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LIBATIONS PUT SOME PUNCH IN YOUR SUMMER

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|| ASPEN UNTUCKED A FEW OF MY FAVORITE THINGS

MAY 22-28, 2014 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

WHY WATER

MATTERS

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 12

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WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION VOLUME 2 F ISSUE NUMBER 68

Publisher Gunilla Asher

DEPARTMENTS

General manager Samantha Johnston Editor Jeanne McGovern

04 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION 10 LEGENDS & LEGACIES 12

FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

13

FOOD MATTERS

21

COVER STORY

Arts Editor Andrew Travers Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott Circulation Maria Wimmer

25 AROUND ASPEN

Art Director Afton Groepper

26 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Publication Designer Ashley Detmering

28 LOCAL CALENDAR

Contributing Writers Gunilla Asher Amiee White Beazley Amanda Rae Busch John Colson Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Kelly J. Hayes Barbara Platts Bob Ward Tim Willoughby High Country News Aspen Historical Society

34 CROSSWORD 35

CLOSING ENCOUNTERS

Sales David Laughren Ashton Hewitt William Gross David Laughren Max Vadnais Louise Walker Tim Kurnos

ON THE COVER

14 WINEINK

Cover design by Ashley Detmering

So what do you get from the equation “Music+Food+Wine+Beer”? In the Napa Valley, it equals BottleRock, the second edition of which takes the stage at the end of the month. And as wine writer Kelly J. Hayes tells us, there’s much to look forward to, as a new group of organizers has promised to eliminate the hassle-factor (hangover) of last year’s event.

Correction: In the May 8-14 edition, the winners from “In Their Own Words” were transposed; Marion Garrett received second place and Katherine Gleason was third.

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Handsome, powerful, 2-year-old male Pit Bull mix. Good with people + other dogs. He must have an extremely knowledgeable, responsible, athletic home. Potential adopters will be thoroughly screened because of his immense strength and breed mixture.

SUNDANCE AND GINGER Sundance is an easy going, gentle, ten-yearold male Rhodesian Ridgeback mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. Ginger is a sweet, seven-year-old, Australian Cattle Dog mix who is a bit shy with new people, but warms up quickly once she gets to know you. Ginger is generally good with other dogs, but she is occasionally aggressive with other female dogs. Sundance and Ginger have been together for many years. They would love to stay together, but we are willing to separate them.

TIKA

2.5-year-old female Cattle Dog mix. Smart, adorable, very affectionate, likes to snuggle. Loves to play with other dogs + toys. Enjoys daily exercise, good offleash. Fine with everyone outside of her home but in home needs male dogs or to be solo.

PATCH

Very cool, sleek, athletic, 10-year-old sled dog. Gets along well with people + other dogs. Everyone loves the patches around his eyes. Loves to cuddle once he knows you a little + really enjoys a nice back massage. Needs a responsible home as not good off-leash.

CHUCK

Chuck is a happy, friendly, handsome, 11-year-old Husky mix who is a retired sled dog. Gets along well with people + other dogs. Still has the energy + ability to hike up Smuggler Mountain or stroll along the Rio Grande Trail. Super laid-back and affectionate.

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PETER

Peter is a sleek, athletic, 7-year-old sled dog who gets along well with people and other dogs. He will require a knowledgeable, responsible home because he is not trustworthy off-leash. Another really great dog!

SAM

Strong, energetic, black/white 5.5year-old female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull—larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing, very friendly + really cute. Loves people. Best as only pet.

JOHNSON

Johnson is a sleek, athletic, 8-year-old sled dog who gets along well with people and other dogs. He will require a knowledgeable, responsible home because of his Huskey breed mix he is not trustworthy off-leash.

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LEA

Came to the shelter in early Feb. from Texas with siblings, all abandoned + since adopted. 1-year-old Chiweenies (Chihuahua/ Dachshund mixes). Pretty shy. Once you hold her she is fine + very affectionate.

TIMBER

JACK

SAM

Strong, energetic, black/white 5.5-year-old female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull—larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing + LOVES people. Best as only pet.

4.5-year-old gorgeous Lab/Pit Bull mix female. Such a sweet girl. Allie is happy, friendly, affectionate and energetic. Turned in because of housing.

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ALLIE

Soft-spoken, sleek, friendly, 10-year old Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. She is a retired sled dog who deserves a comfortable, loving home.

6-year-old domestic short-hair, tabby markings + white feet. He would do best in an indoor/ outdoor home. Enjoys people. Very engaging. Must be ONLY pet.

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ROCKET

Gentle, affectionate, 10-year-old retired sled dog. Unfortunately blind due to complications from diabetes which is now under control. Needs a responsible home with special people willing to give him lots of love. A sweet dog!

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This event program will reach locals and visitors alike, bringing them all of the excitement of America’s most prestigious culinary event. Content will include a daily schedule of events, insightful conversations with star chefs and wine experts, seminar highlights and more.

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Coldwell Banker Mason Morse Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Avenue | 970.925.7000 | Find more at www.masonmorse.com Exclusive Member for Aspen and Snowmass, CO

©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. A Realogy Company. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each office is Independently Owned and Operated. Coldwell Banker®, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International®, the Previews International Logo, and “Dedicated to Luxury Real EstateSM” are registered and unregistered service marks to Coldwell Banker LLC.

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

with ANDREW TRAVERS

POPULAR MUSIC THE OFFSEASON SLATE of free shows at Belly Up continues over the next week, with a duo of local favorites and a taste of Portland’s acoustic scene. On Friday, the club hosts local rockers Jes Grew for a night mixing their originals and classic covers. It’s free before 10 p.m. and $5 afterward. On Sunday, Aspen native DJ Naka G takes to the stage for a free performance. Naka’s been raising his profile with increasing shows beyond the valley (including the Olympics in Sochi), so see him in town while you still can. And on Monday, the Portland-based string quartet Fruition takes to the stage for another no-cover show, showing off their dynamic acoustic blend of folk, rock, blues and more.

The Portland string band Fruition is among a slate of bands playing free shows at Belly Up this offseason.

CURRENTEVENTS LITERATURE

Bassnectar begins a two-night run at Belly Up on Wednesday, May 28.

ELECTRONIC MUSIC

Bruce Machart, Aspen Writers’ Foundation writer-in-residence and author of “The Wake of Forgiveness.”

NOVELIST BRUCE MACHART has been holed up writing in Woody Creek this month, as the May writer-inresidence for the Aspen Writers’ Foundation. On Tuesday, May 27, he’ll offer some insight on what he’s been up to, in a public reading at the Woody Creek Community Center. Machart is the author of the acclaimed 2010 novel “The Wake of Forgiveness” and the short story collection “Men in the Making.” The reading begins at 6 p.m. Free copies of “The Wake of Forgiveness” are available through the Writers’ Foundation’s Catch and Release Program. More information at www. aspenwriters.org.

ELECTRONIC DANCE MUSIC FANS have had Bassnectar’s two-night run at Belly Up marked on their calendars for months now. The San Francisco-based DJ regularly fills arenas for shows featuring his intense, hypnotic turntable stylings, and complementary light show. But he’s bringing it back to his club roots on Wednesday, May 28 and Thursday, May 29 at Belly Up. The EDM veteran’s performances offer a notorious blend of raucous party, teeth-rattling bass and art light show. Needless to say, these shows promise to be a nightlife highlight of the Aspen offseason. Tickets and more information at www.bellyupaspen.com.

COMPLETE LOCAL LISTINGS ON PAGE 28 4

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COURTESY PHOTOS


elevAted duplex lot With GReAt vieWS! ASpen

Incredible, 7,020 sq. ft. corner elevated lot directly opposite the Roaring Fork River with views of Aspen Mountain protected by Anderson Park. The property is only six blocks from the Gondola. Existing side-by-side duplex offers two-bedrooms, one-bath on the east side and four-bedrooms, two-baths on the west side with an over-sized twocar garage. City zoning permits a duplex or single family home. Hike or bike Smuggler Moutain in moments or enjoy an easy stroll to Aspen’s downtown core. An opportunity to build your dream home in this very trendy neighborhood awaits you! $2,700,000 Web Id#: WN133730

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pRivAte FiShinG/luxuRy livinG CARbondAle Rare opportunity at coveted Ranch at Roaring Fork. Single family home on quiet cul-de-sac. Completely rebuilt in 2007 with high-end finishes, top of the line kitchen, fabulous entertaining area including pool room and terrific outdoor patio area including a charcoal grill, Viking gas grill and wood burning fireplace. Tennis, golf, miles of trails and world class protected and private fishery including lakes, spring creeks and two miles of Roaring Fork River frontage. $825,000 Web Id#: WN133845 nancy emerson 970.704.3220 | nemerson@masonmorse.com

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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G WEEK D

Nyla

THE

THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

Nyla is a 1 ½ year old female Australian Shepherd/Heeler mix. She is a sweet doll of a dog, great with other dogs of all sizes. Nyla has lots of energy so will do best with an active owner. She is not a fan of cats at all, has been around horses and just ignores them. She seems to smile when she sees other dogs, kids, men or women and wants to be friends with everyone! What Nyla loves most is to run, play, hike and swim. She is good on a leash, she listens well and wants to please. She is also house-trained, knows how to use the dog door, loves toys and is very smart. She would make an excellent Frisbee dog or dog for agility training. She is such a love! We think Nyla would do great in a home with another dog. If you have the right home for her and would like to make Nyla part of your family, please fill out an application at www.luckydayrescue.org or call Brigid at 213-458-4944

VOX POP Have you done anything fun or interesting during the spring offseason?

LUCKY DAY ANIMAL RESCUE OF COLORADO

www.luckydayrescue.org

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“I had made plans to go see Punk Rock Bowling in Las Vegas, the music festival this weekend. But it happens to be Memorial Day weekend, so I can’t leave my job, but that’s OK.”

JOY KLEIN B A S A LT

“I’ve been working a lot, singing karaoke, shopping and spending all my tips.”

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“I just moved to this area to start a new job.”

Engaging our generation and empowering them to invest in their community through charitable giving and volunteerism. www.SpringBoardAspen.org 6

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V O X C O M P I L E D B Y A N D R E S A LVA I L


Brian Hazen presents...

