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ASPEN FICTION CONTEST “MRS. NICKEL PICKLE” 28 JUNE 7-13, 2012 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

A PORTRAIT OF A UTE SEE PAGE 24


BELLY UP ASPEN WHERE ASPEN GOES FOR LIVE MUSIC.

WED 6/6

GAMES AT 6 PM // SHOW AFTER NBA PLAYOFFS AND GAMES

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 7-13, 2012


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

3


30 ANNIVERSARY

2011

ef ew Ch Best Nar’s top talent This ye

Much

ars: Semin Wine an half the fun more th eet: & Sw Salty ersation with

a conv licchio and Tom Co Simmons Gail

Sched

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Events

This year, we celebrate the 30th anniversary of Food & Wine in Aspen with a special, commemorative guide, featuring thoughtful interviews with chefs, features on the unique activities, tasting tips from experts, the complete event schedule, and fun photos from Food & Wine festivals in the past. The magazine will be inserted into The Aspen Times on Thursday, June 14 and Friday, June 15. Also can be found in The Aspen Times office, dedicated stands, hotels, information booths throughout town and at the event.

970.925.3414 |aspentimes.com 4

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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June 7-13, 2012


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION

DEPARTMENTS 08 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION 12

LEGENDS & LEGACIES

14 FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE 17

WINE INK

18

FOOD MATTERS

28 ASPEN FICTION CONTEST 32 AROUND ASPEN 34 LOCAL CALENDAR 42 CROSSWORD WINEINK

HOW TO TASTE A BEER 17

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ASPEN FICTION CONTEST “MRS. NICKEL PICKLE” 28 JUNE 7-13, 2012 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

A PORTRAIT OF A UTE SEE PAGE 24

20 A&E

30 COVER STORY

Mainstream or not, the Indigo Girls still have a loyal following.

Introducing Skylar Lomahaftewa, a Ute “dude” sharing his heritage in the Roaring Fork Valley.

ON THE COVER

Photo by Ryan Slabaugh

EDITOR’S NOTE

signs of summer | Last weekend, I heard a bartender tell a

patron, “I love summer and I hate summer, you know?” happily distracted by a Yep, we know. cover band blasting the Having only lived likes of The Cars and here a couple of years, Three Dog Night. I am still pretty green The second: when on many ideas, issues, the paragliders begin to concepts and blackcircle above the West market politics. But End. For one, this is a after one summer, reason not to drive, as you realize that this RYAN SLABAUGH they are more distracting is a different place than a cellphone, surely; and when the snow melts. If winter is separately, it makes me wonder if peak, summer is Mount Everest. they could fly over my house and see Summer, not winter, is the time if the gutters need cleaned. when event organizers step on the And third: Summer is officially gas, fill our calendars and drag the here when I start asking strange rest of us along with them to these questions after I see a woman in a really fun … things. bikini walk a dog in a bikini (which Of course, I don’t mean to happened last weekend near my complain. This is all part of the pageantry of living in a popular place home). Immediately after, I ask myself three questions: Where in a popular season. It’s just that do you get a dog bikini? (Answer: we don’t really have seasons. Ours Aspen.) Is it appropriate to take a do not change on June 21 like the picture of a dog in a bikini? (It is rest of the country. Instead, I have not, I decided.) And how bad are learned, we become summer after my tan lines? (I plead the Fifth.) the following three things occur: Moving on … The first: Friday Afternoon *** Clubs. I know it’s summer when A special plug for the start of every Friday at 3 p.m., just when the Aspen Fiction Contest award I need to be working, I will be

winners, which begin publishing today. Look for the top three pieces (out of more than 50 submitted) published in the next three editions, with the grand-prize-winning piece publishing June 21. Thanks to everyone who submitted and judged for this inaugural contest. It will surely grow from here. *** Last but not least, we want to give a special thank-you to Skylar for spending so much time sharing his story this past week, month and years. As the subject of our cover story, he had a few eye-rolling moments with us, especially as we asked him to pose for photos. Despite it all, he showed a kindness and dedication to his roots that made us all a bit envious. As the Historical Society has found, his story is unique and important. And because of the fact that he is one of the few left in the Roaring Fork Valley, we know these opportunities to capture his story, through his eyes, could one day disappear. rslabaugh@aspentimes.com

VOLUME 1 ✦ ISSUE NUMBER 29

Editor-in-Chief Ryan Slabaugh Advertising Director Gunilla Asher Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott Design Afton Groepper Arts Editor Stewart Oksenhorn Production Manager Evan Gibbard Contributing Editors Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Gunilla Asher Kelly Hayes Jill Beathard Jeanne McGovern John Colson Contributing Writers Paul Andersen Hilary Stunda Amanda Charles Michael Appelbaum Warren Miller Contributing Partners High Country News Aspen Historical Society The Ute Mountaineer Explore Booksellers www.aspentimes.com Sales Ashton Hewitt Jeff Hoffman David Laughren Christian Henrichon Su Lum Louise Walker Classified Advertising (970) 925-9937

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 7-13, 2012


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

7


THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

VOX POP What do you have planned for Father’s Day? TAJ CLARENCE ASPEN

“I am going to give him a sword and make him a birthday cake.”

CAMILA HUESCA UNKNOWN

“I am going to make my dad a present.”

ABE EFFRESS ASPEN

“I am going to go to Europe!”

8

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 7-13, 2012

with BRENDAN LEONARD

Talking vegetarianism to a hunter IN THE END, all I chatting and kicking could tell the guy was, up dust. Then I saw “I agree with you. I just what I thought was don’t eat animals.” a marmot crawling During our flight from down a boulder Portland to Denver, field. But it wasn’t two major differences a marmot; it was a between us had come grizzly cub. “Whoa,” RAY up: He was a hunter, I said. RING and I was a vegetarian. We backed up, I listened from the maybe 100 feet away window seat, two days removed from the bear. We waited as it from a backpacking trip in the picked its way over rocks in the Wallowa Mountains in Oregon. late-morning sunshine. It ambled He told me he mostly hunted elk up to the base of a thick evergreen and ate what he killed, and he tree, and suddenly, it was 4 feet noted that the meat he hunted was up in it, claws stuck in the bark, healthier for him than anything he hanging on as casually as Spidercould buy in a store. I nodded and Man. said, “I know.” Watching that grizzly is why I “I just don’t eat animals,” I said don’t eat animals. I can’t make a finally. “But I have nothing against good argument about why that hunting at all.” bear is different from a cow. I can’t It was a classic New West look at them both and say one of conversation, I thought, one them is “meat” and the other one guy trying to reassure the other isn’t. To me, if a cow is meat, so is that he’s not the wild-eyed Ted that grizzly. And so is your dog. Nugent type of hunter, the other A hunter’s relationship with trying to communicate that even animals is different, of course, though he’s a vegetarian, he’s not a but as I’ve found in a few militant, anti-hunting activist. conversations, it can involve I liked that guy because he had similar awe and reverence for clearly spent a lot of time thinking animals as well as a meditative about the morality of hunting and relationship with nature that’s where the best place was for him developed over many hours spent to get the meat he loved to eat. I sitting in one spot and waiting for felt he’d put as much thought into an animal to walk into range. why he ate animals as I’d put into I understand that vegetarianism why I didn’t eat animals. That isn’t won’t work on a global scale, and always the case when I meet new I understand that we evolved people, and they ask, “So … why by eating animals. But being a don’t you eat meat?” vegetarian makes sense to me, I try to give a benign answer. I just the way being a carnivore usually say, “I like animals” or “I probably makes sense to you. don’t eat animals.” I don’t preach, We can both agree that the don’t act like I’m up on the moral mythical West we learned high ground. I don’t like to argue. about in cowboy movies is gone I haven’t eaten meat in 6/ years, now if it ever existed. We’re a and I’m not going back anytime region of yogis, rock climbers, soon. kayakers, hunters, cyclists, ATV Chances are that you eat meat users, oil-industry workers, — most people do — and that’s fine conservationists, vegetarians and with me. But the answer to “Why omnivores. And sometimes, we don’t you eat meat?” is exponentially end up sitting right next to each more contentious than the answer other on an airplane — where we to “Why don’t you eat Brussels have a friendly conversation. sprouts?” So sometimes I tell people Brendan Leonard is a about a bear I saw in the Tetons a contributor to Writers on the few years ago. Range, a service of High Country Nick and I were walking along News (www.hcn.org). He lives in Cascade Creek after an early Denver. morning of slogging up and Regular Page 8 columnist John over the Paintbrush Divide, and Colson is taking the week off. He is we had several more miles to scheduled to return next week. go. We bounced down the trail,

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9


SEEN, HEARD & DONE

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

CHEERS&JEERS

THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

FIVE THINGS TOP 5 MASCOTS WE DISLIKE

Hundreds attended the Aspen Valley Hospital Spring Fair on June 1 through 3.

CHEERS | To the Aspen School District for finding

CHEERS | To the local firemen and U.S. Forest Service

a short-term way to keep teachers from losing jobs. Although we fear the habit of using reserves for this, this is why reserves were created in the first place. We still encourage the district and the Aspen Education Foundation to work closely together and explore creative, new funding mechanisms for local education.

authorities who are actively watching for wildfires as we enter the most dangerous season. We remind everyone to heed wildfire restrictions and to know those restrictions will be increasing as the summer drought continues.

JEERS | To the water-wasters. We’re going to continue jeering this small but active local population of people who water their sidewalks and think about those without second. And we will continue to jeer this — and hopefully not bore all our readers — until we see signs of improvement.

JEERS | To the idea of raising rent 13.5 percent at the El Jebel mobile-home park, especially as local wages continue to remain lower than 2008 levels. The property owners have every right and are using data to prove the rent increase is needed, which we appreciate. But raising rent and then saying, “We really are a for-profit business,” reminds us about the real possibility of lower-income housing being extinct in the region, a problem for everyone.

BUZZ WORTHY ASPEN

PITKIN COUNTY

ASPEN SCHOOLS DIP INTO RESERVES

COUNTY TO CONSIDER GUARDRAIL PLAN

The Aspen School District will pull about 220,000 from its reserves to balance the 201213 budget. The decision, made at Monday’s Board of Education meeting, means no teachers will lose their jobs and no major cuts will be made to programs. All district personnel will be required to take one furlough day in 2012-13 and at least one more furlough day in 2013-14. Still, Aspen teachers and staff will see some increased compensation next year, including a step on the salary schedule for longevity/years of experience, educational increases for those who have completed a degree and raises for nonteaching staff and administrators.

A public proposal to install guardrails along potentially dangerous sections of Castle Creek Road south of Aspen will see its first formal review this month with a presentation to Pitkin County commissioners. County staffers were approached more than a year ago with a proposal to install close to six miles of guardrails along the winding, scenic road, according to Brian Pettet, county director of public works. The safety improvement, urged by billionaire Bill Koch, a part-time area resident with a home about 10 miles up the road, was to be privately financed. Through subsequent discussion and with input from other residents along the road, the

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POST US YOUR TOP FIVE THINGS jbeathard@aspentimes.com

STAY IN THE KNOW — CATCH UP ON RECENT NEWS & LOCAL EVENTS proposal was reduced to 12,600 feet of guardrails and then was reduced further to about 6,500 feet. A memo to commissioners from the consultants contends there are several “very dangerous” sections of the road that could be made safer to negotiate, particularly during the winter months. —Janet Urquhart

ASPEN

ASPEN WOMAN NOT GUILTY OVER DOG DOO

Citing a lack of clarity regarding the dog-poop rules of Smuggler Mountain Road, a judge acquitted an Aspen woman Friday of charges that she failed to pick up her canine’s feces. Following a 90minute trial, Marion Lansburgh and her husband, Leonard, walked

out of Pitkin County Court with no fine to pay and their mission accomplished: to demonstrate that the poop was picked up, and the ticket was not warranted. The trial came after John Armstrong, Pitkin County open space and trails ranger, cited Lansburgh on March 13 near the bottom of Smuggler Road. There was some confusion as to what citations Lansburgh actually faced. Initially Armstrong ticketed Lansburgh for not picking up the poop and failing to keep her goldendoodle within sight control, a requirement on Smuggler. But after Lansburgh’s husband picked up the dung, Armstrong later changed the ticket to show a warning for the poop and a summons for the sightcontrol infraction. — Rick Carroll

