously decreed for diversion of groundwater tributary to Fourmile Creek, Roaring Fork River and Colorado River at a point located in the NW¼SE¼ of Section 10, Township 7 South, Range 89 West, 6th P.M., at a point within the rightof-way of Dry Park Road which point is 2,150 feet distant from the South line and 2,050 feet distant from the East line of said Section 10, according to the Decree entered by the Water Court on May 19, 1998 in Case No. 97CW177 (actual point of diversion is located within 200 feet of the previously decreed diversion point such that no change of water right is required pursuant to ULR 4(b)(1)) for in-house domestic use within two remaining of four approved accessory dwelling units with an appropriation date of May 25, 1997. Applicants have provided evidence of the efforts they have made towards diligently completing the appropriation of 0.156 cfs for the annual diversion of 0.06 acre-foot of groundwater of the subject conditional water right such that this portion of the subject conditional water should right be continued in full force and effect for an additional six-year diligence period. Applicants also request that the other one-half of the subject remaining conditional water right; 0.156 cfs for the annual diversion of 0.06 acre-foot of tributary groundwater be cancelled in this case due to relinquishment by a member-homeowner of the right to construct one of the four approved accessory dwelling units. (8 pages). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 13. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW138 GARFIELD COUNTY; ROARING FORK RIVER. LB Rose Ranch, LLC, c/o Karl J. Hanlon, Esq. and Jeffrey J. Conklin, Esq., Karp Neu Hanlon, P.C., 201 14th Street, Suite 200, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. Application for Finding of Reasonable Diligence, Change of Water Rights and Request to Make Absolute. Date of original decree for all structures: March 22, 1999 in Case No. 97CW236, District Court, WD #5. Subsequent decree awarding findings of diligence: Case No. 05CW53, entered on 8/24/2006. Source: Roaring Fork River for the Posy Pump & Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement. The sources of water for the Rose Ranch Pond Nos. 1 through 10 and the O’Neill Reservoir First Enlargement are off-channel reservoirs which will be filled and refilled from either the Posy Pump & Pipeline or Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement. The ponds will only be filled and refilled when in priority and the rate of diversion for filling all ponds is up to 7.50 c.f.s., conditional. The Posy Pump & Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement will be used for irrigation of up to 201.3 acres total in conjunction with the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement, and for domestic, delivery of water into storage, commercial for a golf course and related facilities, fire protection and to serve as a potable water supply system for a golf course/residential development of up to 550 EQRs. The decreed uses of water for the Rose Ranch Pond Nos. 1 through 10 and the O’Neill Reservoir First Enlargement are fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation. Appropriation dates: Posy Pump & Pipeline: 5/2/1997; Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement: 10/9/1997; Rose Ranch Pond Nos. 1 through 10 and O’Neill Reservoir First Enlargement: 10/2/1997. Claim for Finding of Reasonable Diligence. Posy Pump and Pipeline, a surface water diversion source located in Government Lot 17 of Section 1, T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point whence the Northwest corner of said Section 1 bears North 57º02’42” West a distance of 3799.13 feet. This structure can also be approximately plotted as being 2290 feet from the East section line and 2300 feet from the South section line. Amount: 7.5 c.f.s., conditional. Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement, located on the Westerly bank of the Roaring Fork River at a point whence the SE corner of Section 12, T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM bears North 27º56’ West 2788.14 feet (The Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement has the same point of diversion as the Robertson Ditch.). Amount: 7.5 c.f.s., conditional. In Case No. 05CW53, 0.8 c.f.s. of the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement, was made absolute for commercial use for a golf course and related facilities, irrigation of 107.5 acres, delivery of water into storage, fire protection uses and domestic use in the pro Shop, maintenance building and other golf course buildings. Remarks: No more than a total of 7.5 c.f.s. will be diverted under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at any given time. Rose Ranch Pond No. 1, a pond located in Government Lot 12 of Section 12, T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 12 bears North 57º50’05” West a distance of 4300 feet. In Case No. 05CW53, the point of storage was changed as follows: The center-point of the dam is located in the SW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 1, Township 7 South, Range 89 West, 6th P.M. 1005 feet from the West section line of said Section 1, and 1228 feet from the North section line of said Section 1. Amount: 4.3 acre-feet, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 4.3 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 0.74 acres. In Case No. 05CW53, the amount of storage was changed as follows: Amount: 2.7 AF, absolute, for fire protection, aesthetic and recreation uses. Active storage: none. Dead storage: 2.7 AF. Surface area: 0.80 acres. Average depth: 10 feet. Rose Ranch Pond No. 2, a pond located in Government Lot 9 of Section 12 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 12 bears North 63º26’55” West a distance of 4200 feet. Amount: 5.7 AF, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 5.7 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 1.08 acres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 3, a pond located in Government Lot 13 of Section 12 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 12 bears North 50º20’31” West a distance of 3514.63 feet. Amount: 3.7 AF, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 3.7 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 0.64 acres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 4, a pond located in Government Lot 8 of Section 12 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 12 bears North 57º07’12” West a distance of 3428.10 feet. Amount: 3.3 AF, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 3.3 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 0.77 acres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 5, a pond located in Government Lot 28 of Section 1 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 1 bears North 35º07’39” West a distance of 4526.54 feet. In Case No. 05CW53, the point of storage was changed as follows: The center-point of the dam is located in the NE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 2, Township 7 South, Range 89 West, 6th P.M. 2500 feet from the West section line of said Section 2 and 80 feet from the North section line of said Section 2. Amount: 2.7 AF, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 2.7 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 0.5 acres. In Case No. 05CW53, the amount of storage was changed as follows: Amount: 14.5 AF, absolute, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 14.5 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 2.89 acres. Average depth: 10 feet. Rose Ranch Pond No. 6, a pond located in Government Lot 23 of Section 1 at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 1 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM bears North 43º15’21” West a distance of 3750.39 feet. In Case No. 05CW53, the point of storage was changed as follows: The center-point of the dam is located in the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section 35, Township 6 South, Range 89 West, 6th P.M., 2880 feet from the West section line of said Section 35 and 60 feet from the South section line of said Section 35. Amount: 4.0 AF, conditional, for fire


