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VOX POP

WHAT’S YOUR BIG IDEA? 08

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WINEINK CHEF WILL AND HIS WAY 18

JUNE 28 - JULY 4, 2012 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? SEE PAGE 27


BELLY UP ASPEN WHERE ASPEN GOES FOR LIVE MUSIC.

WED 6/27

ERIN NOETHEN

SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR t/"563"-#-6&4MOBY t t5)&*--4.":&3)"85)03/&t

SHOW 9:30 PM

THE ENGLISH BEAT W/ BONFIRE DUB

Soul, reggae, punk-pop sixtet that “created some of the catchiest and most durable pop-rock singles of the ‘80s� (Houston Press) including “Mirror in the Bathroom�and “I Confess�.

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SHOW 9:30 PM IS 18+

KENNY LOGGINS

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The “King of the Movie Soundtrack� - VH1. Loggins recorded hits “Danger Zone� from Top Gun, the title track “Footloose� & “I’m Alright� from Caddyshack.

SAT 6/30

SUN 7/1

SHOW 9:30 PM 18+

MOBY LIVE OW SH ACOUSTIC T’S BAND H G & DJ ISET ON

MOBY LIVE ACOUSTIC BAND & DJ SET

“Often tagged the king of techno for his symphonic combination of disco beats, punk-rock speed, and anthemic lyrics� -Rollingstone

“Often tagged the king of techno for his symphonic combination of disco beats, punk-rock speed, and anthemic lyrics� -Rollingstone

TU U ONK YO T 8-"5&/*()5%+5#" D A L TH O S

THU 6/28

SHOW 9:30 PM

8-"5&/*()5%+5#"

SHOW 9:30 PM 21+

JES GREW

FEAT. THE BROCOLLI BROS. HORNS Aspen’s local rockers playing originals and rock n roll classics!

JUST ANNOUNCED: t5)&,*--"#*54 t5:$)0

MON 7/2 SHOW 10 PM

BLUES TRAVELER “Why you wanna give me a run-around....�

TUE 7/3

Z-TRIP

SHOW 9:30 PM 21+

801&/*/("$55#" “Pioneer of the mashup movement� (Rolling Stone) and former recipient of “America’s Best DJ Award� returns!

t#-"$,6)636  t5"+.")"-"/%5)& 1)"/50.#-6&4#"/% t&"4:45"3"--45"34

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012


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3


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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION

DEPARTMENTS 08 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION 12

LEGENDS & LEGACIES

14 FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE 18

WINE INK

20 FOOD MATTERS 28 VOYAGES 32 A&E 37 LOCAL CALENDAR 46 CROSSWORD JUNE 28 - JULY 4, 2012 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

WHAT’S THE BIG IDEA? SEE PAGE 27

27 COVER STORY

34 AROUND ASPEN

Writer Hilary Stunda interviews three of this week’s speakers at the Ideas Festival in Aspen.

Contributing editor Mary Eshbaugh Hayes shares her highlights from the Food & Wine Classic.

ON THE COVER Photo by XXX

EDITOR’S NOTE

justice by title only | Anyone else noticing this? In the

past two years, our Supreme Court has made a clear case for an alternative democracy, one where corporations should be treated like people while immigrants without papers should not.

Editor-in-Chief Ryan Slabaugh Advertising Director Gunilla Asher

enforcement officers The court’s defense have gone on the record this month of Arizona’s to say the new laws do harmful immigration not change how they laws leads us to this behave with the public, conclusion. President some have and are now Obama bucked his given encouragement by usual wishy-washy self our highest authority. and disagreed, only to The scenario going be condescendingly RYAN SLABAUGH forward is historically addressed by Justice backward. Do we really want to Antonin Scalia like a student return to a country that allows held after class. In Scalia’s a cop to pull over a person, look written opposition to Obama’s at the color of their skin, ask for immigration platform, he not-sovaguely accuses the administration papers and arrest them if they receive a negative answer? of violating the constitutional The president, meanwhile, rights of states. would be best served to continue It’s sad to see a judge of such a advocating for the Dream Act, high office miss the point so badly. which gives a path to citizenship The question the Supreme Court to all youth brought over illegally needed to be asking was not about by their parents. It is the most states’ rights but a question in sensible, far-reaching policy the same vein as the Civil Rights that allows for our most loyal Acts of the ’60s, when the federal immigrants to contribute back government stepped in to ensure to our country instead of forcing states were not abusing their own them to take and leave, and it is power in a discriminatory fashion. supported by most voters younger Arizona is ripe for intervention. than 40, according to a recent New While many of the state’s law

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VOLUME 1 ✦ ISSUE NUMBER 32

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

York Times article. Why 40? This is the voter block that will truly bear the immigration burden if there is one in the first place. Scalia, meanwhile, discouraged the Dream Act, saying it would put a horrible task on the feds, who would have to sort through more than 4 million identifications and monitor the process for them. What Scalia proposes instead is to put immigration policies in the hands of our local police forces. The police would be the filtering mechanism for the 4 million, who would be processed individually as criminals and destroyed as a generation of immigrants waiting their turn for the American dream. Which leads us to this idea of a new democracy, one where concrete trumps a heartbeat, and our leaders have stopped building unity by asking, “What can you do for your country?” Instead, they coldly ask, “Can I see your papers?” rslabaugh@aspentimes.com

Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott Design Afton Groepper Arts Editor Stewart Oksenhorn Production Manager Evan Gibbard Contributing Editors Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Gunilla Asher Kelly Hayes Jill Beathard Jeanne McGovern John Colson Contributing Writers Paul Andersen Hilary Stunda Amanda Charles Michael Appelbaum Warren Miller Contributing Partners High Country News Aspen Historical Society The Ute Mountaineer Explore Booksellers www.aspentimes.com Sales Ashton Hewitt Jeff Hoffman David Laughren Christian Henrichon Su Lum Louise Walker Classified Advertising (970) 925-9937


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

VOX POP

compiled by MAX VADNAIS

ROB TEPPER B A S A LT

What’s your

big idea?

Bacon-wrapped bacon on anything.

ADAM ZUEHLKE MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.

A Japanese app for your phone that does not

DEISY KESSLER S AO PA U LO , B R A Z I L

allow the owner of the phone to call certain numbers after midnight.

The rocket-powered wingsuit from Germany that I saw fly over Rio this year.

NATALIE GOLDEN ASPEN

Solar panels over entire parking lots in Arizona.

ANDREA CARGILL B R O A DV I E W , O H I O

Replacing everyone in Congress. They are just so futile, it seems like we need a fresh start.

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012


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NNN%J;JI<8C<JK8K<%:FD A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

SEEN, HEARD & DONE

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

CHEERS&JEERS

FIVE THINGS TOP 5 FUNNIEST IDEAS OF 2012 SO FAR

O5 O4 No fireworks this year — and this means you.

CHEERS | To those who participated in June 27’s Bike

CHEERS | To the fire departments all across the state

to Work Day. It was fun to see everyone out pedaling to work, although in this town, it’s not that unusual. On that note, when’s Bike to Work Month?

for cooperatively fighting nearly a dozen wildfires. While property and lives have been lost, the overall work done in the past week saved Manitou Springs from burning, while their colleagues are busily working near Leadville on a fire closest to our homes. We encourage everyone to say “thank you” to a firefighter the next time they see one.

JEERS | To the congressional push for more penalties for whistleblowers. Current investigations into important leaks — which proved our president has a kill list without any accountability — are taking the wrong side. Instead of breaking down the secrecy that leads to expanding presidential powers, they are attacking the public for learning about it. This begs the question of who, exactly, is working for whom.

JEERS | To Citizens United and its constant pervasion of the democratic process of electing our representatives. Only history will prove the Supreme Court’s decision to allow massive corporate contributions to be dreadful, although the wise and willing can see the negative side effects happening already. Why is it so hard to believe that money corrupts?

BUZZ WORTHY ASPEN

COUNCIL DELAYS LIBRARY DECISION

large portion of Galena Plaza — a majority of council members said there were still too many vagaries associated with the project. — Andre Salvail

Saying they still weren’t comfortable with plans for the Pitkin County Library expansion, the Aspen City Council voted unanimously June 25 to continue the discussion at its July 9 meeting. The council postponed the decision once before at its June 25 meeting. At that time, concerns from the public and some council members revolved around the design of a large canopy that would cover the current building and the proposed two-story expansion that would add 7,198 square feet to the library’s existing 31,703-square-foot size. Though library planners spoke Monday of a new canopy design that would have a skylight feature — allowing the sun to pass through and alleviating some of the public’s concerns about the shading of a

ASPEN

ASPEN SKIING CO. GOES BIG IN ITS EFFORT TO OFFSET CARBON Aspen Skiing Co. has taken the big step it needs to offset the power it consumes and gain greater credibility in the battle against climate change. Skico is investing nearly 5.4 million to pay 90 percent of the construction cost of a plant that will capture methane vented from a coal mine at Somerset, about 10 miles northeast of Paonia, and convert it into electricity. “It’s a phenomenal project,” said Skico President and CEO Mike

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

O2 O1

“Fixing” the lights on Aspen’s Main Street Picking up that rescue puppy Pledging not to use the air conditioner this summer Trading Tebow

POST US YOUR TOP FIVE THINGS jbeathard@aspentimes.com

STAY IN THE KNOW — CATCH UP ON RECENT NEWS & LOCAL EVENTS Kaplan while announcing the deal Monday at the Forests at Risk conference in Aspen. Skico has worked on an agreement with two partners for about one year and finally got a contract signed last week. Skico formed a joint venture with Gunnison Energy, a sister company to the one that owns the Elk Creek Mine, and with Vessels Coal Gas Inc., which put together the plan. Gunnison Energy is owned by William Koch. — Scott Condon ASPEN

NEWMAN HEADS TO D.C. TO LOBBY AGAINST DRILLING Bending the ear of a U.S. senator with a new argument against drilling in Thompson Divide will be on Pitkin County Commissioner George Newman’s agenda in Washington,

“IT’S WELL PAST WHAT WE AS A SOCIETY SAY WE CAN AFFORD.” 10

O3

Newt Gingrich’s presidential campaign

D.C., this week. For the second straight year, Newman has been invited to the nation’s capital by the Wilderness Society, via Carbondalebased Wildneress Workshop, to participate in Great Outdoors America Week. The Wilderness Society is picking up the cost of his visit, but the commissioner once again will use the opportunity to lobby federal officials to block the drilling of gas wells in Thompson Divide. Newman said he’ll meet with Mark Udall to express the county’s support for the senator’s Central Mountains wilderness proposal, which would extend wilderness protections to an additional 65,000 acres in Pitkin County, along with lands in Eagle and Summit counties. In all, the proposal contemplates a wilderness designation in 32 areas covering nearly 236,000 acres in the three counties, including a portion of Thompson Divide outside Carbondale. — Scott Condon

— ETHAN AUMACK, GRAND CANYON TRUST, ON WHAT WE NEED TO IMPROVE OUR FOREST HEALTH

PHOTO BY XXX


THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

GUEST OPINION COLUMN

by JOHN CALDERAZZO of WRITERS ON THE RANGE

Notes from a wildfire refugee THE SHERIFF’S CALL CAME to be full of erupting volcanoes at 3:30 a.m.: Leave immediately. — volcanoes on the move. And Luckily, my wife, SueEllen, and I so it went that night — and so it were already up, grabbing passports, still goes two weeks later — for photos, dog food, wall hangings thousands of our northern Colorado from Thailand and Zanzibar. neighbors. More than I’d gone to bed knowing 200 families’ houses that a wildfire was have been burned to crackling in the high ash, and at least one country beyond our woman has lost her life. beautiful valley near Fort So far, our place and Collins and threatened the homes of Gary and the mountain school his sewing-machinewhere kids sometimes toting neighbor have JOHN CALDERAZZO rode horses to class. Still, been spared. For that school was seven this, we can thank miles away from us, as the nature’s whims and the sparks fly. incredible work of firefighters who But those sparks were flying managed to beat back the blaze just like mad, making the fire bound 300 yards from our property. But forward a quarter-mile at a time. As whether we’ve been touched by luck, we drove off, the foothills seemed tragedy or something between, all of

us evacuees now share something. Suddenly we talk openly about being victims of climate change. Understand: I’m not arguing that climate change directly caused the High Park Fire. Lightning sparked it, as it has sparked fires for millennia. But I am saying that the weeks and months and years of this kind of freakishly hot and dry weather eventually add up to something that feels like more than just an unfortunate trend. Hotter and drier weather means more intense fires, whatever the immediate cause. I’m not a climate scientist. But I work with a number of them to help communicate their findings to the public, and one 2008 study from Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Climate Organization and the Natural Resources Defense Council

noted there’s been an increase in the number of Western wildfires, with more acreage burned per fire. There’s also been an astounding 78day increase in the fire season. Nowadays, in our partly scorched valley, the hills are alive with the sound of helicopters dousing hot spots. Smoke fogs our days, and lots of people still can’t go home to the higher country. I’d like to conclude on a note of hope, noting the human heroics that saved so many structures, or maybe the seemingly unrelated but happy fact that an evacuated alpaca at the Larimer Humane Society just gave birth. The newborn’s name is Cinderella. John Calderazzo is a contributor to Writers on the Range, a service of High Country News (www.hcn.org).

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LEGENDS & LEGACIES

CLASSIC ASPEN

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

A Ferris wheel that carried 60 passengers in each car dominated the skyline at the 1893 Chicago Fair.

A GODDESS OF FORTUNE the publication of Erik Larson’s “The Devil in the White City”

and Scott Peck’s children’s novel “Fair Weather” revived interest in the Chicago Columbian Exhibition that celebrated the 400th anniversary of the discovery of the new world. That World’s Fair delivered a peak experience for those who attended, and captivated the interest of all Americans. Aspenites’ appetite for the fair peaked when the town’s contribution, an 18-foot statue that dominated the Colorado exhibit, arrived. Citizens of Santa Monica are currently debating a proposed Ferris wheel from which riders can gaze over downtown and see up and down the California coast. The original wheel, designed by George Ferris, created an even greater stir in Chicago. Most believed it wouldn’t work; nearly all thought fairgoers would be too scared to ride to such heights. The wheel became the premier attraction of the fair. It’s easy to can climb up Aspen Mountain and gaze down at the town, but for Midwesterners, being able to scan the horizon from the top of the 300-foot wheel was dazzling. Other inventions and innovations drew visitors: a hot air balloon,

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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

Swiss music boxes, Tiffany glass, Krupp cannons, the world’s largest telescope, electric generators and dynamos, steam-driven tractors, hydraulic elevators and fire extinguishers. States built exhibits to promote immigration. California showed off theird redwoods and had a citrus tower. New York commissioned

stature for producing minerals. Quarried onyx and marble lined its exhibit walls. Cabinets of mineral specimens from all over the state dazzled viewers, especially the gold display. The seminal structure however, was Aspen’s Silver Queen statue, known locally as the Goddess of Fortune. Contemporary readers may be

IT’S EASY TO CAN CLIMB UP ASPEN MOUNTAIN AND GAZE DOWN AT THE TOWN, BUT FOR MIDWESTERNERS, BEING ABLE TO SCAN THE HORIZON FROM THE TOP OF THE 300-FOOT WHEEL WAS DAZZLING. a model of the Brooklyn Bridge made out of soap. Idaho exhibited silver and gold; West Virginia, coal; Missouri, lead; and Montana, a silver statue of justice. Colorado promoted its national

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

familiar with the statue as photos of it are frequently printed, and the mystery of its disappearance has become legend. Designed by Pueblo artist Hiram Johnson, and financed mostly by Aspen citizens

and mine owners, the towering statue pulled themes from ancient history, showing a 17-year old (the age of Colorado) maiden enthroned in a Roman chariot reminiscent of Cleopatra’s. It stood as a testimonial to Aspen’s wealth and at the same time it projected political support for continued free coinage of silver. In today’s dollars the design and construction exceeded 240,000 and an equal value of silver and minerals were supplied. Seven of Aspen’s mines donated, each having their names engraved on the statue. The maiden’s hair was created from spun white glass. The face, bust and arms were finished in silver. The drapery and scarf that dressed the statue’s body were set with colorful minerals and blue crystals. The statue, fashioned in Pueblo and constructed in sections for shipment, was previewed first in Aspen. Locals were awestruck, but with so many other outlandish displays at the fair, it was not as memorable for others. The Columbian Exposition divided the history of Aspen and the country. Grover Cleveland who opened the fair, later killed free coinage of silver. The country, caught up in the celebration, became reflective when Frederick Jackson Turner presented his thesis at the fair; he said the frontier experience defined the American character, and noted the 1890 census had confirmed that the frontier was closed. Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn@schat.net.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PHOTO


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

‘THE IDEA OF TRUTH’

1956 MOR T I M E R A DL E R

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

“ADLER EXPLAINS CONCEPT OF TRUTH” headlined an article in The Aspen Times on July 5, 1956. “A clear distinction between the definition of truth and the determination of what is true, was one of the things stressed Tuesday evening, July 3, by Mortimer Adler in his discourse on ‘The Idea of Truth’. Speaking in the west conference room of the seminar building, Adler entertained a capacity audience with his mixture of profundities and droll allusions to reality. At the same time he carried his listeners through various definitions of truth and into the more difficult concepts of what is true. In his definition of truth, Adler brought the subject close to every listener. ‘Since we are all liars at one time or another,’ he stated, ‘we must all know what truth is.’”