—Jeanne McGovern

“WE’VE FORGOTTEN ABOUT THESE PEOPLE HERE, … WHAT THEY SAID AND WHAT THEY STOOD FOR.” 10

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 7-13, 2012

TERRY KNIGHT, UTE MOUNTAIN UTE

P H OTO B Y RYA N S L A BA U G H


THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

GUEST OPINION COLUMN

by PAUL VANDEVELDER of WRITERS ON THE RANGE

The Black Hills await justice EVERY NOW AND THEN, a compensation, that money has never bombshell of a story comes along that been touched by the Sioux; it has screams for a reasonable amount of been accumulating interest in the historical context. Why? Because it U.S. Treasury ever since. doesn’t make sense without it. But How would transferring that land given a citizenry as poorly informed back to the Indians work out for the about its own history as non-Indians who own ours is, our gross national property in the Black product may best be Hills today? It’s safe to measured in foolishness. For say it would work out instance, the Intercollegiate much better for them Studies Institute recently than it did for those administered a civics test Indians’ ancestors, when to 2,500 elected politicians this country first stole it and college graduates, from them well over a PAUL VANDEVELDER and 71 percent of them century ago. flunked. The average score But first, some more of 51 percent revealed that seven out context. After World War II, our of every 10 Americans with college visionary ambassador to the United degrees would fail a rudimentary Nations, Eleanor Roosevelt, helped citizenship test. The bombshell of a story I refer to hit the wires in May: “U.N. fact finder on indigenous rights to recommend land restoration for Native Americans,” said a headline in the Washington Post. In the West, this sort of news can get folks worked up. It seems that a special “rapporteur” — an investigator working on behalf of the U.N. Human Rights Council — had just met with members of the administration and the U.S. Senate for two weeks to assess the implementation of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The investigator’s conclusion: South Dakota’s Black Hills are an excellent example of stolen land, and they should be returned to the Indians who originally lived there. But if almost three-quarters of “well-educated” American citizens can’t pass a basic civics test, how many of us know the first thing about the Declaration on the Rights of American bison in the Black Hills of South Dakota. Indigenous Peoples? Moreover, how many Americans write the Universal Declaration of know that treaties with Indian tribes Human Rights in order to prevent indicate a formal acknowledgment of the atrocities of the Holocaust from sovereign-to-sovereign legal status ever reccurring. The declaration — something that is still protected was ratified in formal treaty by the U.S. Constitution as the deliberations by every member “supreme law of the land”? nation of the U.N. except for one The few Americans who do know — the United States. This country these facts also know that the U.S. finally signed the document Supreme Court ruled, in 1980, that in the 1970s just to make the the Black Hills were indeed stolen embarrassment go away. from the Sioux by the U.S. Congress Twenty years later, as indigenous in 1877. But though the court groups around the world began awarded the tribes 100 million in asserting their rights, their leaders

THINKSTOCK PHOTO

at the United Nations wrote a Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples based on Roosevelt’s declaration. When this new declaration was adopted in 1996, it was déjà vu all over again as every member nation eventually signed on but one — the United States. Why? Because the same political forces that denied basic rights to minority groups for 200 years are still in power, particularly in the South and West. Moreover, despite their oftproclaimed regard for the U.S. Constitution, they’re not about to concede what is demanded by that document: the recognition of the sovereignty of native nations. Bending to those political forces,

peoples in the places I visited, it was impressed upon me that the sense of loss, alienation and indignity is pervasive throughout Indian Country,” he said. The token bits of good will extended to Indians in recent years have not begun to overcome the persistent legacy of oppression and the denial of basic rights, he added. This is the context of a lingering source of shame in our shared history, and it is one that we would do well to put behind us. Two hundred and twenty-four years after our nation’s founding, it’s high time we started living up to our idealistic promise — observing basic human rights and embracing the dignity of all people. The best way to get our

Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush both stonewalled this treaty. To its credit, the Obama administration altered course and endorsed the new declaration of rights for indigenous people in 2010. The U.N.’s special rapporteur, James Anaya, told members of the U.S. Senate that Native Americans are unanimous in their cries for greater protection of their constitutional sovereignty. “In all my consultations with indigenous

own house in order is to begin by doing one right thing — something we’ve put off doing for far too long. Let us return the Black Hills to the Sioux Indians. After all, they are theirs. Paul VanDevelder is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (www.hcn.org). He lives in Portland, Ore., and is the author of “Savages and Scoundrels: The Untold Story of America’s Road to Empire Through Indian Territory.”

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

11


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

CLASSIC ASPEN

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

As did these 1898 miners, Aspen’s Yukon adventurers had to carry all of their supplies over Chilcoot Pass.

YUKON GOLD, AND NOT THE POTATO My father would entertain me as a young boy by reciting

from memory Robert Service’s poem of the Yukon gold rush, The Cremation of Sam McGee. “There are strange things done in the midnight sun — By the men who moil for gold”. It was my father’s favorite childhood poem, published in the year of his birth, 1907; but I did not appreciate its significance to my father until my adulthood.

Each generation experiences significant childhood characterforming events. My father endured the 1918 influenza that killed many in his Colorado town, and World War I; every community rallied around those causes. But growing up in a mining family, Father was most influenced by stories told by elder participants in the Yukon gold rush. Men coming home from the war avoided the subject; especially if they experienced combat, but men who trekked to the Yukon and survived, delighted in telling their Yukon yarns. Before the days of television, when storytelling was an art, tales of finding gold, surviving in the extreme northern climate, and the characters attracted to a gold rush, sparked the imaginations of mining town boys. At almost any gathering of Aspen mining men between 1914 and 1924 when my father was a young boy,

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conversation drifted to tales of the Klondike. The Yukon became a popular setting for movies of 1916-1920, with titles like Idol of the North and The Code of The Yukon. The quest for reaching the North Pole played concurrently; death and survival stories made anyone who traveled beyond the northern reaches of civilization heroes. Although isolated in the

Dan Parker, an Aspen boy, was an early Yukon pioneer who found little gold but earned his living delivering mail. By 1916 airplanes eliminated the need for many mail contractors. George Schafer typified many who thought the Klondike would make their fortunes only to discover that there were too many miners and not enough gold. He wrote home after one season (two summers and one

THE YUKON BECAME A POPULAR SETTING FOR MOVIES OF 1916-1920, WITH TITLES LIKE IDOL OF THE NORTH AND THE CODE OF THE YUKON. wilderness, so many men from Aspen went to the Yukon that they would run into each other. When they wrote home, their letters were often printed in the newspapers.

June 7-13, 2012

winter) he was, “glad to get out”. The rigors of the north challenged even the toughest. A. J. Hogan reported, “the weather is abominable, and continuously so”.

Cold weather was not the only challenge. One Yukon adventurer commented on another form of adversity, “the Yukon mosquito is the most brutal and bloodthirsty of its tribe — it kills man and beast, even the ferocious grizzly bear falling victim to its bites”. My father delighted in hearing Jack Atkinson recount the challenges of climbing the Chilcoot Pass. Atkinson, headed north during the later years of the rush, hoping to find a viable claim, (he didn’t); however as a veteran of two previous mineral booms, he planned to make his fortune selling supplies at inflated prices. Moving his store up the Chilcoot grade taxed even his rugged but aging strength. In an act of commitment not often seen during a gold rush, Atkinson brought along his wife. During the ocean journey from Seattle to Juneau they encountered a horrific storm; their boat was swamped with water and nearly sunk. Mrs. Atkinson lost interest in the journey and stayed in Juneau for the duration. B. Clark Wheeler, Aspen Times editor, also journeyed to Alaska in search of quick profits, but then (like that of many others from Aspen) the lure of discoveries of new mineral deposits in Nevada and Mexico shifted his attention south. The heat of the Nevada desert offered a welcome relief from northern cold. Stories of adventure filled father’s head, but the miners’ enchantment — the dream of finding precious metals — was the most enduring message. As Robert Service penned about Sam McGee, “He was always cold, but the land of gold seemed to hold him like a spell.” Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn@schat.net.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PHOTO


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

‘HORSETHIEF ’

1893 U T E I N DI A N S

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE KELLEY COLLECTION

IN THE ASPEN WEEKLY TIMES on Dec. 9, 1893, a headline read “Belong to the Utes; Game in Colorado at the Disposal of the Indians.” Reporting from the state capital, the reporter wrote, “Brigadier General McCook, commanding the Department of Colorado said today that in accordance with the treaty between the United States and the Ute Indians the Indians own every head of deer, elk and other animals in the mountain regions of the state relinquished to the public domain by the redskins. The treaty reads as follows: ‘The said United States shall permit the Ute Indians to hunt upon said lands so long as the game lasts and the Indians are at peace with the white people.’” — Ute Indians circa 1900, from the “Horsethief.”

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GEAR of the WEEK

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

NEED TO KNOW

100 110

Women’s

Men’s

• Fused rubber toe bumper • Vegan-friendly • Men’s weight: 6.2 ounces • Women’s weight: 4.7 ounces

MERRELL BAREFOOT TRAIL GLOVE First of all, let’s get this clear — this is a shoe, not a glove. But it’s pretty clever to think of a shoe fitting the way a glove does, with all the comfort and dexterity that come with it. And we know that’s what Merrell was thinking when it created (and named) this piece of footwear. But is it trailworthy? We think so. With a Vibram sole, these shoes will protect your feet from rocks and roots, but they are so lightweight, you’ll hardly notice them on, and they certainly won’t be a drag the next time you head down the trail.

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June 7-13, 2012

— Ute Mountaineer staff

PHOTO COURTESY SPOT


presented by

ASPEN SUMMER WORDS

LITERARY FESTIVAL

Solazu DOG WEEK THE

Sadie

Sadie is a 4 year old American Staffordshire Terrier mix. Her foster dad says: “She is such an awesome, loving, well mannered dog. She listens really well. She’s as close to perfect as it gets…” She loves to go on hikes, walks and bike rides. She is very playful but also mellow in the house when you want her to be. She loves to play fetch, and walks pretty well on a leash. No cats. She knows many commands and tricks and always responds to “leave it” right away. She loves to go for car rides and does not bark much. She is house trained, healthy, HW negative, spayed, vetted, up to date on shots and micro chipped. If you are interested in Sadie, please fill out an application on www.luckydayrescue.org then call 970-379-4606. LUCKY DAY ANIMAL RESCUE OF COLORADO

www.luckydayrescue.org

2012 36th A N N UA L

CELEBRATING THE STORIES OF LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN JUNE 17 - 22 | ASPEN MEADOWS FIVE AFTERNOONS OF DANIEL ALARCÓN KATHLEEN ANDERSON ERIN BELIEU GIOCONDA BELLI DARRELL BOURQUE EDWIDGE DANTICAT LAURA FRASER FRANCISCO GOLDMAN DEREK GREEN ANDREW GREER RANDALL KENAN BRIAN LAIDLAW SCOTT LASSER WILLIAM LOIZEAUX ROMERO LUBAMBO ORLANDO PATTERSON BENJAMIN PERCY LOUIE PÉREZ IRENE RAWLINGS LUÍS J. RODRIGUEZ MONA SIMPSON LUÍS TORRES LUIS ALBERTO URREA CLAUDIA VILLELA

words, stories, & ideas It was an unmitigated pleasure to have been part of this terrific, first-rate conference. I thank the festival for giving me the chance to meet not only some of my literary heroes but also readers and aspiring writers from a vast range of backgrounds. Aside from its stunning setting, the conference was a wonderful opportunity to celebrate books and to engage with those who read, write, and love them. — K H A L E D H O SS E I N I , AU T H O R O F THE KITE RUNNER

Official Box Office Info & Festival Schedule

CHEF’S SELECTIONS BEET AND KALE SALAD $10 Roasted Golden Beets, Kale, Hazelnuts, Beet & Basil Pesto

COLORADO BLACK ANGUS FLAT IRON $19 Potato-Cauliflower Puree, Sautéed Kale and Creminis,

ASPEN SHOW TICKETS ASPEN WRITERS’ FOUNDATION aspenshowtix.com aspenwriters.org 970.920.5770 970.925.3122

Ticket s Festival Pa sses Regular $20 Regular Passes $200 Student/Educator $15 Member Passes $150 SPONSORS & GRANTORS

FRESH AND HEARTY KIDS’ MEALS $6

Bezos Family Foundation City of Aspen Colorado Creative Industries The Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine Kaye Foundation Cheryl and Sam Wyly

Plus custom cocktails and artisanal libations from our bar

Colorado Center for the Book Jazz Aspen Snowmass

Smoky Blue Cheese Butter

MEDIA PARTNERS Aspen Public Radio The Aspen Times The Kenyon Review Orion Magazine Memoir

COLLABORATORS

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

by GUNILLA ASHER

NEED TO KNOW 1.5 ounces Tequila Ocho Silver 0.5 ounces Campari 4 ounces grapefruit juice

COCKTAIL: THE 212 MY DAD TURNED 80 LAST WEEK. We moved here from New York in 1974. Why is this important? The area code in New York is 212, and Pacifica has a drink called a 212, so I went on an outing to try one. A 212 is made with Tequila Ocho Silver tequila, which is a vintage tequila. Its makers get their agave from a different single estate each year, giving each year a signature flavor. That, coupled with Campari and grapefruit juice, makes for a refreshing treat. Cheers, Charles. Happy 80th birthday! Gunilla Asher grew up in Aspen and now is the co-manager of The Aspen Times. She writes a drink review weekly in the spirit of “She’s not a connoisseur, but she is heavily practiced.”