Snowmass Canyon Ranch...Parcels Now Offered Separately! 677 Lower river road … scHooL House ParceL • 80 acre parcel with senior water rights. • Gold medal roaring Fork river Frontage. • 2 acre building envelop with 8,250 square feet allowed with purchase of a Tdr • 2 bed / 1 bath ‘school House” • dramatic wheatley Gulch offers access to adjacent usFs land $2,125,000

New Listing 964 Lower river road … Farm House ParceL • 202 acres with senior water rights • “Gold medal” roaring Fork river Frontage • site of historic wheatley ranch... homesteaded in 1891. • 3 spring feed ponds • multiple acre building envelop with 8,250 square feet allowed with purchase of a Tdr • 3 bed / 2 bath Farm House, Hay Barn & historic log outbuildings • adjacent to usFs land

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sNowmass caNyoN raNcH…oN THe roariNG Fork (comBiNed) • 282 acre property with two (80 acre and 202 acres) tracts of land, each with a building right of 8,250 square feet (with purchase of a Tdr) • The historic wheatley ranch was homesteaded in 1891 • almost 1 mile of “Gold medal” roaring Fork river frontage, 3 spring-fed ponds, senior water rights • Historic school house, log cabins and outbuildings. $6,900,000 Now $6,100,000

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

with JOHN COLSON

Are we trigger-happy about hiding from the truth? TRY THIS: Google the phrase “trigger warnings,” and see what pops up. For those who would rather not do their own research, I can provide a few insights into this phenomenon, which apparently began years ago in online feminist circles and has since graduated into the halls of higher learning. Or should that be halls of higher complaining? I’m not sure — have to get back to you won that one. Anyways, a trigger warning, according to an array of articles, blogs and other informational items meant for public consumption, is an alert attached to a book, article, movie, play or other artistic or educational exercises, as a way of cautioning potential readers that the content they are about to see might upset them. I can imagine that some readers, unaware of this movement among the champions of political correctness, read that statement and responded with a huffy, “What the...?!” You read it right, I’m afraid. The promoters of this affront to human intelligence have for some time been

HIT&RUN

advocating that anything that might “trigger” an adverse reaction among readers, viewers, listeners and others, such as the Shakespeare play “Merchant of Venice” or the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel “The Great Gatsby,” ought to carry trigger warnings as part of the headline, the title or whatever it is that sits at the top of the page or picture. Originally the warnings were intended to shield victims of rape, violence and other bad acts from anything that might reawaken feelings of trauma and fear. Not a bad idea, you might say, but the trouble is that, once unleashed, this type of thing can easily be transformed into a broad and vicious form of censorship. And censorship, to the dictatorially minded, is a way to keep the citizenry tranquil and obedient by removing anything that might bring shock to the mind or upset the twin applecarts of ever-expanding commerce and ever-tightening societal control. According to the trigger-warning crowd, readers afraid of being contaminated by exposure to one of the great works of American fiction, “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” can simply back away slowly and, once a sufficient distance has been achieved, turn and run like hell. This is not the first time around this block for Huck Finn’s creator, the author Mark Twain, of course. Since the book

was published, in 1885, it has been one of the most oft-censored books in American literature, making it to No. 14 on the American Library Association’s list of the 100 most banned or challenged books in the nation’s history. Twain’s treatment of the racism rampant in the South has been pilloried by intellectually challenged, self-righteous deniers of history, who either failed utterly to comprehend the ironic and sarcastic message of the book or who simply have pretended to misunderstand as a way of promoting their own questionable agendas. A few years ago, an outfit named NewSouth Books came out with a new edition of “Huck Finn” that excised every use of the word “nigger” and replaced it with “slave.” This is exactly the kind of whitewashing, fearful anti-intellectualism that was regularly a target of Twain’s savage wit, of course. And a whimpy desire to rid the world of such bold, problematic ideas probably is why the book’s creator, Alan Gribben, a professor of English at Auburn University in Montgomery, Alabama, came up with the book’s premise. Unfortunately for anyone interested in open, honest examination of the world, the concept of trigger warnings is expanding and has found its way into a number of

universities and colleges, where students have been demanding that professors place trigger warnings on material deemed potentially harmful to someone, anyone. Can it be that our education system has so completely failed these students that they actually believe they must be or even can be protected from any and all negativity? Should nude statues on campus be draped with dense cloth so students are not reminded that men and women are physically different, which some twisted individuals see as nothing but an implied threat that any man is a potential rapist and any woman a potential victim? Should we lock away the works of Lenny Bruce, the wickedly hilarious, deeply flawed comic of the 1950s and ’60s whose use of obscenity, political incorrectness and savage satire inspired most of the better comedians who came after him? Ought censors to have forced the cast of that great ’60s musical “Hair” to put on some clothes during the controversial nude scene, thereby robbing the production of one of its most inspiring moments? Are we truly that pathetic, timid and trigger-happy about hiding from the truth? I, for one, hope we are not. jbcolson51@gmail.com

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Julie Mandt 970-379-9525• mandtie@rof.net


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

Aspenites of the 1880s commonly visited St. Elmo (depicted in 1933), on the other side of the Elk Mountains.

OVER THE MOUNTAIN Before summer, when Independence Pass has not yet opened,

we think of Aspen as a city isolated at the end of a highway. Excepting pricey air travel, each escape to “elsewhere” requires traveling to or through Glenwood.

We view the mountains as our playground but also as a natural barrier; towns such as Vail or Crested Butte might be close as the crow flies, but they remain a long drive away. Although we now enjoy a four-lane connection to the outer world, we limit our “neighborhood” by the time it takes to drive around the mountains to get to it. Miningera Aspen’s residents experienced a different geography. In those days, Aspen connected to the outside world on passenger trains, by which Leadville, Denver and Colorado Springs were a one-day ride away. Residents of those major cities likewise traveled to Aspen, another major city of the time. Nevertheless, the rail routes resembled those of today’s highways; they circumnavigated the mountains, first headed west and then east, poked through the Continental Divide via a tunnel and finally headed downvalley. Aspen’s immediate geography

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was vastly different. Miners who lived and worked in now-isolated ghost towns on both sides of the Elk Mountains chose the shortest cross-country route to get to the dominant mining city, Aspen.

to be the end of the road unless they are four-wheeling or hiking, yet miners of long ago cavalierly continued their travels from that point onward, over the mountains. During the 1880s, a stagecoach

IT’S DIFFICULT TODAY TO IMAGINE EAST MAROON PASS AS A BUSY ROAD OF THE 1880S. LIKE THE ROAD TO ST. ELMO, IT BEGAN AS A TOLL ROAD BUT LATER FELL UNDER THE AUSPICES OF PITKIN COUNTY GOVERNMENT. STAGECOACH DRIVERS USED THIS ROUTE TO ACCESS RUBY CAMP, IRWIN CAMP, GOTHIC AND CRESTED BUTTE. IMAGINE TRAVELING THAT CIRCUIT IN WINTER. Whether they traveled to or from Independence, winter snow simply meant hitching their horses to sleds rather than coaches. Wagon and coach traffic was as busy heading south from Aspen to Ashcroft and beyond as it was west to Basalt or Glenwood. Many of today’s travelers consider Ashcroft

Ma y 22 - Ma y 2 8 , 2014

traveled daily between Aspen and St. Elmo. The route through Taylor Park, now referred to as Taylor Pass, was known as the St. Elmo Toll Road. Side routes led to mines and camps such as Tellurium Gulch. Travelers commonly traversed Pearl Pass to reach Crested Butte and to continue to Gunnison, the

county seat before Pitkin County was formed. That was the route of daily mail service between Ashcroft and Crested Butte. It’s difficult today to imagine East Maroon Pass as a busy road of the 1880s. Like the road to St. Elmo, it began as a toll road but later fell under the auspices of Pitkin County government. Stagecoach drivers used this route to access Ruby Camp, Irwin Camp, Gothic and Crested Butte. Imagine traveling that circuit in winter. After the convenience and comfort of rail travel reached Aspen, use of the high mountain passes declined. Stagecoaches still rattled over Taylor Pass and provided faster travel to Gunnison or Crested Butte than could be had by train. However, miners from both sides of the Elk Mountains continued to travel to and from Aspen on foot, in wagons and on horseback until automobiles took over. Once the internal-combustion engine replaced draft animals, miners also traveled as you do today, enduring the long drive that circumnavigates the Elks. Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn2@ comcast.net.

PHOTO COURTESY OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

DA NCING INTO THE FUTURE

1920 ASPEN

“SENIOR DANCE TONIGHT,” ANNOUNCED THE Aspen Democrat-Times on June 4, 1919. “The graduating class of the Aspen High School will give its farewell dance at Fraternal Hall tonight and the class extends a most cordial invitation to all members of the alumni, teachers and parents of all high school students. Handsome souvenir programs have been prepared by the seniors containing a list of twenty ‘dedicated’ dances arranged in a most unique and original style. The class of 1919 will retire from the A.H.S. under the standard bearing the following most excellent motto: ‘Only the Beginning is Hard.’ The class colors are violet and white, and the class flower is the violet.” This photo and more can be found in the Aspen Historical Society archives at aspenhistory.org.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GEAR of the WEEK

by STEPHEN REGENOLD

PUT SOME SPARK IN YOUR NEXT WATER EXPERIENCE

READERS OF THIS COLUMN know I am more adept with a kayak paddle than a throttle lever. But an event this winter in Florida gave me a chance to demo a new watercraft from Sea-Doo. Beyond some serious fun ripping around in turquoise waters, the demo changed my perspective on the activity in a bigger sense. In short, personal watercraft have evolved hugely since I was younger. A new generation of models can be quiet, super-fuelefficient, easy to maintain and simple for almost anyone to operate.

DO IT Though we’re landlocked here in Colorado, motorized water sports — including a spin on a Sea-Doo — can be enjoyed at several area lakes and reservoirs. Check out www.colorado.com/ water-activities to find out where to go for what sports.