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GEAR of the WEEK

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

NEED TO KNOW

65

• Multicolored • Logo buttons • 100 percent cotton

PRANA CARILLO SHORT-SLEEVED WOVEN SHIRT We think this shirt could be considered “Aspen formal.” After all, it has a collar and buttons and, so far, no holes in the pits. Jokes aside, the Carillo can be worn to the office, trail, bar or fundraiser, which might make it the perfect choice for summer in the mountains. Tucking it in, per our local customs, is optional.

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— Ute Mountaineer staff

PHOTO COURTESY SPOT


SEE THREE WILDLY DIFFERENT

SHOWS THIS SUMMER! HURST THEATRE IN RIO GRANDE PARK

RatedR

DOG WEEK

Sadie

THE

Sadie is a 4 year old American Staffordshire Terrier mix. Her foster dad says: “She is such an awesome, loving, well mannered dog. She listens really well. She’s as close to perfect as it gets…” She loves to go on hikes, walks and bike rides. She is very playful but also mellow in the house when you want her to be. She loves to play fetch, and walks pretty well on a leash. No cats. She knows many commands and tricks and always responds to “leave it” right away. She loves to go for car rides and does not bark much. She is house trained, healthy, HW negative, spayed, vetted, up to date on shots and micro chipped. If you are interested in Sadie, please fill out an application on www.luckydayrescue.org then call 970-379-4606.

JUNE 25 - JULY 21

JULY 10 - AUGUST 18

JULY 25 - AUGUST 18

Music & Lyrics by

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From the Novel by

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Based on the Book “How I Became A Pirate” by MELINDA LONG

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NEW VIEWS: Documentaries & Dialogue Highlighting critically acclaimed documentaries and including post-screening discussions with special guests. The series premieres on Sunday, July 1 at the Aspen Ideas Festival and continues Monday, July 23 to Monday, August 13 ALL SHOWS: Paepcke Auditorium | 1000 N. Third Street | Aspen | Tickets $20 aspenshowtix.com | Information at aspeninstitute.org or aspenfilm.org

read the latest edition online at WWW.ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

The House I Live In

Searching for Sugarman

NEW VIEWS is made possible by generous donations from Leonard Lauder and Jane and Michael Eisner.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

15


FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

by GUNILLA ASHER

NEED TO KNOW • 2 ounces Ketel One • Poured on the rocks • Garnished with fresh cracked pepper

COCKTAIL: THE MCDUDE YESTERDAY I ATTENDED ELAINE AND JIM MCDADE’S MEMORIAL; they were very close friends of our family since we moved here in 1974. They were outrageous, generous people who were a very important part of my life and so many others. Three donations were given in their name to the Aspen Institute, the Aspen Music Festival and Aspen Valley Hospital. My dad hosted the event, where they served Jim’s signature drink, which I feel should carry his name — we can now proudly call this drink “the McDude.” The way Jim would make it is a triple pour of Ketel One on the rocks with fresh cracked pepper. Pour yourself a McDude, and raise your glass to honor the McDades. They are missed. Gunilla Asher grew up in Aspen and now is the co-manager of The Aspen Times. She writes a drink review weekly in the spirit of “She’s not a connoisseur, but she is heavily practiced.”

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PHOTO BY THINKSTOCK


CHAFFIN LIGHT

& Morris & Fyrwald

GARRETT REUSS 970.379.3458 cell Garrett.Reuss@sothebysrealty.com

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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WINEINK

WORDS to DRINK BY

CHEF WILL AND THE EIGHT K WAY ONE OF THE BEST THINGS TO happen in recent years for those who love great food and wine in this valley has been the arrival and subsequent growth of chef Will Nolan at the Viceroy Hotel’s Eight K restaurant. Nolan, who cuts an engaging figure with his bald pate, his tattooed arms (every picture tells a story) and his direct wit and way, has taken a property in need of an identity and given it one. Drawing on cultural and culinary roots honed as a son of New Orleans, he KELLY J. has used his skills and HAYES sensibilities to make Eight K the most interesting and innovative kitchen in Snowmass. It is a go-to spot for visitors and locals alike. So when word came that Eight K will be hosting a special wine dinner June 28, pairing Nolan’s cuisine with California’s Trinchero Napa Family wine offerings, it compelled a mention. In fact, a great Napa Merlot paired with Squab stuffed with Nolans’s famed house-made Boudin Blanc is worth much more than a mention — it’s worth a trip. Trinchero Family Estates is one of California’s great wine success stories. Founded in 1948 in Napa Valley, the company remains family owned and produces more than 27 different brands including the Sutter Home, Terra d’Oro, Montevina and Ménage à Trois labels. It also markets Joel Gott’s The Show Cabernet Sauvignon and his latest collaboration with Dave Phinney, of Orin Swift Wines, a French Grenache from Roussillon called Shatter that I have taken a liking to. But the pride of the lines are the single vineyard wines produced in St. Helena, Calif., under the Trinchero Napa Family label by a young winemaker named Mario

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Monticelli, a perfect name for a Cal-Italian winemaking concern. Also perfect is Monticelli’s pedigree. Educated at UC-Davis (the site, by the way, of the recently christened Trinchero Family Estates Building that houses the Plant Services section of the oenology school), he worked vintages in Tuscany for Antinori

before returning to Napa to toil under the tutelage of Philippe Melka, one of the most renowned winemakers and consultants in Napa. While with Melka, Monticelli made wines for Quintessa, Lail Vineyards and Hundred Acre among others, all wines with reputations for reflecting their terroir.

In 2007, Monticelli was named to his current position and has been turning out single-vineyard bottlings from some of the most prized and celebrated vineyards in the Napa Valley. Not surprisingly, these wines have been highly scored by the wine press, with many of them earning marks in the 90s.

PHOTO COURTESY FOOD & WINE MAGAZINE


by KELLY J. HAYES

+747:),7;87:<16/:)6+0-;

MASTERS IN THE MAKING FIRST COURSE • Charbroiled Wellfleet oysters • Garden tarragon mignonette • Avissi Prosecco, Italy

SECOND COURSE • Gulf red fish • Cornmeal tempura-battered soft-shell crab, fresh fava beans, corn fumé • Trinchero Mary’s Vineyard Sauvignon Blanc, Napa Valley, Calif., 2010

THIRD COURSE • Squab stuffed with housemade boudin blanc, sauce poulette • Trinchero Chicken Ranch Vineyard Merlot, Rutherford, Napa Valley, Calif., 2008

MAIN COURSE • Buffalo ribeye • Foie gras and bone marrow custard • Roasted porcini mushrooms, confit of ribeye cap in crispy crêpe, sauce Bordelaise and a fresh horseradish hollandaise • Duet of Trinchero Mario’s Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon, St. Helena, Napa Valley, Calif., 2008, and Trinchero Central Park West Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon, St. Helena, Napa Valley, Calif., 2009

DESSERT COURSE • Buttermilk ginger panna cotta • Grilled peach carpaccio • Spiced dark chocolate cake, drunken port cherries • Duet of Terra d’Oro Moscato, California, 2010, and Terra d’Oro Zinfandel Port, Amador County, Calif.

For the dinner at Eight K, Monticelli will be pouring a variety of wines from the Napa Valley collection, but my interest is in the pair of Cabernet Sauvignon wines that he will be pairing with the main course. The wines represent two different vineyards, both from the valley floor, Mario’s Vineyard and the Central Park West Vineyard, and two different vintages, 2008 and 2009, respectively. Both vineyards occupy hallowed ground in the St. Helena appellation, and both are named to reflect the legacy of the original Trinchero wine scion, Mario, who came to Napa from, you guessed it, New York’s Central Park West. The opportunity to examine wines of this provenance in concert with Nolan’s cuisine should make for an inspiring evening. Closing out the night will be another pairing that should light it up. The deserts at Eight K have been receiving raves of late, and accolades are coming to pastry chef Ashley Jenkin, as well. Monticelli will be bringing a wine that he did not make but one that should pair perfectly with a rich, dark, spiced chocolate cake that Jenkin will be preparing for the evening’s finale. From Amador County in the foothills of California’s Sierra Nevada Mountains, a sweet spot for Zinfandel, comes the Terra d’Oro Zinfandel Port. Though I’ve yet to try this port, I love the Zins from Terra D’ Oro, another Trinchero label. To attend this special wine dinner, call the Eight K hotline at 970-9238035. And if you can’t make it, plan on spending another evening at Eight K. Nolan will be there, and they might even have some Trinchero Napa left over. Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soon-tobe-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and a black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@wineink.com.

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DIRECT SKI ACCESS TO FANNY HILL Rare offering located off Wood Road with a babbling creek and pond during summer. Four bedrooms, four baths, den, private office off the master suite, plenty of room for family and guests. $3,995,000 STEVE LAMAR 970.379.0717 LaMar@rof.net SteveLaMar.com GREG RULON 970.948.2406 GRulon@rof.net GregRulon.com

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

FOOD MATTERS

SERVING CURIOSITY AT FRUITION A SEAT AT FRUITION restaurant in Denver has been on my radar for years. Ever since it opened five years ago, just about every Denver publication has named Fruition its restaurant of the moment. My curiosity was piqued even further when owner and executive chef Alex Seidel was named best new chef by Food & Wine magazine in 2010. The visit became even more imperative when I discovered Seidel’s recipes would be some of the first featured at the St. Regis Chef ’s AMIEE WHITE Club restaurant BEAZLEY in Aspen. Finally, last month, I took a weekend trip to Denver to stay at the JW Marriott and enjoy some overdue shopping in the Cherry Creek neighborhood. But my main mission was getting to Fruition. With only 50 seats, reservations at the restaurant were hard to come by. The only open spot that weekend was at 9 p.m. I declined at first but quickly changed my mind. Every other eatery in the city is compared to Seidel’s cozy nook on Sixth Avenue, and without having firsthand knowledge of it, I’d never have the full story on Colorado dining. The night we dined at Fruition was only the second night featuring the restaurant’s spring menu. Seidel was not in the kitchen (the former University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee soccer player was attending a Colorado Rapids game), but we were lucky enough to have a chef de cuisine with Roaring Fork Valley ties at the helm of the kitchen. Matt Vawter’s grandfather is a Glenwood Springs resident, and he is a frequent visitor to the valley. The restaurant itself is a small, unassuming building with “antique plumbing” that once housed the restaurant Clair de Lune. Tables are very close, the layout lending itself to an intimacy and quiet experience (and a good look at what others ordered). There is no showy artwork

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or pumping music. The focus was on the food, which the restaurant describes as “sophisticated comfort food.” But there is also no room for early guests or those who have to wait, which for this warm spring evening was not a problem. While my dining partner and I waited outside, the maître d’ and a partner in Fruition, the bow-tie-

“Eric,” our server, has been with Fruition since Seidel and many other staffers left Frank Bonanno’s Mizuna to start this venture. He walked us through the spring menu and, this being our first time to the restaurant, keyed us into some dishes that were compulsorily choices. He also turned us on to Fruition’s outstanding beer list. We chose Damnation from the Russian River Brewing Co. to start.

Marinated beef tartare at Fruition restaurant in Denver.

clad Paul Attardi, came out to the cushioned antique benches with two glasses of champagne. “If you wait, you drink,” he said. This is a courtesy for all guests who must wait, but it still made us feel as though we were embarking on a special night.

(Beer snobs everywhere will be giddy over in Fruition’s incredible beer list.) I began my meal with the pasta carbonara, which has always had a home on Fruition’s menu. It is a combination of house-cured pork belly, handmade cavatelli and a “sixminute egg,” cooked sous vide in a

cacio pecora (sheep’s-milk cheese) broth. It was beautifully presented, and I loved the combination of textures and salty pork belly and was happier still with the sous vide egg that sat atop, although I was surprised it wasn’t sourced locally or even from Seidel’s own Fruition Farms, where his chickens lay fresh eggs. Eric told us it came in on a truck. Seidel has never claimed to be a strict local-food chef, but it was a disappointment from such an ingredient-driven establishment. My first choice for the main course was the Tender Belly Farms (local) slow-roasted porchetta with olive-oil smashed fingerlings, marinated fennel salad, La Quercia Farms (domestic) prosciutto and Meyer lemon vin, but unfortunately, our late seating left us without the option. I was not disappointed, however, in what I did settle on — pan-roasted Colorado lamb loin with handmade orecchiette pasta, lamb meatballs, ricotta, tomato confit and fava bean gremolata. The sheep’s-milk cheese (including the aforementioned cacio pecora and ricotta) comes from Fruition Farms in Larkspur, which is the only certified sheep farm in Colorado, and the farm’s excellent cheese-making is becoming well known. Knowing this, I closed my meal with the Fruition Farms Shepherd’s Halo, a cheese plate with savory brioche French toast, pickled rhubarb, fennel and golden beet salad. While not my usual choice for the final course (I’ll be returning for the strawberry shortcake featuring oliveoil cake and ricotta cheesecake), it was a wonderful end to an interesting dinner. I already have my menu planned for my next visit. Amiee White Beazley writes about dining, restaurants and foodrelated travel for the Aspen Times Weekly. She is the editor of local food magazine edibleASPEN and a contributor to Aspen Peak and travel website EverettPotter.com. Follow her on Twitter @awbeazley1, or email awb@awbeazley.com.

P H OTO B Y K E V I N J. M I YA Z A K I


by AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

WHERE TO STAY IN DENVER JW MARRIOTT, CHERRY CREEK Located across the street from the Cherry Creek Mall and the shopping mecca that is the Cherry Creek neighborhood, JW Marriott has perhaps some of the nicest staff in all of Denver. The hotel’s restaurant, Second Home, has a devoted following and lively bar scene with a young, wellheeled crowd. JW Marriott also offers the amenity of a Concierge Level accommodation. For an extra $50, your room has access to the club, where a host or hostess serves hot breakfast in the morning, afternoon snacks and hors d’oeuvres with wine, beer and cocktails as well as evening desserts until 10 p.m. Request a mountain-view room not only for the beautiful vistas of the mountains and Denver skyline but also for the the warm western sun, which floods your room during your afternoon rest. If you are traveling with the kids, there is nothing more indulgent than Second Home’s Pajama Brunch on Sunday mornings. The weekly event brings in kids clad in PJs from all over the city and, I suspect, many other hotels. On the menu: items like pancakes and waffles with toppings that might make Mom cringe (gummy bears for breakfast, anyone?) but gave my boys the thrill of a lifetime. We ran off the sugar high at the mall before our drive home to Aspen. Now they can’t imagine staying anywhere else during our city adventures, and neither can I.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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VOYAGES

DESTINATION | MEXICO

by RYAN SLABAUGH

ASPEN IS EVERYWHERE FREQUENT CONTRIBUTOR Morgan Smith sent us this picture (below) from an asylum in Mexico, a destination he has volunteered at for many years. At the asylum, patients learn basic life skills and are often released with improved opportunities, but many of the patients are kept at the asylum for the rest of their lives. From time to time, Smith sends us updates as his work evolves. This time, there was no major update, other than a note that read, “Sorry I’ve been out of touch and haven’t sent anything recently. I thought you’d enjoy the attached photo from the asylum in Juarez, Mexico. The name Aspen is everywhere.”