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June 7-13, 2012

PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK


WINEINK

WORDS to DRINK BY

by KELLY J. HAYES

CHILI, SUN AND BREWS SNOWMASS GETS the jump on Hornsby, “that’s just the way it is.” So who feels like a beer? summer this weekend when it kicks I also must mention that the Well, if you do, then Fanny Hill will off the ninth Snowmass Chili Pepper International Chili Society is currently be your place. Thirty craft breweries and Brew Fest. While some like next in mourning as the founder of will be pouring malt and barley week’s Food & Wine Classic, there are the organization and a noted chili beverages and vying to be named the others who prefer the laid-back and aficionado, one Carroll Shelby, passed 2012 winner of the best seasonal beer musically friendly Chili Pepper and away last month. Shelby, who was in the Snowmass Summer Seasonal Brew Fest as their event of choice. better known among the masses for Brew competition. Let’s face it For starters, it’s his amazing career as an automotive — nothing goes with chili like a cold affordable. Tickets for innovator, was also a keen chili chef beer, and brewers from Hawaii (Kona the entire event, two who cooked at the first International Brewing), Washington (Redhook and days of chili, beer, tunes, the whole enchilada, will only run you 70, and there are other ticket options for as low as a 20 bill. That will save KELLY J. you more than a grand HAYES over the ticket price for that upvalley Classic. While we will soon talk beers in this column, I’d be remiss if I didn’t cast a shout-out to the music and chili part of this gathering. The Sierra Leone Refugee All-Stars will be the first act of the Aspen and Snowmass summer of tunes when the Freetown natives (I love a town named for freedom) get an African groove on for world peace on Friday at 4:30 p.m. Denver’s own The Congress holds a roll call at 6 p.m. on Friday, and then, on Saturday, Galactic and Gogol Bordello, fresh from the Rick Rubin sessions, supply the high-energy music. APPEARANCE Chili, both What color is it? Is it clear or red and green, A blonde and two brunettes walk into a Snowmass bar ... cloudy? Does it have a head, or as well as salsa, is it flat? will be made with Chili Society Widmer) and New Mexico (Santa Fe passion (no beans World Brewing) will be pouring along with a AROMA or pasta, please) Championships plethora of Colorado crafters. Does it smell like hops? Is there and perfection way back in Locals include the Aspen Brewing spice or fruit? How about coffee and served up at 1967. In fact, the Co., Carbondale Beer Works and or chocolate on the nose? the festival. This championships the Glenwood Canyon Brewpub. I’m FLAVOR is an International were held on particularly looking forward to the Does it taste fresh and clean? Chili Societyhis ranch in beers from across the hill in Avon Is it “hot” with alcohol? Are sanctioned event Terlingua, Texas. made by Crazy Mountain Brewing Co. there flavors that have been and the winner Shelby later Of course there will be any number of introduced artificially? of the red chili marketed “Carroll great brewskis to quaff with the likes MOUTHFEEL competition will Shelby’s Original of New Belgium, Oskar Blues, Upslope Is it heavy or light in your take home 1,000, Texas Brand and the Breckenridge Brewery all mouth? Does the carbonation while the green Chili Kit,” and sending kegs, bottles and cans our way. overwhelm the beer, or is it chili champion many a fan of the Now, there are a number of ways just right? Does it coat your will pocket 500. bean-less, pastato drink a beer. First, you can slam it. mouth, or does it leave when you Don’t ask me why less style of chili A guzzled cold one out of a can that swallow? the red and green learned to love it has been submerged in a mountain don’t get, say, because of that stream waiting for you after a fourOVERALL IMPRESSION 750 each. Maybe, brown-bagged hour bike ride can be a wondrous Most importantly, do you like to quote Bruce product. thing. Then, you can sip one. That is the beer?

if you have the patience and the time and are a person of sound judgment. Either of those methods will do, but the professional beer drinker regards a glass of suds with the same sophistication as those wine snobs who will be holding court next week. That is to say they evaluate each glass to determine its origin and quality. For some, especially those who simply say “gimme a beer” when they walk

THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN TASTING A BEER

PHOTO COURTESY FOOD & WINE MAGAZINE

into a bar, this can be absurd. But remember these are “craft brewers,” and as the craft revolution has taken hold in the past quarter century, quality has become key. While you certainly don’t have to play the role of professional taster, may I suggest that you take your time with each brew and look for the differences, the subtleties and the variations of the beers you taste this weekend? It will make the experience just that much more enjoyable. And who knows? Maybe you’ll learn something. Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soon-tobe-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and a black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@wineink.com.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

FOOD MATTERS

EYE ON THE CLASSIC: DANNY MEYER THIS WILL BE MY TH YEAR attending the Food & Wine Classic — first as a volunteer and then years later as a member of the press. As much as I’d like to, it’s not always easy to remember every detail. As years go by, grand tastings, seminars and parties seem to lose their shape and glom into one strange, long weekend of decadence. AMIEE WHITE But in this hazy dream, BEAZLEY Danny Meyer and his accessible, eye-opening wine seminars always stand out. Meyer (legendary NYC restaurateur and CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group, which includes Union Square Café, Gramercy Tavern, Blue Smoke and Shake Shack) is a Food & Wine Classic legend for his pork (bacon, “haute” dog) pairing seminars. This year he presents “Swill for the Grill,” focusing on grilled meats and wine with John Ragan, wine director for Union Square Hospitality Group. If you have only one chance to see a great speaker at Food & Wine, you will never be disappointed in the level of expertise and personable charm of Meyer. It’s no wonder he’s been awarded the honor of Restaurateur of the Year by the James Beard Foundation, Bon Appetit magazine and Reader’s Digest. He’s funny, he’s smart, and he loves barbecue and ballpark food. Who wouldn’t want to sit in this guy’s dining room? AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY: As the country’s leading restaurateur, can you speak to the business side of the Classic? Do you feel like relationships are made here, business is done? DANNY MEYER: Beyond being the “granddaddy” of all the food and wine festivals that have subsequently popped up across the nation, there’s

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June 7-13, 2012

simply no other event that better balances the interests of restaurant professionals, consumers, producers and journalists. It’s a virtual atom chamber of opportunity for serendipitous business connections. I actually developed relationships with each of Gramercy Tavern’s two chefs — first Tom Colicchio, then Mike Anthony — at the Classic. AWB: One of the highlights of the Classic is now your hot dog/bacon/ pig-product wine pairings. How did you come up with the concept, and why does this kind of pairing resonate so greatly with attendees? DM: Much as I love winemakers, I had grown a bit tired of hosting tasting panels surrounded by four or five talking heads who would understandably want to use the panel as an opportunity to plug their wines while using all kinds of wine-geek jargon that was going right over the heads of the audience. Since I’d always viewed wine as a condiment for food, it occurred to me that tasting wines with common foods (bacon, hot dogs, pizza, ham, salami — and this year grilled meats) would be a far more relevant way to learn about your own palate. People love the pairings because they learn what they like — not what someone tells them they should like. AWB: What are some of your fondest personal memories of Classics past? DM: I’ve been attending since 1987 and have only missed three Classics since. A favorite memory was running down Ajax Mountain with Josh Wesson my second year. A less favorite memory was being unable to walk for the next three days. I loved doing a picnic demonstration on “Good Morning America” with Julia Child one morning — with two hours notice. Each year something unexpectedly fun happens. You just have to be open to it.

AWB: Why do you think the Aspen Classic has retained so much of its charm and position in the industry? DM: Setting, setting, setting. Everyone is there by choice. It’s laid back and exciting all at once. Plus everyone in the industry loves Food & Wine magazine. Everyone is in a good mood, and of course the altitude is a great equalizer. Amiee White Beazley writes about dining, restaurants and food-related travel for the Aspen Times Weekly. She is the editor of local food magazine edibleASPEN and contributor to Aspen Peak and the travel website EverettPotter.com. Follow her on Twitter @awbeazley1, or email awb@ awbeazley.com.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO


by AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

CARBONDALE BEER WORKS For some of the best hot dogs in the valley, head to Carbondale Beer Works Alehouse and Wienery on Main Street in Carbondale. While the restaurant has limited wine offerings to pair with its seven styles of dogs, Beerworks has lots of tasty craft brews for you to wash down your wiener.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/LITERATURE

CLOSE AS EVER TO FINE INDIGO GIRLS RETURN TO BELLY UP Before there were durable hits

like “Closer to Fine” and “Galileo,” before there was the iconic status in chick/folk-rock, before there were hordes of deeply devoted fans shouting out the lyrics, there was a connection. The twosome of Emily Saliers and Amy Ray began performing as Indigo Girls while both were students at Emory University in Atlanta. In those early gigs, many of them at a bar called the Dugout, the audience was tiny — and would have been even smaller if Saliers’ parents weren’t such loyal fans — many of the songs they played were cover tunes, and there was nothing remotely flashy about the presentation. But people paid attention.

Indigo Girls, the duo of Amy Ray, left, and Emily Saliers, will perform June 8 at Belly Up.

NEED TO KNOW • INDIGO GIRLS, WITH THE SHADOWBOXERS OPENING • JUNE 8 AT 9 P.M. • BELLY UP

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“IT STARTED WITH TWO or four or six people in a bar, and they stuck with us,” the 48-year-old Saliers said by phone. “There’s a strong feeling of loyalty, and they know the music. There’s a lot of singing, a lot of reciprocal experience. It’s more than just listening. And it’s always been that way.” Asked to explain what went into that connection between band and fans, Saliers said, “The first word that comes to mind is ‘love.’ It’s a love thing. Amy and I love music, the experience of writing. There’s a lot of love behind everything we do. It was a teeny-tiny following at the beginning. But very loyal. Then a friend would invite a friend — that kind of vibe was there. We built a following. And it was always progressing.” That bond between band and fans doesn’t seem to have faded. When Indigo Girls made their Aspen debut, in a show two years ago that had Saliers and Ray performing as an acoustic duo, the mood at Belly Up was ecstatic. A song would begin, and people on the floor would hug one another before settling into rapt attention, mouthing the words. Not much noise came from the bar; there was little chit-chat about anything that didn’t have to do with Indigo Girls. This music meant something special to the people who were there.

Saliers and Ray return to Belly Up on June 8. This time through, they will be backed by a full band. The Shadowboxers, a five-piece folk-rock group that shares the same Atlantaarea turf as Indigo Girls, will open the show and then return to the stage as the backing players for Saliers and Ray. The current tour is the first time the format is being tested, and Saliers is looking forward to it. “Both Amy and I think they’re going to make a big impact,” she said. (In the liner notes to “Beauty Queen Sister,” Indigo Girls’ 2011 album, Saliers gave the Shadowboxers a thank-you “for making me feel like a kid again about music.”) BOTH OF SALIERS’ PARENTS played keyboards but allowed Emily, the second-oldest of four daughters, to try drums. All parties agreed that Saliers was mostly just making a racket, and at 9 she switched to guitar, taking lessons at the YMCA. This suited her better, and she began writing songs immediately. In what would become a hallmark of Indigo Girls’ approach, the lyrics had some weight to them, especially for a 9year-old. “I always was a thinker, just thought about serious things as a little kid,” said Saliers, whose father, Don, was a

PHOTO BY JEREMY COWART


by STEWART OKSENHORN

professor at Emory’s Candler School of Theology. “Who knows why? I just did.” At 11, Saliers began studying classical guitar; she also spent a lot of time singing in church choirs. In high school, Saliers hooked up with Ray, who had been a year behind her in grade school. (This “hooking up” was musical only; though both are lesbians, they have never been a couple.) Saliers went on to Tulane University in New Orleans but after two years returned closer to home to attend Emory. Coincidentally, Ray also transferred to Emory, from Vanderbilt, and the two resumed their music-making, this time as Indigo Girls. Following the bar gigs and an independent debut album, 1987’s “Strange Fire,” the two signed to Epic Records. It was a good time to be a girlfocused group with a folk-leaning sound. Tracy Chapman and Suzanne

the Grateful Dead. The group has maintained its commercial viability; “Poseidon and the Bitter Bug,” from 2009, went to No. 29 on the charts. They have even returned to the prolific ways of their early years. Indigo Girls have released three albums, including the holiday recording “Holly Happy Days,” in the past three years, which Saliers chalks up to parting ways with their label. “We were on Epic forever and ever,” she said. “Then Hollywood Records, which we thought would get us more film work, get new fans. And that didn’t work out at all. Now we’re independent. We can do anything we want, no waiting around. It’s just, Can we make this work?” Part of what has made Indigo Girls work so well is that the two halves, despite the similarities of their backgrounds, have differing musical sensibilities. “Because Amy does something

IT ALSO SEEMS TO HAVE HELPED THAT THEY HAVEN’T LOST THEIR IDEALISM. THEY DECIDED EARLY ON TO MAINTAIN A SET OF PRINCIPLES — NO COMMERCIAL USE OF THEIR SONGS, NO ENDLESS TOURS THAT WOULD TURN THEM FROM ARTISTS INTO A TOURING MACHINE — THAT THEY HAVE STUCK TO. “THERE ARE CERTAIN SACRIFICES WE WEREN’T WILLING TO MAKE,” SALIERS SAID.