rotection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 4.0 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 1.3 acres. In Case No. 05CW53, the amount of storage was changed as ollows: Amount: 8.8 AF, absolute, for fire protection, aesthetic and recreation uses. Active torage: none. Dead storage: 8.8 AF. Surface area: 2.64 acres. Average depth: 10 feet. Rose Ranch Pond No. 7, a pond located in Government Lot 11 of Section 1 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at point from whence the NW corner of said Section 1 bears North 55º59’36” West a distance of 472.83 feet. In Case No. 05CW53, the point of storage was changed as follows: The center-point f the dam is located in the SW1/4 SE1/4 of Section 35, Township 6 South, Range 89 West, 6th .M., 3170 feet from the West section line of said Section 35 and 530 feet from the South section ne of said Section 35. Amount: 5.5 AF, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and ugmentation uses. Active storage: 5.5 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 1.79 acres. In Case No. 05CW53, the amount of storage was changed as follows: Amount: 6.3 AF, absolute, for fire rotection, aesthetic and recreation uses. Active storage: None. Dead storage: 6.3 AF. Surface rea: 1.88 acres. Average depth: 10 feet. Rose Ranch Pond No. 8, a pond located in Government ot 12 of Section 1 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section bears North 31º32’28” West a distance of 1801.70 feet. Amount: 12.5 AF, conditional, for fire rotection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 12.5 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 2.51 acres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 9, a pond located in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 12 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said ection 12 bears North 22º59’19” West a distance of 1075.41 feet. In Case No. 05CW53, the point f storage was changed as follows: The center-point of the dam is located in the SW1/4 NW1/4 of ection 1, Township 7 South, Range 89 West, 6th P.M., 772 feet from the West section line of said ection 1 and 1553 feet from the North section line of said Section 1. Amount: 4.0 AF, conditional, or fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses Active storage: 4.0 AF. Dead torage: None. Surface area: 1.3 acres. Amount: 8.3 AF, absolute, for fire protection, aesthetic, ecreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 8.3 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 1.67 cres. Average depth: 10 feet. Rose Ranch Pond No. 10, a pond located in Government Lot 16 of ection 12 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point from whence the NW corner of said Section 12 bears North 46º00’00” West a distance of 4500.00 feet. In Case No. 05CW53, the point of storage was hanged as follows: The center-point of the dam is located in the SW1/4 NE1/4 of Section 12, ownship 7 South, Range 89 West, 6th P.M., 3394 feet from the West section line of said Section 2 and 1450 feet from the North section line of said Section 12. Amount: 1.0 AF, conditional, for re protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 1.0 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 0.15 acres. In Case No. 05CW53, the amount of storage was changed as ollows: Amount: 1.7 AF, absolute, for fire protection, aesthetic and recreation uses. Active torage: None. Dead storage: 1.7 AF. Surface area: 0.51 acres. Average depth: 10 feet. O’Neill Reservoir First Enlargement: A pond located in Section 12 T. 7 S., R 89 W., 6th PM at a point 1600 eet from the East section line and 2100 feet from the South section line of said Section 12. Amount: 21.0 AF, conditional, for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation and augmentation uses. Active storage: 21.0 AF. Dead storage: None. Surface area: 4.2 acres. Exhibit A to the application rovides a detailed outline of what has been done during the diligence period towards the ompletion of the appropriation and application of water to beneficial use as conditionally ecreed, including expenditures. Claim for Change of Water Rights. Rose Ranch Pond No. 5, escribed above. Applicant requests a change in amount of storage as follows: Amount: 18.26 AF, bsolute. Active Storage: 18.26 AF. Dead Storage: none. Surface area: 2.96 acres. Rose Ranch ond No. 6, described above. Applicant requests a change in amount of storage as follows: Amount: 17.67 AF, absolute. Active Storage: none. Dead Storage: 17.67 AF. Surface area: 2.7 cres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 7, described above. Applicant requests a change in amount of storage s follows: Amount: 12.49 AF, absolute. Active Storage: none. Dead Storage: 12.49 AF. Surface rea: 1.88 acres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 9, described above. Applicant requests a change in amount f storage as follows: Amount: 12.07 AF, absolute. Active Storage: 12.07 AF. Dead Storage: one. Surface area: 2.87 acres. Rose Ranch Pond No. 10, described above. Applicant requests a hange amount of storage as follows: Amount: 4.51 AF, absolute. Active Storage: none. Dead torage: 4.51 AF. Surface Area: 0.66 acre. Remarks: These claims for change of water rights are o modify the Amended Findings of Fact, Ruling of Referee, and Decree of the Court in Case No. 7CW236 and the Findings of Fact, Ruling of Referee, and Judgment and Decree of Water Court n Case No. 05CW53 to reflect the “as built” locations and amounts of the ponds, as provided at aragraph 6.F. of the 97CW236 Decree and paragraph 34 of the 05CW53 Decree. Applicant has otal decreed storage rights of 67.7 acre-feet, with total surface area of 15.0 acres. This application eflects full build-out of the ponds and seeks to make absolute the remaining conditional storage ghts decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW53. Claim to Make Absolute. Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement, described above. Water applied for beneficial use: Date: April 1, 2005. Amount: 6.7 c.f.s., absolute. Use: Irrigation of up to 201.3 acres total in conjunction with the osy Pump and Pipeline, and for domestic, delivery of water into storage, commercial for a golf