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PHOTO BY MORGAN SMITH/THINKSTOCK


CHAFFIN LIGHT

& Morris & Fyrwald

F rying Pan River FrontageтАж

The Historic Dallenbach Ranch    %NTIRE ACREPARCEL

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CHAFFIN LIGHT

& Morris & Fyrwald New Listing

Riverfront Ranch in Old Snowmass sBEDROOMS FULL HALFBATHS 8,423 sq ft, 35.17 acres s/NEOFAKINDRANCHPROPERTY s&INELYCRAFTEDTIMBERANDSTONEHOME s'RACIOUSLYDESIGNEDWITHGRANDSPACES and every room enjoying sights and sounds of the river s3PACIOUSANDPRIVATEVERANDASWITH outdoor fireplaces overlooking Snowmass Creek with sweeping mountain vistas s"ARN CARETAKERSQUARTERS ARTISTSTUDIO and irrigated pasture for your horses $13,500,000 Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

Prestigious Two Creeks

Three Dimensional Piece of Art 6 bedrooms, 6 full, 2 half baths, 6,580 sq ft Extraordinary custom home built to enjoy all year-round, adjacent to open space Attention to detail, design and materials $11,950,000 George P. Huggins | 970.379.8485

5 bedrooms, 5 full, 2 half baths, 6,050 sq ft Direct ski-in, ski-out access Views to the Continental Divide 8 fireplaces provide ambiance $11,900,000 Chris Lewis | 970.379.2369

Aspen’s Most Prestigious Neighborhood

Privacy, Proximity and River Frontage

6 bedrooms, 7,737 sq ft, 1.28 acres Beautifully landscaped grounds Faces south for all-day sun Separate 928 sq ft guest house $7,995,000 Garrett Reuss | 970.379.3458

Spectacular log home Snowmass Creek frontage Lot 3 $4,900,000 furnishings negotiable Lot 3 & 2 $6,450,000 Lot 3 & 2 with adjoining vacant Lot 2 Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443

Slopeside Luxury at Two Creeks 5 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, 5,498 sq ft Direct ski access to the door via the Cascade ski run 1,100 sq ft master, great living spaces $10,500,000 Chris Lewis | 970.379.2369

Snowmass Creek Frontage 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 6,179 sq ft 6.52 acres, mature landscaping This is THE River property in Aspen’s Roaring Fork Valley! $3,950,000 Garrett Reuss | 970.379.3458

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

ASPENSNOWMASSSIR.COM 24

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New Listing

Crystal Farm in Redstone s BEDROOM FULL HALFBATHS  SQFT s !TRUETURNOFTHECENTURYESTATE remodeled to todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standards s!LLMODERN YETMAINTAININGA wonderful Old World charm s)NCLUDESAMAINHOUSE GUESTHOUSE over-sized 3 car garage with a game room upstairs, barn, pool, tennis court, and numerous storage buildings s-ULTIPLEFENCEDHORSEPASTURES s5NIQUEONEOFAKIND ACREESTATE s/FFERSALIFESTYLEOFELEGANCEANDPEACE $6,973,000 3EANDE-ORAES\ Evan Boenning | 970.379.1665

Creekside Sanctuary 616 feet of West Sopris Creek frontage 3 bedrooms, 3 full, 1 half baths, 4,058 sq ft, 4.29 pristine acres 20 minutes to Aspen $2,795,000 Terry Harrington | 970.948-9090

4.56 Acresâ&#x20AC;ŚRancho Paradiso 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 3,240 sq ft Beautifully landscaped grounds 'OLD-EDALmYlSHINGOUTYOURDOOR End of the road privacy $2,500,000 -ARGI#RAWFORD\

9-acre Hot Springs Ranch 3 bedooms, 2 baths, 2,410 sq ft One-half mile of Crystal River frontage 2 natural hot springs, river bathhouse Private gated property, exceptional views $2,490,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045 New Listing

Redstone Home for Avid Fisherman 14+ acres with pristine Crystal River 1/4 mile of private stream frontage Keep your horses on property Pastures, gardens, abundant water rights $1,497,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

Sopris Mountain Ranch Viewsâ&#x20AC;Ś Farmhouse on 35.5 acres 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 3,600 sq ft Enjoy as is or remodel to your liking! $1,495,000 Jana Dillard | 970.948.9731 Ted Borchelt | 970.309.3626

The Best of River Valley Ranch 6 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, 5,750 sq ft, .61 acres Located on the 11th tee box Detached one bedroom guest house Perfect second or year-round home $1,375,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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$855,000 CHATEAU DUMONT #1 2 bedroom 2 bath Large open living area 1 block to downtown Aspen

$6,300,000 A+ LOT ON RED MOUNTAIN Rare opportunity 1-acre lot Unsurpassed views

$2,799,000 RIVERFRONT TOWNHOME 4 bedroom 3 bath Aspen core area Carport and garage

$2,750,000 LARGE WEST END DUPLEX Spacious 3 level 3 bedroom 4.5 bath Private 2 car garage

$1,895,000 BEST OPPORTUNITY IN ASPEN 5.02 acre view lot Serene valley setting Ready to build a 12,395SF contempo home

$1,700,000 GLORY HOLE #D 2 bedroom 2 bath Big views, airy living room Two blocks to gondola, pets ok

$595,000 ASPEN MODERN LIVING 1 bedroom 1 bath Completely remodel Comfortable lifestyle

$1,099,000 QUEEN VICTORIA #103 3 bedroom 2 bath Balcony overlooking river Excellent location

$1,795,000 CHATEAU EAU CLAIRE #27 3 bedroom 3 bath Top floor unit, magnificent views Pool, hot tub, conference room

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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

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THREE OF THIS WEEK’S SPEAKERS AT THE IDEAS FESTIVAL SHED LIGHT ON HUMAN CONNECTIONS by HILARY STUNDA

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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every june, the Aspen Ideas Fest stretches

our cerebral cortices like a series of crash courses in grad school. Speakers, thinkers, conceptualists, artists, environmentalists and politicos arrive armed with in-depth research, concepts and solutions. One could be overwhelmed. But Aspen has a way of balancing the intensity of thought by couching the exceptional in blue jeans and alpenglow conversation.

I RECENTLY SPOKE with three Ideas Festival participants: social biologist Nicholas Christakis; Dennis Scholl, art philanthropist and vice president of arts at The Knight Foundation; and acclaimed DJ, musician and photographer Moby (the great-great-great-nephew of Herman Melville, hence the nickname). Moby has sold more than 20 million albums. For decades, he has been captivating audiences in

the hundreds of thousands with his symphonic combination of disco beats, punk-rock speed and anthemic lyrics. While the three might seem to occupy separate camps, I soon learned they had more in common than I imagined. Their visions — backed by science, art and music, respectively — hold to the belief that the “right” human interactions and connections can elevate if not transform life.

HILARY STUNDA: What was it about Tanzania’s Hadza huntergatherer community that affirmed your theories? NICHOLAS CHRISTAKIS: Whenever human networks have been mapped or studied, they always seem to have a strikingly similar mathematical structure. We were wondering: Is there something deep and fundamental in our evolutionary past that destines humans to make networks with particular structures? Ideally we would want to fly back 10,000 years and look at humans when they lived before the invention

of modern technology. But second best is to explore a hunter-gatherer population that lives like they did in the Pleistocene. There are only about 1,000 Hazda left. They are one of the last hunter-gatherer populations on the planet. There are only about 500 adults. The coauthor, Coren Apicella, spent the

summer driving around in a Land Rover avoiding scorpions and other disasters to basically find every adult Hazda she could using a kind of Hazda Facebook that we made that mapped our network. They have no agriculture. They have no significant material possessions (and) do not construct dwellings. They sleep

NICHOLAS A. CHRISTAKIS

HUMAN NATURE LAB

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Nicholas A. Christakis is a professor and the director of the Human Nature Lab at Harvard University. His work examines the evolutionary biology of human networks and such impulses as cooperation, altruism and innovation. This year, his lab mapped the networks of Tanzania’s Hadza hunter-gatherers to see how they related to “modern” man. Christakis is the co-author of the 2011 book “Connected” and was listed in 2009 as one of Time magazine’s 100 most influential people.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS


WHEN HE SPEAKS Nicholas A. Christakis will join the panel discussion “Will Technology Make Us Healthier?” from 10:30 to 11:40 a.m. on July 1 in the Booz Allen Hamilton Room of the Koch Building.

under the stars. They hunt and they gather for their food. The Hazda social networks, we discovered, look just like ours. It helps confirm the belief that there’s something very ancient about the human social network. We humans don’t just live in groups. We live in networks. We need to have particular ties to particular people in a particular pattern. How is a flock of birds able to navigate and pull their wisdom to find a tiny speck of an island in the Pacific? Connections matter. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

HS: Your research delves into emotional contagion. How long does the particular emotion stay with you? NC: In the Hazda, we didn’t study emotional contagion, but we studied other types of similar behaviors like altruism and cooperation. Our work on emotional contagion picks up on older literature on emotional contagion that goes back decades. In fact, people can look at emotional contagion in chimpanzees. We found that when your friends express an emotion — or become happy, for example — it affects the probability that you will become happy. The effect decays after about a year. We’re not talking about transient moods, which also happens — someone smiles at you and you smile back — which lasts a few seconds. We’re talking about a more sustained effect. These emotional effects do

not stop at one degree of separation. They appear to spread to your friends and your friend’s friend and your friend’s friend’s friend.

HS: Which is mind-boggling. NC: Yes. But that result has now been replicated using Twitter. If one person posts a happy tweet, it affects the people to whom they are connected. To be very clear, these are not huge effects. And I need to emphasize that we are not saying that all that is necessary for your happiness is for your friends to become happy. It is only that having happy friends does seem to affect the probability that you will become happy.

HS: How do the Hazdas handle those in the tribe who are unproductive or different? How do they discourage or encourage adaptive behavior that sustains their networks? NC: The tendency of the Hadza is to be cooperative. The data suggests that Hazda people get up and move away from uncooperative people. So altruists shun non-altruists, leaving them in the company of other defectors. HS: Considering the plasticity of the brain and how we can hotwire our brains to new thought patterns, if you were suddenly immersed in a group of very innovative thinkers, would you become more innovative?

of workers for things like innovation and energy. If your co-workers are energized, this can affect you, and it occurs in clusters and spreads within the co-worker network. Innovation and productivity in the workplace particularly show interpersonal influence.

HS: Knowing how humans seek out networks, what would be your ideal scenario for galvanizing positive change in the world? NC: It is possible to do two things to exploit networks to make the world better — manipulate the connections among people, rewiring social interactions and manipulating contagion between people, so leave the network intact, but target particular influential individuals for behavior change.

HS: Dennis Scholl, of The Knight Foundation, has spearheaded Random Acts of Culture, spontaneous performances that bring classical art to the people in very ordinary places — the supermarket, a library, a shopping mall. These acts not only offer shards of beauty within the quotidian but also are galvanizing if not transformative for the masses. I would say their emotional contagion carries a strong import. NC: And in principle we would expect that these interventions would not stop just with the participants. These participants go home and are in turn connected to other people. The ideas they have obtained and their sentiments can presumably spread and affect other people. A variety of public-policy interventions, whether they are health related, economic related or artistically related, have effects beyond the individuals to whom they are targeted. These effects spread through human social networks.

“HOW IS A FLOCK OF BIRDS ABLE TO NAVIGATE AND PULL THEIR WISDOM TO FIND A TINY SPECK OF AN ISLAND IN THE PACIFIC? CONNECTIONS MATTER. THE WHOLE IS GREATER THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS.”

NC: Yes. There is a company that has licensed some of the software and intellectual property from my lab called ActivateNetwork.net. They’ve looked at mapping networks

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“THE IDEA BEHIND RANDOM ACTS WAS TO REMIND PEOPLE HOW MUCH THEY CARE ABOUT THIS ART FORM WHETHER IT’S SYMPHONIC OR THE OPERA OR THE BALLET. WE ASK THEM TO PERFORM CLASSICS, THINGS PEOPLE KNOW, EVEN IF THEY ONLY KNOW IT IN THEIR SUBCONSCIOUS FROM WATCHING WALT DISNEY CARTOONS. WE WANT TO BE SURPRISED WITH WHERE THEY SEE THIS CLASSICAL PERFORMANCE AND HAVE IT SHOW UP IN A COMPLETELY OUT-OF-CONTEXT PLACE — A FARMERS MARKET, A SHOPPING MALL.” HS: What do you think of this, Dennis? Speaking of emotional contagion, I see Random Acts as transforming and galvanizing movements that can better the world.

WHEN HE SPEAKS Dennis Scholl will participate in “Making Cities Sing” with Rocco Landesman and Darren Walker at The Limelight Hotel at 10:30 a.m. on June 30.

DENNIS SCHOLL: Let me tell you something interesting about that. We did a study at Knight Foundation called “The Soul of the Community.” We did it in 26 communities in three consecutive years. We asked a simple question: What attaches you to your community? What makes you care about your community? What makes you want to be there? In all 26 communities in all three years, the one leading indicator that attaches people to their community was social offerings like arts and culture. Not jobs. Not the economy. The No. 1 thing was arts and culture.

HS: And this is the main thrust of The Knight Foundation? SCHOLL: We want art to be general. We believe that having art weaved into the fabric of a community will have a profound effect on how people feel about their community.

HS: It elevates the banal. Random Acts really hits the core essence of all of us. It’s archetypal. SCHOLL: That’s a good way of saying it. And that’s what Random Acts does. It helps us reach for that emotional resonance that we may not be getting in our day-to-day life.

HS: I’ve never seen a live Random Act. SCHOLL: There might be a little surprise on the morning of June 30.

FACTOID As of this publication, 536 Random Acts have been performed; the 70 uploaded online have collectively been viewed 10 million times.

DENNIS SCHOLL

THE KNIGHT FOUNDATION Dennis Scholl is the vice president of arts for The Knight Foundation, where he oversees its national arts program, including the Knight Arts Challenge and Random Acts of Culture. Scholl is also the founder of a series of initiatives dedicated to building the contemporary art collections of museums, including those at the Guggenheim, the Tate Modern and the Miami Art Museum. He is a two-time regional Emmy winner for his work in cultural documentaries. He is currently a Harvard University Advanced Leadership Initiative fellow.

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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS


MORE BIG IDEAS To find more information about these speakers and the rest of The Ideas Festival, visit www. aspenideas.org.

HS: When I think of your more “atmospheric” music, with its combination of varying elements, what do you think others are resonating with? For me, it’s like being suspended in water…

HS: Do you consider yourself an existentialist? MOBY: A big part of the human condition is our inability to have objective understanding of the universe in which we live. That’s the existential crisis. How do we make sense of the universe that seems to be 15 billion years old with our limited intellect and perception? The question is … how do we respond? Some people respond to that dilemma with despair. Some with elation or indifference. Not to sound too much like a grad student but to a large extent, we are all existentialists whether we know it or not.