Vega were doing well. “If we had come along 10 years later, the story would have been different,” Saliers said. But in 1989, the year “Indigo Girls” was released, the world seemed to be waiting. “Closer to Fine” — written by Saliers; she and Ray almost always write separately — was a hit on radio, and the album went gold. Indigo Girls won a Grammy for best contemporary folk recording and lost out (to Milli Vanilli) for best new artist. The next album, “Nomads Indians Saints,” yielded the hit “Hammer and a Nail”; “Rites of Passage,” from 1992, featured their biggest song of all, “Galileo.” Members of REM appeared on their albums, and Indigo Girls opened shows for

PHOTOS BY STEWART OKSENHORN

very different from what I do, we get to live two different musical lives,” Saliers said. “There’s a breadth there. She’s more of a rocker, more immediate in her energy. I gravitate toward pop and groove.” It also seems to have helped that they haven’t lost their idealism. They decided early on to maintain a set of principles — no commercial use of their songs, no endless tours that would turn them from artists into a touring machine — that they have stuck to. “There are certain sacrifices we weren’t willing to make,” Saliers said. And that seriousness of purpose is still reflected in their songs. Twentytwo years ago, in “Hammer and a Nail,” Saliers sang, “I’ve been digging too deep/I always do.” Three years

ago, on “Poseidon and the Bitter Bug,” the ladies were singing about genocide and suicide and unpaid bills. Ray, in a 2010 interview with The Aspen Times, chalked up the heavy tone to being Southerners and fans of Southern writers such as William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor and Carson McCullers — “who are so dark. I read all of them. Those writers are important to me; the images and the stories they tell are what I grew up on,” Ray said. “The music is honest, about a lot

Indigo Girls also have been determined in their musicianship. Saliers had added an array of string instruments to her arsenal. Ray, who always felt a step behind her bandmate in musical gifts, tried mightily to keep up, learning to write harmonies and adding mandolin and harmonica to her repertoire. All that earnestness is typically given an accessible package. Indigo Girls’ songs tend to be upbeat with sparkling harmonies — Saliers and Ray’s voices fit together nicely — and

Emily Saliers, of Indigo Girls, on the connection between the band and its fans: “It’s more than just listening. And it’s always been that way.”

Amy Ray makes up half of Indigo Girls, who will perform June 8 at Belly Up.

of issues in life that people want to explore — relationships but also politics, nature. And philosophical questions,” Saliers said. “People like that. It’s an escape from a world that can be very alienating.”

sharp production. “I think why our fans have stuck with our music is we’re a strippeddown band. Not a show but an honest experience through songs,” Saliers said. “And some people seem to like that.”

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Live. Work. Play. Aspen Style! BEDROOM BATH SQFT .ESTEDINTHEWOODSBYTHE!SPEN#LUB %NJOYTRAILSJUSTOUTYOURDOORSTEP MINUTEWALKTODOWNTOWN!SPEN    "RENT7ALDRON\ New Listing

Aspen Square Contemporary Studio #OMPLETELYREMODELEDSTUDIO -OUNTAINVIEWSFROM3TARWOODTO3MUGGLER 5PGRADEDKITCHEN STAINLESSSTEELAPPLIANCES 7ALNUTCABINETRYWOOD BURNINGlREPLACE   &URNISHED #HRIS+LUG\

Hunter Creek Condo BEDROOM BATH SQFTCONDO 2EMODELEDKITCHEN HARDWOODmOORS 5NITOPENSTOSERENEWOODLANDS #OMPLEXPOOL HOTTUBS TENNISCOURTS    #RAIG7ARD\

Outstanding Core Condo BEDROOM BATH SQFT ,OCATEDJUSTBLOCKSFROMTHE'ONDOLA 3OUTHERNEXPOSURE PLENTYOFNATURALLIGHT $EEDEDOFF STREETASSIGNEDPARKING  &URNISHED -ARK(ALDEMAN\

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‘THE LOCAL DUDE WHO’S A NATIVE’ ASPEN RESIDENT SKYLAR LOMAHAFTEWA, ALSO A UTE, WORKS TO EDUCATE AREA RESIDENTS ON THE HISTORY OF HIS TRIBE WHILE BALANCING A MODERN LIFE

This wall is just one part of an exhibit to be unveiled soon at The Aspen Historical Society dedicated to honoring the past and current Utes living in the region.

by ANDRE SALVAIL

more than a year ago, when the Aspen Historical Society began making plans for a two-year museum exhibit on the Utes, it needed the help of an actual tribal member, preferably someone who lived in the Roaring Fork Valley.

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LEFT: A sheep’s head, a popular symbol in Ute culture. BELOW: A parfleche bag made of rawhide was used to carry food and also as a shield.

in Meeker. We could have had our land over here, and we could have had our reservation over here.’ “So for me to come over here and live in the traditional homelands, it was the perfect thing.”

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S IT TURNED OUT, there was really only one Ute living in the Aspen area: Skylar Lomahaftewa. With his helpful demeanor, easygoing personality, experience in talking with schoolchildren about Indian life and contacts with tribal officials at the Uintah & Ouray Reservation in northeastern Utah, he was the perfect fit. “When we first started working on this, we realized it was impossible without Ute representation,” said Lisa Hancock, the society’s curator of collections. “Skylar had been working with the education community, doing school programs. I went to a couple of those and knew right off that he would make a perfect representative. You can’t do an exhibit on the Ute without the Ute being involved.” Skylar, 36, who first moved to Aspen about five years ago and has been a full-time resident for about three years, is what rock singer Joe Walsh might have had in mind when he wrote “Ordinary Average Guy.” He works each winter as a ski-lift operator; his wife works at Aspen Valley Hospital. He’s a snowboarder. They are raising kids together. It’s all very mainstream American. But scratch the surface, and there’s a lot more underneath. He’s part Northern Ute and part Hopi with some Choctaw blood. He cares about his culture deeply, participating in Bear, Sun and Grass dances and powwows with Indian tribes all over the West. He wants to preserve the traditions of the Utes, the loosely affiliated tribe whose bands lived and roamed throughout much of eastern Utah and western Colorado for centuries before the U.S. government sent them to live on three different reservations in the late 19th century. “I’m just the local dude who’s a native,” Skylar said humbly. “But I did want to talk to the historical society and tell them what I would want to see in an exhibit. I didn’t want it to

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be all cute, showing a bunch of happy Indians on horses.” THE “SHINING MOUNTAINS” The Wheeler/Stallard Museum exhibit, “Seasons of the Nuche: Transitions of the Ute People,” has a soft opening on June 12 and a grand opening on June 19. It covers a lengthy period of the tribe’s history, from the years before the Utes made contact with Spanish explorers in the late 16th century all the way up to modern times on the different reservations where the northern and southern Utes were forced to live more than 100 years ago. The Uintah & Ouray Reservation, which comprises parts of seven Utah counties and counts an estimated 20,000 residents, is closest to Aspen, a mere 4.5-hour drive. Three large bands of Utes — the Uintahs, the White Rivers and the Uncompahgres — were sent to that reservation, which has its headquarters in the small town of Fort Duchesne, Utah, on U.S. Highway 40. Skylar’s mother was an Uncompahgre, the band that used to spend summers hunting in the Roaring Fork Valley amid “the shining mountains,” the name they gave to the lands around Aspen. Skylar spent most of his formative years on the reservation, growing up in the small town of Randlett. However, he attended the public local learning institution, Union High School, graduating in 1993. He made a lot of friends among the Mormon people in the Roosevelt area just outside the reservation’s boundaries. He said he moved to Aspen more than a decade later partly because he was looking for a job and partly for cultural reasons.

June 7-13, 2012

“Ever since we were kids, those of us who were Uncompahgre or White River were taught that we were from Colorado and this was our traditional homelands. Aspen and the area around it was Uncompahgre lands,” Skylar said. With the Meeker Massacre in late September 1879 — in which the Utes’ White River band rose up against Indian agent Nathan Meeker, the U.S. soldiers protecting him and some nearby settlers — the Utes’ fate in Colorado was sealed. The northern bands were banished from their lush mountain habitats and sent to live in the rocky high-desert country around

LIVING IN A TEPEE? When going to classrooms to talk to kids about Indian culture, Skylar usually has to field a few silly questions. “Skylar found, when going into the classrooms, that the kids would always ask him things like, ‘Do you live in a tepee?’ Or ‘Do you ride a horse?’ They view the Indian culture as being strictly historic,” Hancock said. She said the goal of the exhibit is to educate, not only about the Native American culture of yesteryear but also with regard to how the Utes live today. “Our exhibit talks about adaptability. What did the Utes have to do to adjust to the changes they have faced in a short amount of time?” Hancock said. “I tell them, ‘Just like my greatgrandparents might have lived in a tepee, your great-grandparents may have lived in a log cabin.’ But times

“I’M JUST THE LOCAL DUDE WHO’S A NATIVE,” SKYLAR SAID HUMBLY. “BUT I DID WANT TO TALK TO THE HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND TELL THEM WHAT I WOULD WANT TO SEE IN AN EXHIBIT. I DIDN’T WANT IT TO BE ALL CUTE, SHOWING A BUNCH OF HAPPY INDIANS ON HORSES.” Fort Duchesne. Little did the federal government know that the land was mineral-rich with oil and gas and that many years later the tribe would become somewhat wealthy. “I can remember as a boy, driving through here, my grandfather would look out the window and get mad,” Skylar said. “He’d say, ‘Those dang White Rivers messed things up for us

have changed, and so have we all,” Skylar said. He also makes an analogy with the Scots. “I tell the kids we were different in the way the Scottish people were different with their separate clans,” Skylar said. “We’re all Utes, but we’re separate in our bands. And through times of war we would get together


with the other bands and go and fight, just like the Scots.” Hancock explains that along with the historical and educational components, the exhibit is taking steps to be sensitive not only to the Ute culture but other cultures, as well. For example, many white Americans still feel guilty about what happened with the Native American tribes, but the historical society doesn’t want to use the exhibit to bring everybody down or point fingers. It recognizes that there’s a critic in every corner, such as when The Aspen Times published a simple preview story of the exhibit last month and got a call from a woman who identified herself as Native American and working in Aspen. She took offense over the use of the words “squaw,” “papoose” and “braves,” terminology taken from historical photos loaned by the Denver Public Library that identified an Indian woman, her baby and two young hunters. Certain words can be considered derogatory depending on their tone, Hancock points out. Terminology that today might be considered suspect in some quarters was applied to Native American images in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and museumgoers shouldn’t take offense should they find something like that in the exhibit. “There is a lot of emotion attached to this subject,” Hancock said. “What happens for a lot of white people — and I’ll speak for my tribe here — is that they feel bad about what’s happened. They don’t know what to do to make it right, so they try to be politically correct. They try to be sensitive and say the right thing. “But what I’ve learned is everybody thinks differently. One tribe thinks ‘Native American’ is the way to refer to themselves, while another tribe thinks ‘Indian.’ And within each tribe there are people who feel the opposite of the others. You’re not going to make everyone happy.” She said her panels in the exhibit are careful in their references, forgoing terms that are no longer widely used. “If there’s a Ute man, it’s described as a Ute man. If it’s a Ute woman, it’s a Ute woman,” Hancock said. Skylar put the controversy into perspective. He said for his sophomore year, he voluntarily attended a Pueblo Tribe boarding school in Santa Fe. “We were the Braves at that school,” he said. “And every basketball game was wild because the crowd would