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Testing a new Sea-Doo model called the Spark, I felt like I was riding a mountain bike on the water. I gripped the handlebars, hit waves like they were dirt jumps and almost forgot about the cylinders and combusting gas powering me through the swells. There’s even a brake on the Spark, a rare feature for a watercraft that I tested after jetting to 40 mph where the water was flat. (It works!) A four-stroke engine is under the

hood. But it’s quiet enough that the wind in my ears often overpowered the engine noise. I smelled almost no exhaust, even when idling. Sea-Doo advertises the Spark’s 899cc engine as the most efficient you can buy. It can run on less than 2 gallons of fuel per hour of use. The efficiency comes from a new kind of engine as well as a lighter overall weight. At 400 pounds, the Spark can be towed on a trailer by a small car.

With a base price of $4,999, the model is half the expense of many personal watercraft, SeaDoo says. The company cut costs by building a type of hull made of polypropylene that is easier to manufacture. One to three people, depending on the model, can ride on a Spark. It has enough power to pull a skier on a tow rope behind. In Florida, after a five-minute tutorial, I was riding alone into the waves. It’d been 15 years since my last experience captaining a small craft, but immediately I felt in control, aiming at a wave, pressing the throttle full speed ahead. Stephen Regenold writes about the outdoors and gear at GearJunkie.com.


FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

FOOD MATTERS FOOD MATTERS

by AMANDA RAE

WHAT’S IN A NAME? MORE THAN YOU MIGHT THINK

WANDERING DOWN the street last week, I met a jovial guy who introduced himself as Kip Feight, chef-owner of Conundrum Catering. I smirked. The name reminded me of Conundrum Creek, and something else. Something…enigmatic. I couldn’t help but ask: Did he worry about calling the business a synonym of “problem”? “This is the funniest thing,” Feight replied, AMANDA setting up a good story. RAE He explained that one of his first clients was Evelyn Lauder, of Estée Lauder, and when he’d told her the name, Conundrum Catering, she’d balked. “She said, I don’t know if that’s a very good name, and I know a little about marketing,” Feight says. But he liked it. When he ran into Lauder a few weeks later and told her that ‘Conundrum Catering’ had stuck, she urged him to reconsider. “I was at the Music Festival the other night with the US Ambassador to Sweden and the Prime Minister of Japan,” she said, according to Feight. “I brought up Conundrum… Well, the gentleman from Sweden thought it sounded like ‘confusion.’ The gentleman from Japan thought it sounded like ‘condom.’” “They had this lengthy discussion about what a bad name it was for a catering company,” Feight marvels. “Over a cold beer at the end of the night, (my cooks and I) looked at each other, like, We gotta name it Conundrum Catering if we’ve got heads of state talking about our stupid name for our funny little catering company!” Fifteen years later, Conundrum Catering is going strong. Feight’s moniker, in fact, meets a few criteria that experts correlate with success. A name should be short (1-3 words), easy to pronounce, and unique enough to remember. Alliteration is a plus. According to a 2012 study published in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, researchers found that, “When a

name rolls off the tongue, at an implicit level we associate more positive sentiment with it.” Which got me thinking about Aspen restaurants. When I first came to town, I was curious, if a bit cautious, about a spot boasting stellar reviews: Cache Cache. The name, I knew, is French for ‘hide and seek.’ But perhaps more telling, it sounds like money. Positive associations are said to pique interest. See: Over Easy, Paradise Bakery, and — just try to say it without cracking a smile — Bangkok Happy Bowl. Conversely, in the first months I lived here, I bartended occasionally at a restaurant in Snowmass Base Village. The short-lived Burger Bar + Fish was located in the space currently occupied by Bia Hoi. (Which is another study in garbled nomenclature: Some people I know dub it, “Be a Ho,” by way of memorization. Actually, it’s Vietnamese for “fresh beer.”) The restaurant suffered myriad issues, but most frustrating as an employee was that nobody could seem to remember our brand. Burger Fish Bar? FishSteak? An identity crisis is difficult to defend: We served burgers, yes, but also German comfort food and sustainable sushi. When I ask owner Bill Guth about HOPS Culture, opening soon on the Hyman Mall, he cops to the obvious. “Our overall goal is to bring an amazing beer culture to the Roaring Fork Valley,” he says. Then, almost as an afterthought, “And it sounds like pop culture.” I didn’t even make that association. Names are subjective, after all; a person’s experience, background, and preferences all factor. Also, “People generally prefer not to think more than necessary, and they tend to prefer objects, people, products, and words that are simple to pronounce and understand,” writes Adam Alter in a June 2013 New Yorker article titled, “The Power of Names.” Negative associations are best avoided. (Sorry, Junk.) Considering restaurants, experts

point to location and theme as two safe bets. Where’s the White House Tavern? In that little ivory Victorian, duh. What might you expect at Casa Tua? Italian cuisine and hospitality. Su Casa? Tacos and tequila. Restaurants named for their owners — Jimmy’s, Finbarr’s, Victoria’s, Annette’s, Johnny McGuire’s, Zane’s — announce a “welcome to my place” vibe. A name with backstory — The Red Onion, Justice Snow’s — might seem obscure, but it sparks conversation. Then there’s restaurant rebranding. The Cantina is under new management, and though coowner Aidan Wynn says the Main Street haunt will stick to its Mexican roots, the team will switch up the décor, menu, head chef — and, yes, name — just as soon as the city approves the paperwork. “It’s a fresh start. Best to break away from the old,” says Wynn, formerly GM of Cantina for four years before he left in 2012 to go to the Meatball Shack. “Cantina may have gotten a bad name. If I change it, I might get some of those people back. We’ll be able to move forward.” What’s the new title? “El Rincon. It means ‘the corner,’” Wynn says. “It’s

easy, it’s catchy.” Depends on your perspective, I guess. I don’t speak Spanish, so “rincon” would be lost on me without his explanation. Immediately, I think: Skating rink, unicorn, possibly a drunk Chicano rapper. Ending with a vowel would certainly sound prettier. (See: Zocalito, L’Hostaria, Ellina.) Then again, what do I know? A Google search turns up evidence of dozens, maybe even hundreds, of Mexican joints across the country named El Rincon. There’s one in Pflugerville,Texas; Akron, Ohio; Durham, N.C.; Sedona, Ariz.; Tampa, Fla. I’ve been to four of those cities, and I’d return to one of them — though a cantina called El Rincon probably wouldn’t be my first choice for dinner there. In a ski town called Aspen, quality and reputation make or break an eatery, not its name. “Tourists, as far as they know, we’re the Mexican place on the corner,” Wynn says. “It almost doesn’t matter.” Contrary to what her name suggests, Amanda Rae doesn’t have a Southern accent. amandaraewashere@gmail.com

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

WINEINK

TIME TO SPILL THE WINE. AGAIN. IT WAS THE BEST of times. It was the worst of times. The 2013 BottleRock Napa Valley music festival made its inaugural run last May and the sounds, featuring artists like Macklemore, The Black Keys, The Black Crows, The Flaming Lips, Rodrigo y Gabriela and Richard Thompson was, by all accounts, stellar. The logistics — including KELLY J. lines and parking and HAYES “amenities” — well, not so much. Add to that a laundry list of unpaid bills after the festival’s finish, followed by a bankruptcy filing for the production company that put on the 2013 BottleRock Napa Valley, BR Festivals, and the inaugural year was a mixed bag at best. Still, patrons, the community, attendees, artists and participants all found enough that was positive to want to produce a second vintage. A new entity, Latitude 38 Entertainment, a collection of four Napa Valley-based entrepreneurs who are anxious and passionate about getting the event right, has been formed to take over this year’s iteration of BottleRock Napa Valley. They have ridden into town on their metaphorically white horses with the promise that, while the theme of “Music+Food+Wine+Beer” remains, the headaches of the last

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year’s event will be just another forgotten hangover. So on with the show. BottleRock Napa Valley will kick off with a field blend of contemporary acts and a few retro ones as well. Opening night is Friday, May, 30 a little later than last year and the week after Memorial Day, which makes this a summer festival. The opening act will be The Cure. But they are just the first taste of a threeday weekend that will feature 60 bands on four stages. Get ready to shake it like a Polaroid picture on Saturday as Andre 3000 and Big Boi, of OutKast, take the main stage. Then like a church on Sunday, the country tinged Eric Church will be the daily headliner. Now, all of that seems a little weird. One would be hard-pressed to come up with an apt phrase to describe the vibe of the lineup, other than to suggest that all three acts are “artists” in one genre or another. But hey, when you are putting together a three-day show with a $279 price tag you might as well be eclectic, or perhaps democratic, in your pairing choices. That theme runs through the line-up, but make no mistake, there are a number of boffo bands that will playing throughout the weekend. The Bare Naked Ladies are always, always, a fun act. As is Weezer, Blues Traveller, the Spin Doctors, Smash Mouth and Third Eye Blind. I know because I am of

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a certain age where these bands all had hits and headlined summer events — a few, even here in Aspen. Then there are a couple of rappers, LL Cool J and Matisyahu, on the docket. Robert Earl Keen will even make appearance. But the beauty of BottleRock, is well, the bottle. Because this is a Napa event, the wine is as much a headliner as the bands. Miner Family Vineyards, one of our Aspen favorites who began pouring their super-cabs here at the Food & Wine Classic back in the day, is back as a Big Pour for the second year. Other wineries that have been profiled in this very column that will be pouring include Mi Sueno, Cakebread, Ceja Vineyards, Layer Cake and City Winery. They will be joined such luminaries as Rombauer, Shramsberg, Clif Lede, Flora Springs and the Del Dotto Family Vineyard. It is a great wine line-up and one could say that the eclectic mix of wines, from California Cabs to Sparklers to Pinots, from Stag’s Leap to Coombsville to Carneros, mirrors the blend of bands that will be on stage. While man and woman can’t live on wine and grooves alone, one need not worry about getting something great to eat. Napa’s favorite restaurants and trucks will be offering up a cornucopia of world food options. From

Morimoto to Il Posto Trattoria, from Bacon Bacon to Curry Up More, global food will be as much a part of the mix as wine and music. And on tap, local beers, best poured with local bands, will be available for those who prefer grain to grapes. With music festivals proliferating over the past decade, it’s sometimes tough to tell the good ones from those that are less so. Anyone can put together a great line-up with enough cash. But a great festival covers the details so that you don’t even notice them. Get the parking right, get people in and out with a minimal hassle, make sure they don’t miss the acts they paid to see because they are standing in a beer line. Then add that something extra. Make sure the event is true to its place; make sure it resonates with the audience. We are so lucky to have our Jazz Aspen Snowmass events here that we sometimes hesitate to venture out. But if you are looking to try something new, BottleRock Napa Valley may be a good one to get to. Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soon-to-be-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@ aol.com.