WHEN HE SPEAKS: “MOBY In Conversation” will be held at 7:30 p.m. on June 29 at Belly Up.

Every time someone logs onto Facebook to see what their friends are up to they’re turning their back on the existential void. I accept that the universe is vast and beyond our comprehension and try not to be too concerned with it.

MOBY: This is going to sound esoteric and I don’t want to sound like a new age grad student, but a friend of mine has this idea that we have a bunch of different selves — our external selves that tend to be tough, cynical, aggressive. And a lot of pop culture plays to those selves — vanity and anger, cynicism. I have certainly made some music that plays to those, but I think the music that resonates with me the most is music that plays to a deeper self that is more vulnerable, more honest and more genuinely emotional- not covered in the armor of cynicism and anger.

HS: Does this quell the nerves before a big show? Knowing that you are part of this system which is incomprehensible and absurd to try to rationalize?

HS: Yes. It lends itself to a beautiful solitary moment. There’s something about it that makes me want to take a leisurely stroll through The Tuillerie Gardens…

MOBY: I don’t really get nervous performing anymore. Looking at the audience and being filled with a friendly, endearing sense of solidarity and compassion with people who, like me, are blindly stumbling along … Spending a couple of hours in a room with a bunch of other people and helping them feel better in the face of the existential void, then that seems pretty good to me.

MOBY: It comes from a more vulnerable place. That’s what resonates with me. We’re encouraged to buy into notions of youth and vanity. We spend so much time constructing those selves that the more honest, vulnerable selves get neglected. It’s when we find music or art or another person to connect with … then we respond even more powerfully.

“RODIN ONCE SAID, HE STARTS WITH A PIECE OF ROCK AND CHIPS AWAY AT EVERYTHING THAT DOESN’T LOOK LIKE WHAT HE’S TRYING TO SCULPT. MY APPROACH IS SORT OF REDUCTIONIST. WORK ON MUSIC UNTIL YOU END UP WITH SOMETHING THAT HAS AN EMOTIONAL QUALITY THAT I FIND COMPELLING.”

MOBY

MUSICIAN Moby is a musician and DJ. Currently he’s touring in support of his most recent album, “Destroyed,” as well as working closely with a variety of different charities, including the Humane Society and the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function. Moby released his first single, “Go,” in 1991 and has been making albums ever since. His own records have sold more than 20 million copies worldwide, and he also has produced and remixed scores of other artists, including David Bowie, Metallica, the Beastie Boys, and Public Enemy, among others. Moby has toured extensively, playing more than 3,000 concerts in his career.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/LITERATURE

DON’T BRUSH OFF THIS SUMMER THE ARTS SCENE IS KICKING, AND HERE ARE A FEW LOCALS’ RECOMMENDATIONS there’s a lot to see, hear and do in the

Aspen summer. So much that getting insiders to agree on what the highlights are is near to impossible. Everyone’s got their own must-see opera, exhibition, concert, movie.¶ So is there any consensus at all? A bit: “Avenue Q,” the Tony Award-winning musical with puppets, being staged by Theatre Aspen; and Mumford & Sons, the British folk-rock It-band, making its valley debut at Jazz Aspen Snowmass’ Labor Day Festival, seem to be hot tickets. ¶ Here’s a look at what some people inside the Aspen arts community have marked on their calendars. One view that is unanimous: For an arts lover, it’s hard to go wrong in the Aspen summer. NATALIE LACY, PROGRAMS DIRECTOR, ASPEN WRITERS’ FOUNDATION

KARA WALKER (July 19, Anderson Ranch Arts Center): I first saw Kara’s work while I was studying art in college, and since have never ceased to be drawn to it. I’m captivated by her stark, ornately crafted scenes and moved by the themes of repression and race that she portrays. Her ability to narrate haunting, grotesque realities of our country’s history through seemingly playful silhouettes is extremely powerful, and an inspiration to artists everywhere. PICNIC AT THE TENT (Aug. 5, Benedict Music Tent): The perfect Aspen Sunday usually begins with a hike followed by a warm, sunny afternoon picnic in the lawn at the Music Tent. The Aspen Music Festival and School has a stellar season lined up, and I am particularly excited to perch on my blanket with food and wine in hand and hear cellist Alisa Weilerstein play a concerto by one of my favorite composers, Dvorák. MUMFORD & SONS (Sept. 1, Jazz Aspen Snowmass Labor Day Festival): This London band’s ballads and triumphant lyrics resonate with any listener. They swooped into the scene and

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rose to the top with their album “Sigh No More” and I’m thrilled to be able to close the summer and see them perform amidst the backdrop of Snowmass. “AVENUE Q” (opening June 25, Theatre Aspen): I am one of many who are ecstatic to have this witty puppet show grace the stages of Theatre Aspen. It’s smart, it’s funny, and it keeps you singing its songs long after the show is over.

DICK CARTER, ARTIST MUMFORD & SONS ((Sept. 1, Jazz Aspen Snowmass Labor Day Festival): Wow. These guys burst onto the scene with a soulful mix of folk and rock wailing like a hurricane. Great to see a very basic acoustic small band writing beautiful intense lyrics and sensational melodies take it to the top. JAMES CASEBEER (Aug. 18 lecture, Anderson Ranch Arts Center): I love this dude’s work. Amazing photographs of small towns and suburban architecture and life shot from tabletop models that are at once somewhat nostalgic and darkly tragic. Amazingly beautiful and informing work. CHRIS ISAAK (July 17, Belly Up) and Joe Walsh (Aug. 18, Belly Up): Chris Isaak — a great singer-songwriter and I think maybe the reincarnation of Roy

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

Work by local photographer Alan Becker, including images of Hunter S. Thompson, will show during July at the Woody Creek Community Center. The exhibition opens with a reception on July 3.

Orbison. And then Joe Walsh — the original Rocky Mountain High guru. Guitar master, Presidential candidate, an Eagle, a great catalogue of top notch tunes. And he’s very funny to boot. THE CERAMICS OF LUCIO FONTANA (July 27-Oct. 7, Aspen Art Museum): An exhibit at the Art Museum in conjunction with a panel discussion, Aug. 4, at Anderson Ranch. This guy has always been a favorite of mine from the time I started painting in the ‘60’s. A

big influence for me. A visceral, provocative painter…. what artist doesn’t want to take a knife and slash their paintings now and then? But that’s another story. Now we get to see his ceramics. I was unaware of this aspect of his work and it will be a great treat to have this show and discussion here this summer.

GRAM SLATON, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WHEELER OPERA HOUSE

COURTESY WOODY CREEK COMMUNITY CENTER


by STEWART OKSENHORN

“AVENUE Q”: I’m always looking forward to opening nights at Theatre Aspen, and this year in particular for “Avenue Q,” which is a show that is kind of legendary in the industry for how it got started (basically as an in-house after-show for muppet puppeteers) and I’d love to see how it plays to an Aspen crowd. BLUE SKY RIDERS (June 28, Belly Up): Certainly looking forward to Blue Sky Riders at the Belly Up, particularly as the Wheeler had this new Kenny Loggins project in one of its very first performances at our 2012 7908 Festival and they’ve had several more months now to write and play together. ASPEN OPERA THEATER CENTER SEASON(various dates through summer): I’m looking forward to a lot of performances at the Aspen Music Festival this summer, with its “Made In America” theme. And the opera season — the idea of “Sweeney Todd” (July 26, 28 and 30) at the Wheeler and of course the Western U.S. debut of “The Great Gatsby” (Aug. 16 and 18, Wheeler) means that the Opera Theatre season could be a real stand-out year. And really looking forward to seeing what Robert Spano can do as he settles into his first year at the artistic helm of the Music Festival. MOUNTAINSUMMIT: (Aug. 23-26): As a final shameless plug, we know that this year’s MountainSummit festival will be outstanding, with some really brilliant surprises. It’s our fourth year and we think it’s the perfect complement to a week that starts with the USA Pro Cycling Challenge bike race.

THE JOEL SOROKA GALLERY (400 E. Hyman Ave.) has the best photography collection in town. I’m continually awed with each visit and always enjoy his New York vibe and insight on art. ALAN BECKER PHOTOGRAPHS (All of July, Woody Creek Community Center): The never-before seen Hunter S. Thompson portraits and Indian urbanscapes from local photographer Alan Becker. KARA WALKER: Kara’s known for her room-size tableaux of black cutpaper silhouettes that muse on race, sexuality, slavery, gender, violence. A strong cup of coffee. And vital for any lover of contemporary art.

BRUCE BERGER, WRITER

THE FIRST AND LAST SUNDAY CONCERTS of the Aspen Music Festival at the Music Tent are especially interesting. The first (July 1) has Bartók and Rachmaninoff, both big, popular pieces. And the last concert (Aug. 19) is Symphony of a Thousand. Mahler was a maximalist and this is his biggest piece of all. It’s rarely done for the obvious reason that it takes an army to put it on.

AND I’VE GOT A FEW

COMMUNITY CENTER

PICKS OF MY OWN.

“JOE PAPP IN FIVE ACTS (July 2, New Views: Documentaries and Dialogue series, Paepcke Auditorium): Pass is the embodiment of street cool. An inspiration. How could you not love someone who founded New York’s Public Theater and free Shakespeare in the Park?

“SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN” (Aug. 13, New Views series, Paepcke Auditorium): Two young South Africans try to find out what became of their rock ‘n’ roll hero: Rodriguez, a Detroit musician who sang of social injustice, put out two albums in the early ‘70s, and then faded away. Or did he? The

PHOTOS BY STEWART OKSENHORN

LUCIEN BARBARIN & THE NEW ORLEANS RHYTHM REVUE (July 6-7, JAS Café Downstairs@the Nell): The JAS Café has turned into an excellent jazz room, and this one should light the place up. Barbarin, a New Orleans trombonist, was last seen in Aspen as a featured member of Harry Connick, Jr.’s band at the 2010 Jazz Aspen June Festival; he also tours with the iconic Preservation Hall Jazz Band. Expect a deep whiff of southern Louisiana. EDGAR MEYER, CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND DOUBLE BASS (July 13, Benedict Music

MEATBALL SHACK (312 S. Mill St.): Meatballs? Nothing but meatballs? Someone’s got some balls. And I can’t wait to try them. HARRY SHEARER (Aspen Ideas Festival, June 27-July 3): I have no idea what Shearer — filmmaker, New Orleans activist, “Simpsons” cast member, creator of the long-running radio program “Le Show” — is going to be speaking about at Ideas Fest. And I don’t care. As long as he does it in Mr. Burns’ voice MERLE HAGGARD (Aug. 28, Belly Up): If Merle plays “Sing Me Back Home,” his heart-breaking tune about a prisoner asking for a last song before he is put to death, I will turn to jelly

“SWEENEY TODD” and “THE GREAT GATSBY”: “Sweeney Todd” created a scandal when it came out, because of the subject matter. This was the most operatic thing Stephen Sondheim had done till then, and it’s very listenable. And “The Great Gatsby” — not much needs to be said about the novel, but John Harbison is a great composer and this has been on my list of things I want to see for years.

HILARY STUNDA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WOODY CREEK

documentary won an Audience Award at Sundance; a panel will discuss the film following the screening.

British folk-rock band Mumford & Sons makes its valley debut Sept. 1 at the Jazz Aspen Snowmass Labor Day Festival.

Tent): Edgar Meyer, the profoundly gifted bassist, composer and Aspen Music Festival hero, performs his new concerto with the Aspen Chamber Symphony. Need more? The violinist is another Aspen favorite, Joshua Bell. Still not rushing out to buy tickets? Conducting is Robert Spano, and the program is rounded out by Barber’s “Knoxville: Summer of 1915” and Schumann’s Symphony No. 4.

EMERSON STRING QUARTET (July 12, Harris Hall): The Emerson says goodbye to cellist David Finckel, who put 33 years into the stellar ensemble. The group goes out with a bang with a program of Shostakovich, Mozart and Thomas Adès. And yes, I am on board with “Avenue Q” and Mumford & Sons, both of which I expect to be brilliant.

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AROUNDASPEN

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

FOOD & WINE IN ASPEN IT WAS THE TH YEAR for Food & Wine in Aspen, and what an anniversary party it was! I’m not going to write much this week as I want to get many photos in of everyone having such a good time. Jennifer McLellan, of Aspen, graduated from Tulane University in New Orleans on MARY May 19. She earned a ESHBAUGH HAYES Bachelor of Arts degree from the School of Liberal Arts. Undercurrent ... What a beautiful, sunny weekend for Food & Wine. I remember years when it snowed, and one year it rained so hard that attendees had to wear plastic bags on their feet! We lucked out this year!

30TH From left are Rob Price, importer Olivier Wittmann, of New York City, famous chef Jacques Pepin and Jean Claude Szurdak.

Editor’s note: We wanted to give Mary a special thanks this year for all the hard work she put in for our commemorative 30th-anniversary guide to the Food & Wine Classic. Her historic photos were priceless, and we did not do a good job of giving her credit for those in the guide. Thanks, Mary!

30TH From left are Marci Krivonen, of Aspen Public Radio, Jason Suavo and Carolyn Sackariason, editor of the Aspen Daily News.

30TH Laura Blocker, who has Paris Underground, and writer Mark Seal at the Welcome Party.

30TH

Chef Spike Mendelsohn served up fabulous Fish & Chips at the Welcome Party.

30TH Dana Cowin, editor of Food & Wine magazine, was interviewing personality chef Andrew Zimmern.

30TH 30TH In the big tent during the Grand Tastings, the booth for best new chefs was always crowded.

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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

Aspen caterers always attend the Welcoming Party for Food & Wine in the gardens at the St. Regis Aspen. From left are Margi and Peter O’Grady and Kim Decarlo.

P H OTO S B Y M A RY E S H BA U G H H AY E S


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CRAIG WARD 970.379.1254 Cell Craig.Ward@sothebysrealty.com AspenSnowmassSIR.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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30TH From left at a Grand Tasting are Joe Dunn, Nancy Boenning and Sam Mosher.

30TH Chef Jose Andres sampled many of the wines in the Spainish tent.

30TH From left are Jill Cicinato, Julie Peters and Julie’s sister, Lizzie Dudley.

30TH

From left are Pamela Herr, Katy Etheridge and ChiChi Villaroz.

30TH Having a booth at the Grand Tasting were, from left, Wesley Benter, Gil Vanderaa and Emily Kolbe, of Brunelleschi’s Aspen Restaurant.

30TH Pegg and Ron Lehnowsky with Pegg showing her Hayes bracelet.

30TH From left are Nick Richards, John Wheeler and Mary Kenyon.

30TH From left are Sam Louras, Jane Kindall and Sam’s daughter, Jenn Louras, of Seattle.

30TH From left are Jean Robert, Erik Klanderud and Peggy Briscoe.

30TH

From left at a Grand Tasting are Paul Tadune, chef Javier Gonzalez Bringas, of Tempranillo Restaurant in Basalt, and Rick Jones.

30TH 30TH

Jennifer Blocker and Maurice Eaton.

Thrift Shop ladies enjoying a Grand Tasting are Sue Kolbe on the left and Nancy Gensch.

30TH Don and Jill Sheeley.

30TH 30TH Virginia and Rick Newton.

At their booth from Jimmy’s Aspen Restaurant are Erin Harris shaking up a margarita and Chris Kelner.

30TH Sculptor John Doyle, left, with architect Jeff Halferty.