sing the national anthem before the game started, and when we got to the last part, ‘And the home of the brave,’ everybody just screamed it as loud as they could.” DEEPRUNNING SCARS Hancock said the exhibit will attempt to dispel some of the stereotypes surrounding Native American culture. “It will present things in a more factual way,” she said. “We want to take out the Hollywood representations. What I have found is there are perceptions of Indian people. There’s the older one who’s a heathen savage. That conjures up the tomahawk and attacks on the white settlers. Then there’s the noble brave. He’s on his horse, he’s wearing a headdress, the wind is blowing through his hair, and there’s a sunset in the background. “Then maybe there’s a modern stereotype. They’re not educated. They’re overweight. They just live off of casinos and gambling.” While it’s true that many older-generation Native Americans of different tribes have had a longstanding mistrust of U.S. public schools, there’s a reason for that, Hancock said. In the early 20th century, Indian children were sometimes rounded up and taken from their families to attend boarding schools. It was a practice that continued through the 1960s. “The last boarding school was closed in 1973,” she said. “Times have changed, but the scars run deep. It’s going to take generations and more positive experiences for that to change culturally.” Skylar said his parents always made sure he attended school. “My family, they always knew the importance of modern education,” he said. “If we were traveling to a powwow or another reservation on the weekend, they always made sure I made it to school on Monday.” He said the situation is changing for the better. He recently was at the Southern Ute Reservation, near Ignacio, for a Bear Dance, and one of the elders spoke to youths about the importance of modern education. “To hear it coming from an elder Ute man, telling younger people to

P H OTO S C O U RT E S Y D E N V E R M U S E U M O F N AT U R E A N D S C I E N C E

TOP: A woven pine-pitch water jar made from reeds, circa 1850s to 1870s. LEFT: An instrument used during the Bear Dance called the growler, which made the sounds of a bear growling when played.

UTE EXHIBIT OPENS JUNE 12 go to school and not to The Wheeler/Stallard Museum’s new exhibit, miss school, was really a “Seasons of the Nuche: Transitions of the positive thing for me. I Ute People,” opens June 12 at 1 p.m. The liked hearing that,” admission price is $6 for adults, $5 for Skylar said. seniors and free for children younger than He also knows 12. A grand opening is set for 5:30 p.m. on about the stereotypes June 19. That event is free and open to the concerning Indian public. The museum, which is operated by politics. In many the Aspen Historical Society, is located at 620 reservations across W. Bleeker St. The facility has been closed the U.S., infighting during the spring offseason. Beginning over tribal resources is June 12, regular operating hours are from prevalent, a situation not 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For unlike mainstream more information about the museum or the American politics. historical society, call 970-925-3721. His uncle, Curtis Cesspooch, was chairman of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation until he was ousted in 2010 by the Roaring Fork Valley, are generally rival factions. doing well, Skylar said. “I really hate politics,” Skylar said. “I And they are proud to be try to stay away from it. But no matter Americans. The proof can be found where you run to, it’s always there. in the U.S. flags on veterans’ graves at a small hillside cemetery off U.S. 40 “Any government’s going to have near Fort Duchesne. your politicians. But the politics “Indian people will always fight over there (in Fort Duchesne) can be for their homeland,” Skylar said, brutal at times.” “no matter who’s in charge in The Utes in northeastern Utah, Washington. Time has killed a lot of many of whom are descendants of the old resentments.” the Uncompahgre band that roamed

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ASPEN FICTION CONTEST ASPEN FICTION CONTEST

In partnership with the Aspen Writers Foundation’s Summer Words program, we launched a statewide fiction contest in March, hoping to accomplish two things: 1) See what quality fiction writers we have in the region and state; and 2) Build interest in storytelling outside of nonfiction. We received more than 50 entries, which were judged by professional writers in the region, who selected the top 3 due to their organized storytelling abilities, the prose used to tell the story and general spelling and grammar. ¶ The grand prize winner will be published in June 21’s Aspen Times Weekly. Second place will publish next week. The grand prize winner received an entry into a Summer Words Fiction Seminar.

MRS. NICKEL PICKLE

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ROWING UP IN OHIO in the 1950s, my small town had a wonderful place called Culpepper’s General Store. It was on the corner of a block of brick buildings built in the 1800s, in the middle of the oldest part of town, on US Route 40. To the left of the front door was a counter with a cash register. The two isles down the middle displayed canned and MAYLING dry goods and on the SIMPSON far left were large deep wooden bins containing fresh fruits and vegetables. My family had a small apple farm, and every summer Mr. Culpepper bought our apples. At the back of the store was a glass refrigerated case of meats, cold cuts and cheese. A long soda fountain with shiny stainless steel stools topped with red leather cushions occupied the right wall of the room. We kids would gather at the soda fountain after school and have a 6-ounce Coca-Cola from a glass bottle for five cents. I can still picture it, girls in our skirts and blouses, white bobby socks and black and white saddle-oxford laced shoes, and boys in slacks, button-

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down collar shirts and saddle-oxford shoes. Mr. Culpepper, a slightly built man with a receding hairline, manned the cash register and the soda fountain. He enjoyed chatting with the kids and listening to their stories of teachers, sports, band practice, and who likes whom. Mrs. Culpepper would generally stay at the back, tending the refrigerated case and reading a book. She had two round wooden bar stools back there, one that she sat on and the other for a visitor. On top of the refrigerated case was a large jar of giant dill pickles. Mrs. Culpepper charged kids a nickel for a pickle, which she wrapped in a piece of waxed paper. As a result, we used to call her Mrs. Nickel Pickle. For me, as a ten-year-old, it did not seem to matter much whether her name was a pepper or a pickle. We kids called her Mrs. Nickel Pickle with great endearment, because she charged adults ten cents for a pickle. I loved Mrs. Nickel Pickle for other reasons also. She was full of advice for the confused and comfort for the abused. She was probably not very old, but with her slightly graying brown hair worn in a bun,

rd

place

Mayling Simpson-Hebert is an anthropologist (Ph.D.) who has lived and worked in public health in Asia, Africa and Europe for the past 30 years. Now retired, she lives in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. She grew up in Ohio and Virginia. While Mayling has written and published academically, “Mrs. Nickel Pickle” is her first piece of fiction to be published.


by MAYLING SIMPSON

her printed cotton dresses with a lace collar, her white apron, her heavy beige stockings and her sturdy brown-laced shoes, she looked old to us kids. Old enough, at least, to be wise to the world and her word was worth listening to. She had a sweet face and a slim figure. When she talked to us kids, it was with love and compassion. I often left the soda fountain and drifted toward the back of the store with my coke to talk with Mrs. Nickel Pickle. Mr. and Mrs. Culpepper did not have any children. One day when I asked her why, she told me that the Good Lord did not give her any. Then she leaned over like she was going to whisper a big secret in my ear. She said, “I think I know why he did not give me any children.” “Why?” I asked wide-eyed. “Because,” she said, “he wanted me to love all children. If I had my own children, I would be so busy with them, cooking, washing clothes, cleaning house, and taking them to lessons, that I wouldn’t have time for all of you children who come in every day for your cokes and pickles.” So the Good Lord reserves certain adults to be parents to all kids, I thought to myself. What a good idea. “I was once a child,” said Mrs. Nickel Pickle with a smile. I had not thought about that before, and it came as a sort of surprise. I could not begin to imagine Mrs. Nickel Pickle as a child. “My mother died when I was very young. My father’s aunt took me in because my father said he could not raise a young child. She was a spinster, you know, a woman who never got married and never had children. She was the most interesting person I ever knew,” said Mrs. Nickel Pickle. “Tell me about her,” I asked. Mrs. Nickel Pickle looked smilingly into my eyes, realizing how interested I was. With dreaminess in her voice she continued. “My great aunt was tall and slim. She always wore lovely dresses and jewelry and

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ABOUT SUMMER WORDS The Aspen Fiction Contest is partially sponsored by the Aspen Writers Foundation, which organizes the annual Summer Words Festival in Aspen. Among all the workshops and events, here are a few highlights from this year’s schedule. Learn more and reserve seats at www.aspenwriters.org. SUNDAY, JUNE 17 5:30 p.m. Neither Here, Nor There Join us for special evening honoring the 2012 Aspen Prize for Literature winners, Edwidge Danticat and Luis Urrea.These two celebrated authors, whose lives and work inhabit the world between cultures, will share literary insights into the subjects that are as close to their hearts as they are imbued in their writing: immigration, separation, and yearning. MONDAY, JUNE 18 5:30 p.m. Mi Tierra Travel the literary length and breadth of Latin America and the Caribbean as the stars of our festival introduce themselves and their home countries by way of a personal story on the theme, “Mi Tierra.” THURSDAY, JUNE 21 4 p.m. The Three Louies Spalding Gray meets the Marx Brothers in East L.A., when this trio of Chicano artists — musician Louie Pérez of Los Lobos, author Luís J. Rodriguez and journalist Luís Torres — roll out their satirical wink at “growing up Mexican” in the U.S., an unforgettable mix of performance art, storytelling and comedy. 7 p.m. Claudia Villela & Romero Lubambo in Concert A powerhouse of Brazilian bossa nova jazz, vocalist Claudia Villelaand guitarist Romero Lubambo, are a virtuoso pair renowned for her five-octave range and his distinctive sound as the Segovia of Brazilian guitar and have been hailed as the biggest expression of Brazilian music in the United States today.

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looked elegant until the day she died. She had a large library, and she read and wrote poetry. She had many wonderful books in her house, including all the classics, and she read to me every night. When I went to school, my teachers would be amazed at the books I had read and things my aunt had taught me,” said Mrs. Nickel Pickle. “But most importantly,” she continued, “my aunt was an artist and a musician. She had studied art in New York and Paris. She also played the piano and the violin. To support herself, she gave music lessons at her apartment, so I was always meeting new children and learning music as well. She taught me all the nice manners of society and made sure I had pretty clothes. While some of the other kids would tease me that I was an orphan, I felt like the luckiest girl in the world.” Sitting on the small round wood stool beside the refrigerated case, I tried to imagine myself being raised by a wonderful great aunt who knew everything. I could not imagine it really. My life was so different. We lived on a small farm near the middle of town. My father kept our apple orchard and worked as a carpenter, while my mother taught third grade. With four children, my mother was always tired and trying to make ends meet. Now I had three women to compare: my mother, Mrs. Nickel Pickle, and Mrs. Nickel Pickle’s great aunt. Who did I want to be like when I grew up? Would I really ever have a choice, I wondered. So I asked Mrs. Nickel Pickle why she got married and ended up in a general store rather than being an artist and pianist like her great aunt. At ten years old, this seemed to me to be


a giant mystery. How does our fate come about? “Well,” said Mrs. Nickel Pickle, “when I was 18, my great aunt died. She left me her art supplies, piano and violin, and a small bank account. The landlord allowed me to stay one month after my aunt’s death and then said I had to leave, as I had no way to pay the rent. My father had been in touch with me off and on for years, so after my aunt’s death he took me back into his home, a trailer in a large trailer park on the outskirts of Columbus. This was a completely different world for me. Trailers were parked very close to each other in several long lines like a giant pack of Oreo Cookies. It was noisy day and night. People would shout at each other from their windows, “make that dog shut up,” or “cut the lights,” or “clean up your mess!” Sometimes the language was foul and I knew my aunt would never have approved. I had to sleep on the sofa in the living room. There was no room for a piano so I sold it before moving in with him. I dreamed that the piano money would pay for college, and I would study whatever interested me. My great aunt always said: “Follow your dreams.” “My father soon grew tired of me.” A certain sadness entered Mrs. Nickel Pickles’ expression. “He said that his income as a welder was small and he could not keep me long. Now that I was out of high school I needed to get married to someone who could support me. He told me that the piano money would not be enough to go to college. I became very confused. It seemed I had no family and no direction. I cried at the drop of a pin. While my great aunt had shown me how life could be, we had not spent enough time talking