course and related facilities, fire protection and to serve as a potable water supply system for a golf course/residential development of up to 550 EQR’s. Remarks: No more than a total of 7.5 c.f.s. will be diverted under the Posy Pump and Pipeline and the Robertson Ditch, Rose Enlargement at any given time. Rose Ranch Pond No. 5, described above. Water applied to beneficial use: Date: April 1, 2005. Amount: 3.76 AF. Uses: fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation. This claim to make absolute reflects the as-built location and amount of Rose Ranch Pond No. 5. In Case No. 05CW53, Rose Ranch Pond No. 5 was made absolute for 14.5 acre-feet for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation uses. This claim seeks to make the remaining conditional storage amount absolute based on the as-built size of the pond. Along with the other claims to make absolute in this application, Applicant seeks to make absolute its total decreed storage rights of 67.7 acre-feet, as decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW53. Rose Ranch Pond No. 6, described above. Water applied to beneficial use: Date: April 1, 2005. Amount: 8.87 AF. Uses: fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation. Remarks: This claim to make absolute reflects the as-built location and amount of Rose Ranch Pond No. 6. In Case No. 05CW53, Rose Ranch Pond No. 6 was made absolute for 8.8 acre-feet for fire protection, aesthetic, and recreation uses. This claim seeks to make the remaining conditional storage amount absolute based on the as-built size of the pond. Along with the other claims to make absolute in this application, Applicant seeks to make absolute its total decreed storage rights of 67.7 acre-feet, as decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW53. Rose Ranch Pond No. 7, described above. Water applied to beneficial use: Date: April 1, 2005. Amount: 6.19 AF. Uses: fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation. Remarks: This claim to make absolute reflects the as-built location and amount of Rose Ranch Pond No. 7. In Case No. 05CW53, Rose Ranch Pond No. 7 was made absolute for 6.3 acre-feet for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation uses. This claim seeks to make the remaining conditional storage amount absolute based on the as-built size of the pond. Along with the other claims to make absolute in this application, Applicant seeks to make absolute its total decreed storage rights of 67.7 acre-feet, as decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW53. Rose Ranch Pond No. 9, described above. Water applied to beneficial use: Date: April 1, 2005. Amount: 3.77 AF. Uses: fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation. Remarks: This claim to make absolute reflects the asbuilt location and amount of Rose Ranch Pond No. 9. In Case No. 05CW53, Rose Ranch Pond No. 9 was made absolute for 8.3 acre-feet for fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation uses. This claim seeks to make the remaining conditional storage amount absolute based on the as-built size of the pond. Along with the other claims to make absolute in this application, Applicant seeks to make absolute its total decreed storage rights of 67.7 acre-feet, as decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW53. Rose Ranch Pond No. 10, described above. Water applied to beneficial use: Date: April 1, 2005. Amount: 2.81 AF. Uses: fire protection, aesthetic, recreation, and augmentation. Remarks: This claim to make absolute reflects the as-built location and amount of Rose Ranch Pond No. 10. In Case No. 05CW53, Rose Ranch Pond No. 10 was made absolute for 1.7 acre-feet for fire protection, aesthetic, and recreation uses. This claim seeks to make the remaining conditional storage amount absolute based on the as-built size of the pond. Along with the other claims to make absolute in this application, Applicant seeks to make absolute its total decreed storage rights of 67.7 acre-feet, as decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW53. The total volume and surface area of all absolute storage rights does not exceed 67.7 acre feet of storage and 15.0 acres of surface area, as decreed in Case Nos. 97CW236 and 05CW053. None of the ponds, as constructed, intercept groundwater. Name and address of owners of land upon which structures are located: Applicant and Aspen Glen, 9929 Highway 82, Carbondale, CO 81623. A water rights location map is attached to the Application as Exhibit A. (23 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 17. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 05CW144 GARFIELD, EAGLE AND PITKIN COUNTIES, ROARING FORK AND FRYING PAN RIVERS. Second Amended Application. Applicant: Elk Meadows Properties,