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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

P H OTO S B Y M A RY E S H BA U G H H AY E S


CURRENTEVENTS LIVE ENTERTAINMENT THURSDAY, JUNE 28 Aspen Music Festival Highlights 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Benedict Music Tent. New Music Director Robert Spano opens the season with “A Gershwin Celebration,” featuring Gershwin’s definitive jazz concertos. Call 970-925-9042. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 8 p.m. - 10 p.m., Sneaky’s Tavern, Snowmass Base Village Plaza. Live music after the free concert on Fanny Hill. Call 970-923-8787. Karaoke 10 p.m. - 10 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Live karaoke with Hugh. Call 970-925-9955. Kenny Loggins 10 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Grammy winning, multi-platinum selling artist that has been called the “king of movie theme songs” (Rolling Stone) thanks to his smashes like “I’m Alright” (from Caddyshack), “Footloose” (from Footloose) and “Danger Zone” (from Top Gun). Call 970-544-9800.

JUNE 28-JULY 4, 2012

Aspen Music Festival Highlights 8 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., Harris Concert Hall Chamber music. featuring the American Brass Quintet, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Anton Nel and Wu Han. Call 970-925-9042. Aspen Players Association 9 p.m. - 11:59 p.m., The Hunter Bar, Aspen. Singer/ songwriter musicians circle followed by “the Wild Wesy Show” invitational artist showcase. Call 970-274-9078. Boo Coo 7 p.m. - 11 p.m., St. Regis ResortAspen, Shadow Mountain Lounge. Live local music on Friday and Saturday nights, featuring local duo Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-920-3300. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 9 p.m., The Brick Pony, 202 Midland Ave., Basalt. Live music on Saturdays. Call 970-279-5021.

NorthYSur with Josefina and Jeremy 7 p.m. - 10 p.m., Hotel Jerome, Aspen. NorthYSur, a creation of Josefina Mendez and Jeremy Fleisher, blends the sounds of traditional North and South American jazz and bossa nova. Call 970-379-4676. Avenue Q at Theatre Aspen 7:30 p.m. - 9:45 p.m., The Hurst Theatre, 505 Rio Grande Park, Aspen. This musical comedy won Tony Awards for best musical, best score and best book. Go to www.theatreaspen. org/productions for ticket information. Call 970-925-9313. SUNDAY, JULY 1 Sopris Mountain Ranch Polo Tournament 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., 3706 W. Sopris Creek Road, Basalt. Free. Bring coolers and lawn chairs, and watch polo players battle it out for the Sopris Cup. Friendly dogs on leashes

TUESDAY, JULY 3 The Flying Debris Show 1 p.m. - 2 p.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. Juggler Richard Holmgren presents a show filled with zany stunts and lots of laughs. For children in grades 1-4. Call 970-429-1900.

Boo Coo 7 p.m. - 11 p.m., St. Regis ResortAspen, Shadow Mountain Lounge. Live local music on Friday and Saturday nights, featuring local duo Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-920-3300.

Aspen Music Festival Highlights 8 p.m. - 10 p.m., Harris Concert Hall. David Finckel and Wu Han perform a program including works by Strauss, Messiaen and Chopin. Call 970-925-9042.

Electric Lemon 8 p.m. - 11 p.m., Carbondale Beer Works, 647 Main St., Carbondale. One of Carbondale’s favorite blues bands returns to rock Main Street and Carbondale Beer Works. Call 970-704-1216.

Haden Gregg and Friends 7 p.m. - 9:30 p.m., L’Hostaria, 620 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen. Live music every Tuesday. Call 970-925-9022. Z-Trip 9:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Fans voted him “America’s Best DJ” in 2009, beating out more than 100 other contenders in DJ Times’ annual readers poll. He’s an originator of the mash-up genre. Call 970-544-9800.

JAS Cafe 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Downstairs at The Little Nell, Aspen. Cyrille Aimee and Diego Figueiredo perform at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Call 970-920-4996. Moby Acoustic Band & Moby (DJ Set) 9:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. An American musician and DJ who first gained fame in the early ‘90s with his electronic dance music is touring in support of last year’s release, “Destroyed.” He’s sold more than 20 million albums worldwide. Call 970-544-9800.

PHOTO BY ALEX IRVIN

MONDAY, JULY 2 Aspen Music Festival Highlights 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., Harris Concert Hall. Chamber music featuring works by Bernard Rands, Copland and Mozart. Call 970-925-9042.

Avenue Q at Theatre Aspen 7:30 p.m. - 9:45 p.m., The Hurst Theatre, 505 Rio Grande Park, Aspen. This musical comedy won Tony Awards for best musical, best score and best book. Go to www.theatreaspen. org/productions for ticket information. Call 970-925-9313.

FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Aspen Music Festival Highlights 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., Benedict Music Tent, Aspen. Aspen Chamber Symphony performance led by Nicholas McGegan, featuring Beethoven’s Eighth Symphony. Call 970-925-9042.

SATURDAY, JUNE 30 Sopris Mountain Ranch Polo Tournament 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., Sopris Mountain Ranch, 3706 W. Sopris Creek Road, Basalt. Free. Bring coolers and lawn chairs. Watch polo players battle it out for the Sopris Cup. Friendly dogs on leashes welcome. Games benefit the Perfect Unions Animal Rescue and C.A.R.E. An adoptathon will be held field side during the games to raise money for the shelters and to find great dogs new homes. Call 970-355-9811.

Tom Ressel 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., Peach’s Cafe, 121 S. Galena St., Aspen. Acoustic music on the patio. Call 970-544-9866.

Open Mic Night 9:30 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Check out what Aspen’s songwriters and musicians have to offer. Call 970-925-9955.

Avenue Q at Theatre Aspen 7:30 p.m. - 9:45 p.m., The Hurst Theatre, 505 Rio Grande Park, Aspen. This musical comedy won Tony Awards for best musical, best score and best book. Call 970-925-9313.

Avenue Q at Theatre Aspen 7:30 p.m. - 9:45 p.m., The Hurst Theatre, 505 Rio Grande Park, Aspen. This musical comedy won Tony Awards for best musical, best score and best book. 970-925-9313.

Jes Grew featuring The Broccoli Bros. Horns 9:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen. Jes Grew is an eclectic rock ‘n’ roll band out of Aspen, which derives it’s name from the 1972 novel “Mumbo Jumbo” by Ishmael Reed. The band has been entertaining in the Aspen area for more than a decade, playing originals and classic rock songs with their own twist, and sharing the bill with acts such as Widespread Panic, Warren Haynes, Taj Mahal, Trey Anastasio, Sam Bush, John Oates and Rusted Root. Call 970-544-9800.

Blues Traveler 10 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. This band has released a total of nine studio albums, four of which have gone gold, three platinum and one six-times platinum. Their song “Run-Around” was the longestcharting radio single in Billboard history and earned the band a Grammy for Best Rock Performance by a duo or group with vocals. Call 970-544-9800.

Snowmass Free Concert Series 6:15 p.m. - 7:45 p.m., Fanny Hill, Snowmass Village. Outdoor concert series opens with Firefall, the Boulder-based soft-rock group whose biggest hits, “You Are the Woman” and “Just Remember I Love You,” date back to the mid’70s. Blankets and picnics OK; libations must be purchased on the concert grounds. Call 1-800-766-9627.

Red Stinger 9 p.m. - 10 p.m., Carnahan’s Tavern, Carbondale. Denver-based ska/punk/rock/hip-hop/metal fusion rockers return for their third appearance at Carnahan’s. Call 970-618-1156.

edited by RYAN SLABAUGH

Avenue Q at Theatre Aspen 7:30 p.m. - 9:45 p.m., The Hurst Theatre, 505 Rio Grande Park, Aspen. This musical comedy won Tony Awards for best musical, best score and best book. Go to www.theatreaspen. org/productions for ticket information. Call 970-925-9313.

HEAR Robert Spano opens his first season as music director of the Aspen Music Festival and School, conducting an opening-night Gershwin Celebration on Thursday, June 28, and the Aspen Festival Orchestra concert on Sunday, July 1. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 4 p.m. - 7 p.m., Limelight Hotel, 355 S. Monarch St., Aspen. Live music. Call 970-925-3025. JAS Cafe 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m., Downstairs at The Little Nell, Aspen. Hot Club of Detroit at 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Call 970-920-4996. Moby, live acoustic band and DJ set 9:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S Galena St. Moby started making music when he was 9 years old, playing classical guitar and studying music theory before going on to play with seminal Connecticut hardcore punk group The Vatican Commandoes when he was 14. He then played with post-punk band Awol while studying philosophy at the University of Connecticut and Suny Purchase. He started DJ’ing while attending college, and was a fixture in the late ‘80s New York house and hip-hop scenes. Call 970-544-9800.

welcome. Games benefit the Perfect Unions Animal Rescue and C.A.R.E. An adopt-a-thon will be held during the event to raise money for the shelters and to find great dogs new homes. Call 970-355-9811. Aspen Music Festival Highlights 4 p.m. - 6 p.m., Benedict Music Tent, Aspen. Robert Spano leads the Aspen Festival Orchestra with guest artist Gerrick Ohlsson performing Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in D minor. Call 970-925-9042. Chuck Prophet 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., Sopris Park, Carbondale. Carbondale’s Summer of Music kicks off with a performance by San Francisco singer-songwriter/indie artist Chuck Prophet and his band. Bring a blanket and picnic supper. Free. Call 970-963-1680.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 Aspen Music Festival Highlights 4 p.m. - 6 p.m., Benedict Music Tent. Free Fourth of July concert featuring patriotic favorites. Lawrence Isaacson conducts. Call 970-925-9042. Evening of Spanish Guitar 7:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m., Tempranillo Restaurant, Basalt. Spanish, flamenco and other guitar styles, under the sky in front of Tempranillo’s patio. Call 970-927-2433. Mayer Hawthorne & The County 9:30 p.m. - 11:55 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. “Hawthorne emerges with a jaw-dropping collection of classic soul,” says Rolling Stone. This Detroiter mixes Motown sound with ‘60s California pop. He’s touring in support of his new album, “How Do You Do,” is a trip through generations and features a duet with Snoop Dogg. Call 970-544-9800.

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THE ARTS THURSDAY, JUNE 28 Intermediate Ballet 9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., ASFB studios, downstairs at Colorado Mountain College, 0245 Sage Way, Aspen. Aspen Santa Fe Ballet offers intermediate adult ballet class. Drop-ins welcome. Call 970-925-7175 (ext. 106). FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Margo Manhattan Jewelry Trunk Show and Reception 5 p.m. - 8 p.m., LivAspenArt Gallery, 414 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. RSVP at info@livaspenart.com. Call 970-379-2539. MONDAY, JULY 2 Summer Art Camp Sign-up: Screen-Printing, Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. Registration in progress for Screen-Printing Art Camp: Chinese Calligraphy, Nature Designs, and More with Vidabeth Bensen on August 6-10 from 9 a.m. to noon, for ages 8-14 (or ages 6-7 with a parent). Registration is required. Cost is $100 plus $25 for art supplies. Members receive 10 percent off. Go to www.wylyarts.org to register. Call 970-927-4123. TUESDAY, JULY 3 Alan Becker Art Opening 6 p.m. - 8 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center. Featuring Hunter S. Thompson portraits. Call 970-9222342.

YOGA & EXERCISE THURSDAY, JUNE 28 Tot Karate 12:30 p.m. - 1:15 p.m., Aspen Recreation Center. Teaches children gross motor skills and hands-eye coordination. Ice skating will follow from 1:30-2:30 pm. Contact Elaine at 520-661-9243 or e-mail 460kozel@earthlink.net for more information. Call 520-661-9243. Introduction to Tai Chi/Qigong 9:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., Aspen Historical Society garden, 620 W. Bleeker St. Flowing movements for flexibility, balance, muscle tone, focus, relaxation, breathing, visualization and inner peace. Free class. Open to all levels, including beginners. Call 970-925-1130. Nia Class 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Sopris Park, Carbondale. An hour of cardiovascular movement that incorporates dance, martial arts and healing arts. By donation. Call 936870-8749. Rock Rats Climbing Class 4:15 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Aspen Recreation Department, 110 E. Hallam St. Climbing class for ages 6 and up, focusing on learning to climb and staying safe in the indoor climbing gym. The class does top roping, bouldering and plays games. Call 970-920-5140. Weekly Group Run 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Ute Mountaineer, 210 S. Galena St., Aspen. The Ute Mountaineer and Aspen Triathlon Club host (at no charge) a 30- to 60-minute run each Thursday (no charge). Explore trails (well known and unknown to many) in the immediate Aspen area. All levels of runners are welcome; a host runner from the Ute or the Aspen Triathlon Club will accompany differently paced groups. Call 970-925-2849. Yoga, Vinyasa Flow 10 a.m. - 11:15 a.m., Coredination 520 S 3rd St. Suite 7 Carbondale. Yoga, Vinyasa Flow class for all levels. Synthesizing dynamic postures(asanas)designed to increase core strength and range of motion.Become an instrument of expression and performance. Accentuate and balance your fitness goals. Call 970 379-8108. FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Aspen by Bike Tour 10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Wheeler/Stallard Museum, 620 W. Bleeker St., Aspen. A tour by bicycle that brings in Aspen’s Victorian West End, loops through the grounds of the Aspen Institute and winds through town to the original Lift One. Fee is $15 per adult and $12 for seniors; children 12 and under are free. Presented by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721.

38

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

West End Walking Tour 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m., Wheeler/Stallard Museum, 620 W. Bleeker St., Aspen. A stroll through Aspen’s Victorian West End with a focus on history and architecture; learn little-known facts about the homes themselves and the people who lived in them. Fee is $15 per adult and $12 per senior; children 12 and under free. Presented by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721. SATURDAY, JUNE 30 Half & Half 10K Mountain Challenge 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., Base Village, Snowmass Village. Walk or run this half bike path/half alpine trail 10K (6.2 mile) loop. Age group awards and post race give-a-ways. Call 970-544-1158. West End Walking Tour 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m., Wheeler/Stallard Museum, 620 W. Bleeker St., Aspen. A stroll through Aspen’s Victorian West End with a focus on history and architecture; learn little-known facts about the homes themselves and the people who lived in them. Fee is $15 per adult and $12 per senior; children 12 and under free. Presented by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721. Nia Bliss 4:30 p.m. - 6 p.m., Aspen Santa Fe Ballet Studio, Third Street Center, 520 Third Street, Carbondale. Loretta Milo, Nia faculty trainer, and JoAnn Scott, Nia brown belt, provide a day of Nia fun and bliss for students and Nia belt graduates. Fee is $15 for the public and $10 for Nia belt grads. Call 936-870-8749. Restorative Yoga 4 p.m. - 6 p.m., Aspen Health and Harmony. Faith Lipori leads an afternoon of deep release using techniques developed by Judith Hanson Lasater and others. All levels are welcome. Preregistration is required. Call 970-704-9642. Yoga: Moving Toward Steadiness 11 a.m. - 12 p.m., Aspen Health and Harmony, El Jebel. Faith Lipori leads yoga for people with Parkinson’s disease. Yoga increases flexibility, strength and balance, allowing for more ease of movement. A sense of well-being comes from the practice that can reduce the emotional aspects of Parkinson’s, such as depression, anxiety and fatigue. Open to those with Parkinson’s and their friends and caretakers. Call 970-704-9642. MONDAY, JULY 2 Aikido at CMC 7 p.m. - 8:30 p.m., Colorado Mountain College, Aspen campus. Aikido is an effective self-defense as well as a fun and dynamic work out. Class offered Mondays and Wednesdays. Beginners welcome. Try the first class for free. Call 970-379-4676. Coredination Ballet Class 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Coredination, 520 S. Third St., Carbondale. Classical ballet technique class, intermediate level. Emphasizing fundamentals of placement while encouraging freedom of expression through musicality and movement. Taught by Alexandra Jerkunica, professional ballet dancer and local choreographer. Call 970379-2187. Nia Class 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Sopris Park, Carbondale. An hour of cardiovascular movement that incorporates dance, martial arts and healing arts. By donation. Call 936870-8749. Rock Rats Climbing Class 4 p.m. - 5:30 p.m., Aspen Recreation Department, 110 E. Hallam St., Aspen. Climbing class for ages 6 and up, focusing on learning to climb and staying safe in the indoor climbing gym. The class does top roping, bouldering and plays games. Call 970-920-5140. TUESDAY, JULY 3 Intermediate Ballet 9 a.m. - 10:30 a.m., ASFB studios, downstairs at Colorado Mountain College, 0245 Sage Way, Aspen Aspen Santa Fe Ballet offers intermediate adult ballet class. Drop-ins welcome. Call 970-925-7175 (ext. 106).