P H OTO S C O U RT E S Y O F L AT I T U D E 3 8 E N T E RTA I N M E N T


by KELLY J. HAYES

IF YOU GO... BOTTLEROCK NAPA VALLEY May 30-June 1 Napa Valley Exposition Tickets range from $149 for 1-day passes, $279 for 3-day event passes to $599 for 3-day VIP passes www.bottlerocknapavalley.com

UNDER THE INFLUENCE So I couldn’t resist. Here are five songs that always make me want to drink: 1. “Spill The Wine” - Eric Burden’s fantasy comes to life 2. “A Case of You” - Joni Mitchell’s still on her feet 3. “Sweet Blindness” - Laura Nyro goes down by the grapevine and gets happy 4. “Champagne Supernova” - Oasis gets the bubbles flowing 5. “Sport and Wine” - Ben Folds Five sings my personal anthem

P H OTO S C O U RT E S Y O F L AT I T U D E 3 8 E N T E RTA I N M E N T

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

by JEANNE MCGOVERN

MAKE IT 2 bottles of red wine, such as cabernet sauvignon 8 ounces Camus VS Elegance Cognac 12 ounces lemon-lime soda 6 ounces cranberry juice 4 ounces simple syrup ½ of a lemon (ends cut off) ½ of a lime (ends cut off) ½ an orange (ends cut off) 1 cup sliced strawberries

STARS & STRIPES SANGRIA

Thinly slice the lemon, lime and orange and place in a large punch bowl. Add all of the liquid ingredients. Stir well and serve.

When I was a kid, Memorial Day weekend marked the start of summer and we — as a family and a neighborhood — celebrated accordingly. Our backyard pools were open for business and we kids would spend hours jumping off the diving board and playing Marco Polo. The adults, meanwhile, huddled around the barbecue and kitchen counter, where a big bowl of punch was always a centerpiece. It was also a curiosity, as it was for “adults-only.” Now the tables are turned, so this Memorial Day weekend I’m going to mix up a bowl of “Stars & Stripes Sangria” for the friends and family I gather with to celebrate the start of summer. If only we had a backyard pool to keep the kiddos occupied. GUNILLA ASHER DIDN’T MAKE IT TO THE BARS THIS WEEKEND, BUT SHE’LL SHARE ANOTHER FAVORITE DRINK WITH US SOON. IN THE MEANTIME, EMAIL JMCGOVERN@ASPENTIMES.COM WITH WHAT COCKTAILS YOU’RE MIXING, WHAT LIBATIONS YOU’RE DRINKING, WHAT TASTES HAVE TEMPTED YOUR TASTEBUDS AND WE’LL SHARE THEM WITH OUR READERS. CHEERS!

Did you know… We have Gift Certificates available! Perfect for: Birthday’s • Holidays Teacher Appreciation • College Graduation Ask our friendly Sales Staff to purchase yours today!

FREE DELIVERY! | Aspen to Glenwood Springs | $50 Min. | 970.927.2002 | Next to Whole Foods 16

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

ASPEN UNTUCKED

by BARBARA PLATTS

Tuesday Cruise Day, a cold beer on a hot patio and fresh Colorado peaches — who could ask for more in a summer’s day?

SUMMER LOVIN’

MY FIVE FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT AN ASPEN SUMMER WE COME FOR the winters, but we stay for the summers. Despite our love for the powder, when May rolls around, we can’t help but get excited in anticipation for what is to come. Our senses defrost as the snow melts, the days lengthen, and the sunny season arrives. 1.) Dining and Imbibing Outdoors: During Aspen’s dog days, almost BARBARA every restaurant in PLATTS town extends their seating area to the outside. Not only do I find this a good opportunity to soak in extra Vitamin D, I also think it’s the perfect time for some people watching, as tourists and locals alike roam the mall enjoying the season. 2.) Today, We Ride: Tuesday Cruise Day is alive and well again this season. Come out to participate in the popular community bike ride. We start at the local watering hole — the Aspen Brewery — at 5:30 p.m. to head out on a two-hour cruiser ride around town. I love this Tuesday activity because it provides a chance to meet new people and feel like a slight rebel as we literally stop traffic with our intimidating crowds.

COURTESY PHOTOS

3.) Colorado Peaches: They may emerge a bit late this year, due to the large amounts of snow, but a Colorado summer would not be complete without its poster fruit. Once peaches are officially in season, I find it difficult to go even one day without biting into one of these luscious drupes. Find them at a local grocery store, lining the streets of the Saturday Famers Market (from June to October), or at the traditional Buttermilk Fruit Stand in the parking lot at the base of the mountain. 4.) The More the Merrier: In the winter, we often get cooped up indoors. When we do go out in town or on the slopes, we want

to get from point A to point B as quickly as possible to avoid the frigid temperatures. In the summer, it’s all about the journey, not the destination. Take a stroll downtown on the mall and see whose enjoying time outside, go play a game of volleyball at Koch Park, or float down the Roaring Fork River along Independence Pass. Summer activities allow for larger groups and an opportunity to meet new people that we don’t typically cross paths with in the winter. 5.) Endless Music: Aspen always boasts an eclectic mix of beats throughout the year, but in the summer the music heads outdoors.

Take the gondola or hike to the top of Ajax for Bluegrass Sundays or setup a picnic outside the Benedict Music Tent to listen to classical tunes every weekend. And, if you dare venture past the roundabout, go to Snowmass for the free Thursday night concerts on Fanny Hill and festivals like the Mammoth Fest and Jazz Aspen Snowmass. Summer is just getting started, but the first leaf will fall before we know it. So take full advantage of the warm weather, the outdoor activities, and of course, the peaches — before it’s too late. What’s your favorite thing about summer? Reach Barbara Platts at bplatts.000@gmail.com or @BarbaraPlatts.

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Fabulous Family Home on the River • • • • • • • • • • •

The Perfect Mid-Valley Location 5 bedrooms, 4 baths, 5,836 sq ft Located on 5 wooded and private acres Spacious home for family and friends Majestic views of the Elk Mountain Range $2,950,000 Furnished Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443

Charming Country Farm House Located minutes from Carbondale on 45 irrigated acres for horses Spectacular mountain views with room to build your dream home! $2,300,000 Noël Hallisey | 970.379.1977 Sandy Smith | 970.948.3955

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Special Place on the Frying Pan River 18-plus acre offering on the Frying Pan River Incredible mountain views, irrigated pastures, and Gold Medal fishing Approvals for main, guest house, & barn $2,650,000 Terry Rogers | 970.379.2443

Endless Roaring Fork Valley Views Timber mountain home on 37 acres 6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, 5,695 sq ft, 3 levels Media/rec room, bonus room, 2 car garage Privacy and breathtaking views $2,875,000 $2,250,000 Furnished Llwyd Ecclestone | 970.456.6031

Passive solar river home in Woody Creek 6 bedrooms, 5 baths, 5,880 sq ft Main level master suite and office Separate 2 guest bedroom suite for guests or staff Walk-out lower level with game room Open floor plan with 19’ ceilings Wood-burning and gas fireplaces Radiant wood floor heat on main level Attached 3 car heated garage Roaring Fork River frontage South-facing Aspen Highlands views $4,950,000 $4,250,000 Tom Melberg | 970.379.1297

New Mountain Tuscan Home 5 bedrooms, 4 full, 2 half baths, 6,085 sq ft 5 private, treed acres in Missouri Heights Home theater, balcony, hardwood floors Bar, wine room, outstanding views $3,875,000 $2,590,000 Greg Hunter | 970.379.1298

Ridge Run View Homesite One of Snowmass’ best view homesites Extremely easy ski access just steps away - ski Funnel out and West Fork home Build your dream home $1,595,000 Greg Didier | 970.379.3980

rtfully uniting extraordinary homes with extraordinary lives. F

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Hidden Meadows Home • Spectacular mountain home tucked away in a peaceful setting • Highly sought after Old Snowmass location • 4 bedrooms, 4 full, 2 half baths, 6,528 sq ft • Enjoy the sounds of nearby Snowmass Creek • Views of surrounding mountains • Private fishing and cozy streamside picnics with family and friends $4,595,000 $4,195,000 Ted Borchelt | 970.309.3626 Jana Dillard | 970.948.9731

1 Acre Woody Creek Building Site 1 acre building site on Woody Creek Road Up to 5,750 sq ft allowable FAR Existing cabin not historically designated Great Woody Creek opportunity $1,985,000 $1,575,000 Ed Foran | 970.948.5704

Tuscan Influenced Home A family’s playground delight! 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 5,057 sq ft Detached bonus room for office Manicured grounds with 14,000 sq ft pond $1,625,000 $1,495,000 Jack Musser | 970.379.5435

Dramatic Mt. Sopris Views Adobe-style home on over 2 acres 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 4,580 sq ft Over 2,200 sq ft of decks for entertaining Exquisite, dead-on views of Mt. Sopris $1,675,000 $1,495,000 Sally Shiekman-Miller | 970.948.7530

New Listing

Terrific Family Home

Custom Home with Great Views

4 bedrooms, 4 full, 2 half baths, 4,120 sq ft Spacious open floor plan, main level master Two family living spaces, lovely outdoor terrace Gold Medal fly-fishing, golf, gated community $1,395,000 Furnished Sue Hess | 970.309.5455

4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 4,300 sq ft Gourmet kitchen, spa master bath, decks Incredible views from every room 5 minute drive to mid-valley shopping $1,375,000 Partially Furnished Katie Grange | 970.948.2598 Larry Jones | 970.379.8757

Spirit of the New West 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2.62 acres Old west ranch exterior and setting Functional, upbeat interior 125 year-old heirloom apricot tree $1,250,000 Penney Evans Carruth | 970.379.9133