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LLC represented by Sara M. Dunn, Balcomb & Green, P.C., P.O. Drawer 790, Glenwood Springs, CO 81602, (970) 945-6546. The Claim for Underground Water Rt. for the Reserve at Elk Meadows Well Field is hereby withdrawn. The request for approval of a plan for aug. and exchange to replace out-of-priority diversions at the Reserve at Elk Meadows Well Field is also withdrawn. CLAIM FOR SURFACE WATER RT. Structure: Reserve at Elk Meadows River Div. Legal desc. of pt. of Div. is hereby modified as follows: located in the SE1/4, SE1/4 of Sec. 27, T. 6 S., R. 89 W., 6th P.M. 30 ft. N. of the S. Sec. line and 1,220 ft. W. of the E. Sec. line. Date of Approp.: 2/28/2007. How Approp. was initiated: formation of intent to appropriate water for application to beneficial use and field investigation. Amt.: 2.0 c.f.s., cond. Uses: Supplemental irr. of 80 acres within the property identified on the map on file with Water Court, delivery of water to storage on property for subsequent use of supplemental irr., aug. and fire prot. The Reserve at Elk Meadows River Div. will either divert water from the Roaring Fork River in priority, as described in app., or may divert water released form Ruedi Reservoir pursuant to a contract with the W. Divide Water Conserv. Dist. or a Ruedi Reservoir Water Allotment Contract directly with the Bureau of Rec., during periods of call when the Reserve at Elk Meadows River Div. 2007 Approp. would be outof-priority. Infor. from Prior Decrees for Ruedi Reservoir. Legal description of place of storage: Ruedi Reservoir is located in Secs 7, 8, 9, 11 and 14 through 18, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., 6th P.M., in Eagle and Pitkin Counties. The dam axis intersects the rt. abutment at a pt. whence the SW corner of Sec. 7, T. 8 S., R. 84 W., 6th P.M. bears N. 82 deg 10’W. a dist. of 1,285 ft. Previous storage decrees: CA-4613: 6/20/1958. Amt.: 140,697.3 AF, reduced to 102,369 AF pursuant to order of the Dist. Court, Water Div. No. 5 in Case No. W-789-76. Approp. Date: 7/29/1957. Use: Dom., mun., irr., ind., generation of electrical energy, stock watering and pisc. Case No. 81CW34: 4/8/1985. Amt.: 101,280 a.f. (refill). Approp. Date: 1/22/1981. Use: Irr., dom., mun., generation of electrical energy, stock watering, ind., pisc., rec. and maintenance of sufficient storage reserves to fulfill contractual obligations and provide stored water for recreation in times of drought. Name(s) and address(es) of owner(s) of land on which structure(s) is or will be located, upon which water is or will be stored, or upon which water is or will be placed to beneficial use: Applicant, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, Eastern Colorado Area Office, Great Plains Region, 11056 W. County Road 18E, Loveland, CO 80537-9711, and the City of Glenwood Springs, c/o Jeff Hecksel, 101 W. 8th Street, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. (5 pgs). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 18. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 11CW39 (03CW125, 09CW189) GARFIELD COUNTY-CATTLE CREEK ALLUVIUM, TRIBUTARY TO THE ROARING FORK RIVER, TRIBUTARY TO THE COLORADO RIVER. Terry & Diane Kindell; 7305 C.R. 100; Carbondale, CO 81673 (970)963-7445. Teague Well #1-Amended Application Finding of Reasonable Diligence and for Approval of Plan for Augmentation. The Applicants wish to amend their augmentation plan as decreed in Case No. 09CW189 to include a use for non-commercial livestock watering. They propose reducing the amount of decreed acreage (8,200 sq.ft.) they now irrigate to accommodate the watering of 4 horses. Appropriation: 2/12/91. Amount: 0.33 c.f.s., conditional. Use: livestock watering and irrigation of 2,846 sq. ft. lawns and gardens. (7 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of OCTOBER 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. Published in the Aspen Times Weekly on September 27, 2012.