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012

Summer Aikido Classes 7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m., Colorado Mountain College, Aspen Campus Aikido is great exercise for Mind, Body, and Spirit. Aikido is an effective self defense as well as a fun and dynamic work out. Aikido Aspen has been offering classes through CMC for over 10 years. Try the first class for free! All experience levels are welcome. Kids and parents are encouraged. For questions call 379-4676. Register for the class by calling CMC at 925-7740. AROCK for Kids 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Red Brick Center for the Arts, 110 E. Hallam St., Aspen. The City of Aspen takes kids, ages 8 and up, out on the real rocks. Join head climbing instructor Jeremy Graham on Independence Pass for a day of climbing. No experience or technical climbing equipment is needed to participate. Participants learn the basics of climbing safety, rope work and the leaveno-trace principals of outdoor recreation. The class does only top rope climbing in the outdoor setting and all participates wear helmets. Call 970-920-5140. Vinyasa Flow and Pilates Mat Classes 10 a.m. - 11 a.m., Coredination 520 S. Third St., Carbondale. Vinyasa flow yoga class for all levels at 10 a.m. Synthesizing dynamic postures (asanas) designed to increase core strength and range of motion. Pilates mat class, intermediate level, offered at noon. Increase internal core strength for joint support, mobility,spine alignment and muscle elasticity. Call 970-379-2187. Youth Karate 3:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Aspen Recreation Center. Weekly class in Tang Soo Do style. White and yellow belts (beginners) from 3:30-4:30 p.m., orange belts and up (advanced) from 4:30-5:30 p.m. Elaine Kozel is the certified instructor. $35 per month. Call 970-544-4100. WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 Boogie’s Diner Buddy 5-Mile Run 8 a.m. - 10 a.m., Race start/finish in front of Boogie’s Diner, Aspen. Annual event kicks off a day of Independence Day festivities in Aspen. Register online at www.buddyprogram.org or in person at Boogie’s Diner (from June 30-July 3). Fee is $40 in advance and $50 on race day. Proceeds benefit the Buddy Program. Call 970-920-2130.

THE COMMUNITY THURSDAY, JUNE 28 Gang Awareness Education 5:30 p.m. - 8 p.m., Basalt Regional Library. Presented by local law enforcement officers. Open to everyone. Call 970-927-4311. Aspen’s Past to Present 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., downtown Aspen. Indian legend, mining folklore and local tales bring Aspen’s history to life on a guided walk. Meet at the Wheeler Opera House. $20 per person; call 970-9484349. Call 970-948-4349. Free Physics Dialogue: “Love, Fear and Greed: Why We Should Go to the Asteroids” 5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m., Aspen Center for Physics, Sixth and Gillespie streets. Martin Elvis, of Harvard/Smithsonian, says a single asteroid could contain $35 billion in platinum. New space engineering and astronomical knowledge make exploring asteroids possible, even profitable. Call 970925-2585. Out-Of-This-World Summer Movies 1 p.m. - 2:30 p.m., Basalt Regional Library. Movies for kids at the library. Visit the library for a listing of the movies. Call 970-927-4311. FRIDAY, JUNE 29 Book Exchange 3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. Swap your read. For students in grades 5-8. Call 970-429-1900. SATURDAY, JUNE 30 Yappy Hour 3 p.m. - 5 p.m., Smoke Modern BBQ, 241 Harris St., Willits Town Center, Basalt. Featuring drink specials and more, with all proceeds going to Lucky Day Animal Rescue. Call 970-379-4606.

SEE Rock band Blues Traveler, led by singerharmonica player John Popper, plays Monday, July 2, at Belly Up. SUNDAY, JULY 1 Aspen Ideas Block Party 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Rio Grande Park, Aspen. A free event, featuring Aspen Ideas Fest speakers joining local Trade-show for Ideas for an interactive day of big ideas. Trade-show for Ideas is a collection of local exhibitors with dynamic ideas for the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond. Event themes: Arts and Culture: Do they matter?, Raising the 21st Century Child and Jobs & the Economy: Permanent Crisis? Presented by Roaring Fork Leadership. Bring blanket and umbrella; event takes place rain or shine. Music and food are part of the event. Call 805-455-4994. Bret Stephens: Does Israel Have a Future? 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m., Theatre Aspen’s Hurst Theatre. Rio Grande Park Award-winning journalist Bret Stephens is the foreign affairs columnist of The Wall Street Journal, as well as the deputy editor responsible for the editorial pages of the Wall Street Journal Asia and Europe. He will speak on current issues challenging Israel. Tickets available at the Wheeler Box Office or by calling 920-5770. MONDAY, JULY 2 Mac Monday 12 p.m. - 1 p.m., Basalt Regional Library. Get all your questions answered about the world of Mac. Call 970-927-4311. Creative Cooking — Snack Time 2 p.m. - 2 p.m., Aspen Youth Center. This class focuses on healthy snacks that kids can make themselves. Kids will cook, clean and then enjoy their culinary creation. Call 970-5444130. TUESDAY, JULY 3 LINX Networking Group 7 a.m. - 8:30 a.m., Chaffin and Light building, downtown Basalt. Weekly meeting of a business networking organization whose members work together to grow and promote their businesses. New members welcome. Call 970-309-8108. WEDNESDAY, JULY 4 Fourth of July Picnic and Family Art Activity 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m., Aspen Art Museum, 590 N. Mill St., Aspen. Join the museum after the Fourth of July parade for a free picnic and family art activity on museum grounds. Free barbecue from Hickory House and beer provided by New Belgium Brewing will be served. This year’s AMM parade float is designed by Los Angeles-based artist Mungo Thomson, who is known for his humorous, conceptually driven work. Call 970-9258050. Veterans Tribute 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Main Street, near Paepcke Park, Aspen. A tribute to U.S. military veterans — all vets invited to walk in the July 4 parade. Call 970-927-4194.

PHOTO BY STEWART OKSENHORN


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Lost on Friday June 22 4NBMMDBSECPBSECPY MBCFMFE.6-5*1-&9 $POUBJOTNPEFMBJS QMBOFQBSUTGSPN(FS NBOZ-PTUPOCJLF SPVUFCFUXFFO$PN NVOJUZ(BSEFOBOE ,PDI1BSL 1MFBTFDPOUBDU1BVM "OEFSTFO 



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http://www.aspenartmuseum.org/work_opportuni ties.html. Email letter/CV: hr@aspenartmuseum.org or mail to Aspen Art Museum, ATTN: Karen Johnsen, 590 North Mill Street, Aspen, CO 81611.

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Reporter Granby, Colorado

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Retail Sales Associate

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Development Assistant

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'SFODICVMMEPH 'FNBMFXFFLT$SFBN QJF",$SFHJTUFSFE(PPE OBUVSFETUTIPUT XPSNFE)FBMUI (VBSBOUFF "OHFMJOB BOJLJNB!HNBJMDPN -PWFMBOE

to mikeotte@aspencpa.com

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RENTED!

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RENTED!

Summer housing available now in Snowmass Village $550 per room

Tax CPA, Aspen, Co 0UUF$PUF$1"hT1$JT MPPLJOHGPSBOFXUFBN NFNCFSUPZFBST FYQFSJFODF-PDBMQSBD UJDFUBY MJUJHBUJPOTVQ QPSU BOEFTUBUF1FSNB OFOU XJUIBEWBODFNFOU BOEQBSUOFSTIJQQPUFO UJBM$PNQFOTBUJPO DPNNFOTVSBUF UZQJDBM CFOFGJUT FUD0GGJDFPO 3PBSJOH'PSL VQTUSFBN GSPN"TQFOSend Resume

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

41


#""#$4'0GGJDF $BMMPS 4FFXXXHVMMTUVEJPDPN GPSNPSF

3FOUBMT4UPSBHF4QBDF Aspen Secure Storage #FTUQSJDFTJOUIF""#$ YGUDBSQFUFEVOJUT 3JOH5FSSZ

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Hoarders be gone. Advertise your cleaning business in the Service Directory. Always in print and online. Classi№гЂeds@ cmnm.org.

3FBM&TUBUF

3FOUBMT0GGJDF4QBDF

3FBM&TUBUF(FOFSBM

-VDLZ4UBS.JOJOH$MBJN "DSFT4IFFQ.UO .BSCMF$0, 

Gosh, thanks. More than 71 percent of adults read a newspaper in print or online each week.

fact: The best source for Real Estate Information.

Source: January 2001 CDS Readership Survey

ASPEN

ASPEN

Aspen

"GGPSEBCMF SFNPEFMFE#3#"DPOEPJO UIF8FTU&OE(SBOJUFDPVOUFSTDBCJ OFUT EJOJOHOPPL VQHSBEFE#"4UPSBHF MPX)0" BTTJHOFEQBSLJOH(SFBUGJSTU IPNFPSSFOUBMQSPQFSUZ

Aspen Pied a Terre! #FTUEPXOUPXOMPDBUJPO IJHIFTURVBMJUZ -PXFTUQSJDF$POUFNQPSBSZ  SFNPEFMFE TUVEJPCBUIXJUICJH"TQFO .PVOUBJOWJFXT FYUSBTUPSBHF JOUPXOQBSLJOH

DOWNTOWN CONDOMINIUM -JHIU CSJHIUMBSHFTUVEJPXJUICVJMUJO NVSQIZCFE*OVOJUXBTIFSESZFS BT TJHOFEPGGTUSFFUQBSLJOHBOEMBSHFQSJ WBUFTUPSBHFVOJU-PX)0"GFFT8BML UPHPOEPMB$BMMUPTFFJUUPEBZ

Sally Shiekman-Miller, Morris & Fyrwald SIR 970-948-7530 Sally@SallyShiekman.com

$349,000 Call Tim Estin 970-309-6163 State of the Aspen Market www.EstinAspen.com Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

$515,850 Charley Podolak 970-948-0100 Aspen Snowmass Sotheby's Charley.Podolak@Sotheysrealty.com

ASPEN

ASPEN

BASALT

CARBONDALE

Top Floor Downtown Condo -BSHFUPQGMPPSPOFCFESPPNDPOEP0OMZ CMPDLTUPUIF(POEPMB1MFOUZPGOBUV SBMMJHIU1SJWBUFEFDLGBDJOHOPSUIXJUI WJFXTUP4NVHHMFS3FE.PVOUBJO 8PPECVSOJOHGJSFQMBDF HSBOJUFDPVOUFST BOEIBSEXPPEGMPPSTUISPVHIPVU $670,000 TOM CARR 970-379-9935 Leverich & Carr Real Estate XXXBTQFOSFJOGPDPN

Woody Creek 'BCVMPVT#%#"GBNJMZIPNFIPSTF QSPQFSUZJODPNFPQQPSUVOJUZPOBDSFT JO"TQFO4DIPPM%JTUSJDU8BMLUP5BWFSO 4FQBSBUF#%DBSFUBLFS"%6BOEPGGJDF BSUTUVEJPTUPSBHFTIFET;POFEGPS EVQMFYBOEIPNFCBTFECVTJOFTT $1,150,000 Shanta Heath (720)252-2256 Carol Dopkin Real Estate, Inc. Shanta@Caroldopkin.com XXXTIBOUBIFBUIDPN

Aspen Junction- Mountain Views (SFBUWBMVFGPSNJEWBMMFZCFESPPN TJOHMFGBNJMZIPNF.BHOJGJDFOUQBO PSBNJDWJFXTPWFSMPPLJOHUIF&NNB WBMMFZ3FNPEFMFELJUDIFO OFXDPVOUFS UPQT DBCJOFUT BOENPSF 4PVUIGBDJOH XJUIQMFOUZPGTVOBOEMJHIU $469,000 TOM CARR 970 379-9935 Leverich & Carr Real Estate XXXBTQFOSFJOGPDPN

CARBONDALE

COMMERCIAL-BASALT

COMMERCIAL - GYPSUM

REDSTONE

3FOPWBUFESBODITUZMF#%#"IPNF XPQFOGMPPSQMBO XPPEGMPPST HSBOJUF DPVOUFST TUBJOMFTTBQQMJBODFT DVTUPN DBCJOFUT VQHSBEFECBUIT XPPECVSOJOH '1 DBSHBSBHFQMVTFYUSBQBSLJOH EFDL GFODFEZBSE"DSPTTGSPNQBSLXBML JOHEJTUBODFUPEPXOUPXO$BSCPOEBMF Offered for $279,000 Sally Shiekman-Miller, CRS Aspen Snowmass Sothebys 970-948-7530 Sally@SallyShiekman.com

LAND FOR SALE 3BSFMZBWBJMBCMF TGDPNNFSDJBMMZ [POFEMPUXJOXBMLJOHEJTUBODFUP #BTBMU3PBSJOH'PSL3JWFS"MMPXT NJYFEVTFPGCVTJOFTTSFTJEFOUJBM &YDFMMFOUPQQPSUVOJUZ

&YDFMMFOUEFWFMPQNFOUPQQPSUVOJUZ GSPOUJOH)JHIXBZOFBS$PTUDPJO "JSQPSU(BUFXBZ$FOUFS BDSFTPGGMBUIJHIMZWJTJCMFMBOE

ASPEN

AABC 3 Bedroom Condo 5PQGMPPS CFESPPNDPSOFSVOJU$POWF OJFOUMPDBUJPOOFBSEPXOUPXO"TQFO MFTTUIBONJMFT BOEMPDBMTLJBSFBT SFNPEFMJODMVEJOHOFXQBJOU BEEFE XJOEPXT 1FSHPGMPPSJOH OFXDBCJOFUT BOEDPVOUFST TUBJOMFTTTUFFMBQQMJBODFT BOENPSF"TTJHOFEQBSLJOH $485,000 TOM CARR 970-379-9935 Leverich & Carr Real Estate XXXBTQFOSFJOGPDPN

ASPEN

HUNTER CREEK CONDO 1FBDFGVMHSPVOEGMPPSDPSOFS)VOUFS $SFFL#%#"DPOEPGBDJOHUIFXPPET BOEDSFFL8FMMNBJOUBJOFEXJUIVQEBUFE CBUITUPSBHFDMPTFU$MPTFUPMBVOESZ QPPM IPUUVCTUFOOJTDPVSUT JOBCFBVUJ GVMMZNBJOUBJOFEDPNQMFY"TQFO.PVO UBJOWJFXGSPNCFESPPN Offered for $399,000 Sally Shiekman-Miller, Morris & Fyrwald SIR 970-948-7530 4BMMZ!4BMMZ4IJFLNBODPN

Offered for $189,000 Sally Shiekman-Miller, CRS Aspen Snowmass Sothebys 970-948-7530 Sally@SallyShiekman.com

SNOWMASS

Offered for $399,000

Commercial Development

$1,399,000

Please call Chad Brasington, Prudential Colorado Properties DIBE!WBJMOFU

#%#"IPNFJO3FETUPOF4FDMVEFE 4R'UPQFODPODFQUDIBMFU"EEJ UJPOBMDPOWFSUFEBUUBDIFEDBSHBSBHF IVHFEFDL DIBSNJOHMPGUXCBMDPOZ SF DMBJNFEUJNCFST PBLGMPPST XPPEDFJM JOH OFXTFQUJD QSJWBUFXFMM JSSJHBUFE MBOETDBQFE Possible owner finance. $297,000 970-963-9620

Blue Creek Ranch CFE CBUIXJUIDBSHBSBHFBOE TFQBSBUFTUPSBHFVOJU0QFOGMPPSQMBO XJOEPXTHBMPSF TUPOFDPVOUFSUPQT TUBJOMFTTBQQMJBODFTBOE&VSPQFBO HMBTT1SPGFTTJPOBMMZMBOETDBQFEBOE MJHIUFE4FBTPOBMDSFFL WFHFUBCMFHBS EFO WJFXTUPPQFOTQBDF8BMLUPSJWFS BOE3JP(SBOE5SBJM

Price Reduced! $699,000 MLS#124519 Scott Bayens 970.948.2265 McKinley Sales

SNOWMASS VILLAGE

SEASONS FOUR #FBVUJGVMMZSFOPWBUFE#%#"TG WBVMUFEDFJMJOHTTLZMJHIUT TMBUF CBNCPPXPPEGMPPST VQHSBEFEOECBUI XPPECVSOJOH'1 8% TLJTUPSBHF )0"JODMIPUUVC QPPMDMVCIPVTF Offered for $399,000 Sally Shiekman-Miller, CRS Aspen Snowmass Sothebys 970-948-7530 Sally@SallyShiekman.com

Agents. Market Your business using inexpensive real estate photo ads!