AspenSnowmassSIR.com

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536 A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Whitman Fine Properties ted a v ti ller Mo Se

Executive Pitkin Green Estate

Ski-Out Serene Maple Ridge

Five bedroom, five and two half bath Red Mountain estate Four bedroom contemporary Snowmass home • Completely • Exquisite panoramic mountain views located on the “Fifth renovated with exquisite finish details • Landscaped gardens, panoramic mountain views from the living areas & wrap Avenue” of Aspen • Complete with gourmet kitchen, hot tub, around deck • Ski-out access to Assay Hill • $3,400,000 massage room, sauna & Western billiards room • $7,595,000 w ! Nesting Li

w ! Nesting Li

38 Acre River Ranch Property

Perfect horse ranch • Extremely private with 3/4 miles of river frontage • 5 Bed 5 Bath House • 4,000 sq. ft. Barn with Arena • Close to the Bike Path • 3 Separate Building Sites • $3,500,000

n ha rice t p r we er Lo elop v De

2 Blocks from the Gondola

Top floor two bedroom, two bathroom • Floor-toceiling windows frame Aspen Mtn • Open living area and kitchen • Glass enclosed wood burning fireplace • Off-street parking • $1,450,000

ed t a tiv ller Mo Se

Best Location in Aspen

Two bed, two bath • Exceptionally located with patio & hot tub out your front door • Completely remodeled with beautiful finish details • One block to the gondola • $945,000

n t! k oarke c Ba e M Th

Best Priced Dancing Bear

Three bedrooms, three & one 1/2 bath, fantastic core location • Mountain views from rooftop deck • Outstanding owner amenities • Beautifully decorated • 1/8th Share • $725,000

Unobstructed Views of Mt Sopris Beautiful Two Bedroom Alpine Grove Condo

Corner condo with spacious private patio and yard The best lot in RVR • It will never lose its’ • Open living areas with hardwood floors & granite magnificent views of Mt. Sopris or the 11th counters • Short bike or drive to downtown Aspen green • Architectural plans, and development & on the shuttle route • $505,000 rights include an ADU • $415,000

Contact Lisa Turchiarelli • 970.379.5018

Please Contact Wendalin Whitman for a Showing • 970.948.5932

whitmanfineproperties.com • 970.544.3771 • aspen-luxury-rentals.com 20

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CROSSING THE NEGEV DESERT in Israel by bicycle in 100-degree weather last month, the sun seared us and the wind scorched us. It was like riding into an oven. There was hardly a green thing to be seen – few trees or shrubs – only a scattering of low, scraggly plants struggling for survival on an otherwise barren, brown, rocky landscape. With perspiration pouring from our bodies, water was foremost in our thoughts. In the dry Middle East, collecting, storing and making the best use of water is an age-old tradition. It’s the only way desert cultures could grow food and survive the harsh, oppressive heat. Thousands of years ago, cities of the ancient world were challenged to provide ample water supplies – enough for swimming pools and heated baths. During our bike tour from the northern border with Lebanon and Syria down to the Red Sea on the borders with Jordan and Egypt, my friend Graeme and I observed numerous ancient ruins and studied their water sources. At Masada, a mesa top fortress built by King Herod just before the time of Christ, gutters were carved into sandstone walls to channel cherished rains into vast cisterns hewn from solid rock. We climbed down long stairways into these cisterns and noted that the floors, walls and ceilings were plastered to seal in water and keep it clean of sediments. On a side trip to Petra, Jordan, the canyon walls were carved with water channels to bring rain runoff into a city that supported thousands. Israeli water technologies have gone far beyond what Herod’s architects and the Nabatean city builders of Jordan contrived in the ancient world, but they hark to a conservation ethic for water that leads the world today. And what we saw from the seats of our bicycles was no less than an agricultural wonder. The lush greenery of kibbutzim (traditional communal societies) or moshavs (collective farms) stood out like oases. Many kibbutzim are lush and flowering, not only with food crops, but with decorative horticultural marvels that rival the mythical Babylonian Gardens. We were drawn to kibbutzim like flies to honey because they provided us with water and food. They also offered an inspiring look at intensive agriculture practiced with extreme water efficiency and social cohesion among those who live there. The lessons from Israel could well be applied to the West and the Colorado River Basin, which is struggling with drought.

AFOR THELESSON AMERICAN WEST:

LEARNING THE VALUE OF WATER IN ISRAEL by PAUL ANDERSEN

Water and greenery are celebrated in this Israeli national park near Bet She-an in the Harod Valley.

PHOTO BY PAUL ANDERSEN/ASPEN JOURNALISM

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Following the Jordan

Jim Pokrandt, the communications and education director for the Colorado River District, based in Glenwood Springs, spent two weeks in Israel last December traveling with his wife. Pokrandt was not visiting Israel as a water expert, but he gleaned, as I did, that Israel is intensively farmed with state-of-the-art irrigation systems. “My wife and I stopped in kibbutzim and chatted with the people there,” Pokrandt said. “We learned that through drip irrigation, date palms can produce a product in 20 years. In the north we saw a lot of grazing, and in the Negev Desert we saw lots of vegetables. The water comes from wells, recycling and desalinization.” Pokrandt said that the American West shares a feature with Israel for being just as dependent on limited water. Among traditional users relying on the Colorado River, agriculture is the dominant customer, accounting for approximately 88 percent of the water consumed in the state. “Including transbasin diversions, the Colorado River helps irrigate nearly two-thirds of Colorado’s total irrigated lands,” Pokrandt said. “Major crops grown with Colorado River water include grass and alfalfa hay, grains, vegetables and fruit.” When Pokrandt talks to people about a water crisis in the American West, he reflects on the Israeli model. “I tell them I spent two weeks in Israel and that I’m not worried about water over here. We’ll figure it out like they did – with water re-use, cluster development, and desalinization. We can also be innovative with our uses of water.”

There may be no better model for water efficiency than Israel. The country is intensely farmed and scrupulously watered. Most important, however, is an overarching conservation ethic in a land where water has long been valued as a precious commodity. Sustainable agriculture in Israel has long been a national priority that maximizes arable land for food production – with limited water. That’s why most of the country is plumbed for drip irrigation, a technique developed in Israel for watering individual plants with minimal water to avoid loss from seepage and evaporation. Piped water is also easier to monitor, regulate and protect.

Huge purple irrigation pipes are seen across Israel’s countryside where farms, orchards and vineyards draw water allocations and use them sparingly to incredible effect. Huge covered orchards in the north and vast date palm plantations in the south reveal a nation of skilled and studied agronomists. Until recently, modern Israel had long relied on a central river system – the River Jordan – which flows south through the Great Rift Valley. More than the

metaphorical boundary to the Promised Land, the Jordan has served as a chief source of Israel’s fresh water. The Jordan gathers tributaries from the northern part of the country, surrounding the heights of Mt. Hermon, the highest mountain in Israel at 9,230 ft, which stands sentinel over the border with Syria. These waters serve myriad uses many times over on their way south to the Dead Sea. Below Galilee we pedaled down the West Bank of the Jordan, a stone’s throw from the Jordanian border. Here the biblical river eventually tapers down to the equivalent of an irrigation canal by the time it reaches the Dead Sea 1,500 feet below sea level – the lowest place on the surface of the earth. The Dead Sea is known for its buoyancy because its salt content is 9.6 times that of the world’s oceans, with 34.2% salinity. There is no outflow, so salts are concentrated through evaporation. The mineralization of the Dead Sea, which is dropping at the rate of about one meter per year (3.2 feet), is accelerating due to the Jordan’s flow being dramatically reduced by upriver draws for agricultural and municipal purposes. The Jordan River system, though only 124 miles long (223 miles if you count the meanders), reminded me of the Colorado River system in that they both serve arid regions with limited water. The Colorado is a lot longer (1,450 miles) and complex than the Jordan, but the challenges of administering these rivers are similar. Like the Jordan when it reaches the Dead Sea, the Colorado’s flow is greatly reduced when, or if, it reaches the Gulf of California in Mexico, where the once marine rich Colorado River delta is rarely recharged with fresh water from the mountains.

“I TELL THEM I SPENT TWO WEEKS IN ISRAEL AND THAT I’M NOT WORRIED ABOUT WATER OVER HERE. WE’LL FIGURE IT OUT LIKE THEY DID – WITH WATER RE-USE, CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT, AND DESALINIZATION. WE CAN ALSO BE INNOVATIVE WITH OUR USES OF WATER.” — JIM POKRANDT, COLORADO RIVER DISTRICT ABOVE: The arts center at Kibbutz Neot Smadar is an elaborate, organically fashioned centerpiece to a spiritual growth center in the heart of the Negev Desert. RIGHT: Cut by hand with primitive tools into the solid sandstone of the mesa at Masada, this is one of nine major cisterns designed to hold precious desert water.

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PHOTOS BY PAUL ANDERSEN/ASPEN JOURNALISM


Efficiency and Innovation

The Israeli’s have made the desert bloom by using high-tech irrigation techniques with water from varied sources. In addition to the Jordan, supplies come from wells, recycled wastewater, and from the desalination of saltwater, in which Israel is a world leader. In 2013 more than a third of Israel’s tap water came from the Mediterranean Sea and briny wells. Dozens of Israeli water innovators work intensively on monitoring and measuring flows and designing filtration systems for everything from microbial organisms to acidic chlorine from swimming pools. Innovators have developed ultrasonic technologies, micro generators inserted into water pipes to capture energy, pressurized systems and valve designs, ultraviolet disinfection, contamination detection, and more.

Today, the Israeli Ministry of Industry, Trade and Labor lists some 166 water tech enterprises, including 91 companies offering water efficiency solutions, 50 companies specializing in wastewater reuse and desalination, and another 25 offering water control and command systems. Even as Haaretz, the Englishlanguage news source, reported recently of an abundance of water in Israel due to desalinization, the state continues to advocate for water efficiency as a national ethic that harks to a slogan known traditionally in Israeli households: “Don’t waste a drop.” This strict ethic of developing water supplies and maintaining efficiency exists because water has long been key to the survival of Israel. Water innovation is the equivalent of a national defense industry, and desalinization is the country’s new lifeblood. The largest desalinization plant of its kind in the world, using reverse osmosis, is at Hadera, a city on the Mediterranean Sea north of Tel Aviv. Desalinization has been practiced in Israel since the 1930s, but today’s facilities are fueled by a recently discovered off shore play of natural gas in the Mediterranean.