Are you being solicited from an annoying “toll free” business that wants YOU to place your ad with THEM?

1. Write down the # and the time you got the call (these are usually recorded calls). 2. Go to complaints.donotcall.gov or www.donotcall.gov. 3. Follow the steps on the web form. If you aren’t sure if your phone number is registered you can find out on this same site. As long as your phone number has been registered for at least a month you can file a complaint. A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by ALICIA RANCILIO/AP

AUTHOR INTERVIEW

3 QUESTIONS FOR ANDREW MCCARTHY TWENTY YEARS AGO, actor Andrew McCarthy read a book about walking the Camino de Santiago, the ancient pilgrimage route in Spain, and it inspired him to walk the Camino himself. “That sort of changed the way I felt in the world and it helped me stop being afraid of the world,” recalled McCarthy, 49. “It helped me realize travel obliterates fear.” McCarthy, whose best-known films include his work as part of Hollywood’s “Brat Pack” in “Pretty in Pink” and “St. Elmo’s Fire,” is now an acclaimed travel writer for major magazines (he admits that he’s lucky to have “the two best jobs in the world” as both an actor and a writer). And he’s just written his own book about travel called “The Longest Way Home: One Man’s Quest for the Courage to Settle Down.” He sums up

by DAVID STEINBERG AND BARRY HALDIMAN

| edited by WILL SHORTZ

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Hip bones Safecracker Zip When things aren’t going right Terrific, in slang Jai ___ Web app platform Title heroine of a Gustave Charpentier opera Doctrines Domino’s most important part? Highest taxonomic rank Successors’ spots Host P.M. part Speak raucously Game played with a rope Monk’s wear French possessive Director Wertmüller Grandpa Munster portrayer Coastal indentations City on the Somme Rudely interrupts Wish one ___ (rue) It may be cured Suffix with peck or puck Certain elective surgery, for short ___ es Salaam Vest opening Like strongmen Careful wording, maybe The White House’s ___ Room Suit Obsolescent belt attachment