about my future and how I would live when she passed on. My aunt was an optimist. Once I asked her what kind of funeral she wanted when she died, and she said ‘What funeral? I will not think about dying — ever!’ So when she died, I was not prepared, at all.” I readjusted my seat on the wooden stool, thinking about Mrs. Nickel Pickle having no one in the world who cared about her, not even her own father. It seemed so sad. “Then Johnny Culpepper showed up in my life.” Mrs. Nickel Pickle’s expression now looked romantic. A slight smile appeared as she glanced downward. “My daddy and I were driving through rural Ohio when we stopped here to get a coke. Working behind the soda bar was my Johnny. Oh, he was so cute and so sweet. Johnny and I looked at each other and it was love at first sight. This did not go unnoticed by my daddy who immediately saw me in a wedding dress. The next week, daddy went back to that store to meet Johnny again and his parents. It turned out that his parents wanted to retire and turn the store over to Johnny, their only child, but they felt he should marry first to have someone to help him,” said Mrs. Nickel Pickle. “My daddy invited Johnny and his parents to meet us in a nice restaurant in Columbus, to get to know each other,” she continued. “Johnny’s parents were religious and very kind, and I liked them. When they learned I played the piano and violin, they suggested that I apply at their Presbyterian Church to be the pianist. The pay was not much, they said, but I would meet a lot of people and could be a music teacher. What did I know? I was 18

and my father was pushing me into Johnny’s arms. I got the pianist job and two months later I was married to Johnny, who was only 21 himself. As time went by, my hope of going to college faded. I paint, play the piano and violin and give lessons to a few children. Mostly I still dream of living like my great aunt. Don’t you do as I did, child. Live your dream and don’t marry young.” I decided that Mrs. Nickel Pickle was very wise. I determined that very day to follow my dream. I would become a doctor. Nobody would marry me off, not even to a nice handsome guy. I slid off the stool, kissed Mrs. Nickel Pickle on the cheek, and bounced back to the soda bar with new wisdom and confidence. When I was 14, my family moved to another state. At 26, doing my medical residency, I received a call from an old friend in Ohio saying that Mrs. Culpepper had passed away. The funeral would be held in three days. Could I come? Suddenly I felt badly that in all the intervening years I had never been back to see Mrs. Nickel Pickle. I had never written her a letter to tell her how she had influenced my life. I decided I should at least go to the funeral. Wearing my best black wool suit and black hat over my long brown hair, I went to the funeral. The service was packed, especially with young people. All were talking about how Mrs. Culpepper had guided their lives, given them pearls of wisdom, helped them through family crises, listened when no one else would. I wept as I listened to them. I wept for myself for never saying to her, “Thank you for telling me your story.”

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AROUNDASPEN

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

THE RED BRICK RECEPTION THE RED BRICK BIENNIAL 2012, a judged exhibition, was held early this spring with a reception, and a large group of Aspenites turned out to look at the artwork. Judges were artist Jody Guralnick, art consultant Carolyn Landis and gallery owner Ann Korologos. Watch for the next art MARY show at the Red Brick ESHBAUGH HAYES Center for the Arts as there is usually one a month and they are all wonderful. Undercurrent ... Another thing about those megamansions that are built lot line to lot line: The noise from their air conditioners keeps the neighbors awake half the night.

RED BRICK Kathy Honea, left, with Helene Slansky.

RED BRICK

Enjoying all the artwork at the Red Brick are Bernard Philips and Mary Stein Dominick.

RED BRICK

From left are Sam Harvey, Bob Camp and Tom Buesch.

RED BRICK

Jane Click, left, with Sally Cole.

RED BRICK

Joyce Carp and Tom Sharkey.

RED BRICK

RED BRICK

Laura Sherry and sons, and John Clark.

Nora Feller and Francois Couturier.

RED BRICK

Steve Mundinger and Corene McGovern.

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June 7-13, 2012

P H OTO S B Y M A RY E S H BA U G H H AY E S


by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

RED BRICK Topher Sabella and Jordana Picknan.

RED BRICK J.T. Thompson and Debra Muziker, who is the director of the Red Brick Arts Center.

RED BRICK

From left are Andrew Buarni, Mick Ireland and Roger Adams.

RED BRICK From left are Ada Christensen, Eric Reische, Rosalyn Pergandde and Danne, and Linda Chi.

RED BRICK From left are Tanai Starrs, Dan Brabic and Pat Otte.

RED BRICK Claudia Fores looks at a painting at the art show.

RED BRICK Ilene Schmidt, left, with Carol Loewenstern.

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CURRENTEVENTS

JUNE 7-13, 2012

SUNDAY, JUNE 10 Aspen Art Museum Family Workshop 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m., 590 N. Mill St., Aspen. Family Workshops at the museum encourage children and adult teams to look, share and create together. Offered on select Sundays, families with children of all ages are welcome to drop in and explore the museum’s current exhibitions and participate in hands-on art projects. Each month families explore a different theme. Admission is free. Call 970-925-8050. MONDAY, JUNE 11 Sign-up: Summer Bilingual Art Camp, Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Ave., Basalt. Registration in progress for Bilingual Art Camp: Murales Mexicanos with Merritt Mahek to be held July 9-13 or Marionetas with Mahek on July 23-27, both for ages 6-12 (parents are welcome). Registration is required. Cost is $180 plus $20 for art supplies. Members receive 10 percent off. Go to www.wylyarts.org to register. Call 970-927-4123. TUESDAY, JUNE 12 Intermediate Ballet 9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., ASFB studios, downstairs at Colorado Mountain College, 0245 Sage Way, Aspen. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet offers intermediate adult ballet class. Drop-ins welcome. Call 970-925-7175 (ext. 106). WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 Christopher P. Leidy: Fine Art Underwater Photography, Woody Creek Community Center. The community center presents the photographs of a thought-provoking marine photographer. The Palm Beach native and grandson of famed designer Lilly Pulitzer exhibits six of his large-scale photographs during a one-time only solo exhibit at the WC3 gallery through June 23. The images, created in limited editions of five; range in price from $4,000-$8,000. They were captured during his underwater explorations in French Polynesia, Panama, Guatemala and the Bahamas. Call 970-922-2342.

SEE The Sierra Leone Refugee Allstars play Friday, June 8, at the Snowmass Chili Pepper & Brew Fest in Snowmass Village.

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Aspen Music Festival Highlights 8:30 p.m. - 10 p.m., Benedict Music Tent. Special event with trumpet great Chris Botti. Go to www. aspenmusicfestival.com for more information. Call 970-925-9042. Jimmie Vaughan Tilt-a-Wheel 8:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St. Whether a part of the Fabulous Thunderbirds or flying solo, Jimmie Vaughan has been rockin’ the blues for 40 years, including a stint working with his younger brother, Stevie Ray Vaughan, who was killed in a helicopter crash in 1990. Jimmie has continued to blaze a modern trail through roots music. Guitar Player Magazine calls the Dallas native “a virtual deity — a living legend.” Also featuring Lou Ann Barton. Call 970-544-9800. Roxy Cox 7:30 p.m. - 11 p.m., Eagles Club, 700 E. Bleeker St., Aspen. An Aspen native returns to the valley to play her acoustic rock music — a mix of original songs and covers. Call 970-925-9912. FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Snowmass Chili & Brew Fest 4 p.m. - 8 p.m., Snowmass Village. Concerts plus microbrew sampling and chili tastings on Fanny Hill; International Chili Society tastings on the Snowmass Mall. Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars on stage at 4:30 p.m., followed by The Congress at 6:30 p.m. Call 1-800-SNOWMASS. Boo Coo 7 p.m. - 11 p.m., St. Regis ResortAspen, Shadow Mountain Lounge. Live local music on Friday and Saturday nights. Call 970-920-3300. Reno Divorce with King Rat 9 p.m., Carnahan’s Tavern, Carbondale. Two of Denver’s heavy hitters in the punk ‘n’ roll world come to rock Bondale. Reno Divorce has just returned from a tour of Europe where they played to 29 audiences in nine different countries in 31 days. King Rat has been one of Denver’s most popular bands for a decade. Call 970-618-1156.

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 7-13, 2012

SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Snowmass Chili and Brew Fest, Snowmass Village. Concerts plus microbrew sampling and chili tastings on Fanny Hill; International Chili Society tastings on the Snowmass Mall. Galactic takes the stage at 1 p.m. followed by Gogol Bordello at 6 p.m. Go to www. snowmasschiliandbrew.com for more. Call 1-800-766-7627. Aspen Players Association 9 p.m. - 11:59 p.m., The Hunter Bar, Aspen. Singer/songwriter musicians circle followed by “the Wild Wesy Show” invitational artist showcase. Call 970274-9078. Boo Coo 7 p.m. - 11 p.m., St. Regis ResortAspen, Shadow Mountain Lounge. Live local music on Friday and Saturday nights. Call 970-920-3300. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 9 p.m., The Brick Pony, 202 Midland Ave., Basalt. Live music on Saturdays. Call 970-279-5021. This Must Be The Band 10 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S Galena St., Aspen. A Talking Heads tribute band that has been “Burning Down The House” throughout Chicago and the Midwest with its expanding repertoire from the Talking Heads’ catalog. Call 970-544-9800. SUNDAY, JUNE 10 The Stone Foxes with The Foot 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S Galena St., Aspen. It’s not just song writing, warm guitars, a tight rhythm section and the occasional blues harp riffs that make the The Stone Foxes so good; the Bay Area band consisting of brothers Shannon and Spence Koehler, and Aaron Mort have captured something else on their recordings and live shows that demands attention. No cover charge. Call 970-544-9800. Tom Ressel 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., Peach’s Cafe, 121 S. Galena St., Aspen. Acoustic music on the patio. Call 970-544-9866.

TUESDAY, JUNE 12 Haden Gregg and Friends 7 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., L’Hostaria, 620 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen. Live music every Tuesday. Call 970-925-9022. The Moondoggies with Swayback 9 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. The Moondoggies are a four-piece band with three-part harmonies and a timeless American rock sound rooted in blues and cosmic country. Lead singer/guitarist Kevin Murphy has the “reedy voice of Neil Young,” says Pitchfork. Call 970-544-9800. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 Snowmass Rodeo 5 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Snowmass Village Rodeo Grounds. Featuring authentic western fun with saddle bronc riding, mutton bustin,’ team roping, bull riding, barrel racing and more. Western barbecue offered before the action. Admission is $18; youths (ages 11-15) get in for $10 and younger children are admitted free. Barbecue buffet is extra. Call 970-923-8898.

THE ARTS THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Intermediate Ballet 9 a.m. - 10:30 am, ASFB studios, downstairs at Colorado Mountain College, 0245 Sage Way, Aspen. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet offers intermediate adult ballet class. Drop-ins welcome. Call 970-925-7175 (ext. 106). FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Colby June Coral Collection 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., SAW, 978 Euclid Ave, Carbondale. The release of a new line at this second Friday opening. Call 970-355-9058. Ballet Technique 12 p.m. - 1 p.m., Coredination, 520 S. Third St., Carbondale. Classical ballet technique for adults and teens — beginning level. Call 970-379-2187.

YOGA & EXERCISE THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Tot Karate 12:30 p.m. - 1:15 p.m., Aspen Recreation Center. Teaches children gross motor skills and hands-eye coordination. Ice skating will follow from 1:30-2:30 pm. Contact Elaine at 520-661-9243 or e-mail 460kozel@ earthlink.net for more information. Vinyasa Flow Yoga 10 a.m. - 11:15 am, Coredination, 520 S. Third St., Carbondale. Class for all levels. Call 970 379-8108. Weekly Group Run 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Ute Mountaineer, 210 S. Galena St., Aspen. The Ute Mountaineer and Aspen Triathlon Club host (at no charge) a 30- to 60-minute run each Thursday (no charge). Explore trails (well known and unknown to many) in the immediate Aspen area. All levels of runners are welcome; a host runner from the Ute or the Aspen Triathlon Club will accompany differently paced groups. Call 970-925-2849. FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Tennis Tournament, Crown Mountain Park tennis courts, El Jebel. Featuring two levels — 2.5 and 3.0; double and single divisions. Single-elimination format. Cost is $20 per entry. Held June 8 and 9. Call 970-963-6030. SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Yoga Rave 7:30 p.m. - 10 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. Hosted by the Aspen Yoga Society at Eco-Fest. Come together after yogi Rod Stryker’s talk at the Wheeler for a yoga dance party; bring a mat and wear white. A ticket includes admission to Stryker’s talk (starts at 5:30 p.m.), followed by a DJ, drumming and stretching on the Wheeler stage. Call 970-618-5101. Yoga for Common Aches and Pains 4 p.m. - 6 p.m., Aspen Health and Harmony, El Jebel. In this workshop led by Ashley Serrao, students reflect on their habitual movement patterns and understand their areas of concern, physiologically and energetically. Participants will practice two Viniyoga-inspired sequences — one to target the lower part of the body and one to target the upper body. Call 970-704-9642.