TOP: Drip irrigation is the key to producing year-round food crops at this moshav near Tel Aviv. CENTER: Graeme Means and Paul Andersen explore the mesa-top ruin of Masada during a month-long bicycle tour of Israel. RIGHT: The mountainous heights of the southern Negev Desert describe a dry, inhospitable landscape bereft of water and plant life.

PHOTOS BY PAUL ANDERSEN/ASPEN JOURNALISM

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Values from the kibbutzim

On a particularly broiling day during our ride through the Negev Desert, which covers about one-third of Israel, we stumbled upon a paradise-like oasis at kibbutz Neo Smadar. Here the desert blooms where a temple-like arts center stands prominently with a phallic cooling tower. Heat exhausted and fly-bitten, we were welcomed there for two nights of camping. More important, our visit coincided with the second Seder dinner of the Passover holidays. Dining on an outdoor patio with 250 kibbutz workers, and appreciating a cooling desert breeze, we felt an uplift in our spirits that went beyond the delicious organic food and drink we were served, much of which originated from the kibbutz fields, orchards and vineyards. It was only after my return home that I learned that Eden Vardy, founder and director of Aspen TREE, a local non-profit focused on creating sustainable communities, had lived and worked at Neot Smadar six years ago. As a result of his kibbutz experience, Vardy knows

Israel’s water ethic firsthand. Born in Tel Aviv in 1986, his family moved to Aspen in 1988. He returned to Israel in 2008 to explore his native land. Vardy, who grows food year-round at the greenhouse at Cozy Point Ranch, first studied desert agriculture at kibbutz Lotan in the Arava Desert north of Eilat, near the Red Sea, on the border with Jordan. Here he learned the benefits of drip irrigation and intensive farming and livestock raising. “Drip irrigation started in Israel and it’s the best irrigation school in the world – leading the way, out of necessity,” Vardy said. Vardy then spent six months in the Arava Desert

where he witnessed the application of “black water” for date palm plantations. Black water is the effluence from raw sewage, whereas gray water comes from non-septic drains like kitchen sinks. The kibbutz experimented with black water to see if the date palms would survive with that water source. “There was a lot of research going on in the desert – growing dates and feeding them with different levels of black water,” Vardy said. “At one kibbutz they constructed wetlands to handle effluent for 500 people. We also built mini gray water systems and used composting toilets. “The idea is not to use water, but if you do, use it as many times as you can. Using every drop – twice – is also a key part of permaculture, which calls for using resources many times before they leave a site.” For Vardy, the big difference between farming in Israel and the Western US is in the manner in which water is regarded. “The difference is in the mentality,” he said. “Here, people are trying to get as much water as they can. There they try to use as little as possible. Israel has had to rely on itself with limited water for the whole country. Here it’s use it or lose it. Paul Andersen writes for Aspen Journalism.

“THE DIFFERENCE IS IN THE MENTALITY,” HE SAID. “HERE, PEOPLE ARE TRYING TO GET AS MUCH WATER AS THEY CAN. THERE THEY TRY TO USE AS LITTLE AS POSSIBLE. ISRAEL HAS HAD TO RELY ON ITSELF WITH LIMITED WATER FOR THE WHOLE COUNTRY. HERE IT’S USE IT OR LOSE IT.” — EDEN VARDY, ASPEN TREE TOP: Making the desert bloom with lush foliage and brilliant flowers is a noted achievement of Israel. ABOVE: Eden Vardy, of Aspen TREE, preparing stucco mud on an Israeli kibbutz in 2008, where he learned the value of hard labor and an appreciation for intensive agriculture and the efficient use of water. LEFT: A mud bath at the Dead Sea is considered the ultimate skin treatment at the lowest point of land in the world.

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Ma y 22 - Ma y 2 8 , 2014

PHOTOS BY PAUL ANDERSEN/ASPEN JOURNALISM


AROUNDASPEN

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

MORE WILDWOOD SCHOOL MORE PHOTOS from the Wildwood School benefit called “Go Green.” Cherie Oates, who already this year was elected to the Aspen Hall of Fame, has now been named “Senior Citizen of the Year” by the Ptkin County Senior Center. Her cousin, Bill Marolt, also recently received MARY the SnowSports ESHBAUGH HAYES Recognition Award from the SnowSports Industries America. Undercurrent...The big snow will hold up our gardening for awhile...but makes it easier to pull up the Quackgrass.

GO GREEN Alison, Lynn and Phil Eastley.

GO GREEN Britta Gustafson and Heather Merritt, who was chairwoman for the event.

GO GREEN Tiffany and Michael Ernemann and daughter-in-law Ashley Ernemann.

GO GREEN Blair Caibsane and Anne Cheyne.

GO GREEN

GO GREEN

Bob and Meghan Holmes.

Chris and Heather Macdonald.

GO GREEN Lisa Poole and Adrienne Nelson.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/LITERATURE

ART IN TRANSIT ASK MOST ROARING FORK Valley bus commuters what they achieved on their morning RFTA rides this winter and you’ll most often hear that they read the local papers, listened to podcasts, napped, or maybe moved up a few levels playing Candy Crush Saga. Glenwood Springs-based artist Annette Roberts-Gray used six months’ worth of morning bus rides to paint the daily view from her seat. The resulting collection of work, “Commuter Watercolors,” is now on display at the R2 Gallery in Carbondale’s Third Street Center. From November through April, Roberts-Gray brought a small kit bag on her morning ride from West Glenwood, packing six or seven brushes, a pencil, a selection of paints, a few 6-inch square blocks of paper, a small palate and a little bottle of water. Using her bus-eye-view, she’d pencil in the landscape, then fill in its color, and then add the sky or clouds above. Arriving at the Carbondale parkand-ride stop at the conclusion of her 20-minute ride, she’d pack her brushes, dump out the water, and call her work done. The aim of the project, says Roberts-Gray, was to condense her work with a simple, powerful aesthetic. “The most important thing, and I don’t think I’ve fully learned it yet, was being able to do a lone brush stroke and make it mean something,” she says. “That’s what I’m aiming for.” The immediacy and permanence of

working in watercolor was instructive on that front, she explains. She’s worked in other mediums — ranging from painting to ceramics to junkmail sculpture — but went back to watercolor on the bus to give herself a set time limit. “It seemed like I had more of a problem of overworking the piece, and with watercolors you don’t really have another chance,” she says. “It’s not like with oils when you can go back and erase and redo everything.” The show features nearly 40 of her watercolors, including a handful that fall outside the parameters of the bus painting project featuring Florida beach scenes. Spending her time on the bus intently studying the view, RobertsGray says, made her see the local landscape with new eyes, taking in the changing hues of sky from day to

day, the morphing colors on canyon walls between periods of snowfall, and the lost and gauzy feel of a whiteout. “It was just a personal goal I set for myself, to address the issue of condensing the moment and getting that little scene done,” she explains. Walking through Roberts-Gray’s exhibit and taking in these small, impressionistic watercolors, you gain an appreciation for the incremental daily transformations of the local wintertime landscape — the hints of color that peak through the snow one day and fade back to white the next. Her first attempt (titled “First Commuter Watercolor,” painted Nov. 26) shows the reds and browns of the lower valley’s canyon walls in early winter. “Snowing Lightly” offers glimpses of distant mountains, bathed in white, with houses and pines in

the foreground. “Snow is Melting, 23 Degrees” shows just that, with greens emerging from a shroud of white. “Sopris from Red Canyon,” from mid-winter, displays a snowcapped Mt. Sopris majestically framed by the greens and reds of the canyon. One of the last pieces in the series, “Spring is on the Way,” from April 16, gives us the valley unthawing itself, with the green grass and red rock emerging again in the sun. She rarely received questions from fellow bus passengers about what she was up to, Roberts-Gray says, as most keep their eyes on their newspapers and phones. The show is on display alongside a retrospective of Robert Johnson’s furniture at the R2. Roberts-Gray and others will hold a panel discussion there on Thursday, May 22 at 5:30 p.m.

IF YOU GO... ‘COMMUTER WATERCOLORS’ Through June 6 R2 Gallery, Third Street Center Carbondale

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Ma y 22 - Ma y 2 8 , 2014

Annette Roberts-Gray with her “Commuter Watercolors.”

PHOTO BY AUBREE DALLAS


by ANDREW TRAVERS

“IT WAS JUST A PERSONAL GOAL I SET FOR MYSELF, TO ADDRESS THE ISSUE OF CONDENSING THE MOMENT AND GETTING THAT LITTLE SCENE DONE.” — ANNETTE ROBERTS-GRAY

PHOTO (TOP) BY AUBREE DALLAS; INSET IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THELISTINGS

MAY 22 - 28, 2014

nonprofits, and learn about the organizations’ missions and volunteer opportunities while enjoying wines and snacks. To reserve a nonprofit booth for your organization, email events@aspenypa. org. Participating nonprofits must register in advance. Booth space is $75 and payable by check.

aspensciencecenter.org, or for more information, contact Jackie at jfrancis@aspensciencecenter.org. Suggested donation: adults $20, kids $10.

THE BIG EASY BRAIN TEASY TRIVIA EXTRAVAGANZA — 7:30 p.m., Square Grouper, 304 E. Hopkins, Aspen. Free to play with prizes.

DJ NAKA G — 10 p.m., Belly Up, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. No one younger than 18 permitted. $5 surcharge for those younger than 21.

LIVE MUSIC — 9 p.m., BB’s Lounge, 525 E. Cooper Ave., Suite 201, Aspen.

MONDAY, MAY 26

SUNSQUABI (DJ SET) WITH KROOKED DRIVERS — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. A three-piece featuring guitarist/producer Kevin Donohue, bassist Andrew Clymer and drummer Chris Anderson. Electronic elements with funk, blues and progressive rock. No cover. $5 surcharge for those younger than 21. HEAR Portland-based Fruition plays a free show at Belly Up on Tuesday, May 27.