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Nautical pronoun Cousin ___ Actor Eric of “Troy” Beam over “Help wanted” inits. 2000 Ricky Martin hit One small step It’s separated from N.B. by the Northumberland Strait Barrister’s deg. One letting off steam Half a Yale cheer “Of course, Señor!” Kind of sch. Two long parts of the body Experience Mauna ___ Skin soother Day-___ ___ v. Ashcroft (2004 privacy case) Coming up Opens, in a way Sign with an arrow Bygone ruler First bishop of Paris Olympic goldmedal gymnast Conner Coins that disappeared during the French Revolution Onetime billionaire investor Laurence Certain ones, in Brooklyn “Rule Britannia” composer Write ___ Lumpur,

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Malaysia “That is so funny — not!” Appear as such Eastern Conference N.B.A. city “I ___ confused” Androgynous “S.N.L.” skit turned into a 1994 movie Escapade Ersatz New Mexico county or its seat Gambling games Addition, of a sort Dickens’s Uriah Feminine suffix

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MCCARTHY: I like to know what story I’m planning to write before I go and then invariably it changes. I find, like with anything, it’s like with the acting, the more prepared you are, the more you can throw that out the window with surprises to happen, do you know what I mean? When I’m just on my own, I just go. I just show up without a reservation. I just arrive AP: How does travel affect you? MCCARTHY: People think they’re going to escape and have a vacation (but) people always have meltdowns on vacation. You go, you leave everything you know that you’ve safely constructed to keep yourself from having any anxiety and you go to a beach and you lay there and all you have is your mind. How can you not think that’s gonna be a stressful experience? I always think travel is not about escape at all, it’s about confronting yourself.

his conflicts over settling down as, “I want to be alone and I want to be with you,” and says he resolved the conflict “the way I answer all questions in my life, by traveling.” Here’s more from McCarthy, who is married and the father of two children, about travel: AP: Any place you don’t like? MCCARTHY: Very rarely do I get to a spot where I’m like, ‘This is awful.’ It’s usually me that’s awful in the spot and then when I have something to eat usually, or maybe a nap, I come back, ‘Oh, yeah, no. This is OK.’ I find anywhere interesting. ... You know I was recently in Sudan and I found that endless and fascinating. I would love to go back to Sudan. I’ve been to a lot of places, I was in Mozambique recently and it was just ravaged parts of it and I found it fascinating. AP: Do you plan for trips?

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Sans-serif typeface The scarlet letter Phone billing plan Think that maybe one can William ___ Henley, “Invictus” poet Denounce harshly Pesto part 1960s TV spy org.

107 Start of a spill 111 Designer Lagerfeld 112 Rope material 113 Symbol of Aphrodite 115 ___ Paulo 117 Nonhuman villain of a classic 1968 film 118 ___ kwon do

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O R I N G G A L I L L P L A Y E P A R C H U L I U S R E S T A R K E T L O Y I S M E L I A R P A G E U M O C C A R D I E S A R S T R A P T A I R R I C O N C E S A G E T M Y L A

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N O D A T Y E A R R E N D S A T I T




OPEN ALL OFF-SEASON FRESH, CREATIVE FOOD HAND-CRAFTED COCKTAILS $6 KIDS’ MEALS INCREDIBLE, AFFORDABLE WINES Serving Lunch & Dinner Daily 11am-10pm 

Your BEST FRIEND is waiting for YOU!

MADISON

Friendly, 7-year-old German Shepherd mix female who gets along well with all people and most dogs.

FIONA

Black short-haired Chihuahua mix female about 2 years old. Turned in with siblings due to death of their owner in late July. Shy at first but warms up to a gentle approach. Loves people and likes to be with other dogs.

JIM

Outgoing, energetic, 11-yearold American Foxhound/Husky mix male. Gets along well with people and other dogs. A retired sled dog who came to the shelter with his brother, Buck, and his sister, Jackie.