PHOTO COURTESY STEWART OKSENHORN


edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

Yoga: Moving Toward Steadiness 11 a.m. - 12 p.m., Aspen Health and Harmony, El Jebel. Faith Lipori leads yoga for people with Parkinson’s disease. Yoga increases flexibility, strength and balance, allowing for more ease of movement. A sense of well-being comes from the practice that can reduce the emotional aspects of Parkinson’s, such as depression, anxiety and fatigue. Open to those with Parkinson’s and their friends and caretakers. Call 970-704-9642. SUNDAY, JUNE 10 Yoga in Nature 9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Paepcke Park, downtown Aspen. Join Aspen Yoga Society for a free yoga class celebrating community. Open to all. Music Together with Annie Flynn and kids yoga to follow. Support environmental education and Aspen TREE. Call 970-618-5101. MONDAY, JUNE 11 Aikido at CMC 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Colorado Mountain College, Aspen campus. Aikido is an effective self-defense as well as a fun and dynamic work out. Class offered Mondays and Wednesdays. Beginners welcome. Try the first class for free. Call 970-379-4676.

Aspen Green Drinks 5 p.m. - 7 p.m., Stan Clauson Associates, Inc., 412 N. Mill St., Aspen. A fun and relaxed gatherings where people who are interested in environmental issues share some drinks and network. The event is free; beverages and appetizers will be provided. Aspen Green Drinks is sponsored by the city of Aspen’s ZGreen Program. For more information, visit www.aspenzgreen.com. Call 970-429-1798. Mobile Food Pantry 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., Health and Human Services building, 0405 Castle Creek Road, Aspen. Food Bank of the Rockies hands out food to anyone in need. No eligibility requirements. Participants should bring boxes and/or bags to transport food items. Call 970920-5235. WC3 Eco-Fest 6 p.m. - 7 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center. Organic farmer Clara Coleman presents “Produce More Food Year Round with Season-Extension Techniques.” For more information, call 970-922-2342 or email hilary@woodyc3.org. Call 970-922-2342.

SATURDAY, JUNE 9 Basalt Second Saturday — Motors on Midland 5 p.m. - 8 p.m., Midland Avenue in Basalt. Featuring a classic car show, local food, Wyly Community Art Center events and a live band — Echo Monday. Call 970-704-3165. Carbondale Rotary’s The Happening 5 p.m. - 10 p.m., The Gathering Center at The Orchard, 110 Snowmass Drive, Carbondale. A luau-inspired gala. The wearing of Hawaiian prints and bright colors is encouraged. Tickets are $125 per person and include dinner, complimentary beer and wine, dancing to music by The Big Daddy Lee Band, live and silent auctions, plus The Wall of Wine — for $20, participants may blind pick a bottle of wine ranging in value from $10 to $100. For tickets, information, auction donations and sponsorship, visit www. rotarycarbondale.org, email TheHappening@ rotarycarbondale.org or contact a Carbondale Rotary member. Proceeds support the club’s humanitarian efforts. Call 970-379-3943.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 Fast & Healthy Nutrition 5 p.m. - 6 p.m., Aspen Club & Spa, 1450 Ute Ave. Food demonstrations and tasting, plus successful food planning tips dispel the top five nutrition myths. Call 970-920-5849.

Tot Karate 12:30 p.m. - 1:15 p.m., Aspen Recreation Center. Teaches children gross motor skills and hands-eye coordination. Ice skating will follow from 1:30-2:30 pm. Contact Elaine at 520-661-9243 or e-mail 460kozel@ earthlink.net for more information. Call 520-661-9243.

RELIGION THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Concert With Rafael Bejarano and Oneness Meditation 4 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., Doerr-Hosier Building, Aspen Meadows Resort, 845 Meadows Road. The Oneness Meditation, or OM, is a Deeksha meditation from India, for awakening into higher states of consciousness. Two sessions; come to one or both. Visit: http:// aspenomjune2012.eventbrite.com/ for details. Register online, or pay cash at the door. Please arrive 45 minutes before each session starts. Call Julia Desmond 970-948-4512.

Zumba Blast 6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m., PAC3, Third Street Center, Carbondale High-energy dance fitness class combines Latin and international music and easy-to-follow steps taught by a professional Latin dancer. Everybody is welcome. Classes are bilingual. Call 818-640-6482. TUESDAY, JUNE 12 Yoga for Freedom 5:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., PAC3, Carbondale. Yogis unite as all area studios come together to support one cause, eradicating sex slavery worldwide. All proceeds support the nonprofit organization Off The Mat Into The World (OTM). Event includes concert with OTM co-founder Suzanne Sterling, yoga with Aaron King and Evan Soroka of King Yoga, live DJ and drumming, and a silent auction. All proceeds go toward direct action. Call 970-618-5101.

SUNDAY, JUNE 10 Buddhist Meditation and Mindfulness 9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., 549 Main St., Carbondale. Practical, approachable and livable meditation training integrated with modern life. For more information, call 970-618-1032 or 970-379-8422. Aspen Community Church Worship Service 9:30 a.m. - 11 a.m., 200 E. Bleeker St., Aspen. Everyone welcome. Communion service held the first Sunday of each month. Call 970-925-1571.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 Aspen Cycling Club Racing 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., Location varies. Join a weekly cycling series, alternating between mountain and road bike races. Go to http://aspencyclingclub.org for schedule. Call 970-922-2000.

Christ Episcopal Worship 8 a.m., Christ Episcopal Church, 536 N. Fifth St., Aspen. Holy Communion rite I at 8 a.m. service. Holy Eucharist rite II at 10 a.m. Call 970-923-0122.

THE COMMUNITY

The Physics of Cancer 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Aspen Center for Physics, Sixth and Gillespie. A free physics dialogue. Robert Austin of Princeton returns to continue his thoughtprovoking discussion of why cancers continue to defy conventional approaches. Call 970-925-2585.

P H OTO C O U RT E S Y L I N D S AY

Ruedi Dam Hydroelectric Tour 5 p.m. - 8 p.m., Meet at Basalt Town Hall, 101 Midland Ave., Basalt. The Ruedi Hydroelectric facility generates 40 percent of the City of Aspen’s electricity. Come learn from city officials how the facility operates and why Ruedi Reservoir is important to the electricity needs of the area. Participants will travel to earthen dam and tour the hydroelectric plant below the dam. Be prepared to carpool to and from the dam site, approximately 13 miles up the Fryingpan River from Basalt. Free, but registration is required at www.roaringfork.org/events. Call 970-927-1290. West End Walking Tour 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m., Wheeler/Stallard Museum, 620 W. Bleeker St., Aspe.n A stroll through Aspen’s Victorian West End with a focus on history and architecture; learn little-known facts about the homes themselves and the people who lived in them. Fee is $15 per adult and $12 per senior; children 12 and under free. Presented by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721.

S.P.E.E.D. Camp 8 a.m. - 9 a.m., Crown Mountain Park, El Jebel. Every athlete who attends this six-session camp will learn cutting-edge speed and strength training techniques that will bring their sports performance to the next level. Held on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at Crown Mountain Park. First session is June 11-22. For ages 13-18. Cost is $60 per session and includes a shirt. Call 970-963-6030.

THURSDAY, JUNE 7 Colorado Workforce 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. Having trouble in this tough job market? The Colorado Workforce Center wants to help put you back to work. Drop in every first Thursday of the month and get help with resume writing and job training. Employers, list job openings with the Workforce Center. Call 970-429-1900.

The Schnickelfritz Party 5:30 p.m. - 7 p.m., Holden/Marolt Mining and Ranching Museum, 40180 Highway 82, Aspen. Celebrate the irreverent spirit of Freddie Fisher with live music by Walt Smith, Hickory House barbecue and stories about the man with friends like Mead Metcalf, Don Higbie and Susan Fox. Free to attend; food is $15. Presented by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721.

Crossroads Non-Denominational Christian Church 8 a.m., 726 W. Francis St., Aspen. Sunday services at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m. Wednesday services offered at 6:30 p.m. Go to www.ccaspen.com. Call 970-925-7828.

LOOK “Domestic Tranquility,” reclaimed grate and wood box, by Micahel Lindsay, is part of the groupo exhibition Reclaimed, opening at the Red Brick Center for the Arts with a reception on Thursday, June 7. FRIDAY, JUNE 8 Dream Big: Read! 11 a.m. - 3 p.m., Pitkin County Library plaza, Aspen. The library’s summer reading program kicks off in the plaza behind the library. Refreshments and games are planned, starting at 11 a.m., along with registration for infants through eighth-graders. Registration and an ice cream social for high school students starts at 2 p.m. Call 970-429-1900.

TUESDAY, JUNE 12 LINX Networking Group 7 a.m. - 8:30 a.m., Chaffin and Light building, downtown Basalt. Weekly meeting of a business networking organization whose members work together to grow and promote their businesses. New members welcome. Call 970-309-8108.

Sunday Worship 9:30 a.m., Basalt Community United Methodist Church. Worship with children’s church and fellowship at a parish with an active, progressive congregation. Call 970-379-4643. Worship in Thomasville 7 p.m., Thomasville Community United Methodist Church, 24523 Frying Pan Road, Thomasville. Worship in an historic one-room schoolhouse. Call 970-379-4643.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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ASPEN

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Deluxe Condos from. #FTU-PDBUJPO '-45FSNT/FHP UJBCMF4UVEJP -PGUT #VOLIPVTF CESNT /1/4 "TQFOXPPE$POEP!B PMDPN"WBJM4FQU

Local newspaper Web sites rank ямБrst in terms of the trustworthiness of the advertising. ItтАЩs time to place your ClassiямБed ad in this publication тАУ always in print and online and always a trusted source. Call 866-850-9937 or e-mail classiямБeds@cmnm.org.

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CARBONDALE

CARBONDALE

COMMERCIAL - GYPSUM

Blue Creek Ranch CFE CBUIXJUIDBSHBSBHFBOE TFQBSBUFTUPSBHFVOJU0QFOGMPPSQMBO XJOEPXTHBMPSF TUPOFDPVOUFSUPQT TUBJOMFTTBQQMJBODFTBOE&VSPQFBO HMBTT1SPGFTTJPOBMMZMBOETDBQFEBOE MJHIUFE4FBTPOBMDSFFL WFHFUBCMFHBS EFO WJFXTUPPQFOTQBDF8BMLUPSJWFS BOE3JP(SBOE5SBJM

GREAT FAMILY HOME! (PSHFPVTIPNFGFBUVSJOHGPVSCFESPPNT UISFFCBUITQMVTGBNJMZSPPN PGGJDF PWFSTJ[FEHBSBHFBOEBDIFGTESFBN LJUDIFO(SFBUOBUVSBMMJHIU BNB[JOH WJFXTPG.U4PQSJT DFOUSBMMZMPDBUFEBOE VQHSBEFTHBMPSF

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Christy Clettenberg 970.379.5589 $PMEXFMM#BOLFS.BTPO.PSTF

Please call Chad Brasington, Prudential Colorado Properties DIBE!WBJMOFU

Price Reduced! $699,000 MLS#124519 Scott Bayens 970.948.2265 McKinley Sales

Commercial Development

PRICE REDUCED $524,500

$1,399,000

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Your Sellers Want to See This Sign! Place an ad in our Real Estate Photo Ads to get your real estate

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Price Reduced to $2,200,000 Contact Steve Serenyi, Colliers, 303.745.5800

Raymi Goodman The Luxury Team @ Aspen Real Estate  XXX3BZNJ(PPENBODPN

SOLD!

925-9937

$450,000

Call today to reserve your space!