Real estate ads in this section not only attract buyers but continue to brand your name and keep you top of mind for those who may need an agent in the future.

WOODBRIDGE #FBVUJGVMMZSFOPWBUFE#%#"TG DPOEPXLJUDIFOVQHSBEFTJODMHSBOJUF DPVOUFST TUBJOMFTTBQQMJBODFT UJMFGMPPST OFXCBUIT GVSOJTIFE HBT'1 WJFXPGTLJ BSFB$PNQMFYJODMQPPM IPUUVC MBVOESZ QBSLJOH Offered for $449,000 Sally Shiekman-Miller, Morris & Fyrwald SIR 970-948-7530 4BMMZ!4BMMZ4IJFLNBODPN

42

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

925-9937 Рђб www.aspentimes.com/placead Рюд

June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012


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A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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June 28 - Jul y 4, 2012


DIVISION 5 WATER COURT- MAY 2012 RESUME 3. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF MAY 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW72 GARFIELD COUNTY. ROARING FORK RIVER. Dale Eubank, LLC, c/o Patrick, Miller & Kropf, P.C., Kevin L. Patrick, Esq. and Laura C. Makar, Esq., 730 E. Durant Ave., Suite 200, Aspen, CO 81611, (970) 920-1028. APPLICATION FOR FINDING OF REASONABLE DILIGENCE AND TO MAKE ABSOLUTE. Name of structure: Dale Well. Type: Well. Well Permit No. 050080-F. Description of conditional water right: Date of original decree: June 8, 1999. Case No.: 95CW333, District Court, Water Division No. 5 (see also Case No. 98CW89). Subsequent diligence decrees: 05CW112, May 16, 2006. Legal description: The well is located n the SE ¼ of the SW ¼ of Section 36, Township 7 South, Range 88 West of the 6th P.M., at a point approximately 650 feet North of the South section line and 1750 feet East of the West section line of said Section 36 in Garfield County, Colorado. Source: Groundwater tributary to the alluvium of the Roaring Fork River, tributary to the Colorado River. Appropriation date: August 31, 1994. Total amount decree: 0.167 c.f.s. (75 g.p.m.). Amount absolute: 0.122 c.f.s. (55 g.p.m) for domestic and industrial uses. Amount remaining conditional: 0.045 c.f.s. (20 g.p.m.) for domestic and industrial uses. 0.167 c.f.s. (75 g.p.m.) for irrigation, commercial and fire protection uses. Use: Domestic, irrigation, commercial, industrial, and fire protection. General description of place of use: Applicant’s Carbondale Mini Storage in the SW ¼ of Section 36, Township 7 South, Range 88 West of the 6th P.M. in Garfield County. Depth: 140 feet. A detailed outline of work toward completion of the appropriation and application of water to a beneficial use as conditionally decreed, including expenditures is on file with the Court. Claim to make absolute. Date water applied to beneficial use: June 1, 2006. Amount: 75 g.p.m. Use: Irrigation, commercial, and fire protection purposes. Date water applied to beneficial use: June 1, 2006. Amount 20 g.p.m. (55 g.p.m. previously made absolute, an additional 20 g.p.m. requested to be made absolute). Use: Domestic and industrial uses. Description of place of use where water is applied to beneficial use: Carbondale Mini-Storage in the SW ¼ of Section 36, Township 7 South, Range 88 West of the 6th P.M. in Garfield County. Applicant owns the land upon which the structure is located and upon which the water will be used. (14 pgs.) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of JULY 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 7. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF MAY 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW76 PITKIN COUNTY. WOODY CREEK. Donald Delise, c/o Patrick, Miller & Kropf, P.C., Paul L. Noto, Esq. and Laura C. Makar, Esq., 730 E. Durant Ave., Suite 200, Aspen, CO 81611, (970) 920-1028. APPLICATION FOR FINDING OF REASONABLE DILIGENCE AND TO MAKE ABSOLUTE. First Claim to Make Absolute. Name of structure: Delise Pond Well. Type: Well. Well permit no. 67408-F. Description of conditional water right: Date of original decree: May 16, 2006. Case No.: 04CW154, District Court, Water Division No. 5. Legal description: NW ¼ of the SE ¼, Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 85 West of the 6th P.M., at a point approximately 2450 feet North of the South Line and 2100 feet West of the East Line. Source: Groundwater tributary to Woody Creek, a tributary of the Roaring Fork River. Appropriation date: September 15, 2002. Amount: 1.5 acre feet, conditional, with total annual evaporative losses of 1.485 acre feet from 0.482 acre of surface area. Use: Aesthetic, recreation, piscatorial and fire protection. Depth: 8 feet. A detailed outline of what has been done toward completion of the appropriation and application of water to a beneficial use as conditionally decreed is included with the application. Applicant owns the land upon which any new diversion or storage structure, or modification to any existing diversion storage structure is or will be constructed or upon which water is or will be stored, including any modification to the existing storage pool. Claim to make absolute: Date of water applied to beneficial use: September 1, 2003. Amount: 1.5 acre feet. Use: Aesthetic, recreation, piscatorial and fire protection. Description of place of use where water is applied to beneficial use: NW ¼ of the SE ¼, Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 85 West of the 6th P.M. Second Claim to Make Absolute. Name of structure: Delise Augmentation Pond. Type: Reservoir. Description of conditional water right: Date of original decree: May 16, 2006. Case No.: 04CW154, District Court, Water Division No. 5. Legal description: NW ¼ of the SE 1/4 , Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 85 West of the 6th P.M., at a point approximately 2420 feet North of the South Line and 1920 feet West of the East Line. Name and capacity of ditch used to fill reservoir, and legal description of each point of diversion: Filled from diversions from an unnamed ditch diverting from Woody Creek, with a capacity of approximately 1 c.f.s., which has a point of diversion located in the NW1/4 of the SE1/4, Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 85 West of the 6th P.M., at a point approximately 2310 feet North of the South Line and 1700 feet West of the East line. Source: Woody Creek, a tributary of the Roaring Fork River. Appropriation date: June 1, 2004. Amount: 0.874 acre feet, conditional. Rate of diversion in c.f.s. for filling the reservoir: Approximately 1.0 c.f.s. Use: Aesthetic and augmentation purposes. Surface area of high water line: 0.175 acre. Maximum height of dam: Less than 10 feet. Length of dam: Less than 150 feet. Total capacity of reservoir: 0.874 acre feet. Active capacity: 0.874 acre feet. Dead storage: 0.0 acre feet. A detailed outline of what has been done toward completion of the appropriation and application of water to a beneficial use as conditionally decreed is included with the application. Applicant owns the land upon which any new diversion or storage structure, or modification to any existing diversion storage structure is or will be constructed or upon which water is or will be stored, including any modification to the existing storage pool. Claim to make absolute: Date of water applied to beneficial use: August 12, 2010. Amount: 0.874 acre feet. Use: Aesthetic and augmentation purposes. Description of place of use where water is applied to beneficial use: NW ¼ of the SE ¼, Section 15, Township 9 South, Range 85 West of the 6th P.M. Applicant requests that in the event the Court does not confirm Applicant’s claims to make absolute listed above, the Court in the alternative confirm a finding of reasonable diligence for any amounts and uses remaining conditionally decreed to the Delise Pond Well and Delise Augmentation Pond. (13 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of JULY 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water

Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601 13. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF MAY 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW84 GARFIELD COUNTY; Application to Make Water Right Absolute and/or for Findings of Reasonable Diligence. Applicant: Larry D. Giroux; please direct all correspondence to Applicant’s attorneys: Sherry A. Caloia, LLC, 1204 Grand Ave., Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, (970) 945-6067; megeiger@caloia.net. Name of structure which Applicant seeks to make absolute: Kelso Ditch, Hays Enlargement; Original decree: Case No. 05CW56, entered on May 1, 2006, in the District Court in and for Water Division No. 5. Location: the approximate location of the point of diversion is at a point on the North bank of the Roaring Fork River at a point whence the East Quarter Corner Section 27, Township 7 South Range 88 West, 6th P.M. bears North 73 degrees, 31’ East 3,425 feet, located approximately 1900 feet from the west section line and 1640 feet from the South section line of said Section 27, Garfield County, Colorado. Source: the Roaring Fork River tributary to the Colorado River. Appropriation date: January 1, 2005. Amount: .10 c.f.s., conditional. Uses: Irrigation and Stockwater. Irrigation of up to 1.5 acres on Applicant’s property located in section 27, Township 7 South, Range 88 West 6th P.M. Date applied to beneficial use: March 2010 for stockwatering, September 15, 2010, for irrigation by replacement of irrigation system and use to water 1.5 acres of Applicant’s property. Name and address of owners of land where point of diversion is located: Applicant. The Application contains a detailed outline of work performed during the diligence period toward the development of the subject water right and application thereof to beneficial use. (4 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of JULY 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 14. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF MAY 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW85 (05CW133). IN GARFIELD COUNTY. APPLICATION FOR FINDING OF REASONABLE DILIGENCE AND TO MAKE WATER RIGHTS ABSOLUTE. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION FOR WATER RIGHTS OF CRYSTAL RIVER RANCH CO., LLP, IN GARFIELD COUNTY, COLORADO. DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION NO. 5, STATE OF COLORADO, 109 8th Street, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 1. Name, Address, and Telephone Number of Applicant: Crystal River Ranch Co., LLP, c/o Sue Anschutz Rodgers, 555 17th Street, Suite 2400, Denver, CO 80202. Direct all pleadings to: Glenn E. Porzak, William D. Wombacher, Porzak Browning & Bushong LLP, 929 Pearl Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302. 2. Name of Structures. (a) Hunter Spring (b) Little Buck Spring (c) Indian Spring (d) Red Gate Spring (collectively, the “Springs”) Remark: The locations of the structures listed above and described below in Paragraph 3 can be seen on the map attached herein as Exhibit A. 3. Description of the Conditional Water Rights. The following water rights were decreed by the District Court in and for Water Division No. 5, State of Colorado (the “Water Court”) on April 20, 1999, in Case No. 98CW043. Diligence was subsequently found in Case No. 05CW133. (a) HUNTER SPRING (i) Decreed Location: Section 17, Township 6 South, Range 87 West of the 6th P.M., at a point 4600 feet from the East Section Line and 1975 feet from the South Section Line of said Section 17. (ii) Source: Tributary to West Coulter Creek, tributary to Coulter Creek, tributary to Cattle Creek, tributary to the Roaring Fork River, tributary to the Colorado River. (iii) Appropriation Date: 1992. (iv) Amount: 1.0 c.f.s., conditional. (v) Uses: Domestic, livestock watering and irrigation. Hunter Spring will irrigate approximately 100 acres in the SW¼SE¼, SE¼SW¼ of Section 17, Township 6 South, Range 87 West of the 6th P.M. (b) LITTLE BUCK SPRING (i) Decreed Location: Section 20, Township 6 South, Range 87 West of the 6th P.M. at a point 1650 feet from the East Section Line and 1650 feet from the South Section Line of said Section 20. (ii) Source: Tributary to West Coulter Creek, tributary to Coulter Creek, tributary to Cattle Creek, tributary to the Roaring Fork River, tributary to the Colorado River. (iii) Appropriation Date: 1992. (iv) Amount: 15 g.p.m. (0.033 c.f.s.), conditional (v) Uses: Domestic, livestock watering and irrigation. Little Buck Spring will irrigate one acre immediately downstream of its point of diversion. (c) INDIAN SPRING (i) Decreed Location: Section 20, Township 6 South, Range 87 West of the 6th P.M. at a point 2575 feet from the East Section Line and 475 feet from the South Section Line of said Section 20. (ii) Source: Tributary to West Coulter Creek, tributary to Coulter Creek, tributary to Cattle Creek, tributary to the Roaring Fork River, tributary to the Colorado River. (iii) Appropriation Date: 1992. (iv) Amount: 15 g.p.m. (0.033 c.f.s.), conditional (v) Uses: Domestic, livestock watering and irrigation. Indian Spring will irrigate one acre immediately downstream of its point of diversion. (d) RED GATE SPRING (i) Decreed Location: Section 29, Township 6 South, Range 87 West of the 6th P.M., at a point 1700 feet from the East Section Line and 1175 feet from the North Section Line of said Section 29. (ii) Source: Tributary to West Coulter Creek, tributary to Coulter Creek, tributary to Cattle Creek, tributary to the Roaring Fork River, tributary to the Colorado River. (iii) Appropriation Date: 1992. (iv) Amount: 15 g.p.m. (0.033 c.f.s.), conditional (v) Uses: Domestic, livestock watering and irrigation. Red Gate Spring will irrigate one acre immediately downstream of its point of diversion. 4. Detailed outline of work done to complete project and apply water to beneficial use. During the subject diligence period, Applicant has engaged in the following activities: (1) Applicant installed and has maintained collection and drinking tanks at the Little Buck Spring, Indian Spring, and Red Gate Spring. These tanks are supplied by a hydrant system which controls diversions and provides a water supply for 1600 head of cattle. Costs associated with the engineering and construction of this system exceeded $16,000. (2) Water has also been diverted from Hunter Spring into a natural collection tank which is subsequently consumed by 1600 head of cattle. Moreover, Applicant operates the Hunter Spring such that excess livestock water flows down gradient providing natural irrigation to surrounding grazing lands that is utilized by the 1600 cattle which graze the area. (5) Claim to Make Water Rights Absolute. As detailed in Paragraph 4, the Applicant has placed each of the Springs to beneficial use for livestock watering by constructing a collection and tank system that provides livestock water for approximately 1600 cattle. Additionally, the Applicant has placed the Hunter Spring to beneficial use for irrigation by diverting and applying water from that spring to the surrounding grazing land. Consequently, the Applicant is entitled to a decree finding that each of the four Springs has been made absolute for livestock purposes and that Hunter Spring has also been made absolute for irrigation use. 6. Name and address of the owner of the land on which the subject conditional water rights are located. Applicant. WHEREFORE Applicant requests that the Water Court issue a final decree that (1) finds that Little Buck Spring, Indian Spring, and Red Gate Spring have been made absolute for livestock watering, (2) finds that the Hunter Spring