FREDDY

Handsome 6-yearold Pomeranian.He can be a bit cranky around his food, so he will do best in an adult household with a responsible owner.

JACKIE

Beautiful, friendly, 11-year-old Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. Jackie is a retired sled dog who came to the shelter with her brothers, Buck and Jim.

MAYA

Sweet, pretty 2-year-old Staffy mix female. Athletic + affectionate. Needs a responsible, active knowledgeable home.

BUCK

Mellow, friendly 11-year-old American Foxhound/Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. Buck is a retired sled dog who came to the shelter with his brother, Jim, and his sister, Jackie.

CLEO

Beautiful, friendly, soft-spoken 9-year-old Husky mix female. She is a retired sled dog looking for a loving home. Outgoing with people.

GOOSE

1.5 year-old, easygoing, friendly Labradoodle who gets along well with people and other dogs.

HUNTER

3-year-old Pit Bull/ Chow mix who was found wandering around Aspen. He is wary of strangers, but friendly once he knows you and trusts you.

See dogsaspen.com for more animals. SAM

Strong, energetic, black/white 5-yearold female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull-larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing and very friendly. Loves people. Best as only pet.

OPEN 7am-6pm EVERY DAY 970.544.0206

LUCY

DON’T RIDE ON THE SIDEWALK.

ALEX

1.5-year-old Lab/ German Wirehaired Pointer mix female. Happy, friendly and quite well-behaved. Alex is a cool, goodlooking dog.

SARGE

7-year-old male Rottweiler. Friendly + sweet. Loves people. Perfect except for severe separation anxiety. Would do best in a home with constant companionship. Ask staff for info.

BEAR

Gentle, friendly, affectionate, 3-year-old Pit Bull female found wandering the streets of LA. Brought to Aspen to start a new life. She is the hardest dog to photograph to show how sweet she really is. Give her a chance, please.

Large, friendly, 8-year-old Mastiff male. Gets along well with everybody, but occasionally picks fights with other dogs possibly due to fading eyesight. All in all, a very cool dog.

Aspen/Pitkin Animal Shelter 101 Animal Shelter Road

www.dogsaspen.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

39


Frying Pan River Frontage s137+ acre parcel with a home and 14 cabins sLocated 2 miles from the heart of Basalt sOver half a mile of Frying Pan River frontage s"ORDEREDONTHREESIDESBY",-AND National Forest Entire 137+ acre parcel $19,500,000 Dodge City Parcel 68+ acres $10,000,000 Homestead Parcel – 68+ acres $10,000,000 Jana Dillard | 970.948.9731 Ted Borchelt | 970.309.3626

Riverfront Ranch in Old Snowmass One of a kind ranch property – 35+acres -AIN(OUSEBEDROOMS FULL HALFBATHS 'UEST(OUSEBEDROOMS BATHS $13,500,000 Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

On the Banks of the Roaring Fork 4 bedrooms, 4 full, 2 half baths, 6,379 sq ft Coryell Ranch – unique angler’s paradise "REATHTAKINGVIEWS 'OLD-EDALlSHING Aspen Glen golf membership included $2,660,000 Doug Leibinger | 970379.9045

Stellar Mt. Sopris Views 35 acres of privacy, piñions and views! 5 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, 5,913 sq ft Finish to suit buyer’s tastes Exceptional floor plan takes in the views $3,500,000, pre-completion $2,500,000 Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443

Top of the World Views 3PECTACULAR-ISSOURI(EIGHTSHOME 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 3,744 sq ft Elegant spaces, superior finishes $1,695,000 Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443 Greg Didier | 970.379.3980

Cerise Ranch’s Premier Home 6 bedrooms, 7.5 baths, 8,621 sq ft, 4.26 acres Finishes are of the highest quality The kitchen is a chef’s dream This home is fit for a king! $2,775,000 Garrett Reuss | 970.379.3458

The Best of River Valley Ranch 6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, 5,750 sq ft, .61 acres Located on the 11th tee box Detached one bedroom guest house Perfect second or year-round home $1,375,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

ASPENSNOWMASSSIR.COM

Aspen Times Weekly: Sept. 27 edition  

The Aspen Times Weekly in Aspen, Colorado, reaches thousands of readers every week. In this edition, 65-year-old George Ryerson tells the st...