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

41


WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by JENNY SHANK of HIGH COUNTRY NEWS

AUTHOR Q&A

3 QUESTIONS FOR GEORGE R.R. MARTIN DRIVING ACROSS the high desert north of Santa Fe, it’s easy to see how the landscape inserted itself into George R.R. Martin’s fantasy books , “A Song of Ice and Fire” and the HBO series “Game of Thrones.” Martin moved to Santa Fe in 1979, and has split his time between this historic city and Hollywood, traveling to fantasy/science fiction conventions around the country and, now, film locations in Scotland. Q: The books have a strong sense of place. How did that translate to the screen? A : King’s Landing, that’s the capital, is not quite so tropical — in the books it’s more like medieval Paris or London and the north is more like Scotland. You don’t get the real tropical stuff til you get down south to Dorne. by BYRON WALDON

| edited by WILL SHORTZ

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ACROSS

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Entourage, in slang Hide pokers Patriot Caesar Rodney on horseback Person running the show “___ Majesty’s Secret Service” The Great Lakes Parallel, e.g. “It’s the HardKnock Life” musical Some dabblers Snake predators named for their calls Scissor-tailed flycatcher with wildflowers D-backs, e.g. P.R. problem Beach lotion abbr. Ones getting away Battery type Zales rival Reduce to a symbol Hosiery shade Irons, in Paris “The Goodbye Kiss” author Massimo Much-quoted line from Edgar in “King Lear” Royal title that means “great house” Common sweetener Go by Lacking rhyme or reason Versatile delivery vehicles Outlets in a chemistry lab

58 59

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80 81 82 84 85 87 88 89

90 91 94 97 99 100 101

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

Island province of the Roman Empire Nonauthoritarian Covered wagon next to Chimney Rock Concerning United in purpose Rice stalks, a diamond and a mallard Old comic book cowboy Eager reporter Venture to postulate Nassau residents “Lose Yourself” rapper The Perfesser’s nephew in the comic strip “Shoe” Party hat? Beauty contest since 1952 Civil defense devices Help in a bind Simpson girl Author Jorge Sui ___ With 95-Down, “The Royal Family of Broadway” star, 1930 Postcard in a barrel, perhaps Expose Old French coin Tennis’s Stefan Result of failing banks? Statehouse dome French Baroque artist who painted “The Fortune Teller” “Get Smart” robot Film composer Morricone 110-Across set in Egypt

June 7-13, 2012

109 110 111 112

Abraham Lincoln See 108-Across Fair sight Racehorse in front of the Federal Hill mansion 113 “A madness most discreet,” per Romeo 114 Not flabby

DOWN 1

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5 6 7 8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 22 25 26 31 32 33

“Wanderings: Chaim ___ Story of the Jews” Quarter-mile, for many tracks Noted exile of 1979 Home to the National Voting Rights Museum Hosp. zones “Thanks ___!” Father of the Blues Outgrowth from the base of a grass blade Birth control pioneer Margaret Handlers of brats Stretched out Designer Vera Island protector Islamic analogue of kosher Like many music reissues Military jacket with a furry hood What a poor listener may have Athletic awards since 1993 Some baseball scores: Abbr. Salts Inter Neighbor of Poland: Abbr. ET carrier

34 35 36 39 40 41 42 43 44 45

46

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70 72 73 75

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___ belli (warprovoking act) Transition point Prefix with center Rocky Mountains Arctic ___ (poleto-pole migrator) Part of many a freight train E.M.T. application Bingo alternative? Saint in a Sir Walter Scott title “___ my garment and my mantle”: Ezra 9:3 “Commonwealth” statue and a keystone Too Do dos, say Goes across “Cómo ___?” Like the scent of many cleaners Homo, for one Area that’s frequently swept? “Lorna ___” Uncool types Spring ___ Severely parched Part of Russia next to Finland Like the eastern part of Russia Herring varieties Belgian river Old Man of the Mountain rock formation Winter solvent Villain “I ___ bored!” Lewis and Clark and the Gateway Arch Greenhouse workers Sinuous character ___ West Fabulist

“A Song of Ice and Fire’ George R.R. Martin Bantam, 831 pages; $8.99

Q: The books depict more violence than the shows, which have their share of battles. Did you struggle on how to describe violence? A : I don’t think I made any effort to define a line, I just want to present violence accurately and the way it is, and graphically in that sense. One of the things I hated about the television networks I worked for, primarily CBS with “Beauty and the Beast,” the premise was that Vincent is a beast and he’s repeatedly called on to defend Catharine and he does so violently. He doesn’t have a gun or a knife or anything. He is ripping people apart with his claws. We were never allowed to show any of that, it would be “disturbing.” But the network said we needed more “action,” code-speak for violence. No blood, not a drop of blood.

1

STATE QUARTERS 1

NOTEWORTHY

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This book review originally appeared in the High Country News.

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Q: Are your books a commentary on violence in our culture? A : It’s not an allegory of any particular war. There are, certainly, ruminations in it on war and the nature of power, the obligations of the ruled. I think a lot of fantasy is about war, going back to Tolkien, there’s almost always a war as part of it. But some treat war as an excuse for “action.” As it relates to violence in my books, I wasn’t going to do “action.” If I was going to have violence, I was going to present it the way it really is.

104

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— Last week’s puzzle answers — 81

83 84 85 86 88 90 91 92

Word repeated before “tekel” in biblical writing on the wall Billing fig. Race, as an engine Lord or vassal Move toward the middle “Boris ___” Cereal killer? Suffix with form Kind of farming that doesn’t disturb the soil

93 95 96 98 99 100

102 103 104 105 106

“Gangsta’s Paradise” rapper See 89-Across Like zombies Ireland Unreliable “I want my ___!” (old advertising catchphrase) Benefit Force Cabinet dept. since 1979 Go up Scorching

C A T O

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F E A T U D A C R O R L E G O O D N U T A S U S P A R T L E A R F A I R A I T B R A N U P D O L O D G I R S S T U T S P

T A M O

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N A A N

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A T A D

T A D A

E L A L

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R H E A

S E P T

R A P E I C A L V E R S S T A S A S T U B U R N R E A D A V E D E R M A L O D E D D R E E L L E O E X A N D P S L O G S O U N I D A M E R

A R I D

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O M A N Y D R A L L E S I S A O N S C A E P O T B E E R A D D I L L L T H T R U R Y A N E R S T F R T H Y A W E B I T N D T H O U T L L Y

I S R

T O L D A L I E

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G O P O S T A L

B E N O D E K I D S T M E O P T A B L E C E E S I R S T D T E R S E F U R S O D A T R E S


The wine prospector

“A Tut’s tomb of wine in Colorado” Matt Kramer, The New York Sun

1 (970) 704-WINE (9463) 1

Your BEST FRIEND is waiting for YOU!

RYDER

1). Chateau Roaring Fork ‘s beautiful setting on the Roaring Fork River 2). Large outdoor heated pool, hot tubs, conference & workout areas.

Happy, friendly, eight-year-old Australian Shepherd. He gets along well with people and other dogs.

ANUBIS

Eight-year-old purebred American Dingo female who gets along well with people and other dogs.

BODHI

Friendly, handsome, three-year-old Golden Retriever male who gets along well with people, but can be aggressive with other male dogs.

RODEO

Eight-year-old Australian Cattledog mix male who gets along well with people and other dogs.

HUNTER

Three-year-old Pit bull/Chow mix who was found wandering around Aspen. He is wary of strangers, but friendly once he knows you and trusts you.

KIDD

Eight-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback mix male who gets along well with people and other dogs.

Chance to snag a downtown Aspen 3 bedroom condo with all the amenities for a friendly price – perfect if you’ll do the updating and don’t like the sound of the river: $995,000

W

hy is this well located condo only $995,000? It’s 43 years old and needs updating. What an opportunity for someone looking to create their own special look and feel! This 1,110 square foot condo has vaulted ceilings in all the rooms, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a large kitchen - dining room – living room area with a real fireplace, and a deck facing the sun – a prime space for a tasteful renovation. This condo is at Chateau Roaring Fork, 1039 East Cooper Avenue, a couple of blocks to the heart of downtown Aspen. The complex has fabulous amenities such as a large heated outdoor

pool - just like being at a grand hotel – your friends will be very impressed! In addition, you have hot tubs, workout facility, sauna and conference facility – great for parties! The problem for some people is that the Chateau Roaring Fork complex is right on the Roaring Fork River. Whenever you open your windows, the sound of the river can be overwhelming at times. But, if you like all the amenities and A+ location of the Chateau Roaring Fork complex, and don’t like the sound of the river, this is a perfect condo for you. Another great benefit is that this condo has great short-term rental potential. Whether you

decide to redo it, or just keep it the way it is, this unit has a solid history of producing good rental income that will help you to offset the cost of owning an Aspen condo when you’re not using it. But if you are a read-to-actbuyer, call the listing agent direct, William Small at Frias Properties of Aspen, LLC at (970) 429-2419 or e-mail him at Bill@FriasProperties.com. On The Web at: PerfectAspenUpdate.com

A Division of Frias Properties of Aspen, LLC, 730 E. Durant Ave., Aspen, CO 81611 (970) 429-2419

PUMPKIN

Beautiful, friendly, calm 9-year-old Husky mix female. A retired sled dog looking for a loving home. Pumpkin has an adorable expression with ears that reach to the sky.

CHUTNEY

Seven-year-old retired sled dog. She is happy, friendly and well-socialized. She gets along great with her sister, Cherry. They would love to be adopted together, but we will separate them if necessary in order to find them loving homes.

TIANA

Beautiful, happy, friendly, sablecolored, 4-year-old German Shepherd female who gets along well with people and other pets.

OPEN 7am-6pm EVERY DAY 970.544.0206

CHERRY

Seven-year-old retired sled dog. She is happy, friendly and well-socialized. She gets along great with her sister,

ROCCO

Older neutered male Boxer/Pitbull/Lab. Roughly 11 years old. Found in Emma on 12/9 and never claimed. Super sweet old man.

Lots of NEW DOGS AND CATS! See dogsaspen.com for more animals.

LUCY

Gentle, friendly, affectionate, threeyear-old Pit bull female who was found wandering the streets of Los Angeles. She was transported to Aspen in order to start a new life in the mountains.

SAM

PUP

One-year-old Australian Shepherd/Australian Cattle dog mix. He is happy, friendly and playful with people he knows, but can be territorial with strangers.

PRINCESS

Strong, energetic, black/white 5-yearold female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull so she is larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing and friendly. Best as only pet.

Happy, friendly, 8-year-old Pit Bull mix. Has lived with Lupita for the past four years. It would be great if they could be adopted together but they don’t have to be.

Aspen/Pitkin Animal Shelter 101 Animal Shelter Road

www.dogsaspen.com

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

43


CHAFFIN LIGHT

& Morris & Fyrwald Sinclair Meadows – Last of its Kind! 17 magnificent homesites in Snowmass Village adjacent to the Two Creeks Ski Resort Ski Area. WITHIN ASPEN SCHOOL DISTRICT. Available with Single Family Homes Lot Number

Lot Sq. Ft.

F.A.R. (excl. garage)

Lot 11 13,482 Lot 13 14,072 Lot 5 24,924 Available Homesites Lot Number

Lot 17 Lot 4 Lot 8

Lot 11

2,400 2,400 3,624

Lot Sq. Ft.

F.A.R. (excl. garage)

17,056 21,174 56,759

2,755 3,042 4,500

Available at

$2,325,000 $2,325,000 $3,275,000 Available at

$799,000 $1,200,000 $1,695,000

Garrett Reuss | 970.379.3458

Price Reduced

Ridge Run’s Most Private Enclave

Ski Mountain and Golf Course Views

4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 4,648 sq ft Endless mountain views Direct ski access via mid-lift station Best home value in Snowmass Village $2,795,000 Garrett Reuss | 970.379.3458

3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1,950 sq ft Plus den and loft – lots of room! Deck provides beautiful outdoor spaces 2010 exterior remodeled $1,295,000 Bruce Baker | 970.948.9314

Direct View of Mt. Daly 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1,218 sq ft Spectacular Golf Course and Mt. Daly views Includes Snowmass Club Membership Can rent short term or owner occupy $1,195,000 Kathy DeWolfe | 970.948.8142

New Listing

On the Sunny Side of Assay Hill

Country Club Living at it’s Best!

2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1,104 sq ft Incredible ski-in, ski-out access Top floor Enclave condominium Walk to shops and restaurants at Base Village $1,050,000 Garrett Reuss | 970.379.3458

2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1,106 sq ft Views, amenities galore, Gold Star Rated Perfect location for the active lifestyle $775,000 $720,000 Anne White | 970.379.6876 Becky Dombrowski | 970.618.0960

Crestwood – Ski Slope Location 1 bedroom, 1 bath, 600 sq ft Corner unit with lots of windows Nice views of the mountain Top-rated management $390,000 Bruce Baker | 970.923.2006

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

ASPENSNOWMASSSIR.COM

Aspen Times Weekly: June 7 edition  

The Aspen Times Weekly reaches thousands of readers interested in the Aspen and Western Colorado region. In this edition, writer Andre Salva...

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