has been made absolute for both livestock watering and irrigation, (3) finds reasonable diligence in applying the remaining conditional portions of the Springs to beneficial use, (4) continues the conditional portions of the Springs that are not made absolute herein; and (5) grants such other and further relief as may be appropriate. (6 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of JULY 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 15. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF MAY 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW86 GARFIELD COUNTY, ROARING FORK RIVER. Application for Finding of Reasonable Diligence. Westbank Mesa Homeowners Association, Inc., c/o Julie S. Hanson, Beattie, Chadwick & Houpt, 932 Cooper Ave, Glenwood Springs, (970) 945-8659. Structure: Westbank Ranch No. 1, Ltd., Well No. 3. Original decree entered on 10/11/78 in Case No. W3691. Location: SW¼SE¼ of Sec 35, T 6 S, R 89 W, 6th P.M., at a point 1,017 ft N of S Sec Line, and 1,326 ft W of E Sec Line, of said Sec 35. Source: Trib to the Roaring Fork River. Appropriation date: 04/11/76. Amount: 0.0112 cfs, conditional (the balance of this water right was previously made absolute). Use: Domestic and commercial. Owner of land: LB Rose Ranch, LLC, 1007 Westbank Road, Glenwood Springs, Colorado, 81601. (4 pages) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of JULY 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. 22. PURSUANT TO C.R.S., §37-92-302, AS AMENDED, YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT THE FOLLOWING PAGES COMPRISE A RESUME OF THE APPLICATIONS AND AMENDED APPLICATIONS FILED WITH THE WATER CLERK FOR WATER DIVISION 5 DURING THE MONTH OF MAY 2012. The water right claimed by this application may affect in priority any water right claimed or heretofore adjudicated within this division and owners of affected rights must appear to object and protest within the time provided by statute, or be forever barred. 12CW93 GARFIELD COUNTY; Application for Findings of Reasonable Diligence; Applicants: Mr. Neal W. and Tamara Piper, please direct all correspondence to: Sherry A. Caloia, LLC; 1204 Grand Ave., Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, (970) 945-6067, megeiger@caloia.net; Names of structure for which diligence is sought: Cole Spring No. 1Date of original decree: November 23, 1992, Case No.: 92 CW 185, District Court, Water Division No. 5, Subsequent decrees: in Case No. 95 CW 369, the District Court, Water Division No. 5, determined that Cole Spring No. 1 had been made absolute for the purposes of pond filling (storage), aesthetic, recreational, piscatorial, and stockwater uses. Irrigation, augmentation and replacement uses remain conditional. Findings of diligence were entered in Case Nos. 98CW215 and 05CW193. Location: the point of diversion for Cole Spring No. 1 is located in the SW ¼ of the SW ¼ of Section 9, Township 7 South, Range 89 West of the 6th P.M., at a point 4,110 feet from the North section line and 100 feet from the West section line of said Section 9, Garfield County, Colorado. Source: surface water tributary to Four Mile Creek, tributary to Roaring Fork River, tributary to Colorado River. Appropriation date: March 13, 1989. Amount: 65 g.p.m. Use: filling a pond (storage), aesthetic, recreational, piscatorial, stockwater, irrigation, augmentation and replacement. Bershenyi Spring No. 2 Upper Spring, Cole Enlargement. Date of original decree: August 8, 1994, Case No.: 93 CW 331, District Court, Water Division No. 5, Subsequent decrees: in Case No. 95 CW 368, the District Court,Water Division No. 5, determined that Bershenyi Spring No. 2 Upper Spring, Cole Enlargement had been made absolute for the purposes of pond filling, aesthetic, piscatorial, recreation and stockwater use, and use to continuously divert water into and through the Cole Pond. Domestic, augmentation, replacement, exchange and irrigation uses remain conditional. Findings of reasonable diligence were entered in Case No. 05CW193. Location: the point of diversion for Bershenyi Spring No. 2 Upper Spring, Cole Enlargement is located in the SW ¼ of the SE ¼ of Section 8, Township 7 South, Range 89 West of the 6th P.M., at a point whence the East Quarter Corner of said Section 8 bears North 39º37’36” East 2,717.70 feet, also described as being 550 feet from the south section line and 1690 feet from the east section line of said Section 8, Garfield County, Colorado. Source: spring tributary to Four Mile Creek, tributary to the Roaring Fork River, tributary to the Colorado River. Appropriation date: June 1, 1990. Amount: 35 g.p.m. Use: to fill the Cole Pond, aesthetic, piscatorial, recreation, domestic, stockwater, augmentation, replacement and exchange, and to continuously divert water into and through Cole Pond and for the irrigation of one acre. Cole Pond; Date of original decree: August 8, 1994Case No.: 93 CW 331, District Court, Water Division No. 5; Subsequent decrees: in Case No. 95 CW 368, the District Court, Water Division No. 5, determined that Cole Pond had been made absolute for aesthetic, piscatorial, recreation and stockwater uses. Domestic, augmentation, replacement, exchange and irrigation uses remain conditional. In Case No. 05CW193, findings of reasonable diligence were entered. Location: the center of the dam is located in the SW ¼ of the SW ¼ of Section 9, Township 7 South, Range 89 West of the 6th P.M., at a point 1,250 feet from the South section line and 300 feet from the West section line of said Section 9, Garfield County, Colorado. Source: Cole Spring No. 1 (see above) and Bershenyi Spring No. 2 Upper Spring, Cole Enlargement (see above). Each spring is tributary to Four Mile Creek, tributary to the Roaring Fork River, tributary to Colorado River. Appropriation date: June 1, 1990. Amount: 2.0 acre-feet, with the right to fill, refill and continuously fill to maintain certain lake levels and to maintain water quality. As off-channel reservoir, rate of diversion in c.f.s for filling the reservoir: Cole Spring No. 1: 65 g.p.m. (0.15 c.f.s.) and Bershenyi Spring No. 2 Upper Spring, Cole Enlargement: 35 g.p.m. (0.075 c.f.s.) Use: aesthetic, piscatorial, recreation, domestic, stockwater, augmentation, replacement and exchange and irrigation of one acre. The Application includes a detailed outline of water has been done toward completion of the appropriation and application of water to a beneficial use as conditionally decreed, including expenditures. (5 pages). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT YOU HAVE until the last day of JULY 2012 to file with the Water Clerk a verified Statement of Opposition setting forth facts as to why this application should not be granted or why it should be granted in part or on certain conditions. A copy of such statement of opposition must also be served upon the applicant or the applicant’s attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service shall be filed with the Water Clerk, as prescribed by Rule 5, CRCP. (Filing Fee: $130.00) KATHY HALL, Water Clerk, Water Division 5; 109 8th Street, Suite 104 Glenwood Springs, CO 81601. Published in the Aspen Times Weekly on June 28, 2012.

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WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by RYAN SLABAUGH

BOOK REVIEW

NOTEWORTHY

‘EVEN COWGIRLS GET THE BLUES’ FIRST OF ALL, don’t watch the movie. It’s just not that good. Now that we have that covered, we’ll turn our attention to the film’s predecessor, a book that inspired freaks and challenged the status quo — after all, this is literature from the 1970s. Published in 1976, “Cowgirls” told the story of Sissy Hankshaw, a woman born with extremely large thumbs. (This is one of the reasons the movie stunk. Uma Thurman’s thumbs were just not big enough.) The book brilliantly displays her awkwardness and explains how young Sissy turns her awkward thumbs into her best asset — mainly by hitchhiking

by KYLE T. DOLAN

| edited by WILL SHORTZ

• “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues” • Tom Robbins • 1976; $14.49

through most of the book, where she travels to New York and meets, among dozens of eccentric characters, a cowgirl named Bonanza Jellybean. The story develops from there, and Robbins displays his masterful ability to describe the insane in plain language and without confrontation. Never does Robbins judge the size of her thumbs as negative — he lets other characters do that. And never does Robbins put her in a situation to make the thumbs cliché or a joke. While the hitchhiking scenario might be close, in the book at least, he makes it seem as if Sissy should be doing nothing else, and he is very convincing.

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named Animal stomach See 67-Across Suffix with ball “All systems go” Tuition and others What the turnoverprone football player had? Fountain location El Pacífico, e.g. Ball-shaped part “Hmm …” Knock for ___ W.W. I battle locale A bad one may contain holes Shenanigans at the royal court? Not a lot Mil. leader Points in the right direction Ball partner Begin a tour He wrote “Knowledge is the food of the soul” Senescence Nickname for a hard-tounderstand monarch? Lens cover for a large telescope? Classical bow wielder Eats up Outer: Prefix Blood rival Oxford profs Feature of grocery purchases, often Coral, e.g. Numbers game

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100

108

110

73

68

98

107

41

53

94

97 106

40

58

84 88

39

62

78

93

105

52 57

71

77

82

104

65

16

48

61

70

92

38

47

56

64

15

33 37

51

63

14

29

46

69

13 21

28

50

54

12

25

36

45

49

11

32

35

44

10

20

31 34

9

24

30

42

Editor-in-Chief Ryan Slabaugh dusts off old books from time to time and reminds us of why we liked them in the first place.

8

23

26

ACROSS

7

In the end, the book humbly and humorously reminds us that we are all different and that we have a choice in life: Play on our differences as an advantage, or hide behind them in fear of being different. Robbins allows the main character to do both, but in the end, he ties it up with his classic line from the novel: “There are many things worth living for, a few things worth dying for, and nothing worth killing for.”

113

109 114

115

118

119 122

123

— Last week’s puzzle answers —

96 99 101 102 103 104 105

Outdoor promenade iPod ___ Brooch feature, maybe Over One of the Marx Brothers Threw out of a contest, informally Prefix with zone

106 Lowly laborer 107 With 34-Across, what “<” means 109 Concerto soloist, perhaps 111 Its stem is used in miso soup 112 Witticism 113 Cup holder? 115 Energy meas.

A N G E R

N O I R E

S O F I A

P T B S E L A N I O N N I O W I E

C O N N

A B C S

L U L U

H O T D O G B U N

E L M Z E N E R A X T W R A P P E O P P O R B E A S V O X O A T I N F C O N T A T A A S I E T O N A N E B A N D D E N Y S R A E H O O R E R N A L O E D C A S P E T W A A B E S B L E D U P E L O I S G A N T I

A T E S T

L O D E S U B E S I D I N E F T O M E D A D E L A I N G R G A I O S A H A I G O E L S I

R S V P B E A R I N N E D E K F O S E F S E F A S D E M A C G A E R M A D I M E P I A E D P L N S I O K G A P E R G E L I N C I S E K T S E

R E A L T Y A I R W A R S

O V A L P O L O T U B E C A W S H A S S O B A L L E F U L R E M Y L L A N O

L I V E N

O N E S T S O N

M A M A D E R C L E A R A T G O I S

A S S E T


CHEF’S SELECTIONS LOCAL TOMATO SALAD $10 Fresh Watermelon, Grilled Halumi Cheese, Kalamata Olive Pesto

GRILLED IDAHO RED TROUT $20 Peppadew Romesco, Crispy Red Quinoa

Beyond Nature: Flora, Fauna, Fungi

and Veggie Croquette

Painting, Sculpture, Mixed Media Works On Paper

SERVING LUNCH & DINNER DAILY 11AM-10PM

Opening Reception Friday, June 29, 2012 6-8pm Exhibition Continues Through August

602 East Cooper Avenue • Aspen, CO • 970-925-6100 art@galeriemax.com • www.galeriemax.com

Your BEST FRIEND is waiting for YOU!

JOIN US... Sat, July 28th for dinner, drinks, auctions and live disco band. Visit with our adoptable pets! Full details at www.dogsaspen.com

HUNTER

3-year-old Pit Bull/ Chow mix who was found wandering around Aspen. He is wary of strangers, but friendly once he knows you and trusts you.

HOMER

A very happy, friendly, affectionate, 9-year-old Yellow Lab. He gets along great with people and other dogs. A really nice dog!!

ROXY

Large 7-year-old black/tan Sharpei/ Rottweiler mix female. Must be the only pet. Has guarding issues w/ toys and food. Needs an owner with the time and patience to work with her. Loving once she gets to know you!

PUMPKIN

Beautiful, friendly, calm 9-year-old Husky mix female. A retired sled dog looking for a loving home. Pumpkin has an adorable expression with ears that reach to the sky.

OPEN 7am-6pm EVERY DAY 970.544.0206

RYDER

Happy, friendly, 8-year-old Australian Shepherd male. He gets along well with people and other dogs.

KIDD

8-year-old Rhodesian Ridgeback mix male who gets along well with people and other dogs.

BODHI

Friendly, handsome, 3-year-old Golden Retriever male who gets along well with people, but can be aggressive with other male dogs.

PRINCESS

Happy, friendly, 8-year-old Pit Bull mix. Shy with strangers but warms up very quickly once she gets to know you.

Lots of NEW DOGS AND CATS! See dogsaspen.com for more animals.

RODEO

8-year-old Australian Cattle Dog mix male who gets along well with people and other dogs.

LUCY

Gentle, friendly, affectionate, 3-year-old Pit Bull female who was found wandering the streets of Los Angeles. She was transported to Aspen in order to start a new life in the mountains.

PUP

ANUBIS

8-year-old purebred American Dingo female who gets along well with people and other dogs.

SAM

Strong, energetic, black/white 5-yearold female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull so she is larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing and friendly. Best as only pet.

CLEO

1-year-old Australian Shepherd/Australian Cattle Dog mix. He is happy, friendly and playful with people he knows, but can be territorial with strangers.

Beautiful, friendly, soft-spoken 9-year-old Husky mix female. She is a retired sled dog looking for a loving home. Outgoing with people.

Aspen/Pitkin Animal Shelter 101 Animal Shelter Road

DONALD BAECHLER “RECENT WORK” RYAN MCGINNESS “UNITS OF MEANING” 22 JUNE - 22 JULY AN OPENING RECEPTION FOR THE ARTISTS WILL BE HELD FROM 6 - 8 P.M. ON THURSDAY, 5 JULY.

BALDWIN GALLERY 209 S. Galena Street Aspen, CO 81611 Tel 970/920.9797 Fax 970/920.1821 www.baldwingallery.com

www.dogsaspen.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

47


CHAFFIN LIGHT

& Morris & Fyrwald

New Listing

Great, Convenient Location s .EWLYRENOVATEDBEDROOM BATH 1,030 sq ft condo that lives like a duplex s /PENmOORPLANWITHHIGHCEILINGSAND great light s ,ARGEMASTERWITHSITTINGAREA s 0ATIOOFFLIVINGDININGAREAS s 3EPARATELAUNDRYROOMWITHWASHERDRYER s BLOCKSFROM#ITY-ARKET s /NERESERVEDPARKINGSPOT $1,165,000 Furnished Erik Berg | 970.379.6353 Mel Taylor | 970.366.0220

Ski-In/Ski-Out Downtown Condo Beautiful Aspen Mountain condo 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1,219 sq ft 6AULTEDCEILINGS HARDWOODmOORS DECK 'REATRENTALINCOMEPRODUCINGPROPERTY $1,900,000 %RIC#OHEN\

Central Core Condo on Riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Edge Newly refurbished, clean and sleek 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 965 sq ft Private deck on riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edge Short walk to downtown Aspen $1,545,000 $1,450,000 Furnished Mark Haldeman | 970.379.3372

Comfy, Cozy & Affordable 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths, 1,131 sq ft Inviting half duplex in the West End Decks, great outdoor spaces, views Lives larger than its square footage! $1,700,000 $1,375,000 Mark Haldeman | 970.379.3372 New Listing

Convenient Aspen Core Condo

Everything Aspen!

2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 960 sq ft Located just two block from the gondola South-facing and completely updated Assigned parking and good storage $1,280,000 -YRA/"RIEN\ Pat Marquis | 970.925.4200

2 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,140 sq ft condo A best-known Aspen rental complex 2EMODELEDINTERIOR NEWWOODmOORS Just off the pool with ski access nearby $1,575,000 $1,225,000 Furnished Greg Hunter | 970.379.1298

Remodeled Downtown Aspen Gem 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 976 sq ft 3 blocks from gondola next to park Head on views of Aspen Mountain ,OW(/!DUES PETSALLOWED $1,195,000 Wendy Wogan Williams | 970.948.8948

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

ASPENSNOWMASSSIR.COM

Aspen Times Weekly June 28 edition  

The Aspen Times Weekly reaches thousands of readers interested in Aspen and Western Colorado every week. In this week’s edition, we profile...

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