ONGOING IN RETRO — All Day, Woody Creek Community Center, 6 Woody Creek Plaza, Woody Creek. Come to see a retrospective art show featuring the work of Betty Weiss at the Woody Creek Community Center. Betty Weiss, of Aspen, Colorado, does abstract visual artwork, exploring the interaction between form, texture, and color. She uses acrylic mediums and elements of collage. She is a resident artist of the Red Brick Center for the Arts in Aspen. Her work has been chosen for exhibition in numerous juried shows in the Midwest and in Colorado, and she is represented in private collections nationally and internationally. Betty says of her work,’I find continual joy in the exploration and interaction of form, texture, and color. I strive to bring forth that focus to the viewer of my work.’ Show runs May 1 through May 31. 970-922-2342

WEDNESDAY, MAY 21 TEEN BOOK-TO-FILM — 3 p.m., Pitkin County Library, 120 N. Mill St., Aspen. Movies are selected by teens for teens, and refreshments are provided. This month is “The Mortal Instruments: The City of Bones.” “PARTICLE FEVER” — 7:30 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, 320 E.

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Hyman Ave., Aspen. This documentary follows the inside story of the scientists launching the Large Hadron Collider, the biggest and most expensive experiment in history. With input from 10,000 scientists from more than 100 countries, the project had the goal of explaining the origin of all matter. Physicist-turned-filmmaker Mark Levinson focuses on key scientists and explores the friendly competition between theoretical and experimental physicists, creating a narrative that captures the action as it is happening. Length: 99 minutes. “THE LUNCHBOX” — 7:30 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, 320 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen. This film hinges on an error by Mumbai, India’s Dabbawallahs, the city’s lunchbox-delivery community, resulting in an unlikely friendship between strangers. Rated PG. In Hindi with English subtitles. Length: 104 minutes. BARREL PROOF — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. No one younger than 18 permitted. $5 surcharge for those younger than 21. Colorado alternative, rock and ’90s punk.

THURSDAY, MAY 22 NONPROFIT FAIR AND WINE TASTING — 6 p.m., Hotel Jerome, 330 E. Main St., Aspen. Free for members, $15 for nonmembers. Meet the people behind more than 30 local

Ma y 22 - Ma y 2 8 , 2014

LIVE MUSIC WEEKENDS — 4 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen.

KARAOKE WITH SANDMAN — 9 p.m., Ryno’s Pies and Pints, 430 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Song list available at www.songbookslive. com/sandman. FRUITION — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. String-infused quintet. OPEN MIC — 10 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen.

THURSDAY NIGHT KARAOKE — 10 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen.

FRIDAY, MAY 23 JES GREW — 10 p.m., Belly Up, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. No one younger than 21 permitted. No cover before 10 p.m.; $5 afterward. Originals and rock ’n’ roll classics.

SATURDAY, MAY 24 LIVE MUSIC WEEKENDS — 4 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen.

TUESDAY, MAY 27 MEET BRUCE MACHART, ASPEN WRITERS’ FOUNDATION WRITER IN RESIDENCE — 6 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center, 6 Woody Creek Plaza, Woody Creek. Author of the novel “The Wake of Forgiveness” and the short-story collection “Men in the Making.” A limited number of free copies of the novel are available through the foundation’s Catch and Release program. More information and pickup locations for books are at www. aspenwriters.org. 970-922-2342

KINETIX PERFORMING A TRIBUTE TO THE RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Anyone younger than 18 must be accompanied by parent or guardian. No cover before 10 p.m.; $5 afterward. $5 surcharge for those younger than 21. High-energy show blending party rock, funk, pop, hip-hop and live electronica.

MUSIC TUESDAYS — 7 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center, 6 Woody Creek Plaza, Woody Creek. Local band The Crowlin Ferlies, led by Sandy Munro, plays traditional acoustic Irish music and will alternate weeks with local band Thunderclaw, led by Travis Blair. Blair plays originals as well as standard folk and rock songs. 970-922-2342

MEMPHIS LINZY — 9:30 p.m., Square Grouper, 304 E. Hopkins Ave., No. 1, Aspen. Live music.

LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC — 10 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen.

SUNDAY, MAY 25

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

ASPEN SCIENCE CENTER SUNDAYS — Noon, Jimmy’s, 205 S. Mill St, Aspen. Appetizers and snacks will be provided. Each week will feature educational and interactive stations geared to entertain families, kids and adults. Preregistration is requested at www.

BASSNECTAR — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S Galena St, Aspen. BASSNECTAR is one of the longest standing and most respected artists in American electronic dance music, commonly referred to simply as the EDM scene. $136 GA / $246 Reserved

COURTESY PHOTO


C L A S S I F I E D S @ A S P E N T I M E S .C O M

Wordpress Developer Want to put your coding talents to work while working at a great company?

Electricians

R&A Enterprises

Jobs Child Care Part Time Nanny Part time SUMMER NANNY NEEDED JUNE 20-AUG 22 IN BASALT for girls age 9 & 7. Want local events, outdoor activities, and healthy f o o d . E m a i l shannon@closeconcerns .com with PART TIME NANNY in subject line for info.

Hire Me Experienced RN available. Flexible hours. References. Reliable & compassionate care to meet your needs. 303 945 1504

Child Care Special Needs Nanny for Summer Full time SPECIAL NEEDS NANNY WANTED JUNE 20-AUG 22 IN BASALT for a 6 year old child. Want local events, outdoor activities, and healthy f o o d . E m a i l shannon@closeconcerns .com with "Special Needs NANNY" in subject line for info.

Health Care Emergency Room RN (fulltime w/ benefits)

Aspen Valley Hospital is looking for a fulltime ER RN with a minimum of 2yrs of ER experience. This is a nights position (6 on / 8 off) with some call. For more info or to apply please visit AspenValleyHospital.org

Director of Advancement Aspen Country Day School, a coeducational nonsectarian independent nursery-8th grade school for over 200 students on a picturesque campus in Aspen, Colorado seeks an experienced Director of Advancement to direct and to expand the annual capital, and planned giving programs; the alumni program; publications; and special events and supervises the volunteers in these areas.

The School which was founded in 1969 in the spirit of Aspen itself, with its convergence of world-class intellectual pursuits and the arts, and a stunning outdoor beauty. Appropriately, the school describes its inspiration as the Aspen Idea of developing Mind, Body and Spirit. Candidates should have: 1) experience in designing and implementing a creative and professional full scale development program., 2) the ability to oversee, to motivate, and to supervise staff, 3) a track record in working with volunteers and trustees, 4) superior organizational, interpersonal, and communication skills. Preference will be given to candidates who have worked in an educational setting. The Director of Advancement will report and work closely with the Head of School. The ideal start date is September, 2014. A competitive salary and benefits will be offered. Additional information about the School can be found on the Website: aspencountryday.org. Interested candidates should send a letter of inquiry, a resume and a writing sample electronically to: Josh Wolman, Aspen Country Day School Head of School elect, wolmanj@sidwell.edu

Sell your vehicle,

guaranteed,

when you place an auto photo ad for a month!

Hospitality PT Front Desk Hotel Durant Front Desk Exp. req. Email Resume info@durantaspen.com www.durantaspen.com

Office/Clerical Administrative Assistant is needed

Trades/ Construction

The position is based in one of the following locations: Reno or Carson City, NV or the Colorado mountains: Vail, Aspen, Frisco, Gypsum, Glenwood Springs, or Granby. Submit resume and cover letter to rmoulton@swiftcom.com.

CARETAKER - Live in. 26 yr. local. Trustworthy, Accountable. 970.544.4946

Hospitality

Activities Coordinator for Snowmass Tourism Guest Services. Thurs 3p-5p and Fridays 6-8p . June 19 - Aug 20. $20/hr Contract position. swhittingham@snowma sstourism.com or 970.922.2297 References required.

Apply Today!

Hire Me

A S P E N T I M E S .C O M / P L AC E A D

Activities Coordinator

Swift Communications is looking for a talented Wordpress developer to work on a unique combination of websites. If you’re a quick-learner who is well versed in the LAMP stack, able to work effectively with teams across the country and possesses a good understanding of HTML, CSS, JS, AJAX, XML and OOP we want to hear from you. Got a solid understanding of responsive design principlesand mobile web/apps development? Well, that’s even better.

M O N DAY- F R I DAY 8 : 3 0 A M TO 5 : 0 0 P M 970.925.9937

Now hiring Experienced Apprentice, Journeyman, and Service Electricians for work throughout the Roaring Fork and Vail Valleys. Skills/Qualifications: • 3rd, 4th year apprentice, Journeyman, and Master Electricians • High End Residential and Commercial Experience a MUST • Team Player • Flexible hours and schedule to support a growing company • Positive "can do" attitude in a fast pace high volume environment • Physical hands-on environment • Must have basic hand tools as employer will provide specialty tooling. Salary/Wage negotiable based on experience and advancement opportunities Excellent wage and benefit package includes: 401k Plan w/match Health Insurance Truck/Gas Holiday/Vacation Pay based on Journeyman/Master Electrician licensing Please apply at: 5317 County Road 154, Suite 201, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

Administrative Assistant is needed Hunt group of companies Richard Klint 8552971426 richardrich009@gmail.c om 726 W. Francis St Aspen CO

Executive Assistant Part-time Professional assistant needed to assist in running small non profit. Communicate with members, help with budgets, assist in event planning Long term commitment wanted. High school education or GED required. Experienced required.

Tons of applicants!

Office/Clerical Personal Assistant PT/FT Personal Assistant to Interior Designer. Must have experience & references. Must be energetic and enthusiastic. Please email resume to hogg@rof.net

Restaurant/ Clubs Assistant Manager / Food Runners / Back Servers / Hosts bb's is hiring back servers, food runners, hosts for the summer season. Experience and references required. Forward resumes to: Christina@bbskitchen.com or apply in person at 525 E. Cooper Ave. Tuesday through Saturday between 3 and 5 PM

mountainqueen @mountainqueen.com

Front & Back of House Hiring - Finbarr's Irish Pub, Carbondale. Contact Joe or Glenn 970-963-0300 or info@finbarrspub.com Carbondale CO Full time Restaurant Manager Well established restaurant seeks year round manager. Strong management background required. Fun, active environment. Inquiries confidential. Email resume: Fulltimemanager646@g mail.com

Professional Director of Development

Please Recycle Exp. Bookkeeper For small condo complex, 15 units, 1 day per week. Please Email resume & references to

Restaurant/ Clubs

HOPS Culture is hiring Full-time Servers, Bussers, Runners, and AM Cooks. www.hopsculture.com/c areers/

Director of Development sought immediately for full time position at Theatre Aspen. Experience required. Contact john@theatreaspen.org 110 E. Hallam St. 103 Aspen CO 81611 970-300-4301.

ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL ADVERTISER We received over 100 resumes for the Personal Assistant ad we ran!! The ad was a huge success and we are now sorting through all the resumes to find that perfect applicant. Thank you for posting the ad!! Thank you so much for all the help!

~SAMMIE

CALLING ALL If you love having a clean inbox, helping awesome coworkers find important answers and get excited about the words “process,” “protocol,” and “escalate,” then we should talk. Like, soon. Swift Communications, Inc. seeks a highly motivated individual with excellent written and verbal communication skills to assist in coordination, management, trafficking and reporting of Employee Services Desk tickets, as well as internal employee relations. Read the full job description at www.swiftcom.com/?p=4977. Email cover letter, resume and three references to careers@swiftcom.com. Please put “ES Coordinator” in the subject line. A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Rentals Aspen

Rentals Aspen

1BD 1BA Core 1.5 blck to Gondola, Seasonal/Annual, NS/NP, $2350/Mo. Avail 6/1. 646-335-5400

Rentals Rentals Housing Wanted

1BD/1BA in quiet neighborhood 3 blks from downtown. Cute and nicely furnished, lots of light and porch with views. W/D, water, cable, wifi included. N/S, no dogs. $1,900 + electric. 970-948-7954

Roommates Wanted Carbondale: 1BD/1BA in shared house on river. Furn. Garage, Wireless Wifi, NS/NP. $850 incl. all utils. 970-618-5221

2BD/2BA Prime location! core/furn/ski-in. Deluxe, vltd clngs/skylts/grnt kchn. W/D DW NS/NP. Prkg LT lease starts 6/1.$3795 + utilities. 847-997-4321 ajaxcondorental.com #8

Rentals Aspen

Dwntwn Core Duplex, Summer Rntl: 3 BD 3.5 BA Furn&Equipd. Perfectly Maintnd, AMtn Views $30,000/mo, Lse, 970-925-1677, Broker, cschmidt@rof.net

Frias Properties of Aspen

• For the person who appreciates quality, a highly renovated, furnished, 1Br/1Ba Unit with W/D. Lease start date to begin 6/10. $2000 mo plus utilities. • Furnished Studio, $1600 mo which includes utilities. Hunter Creek amenities include a pool, tennis courts and hot tubs. Just a short stroll to Aspen! All leases are longterm, minimum oneyear. No pets, No Smoking.

2 Co m m e r c i a l Private/upscale Offices Furnished.approx 106 Sq. 6 month or 1 year lease.Call Kathleen 970-618-2044 Aspen 715 West Main Suite 103 Aspen CO

Rentals Long & Short term avail. Sybrina Stevens 970-379-1501

1BD/1BA Apt in lower Woody Creek home, part furn, W/D, FP, NS/NP, 1 yr lease, $1250/mo includes heat & electric. 1st, last, damage/ security. Avail NOW. Ref’s req’d. Ray 970-309-9007

Studio on the Mall, balcony, incl util, w/d, furnished $2200/ unfurnished $1800, 1yr 970 920 6512

Hunter Creek Properties, Inc.

Longtime local working at RUEDI looking to park fully self contained rv in area please call Brad 970-306-2611

3 Bdrm 3-1/2 Bath West End Home - Available mid-June to mid-Aug. Also 1 Bdrm 1 Bath Turn-Key Apt in West End, Avail. now until mid-July. 970-925-8623 Aspen

Rentals Aspen

One bedroom located in downtown Southpoint. Long term. Parking. $2500 includes utilities. Joe 970-925-1510.

Upscale Furnished Luxury Studio. Out Door Hot-tub, parking pass, walk everywhere, incl utilities & cable tv, $1750/mo. 561-866-2145 Woody Creek Barn Loft Apt W/D. No pets. $2,000 outfitter738@rof.net 970-379-3474

Rentals Basalt Area

2BD 2.5BA unfurn apt. 2 car carport, W/D. NO PETS $1400/mo. +

RENTED

2BD/2BA Condo Downtown Basalt NS/NP 1800/mo. includes utill.970-948-7358 3BD/2BA Arbor Park Townhome, 2 car garage, decks, W/D, walk to town & schools, pets considered, $2100/mo. Avail 6/1. Scott Davidson: 970-948-4800 scott@zgaspen.com

Please Recycle

Rentals Basalt Area

Rentals Carbondale

Rentals Snowmass

3Bd/2½Ba Luxury Townhome. 2 Car Garage. Outdoor space. $2600/mo. 970-948-1341

Live in the Rockies! 400 Sq. Ft. Apt. Located on 35 Acres, 15 miles from the hwy. Beautiful, Serene property. $750/Mo. Util incl. No Cable 970-261-7310

4BD/3½BA + Office Furn. Pets Considered. $5000/mo. Long Term. 970-404-4921 or 379-1614

4BD/2.5BA Willits Single Family Home, Fenced Yard, Great Location, Avail 6/7 @ 2,350/mo (916) 899-3415 4 bd/4.5 ba Gorgeous high-end Basalt unfurn home 3 acres Avail 7/1 $3,700+ (970) 948-5858 High End 3bdrm, 2 ½ BA, Southside 1/2 Duplex (1900 sq ft), Private Yard, Jacuzzi, Steam Sh., Fireplace, 2-outdoor balconies off bdrms, front porch, patio, AC, WD, Basalt Mtn. Views, 2-car gar., walk to town and bus. N/S, small pet negot., $2800/per mos. June 1. 970-319-0193.

5BD/2.5BA 35 Acre Ranch. katefrankelrentals.com/ snowmass. 773-294-2051

Rentals Glenwood Springs VILLAGE GREEN TOWNHOMES! FP, DW, W/D, Great community, beautiful landscaped play area. Large 1, 2, & 3 bdrms $875 - $1375 970-945-6622

Rentals Snowmass 2bd/2ba Woodbridge Condo. Top floor with deck and extra sleeping lofts. Fully furnished, on bus route with pool. Includes utilities. Available June 2nd. $2,800/mo. 1st/last/security. 970-379-8333

RE Mobile/ Manufactured Homes Aspen School District, 3BD 3BA SFH $5000/mo 1 yr lease. Pets OK. Sinclair Lane, Melton Ranch, SMV. Scott (970) 618-7909

Did you know more people read a newspaper on a typical Sunday than watched the 2011 Super Bowl?

Rentals Commercial/Retail Willits, Basalt SFH 4BR/3+BA - approx 2900sq ft. Gas Fire Place, SS App, Steam Sh. + more. Pets negotiable. No smoking. $3,000/mo. First, last & security. 1yr (or LT) lease. 970-948-8588, db@bccaccounting.com

2Br/2Ba Slopeside Condo

Fireplace, balcony, beautifully remodeled. Pool, hot tub & fitness center. $3,500 Long Term 970-544-3771

AABC OFFICE: 1000sqft with 3 large offices, conference room, great light, AC, Private Entry & Bath. 970-618-3544 www.aspenabc.com

Aspen - $19,500,000

Aspen $22,950,000

Breathtaking Hallam Lake Estate Charming Old World Estate located on over an acre and backing to Hallam Lake nature preserve. With just a short walk to the Aspen Institute this is truly one of the best properties in Aspen.

6BR 9BA. Aspen Living at its Best is had at this 14,000sqft home on a 5 acre estate nestled in a peaceful and protected setting within a private gated community.

Mobile Home. Free mobile home, currently in Silt. 1970 Grand Western Mobile Home 24'x60'3 Bedroom 2 Baths. This home must be moved. Spacious home ready to find a new place to live. This home includes large living room, carpet throughout. If you can move it you can have it. For more information, please contact amanda@canberraconcretepumping.com or 970-379-1828

ClassifiedMarketplace Jobs Rentals Real Estate Transportation Merchandise Recreation Pets Farm Services Announcements

Aspen - $515,000

Aspen - $12,000,000

Aspen - $18,900,000

Stunning Victorian Home with mountain contemporary renovation in West End close to Aspen Institute. $8,500,000 or $12,000.000 w/ adjacent lot.

New Luxury Riverfront Estates Amazing compound w 4 homes(2 New). Multiple purchase options starting at $9.1M. Open Sat & Sun 12-5. From Woody Creek Tavern drive west .3mi, turn left at Doc Henry Rd to property on left.

Ryan & Matt Podskoch

303 579 2725 or 970 236 6672 Info@InvestInColorado.com InvestInColorado.com

Mary Ellen Sheridan

303 579 2725 or 970 236 6672 Info@InvestInColorado.com InvestInColorado.com

303 579 2725 or 970 236 6672 Info@InvestInColorado.com InvestInColorado.com

Ryan & Matt Podskoch

303 579 2725 or 970 236 6672 Info@InvestInColorado.com InvestInColorado.com

Ryan & Matt Podskoch

Basalt - $340,000 per lot

Basalt - $330,000

Basalt - $759,000

Carbondale - $375,000

Carbondale - $395,000

Expansive Valley Views Two adjoining lots in Hoaglund Ranch (1.37 or 1.63 acres), can be purchased individually or together to create a private retreat. Build up to 5,750 sq. ft. per lot. Water rights, gorgeous views.

Great mid-valley location at one of the most desired neighborhoods. Top floor, 2 Bed/2 Bath condo. End-unit with extra corner windows. Views overlooking the Willits Lake. Stainless steel appliances. Private deck. Stackable washer/dryer.

Private, peaceful and remote, yet only 10 minutes from Highway 82. Beautiful log home built in 2001. Recent renovation. Room to roam for horses, snowmobiling & other recreational activities. No HOA. Borders BLM lands.

This adorable family home has an open floor plan with vaulted ceilings and good light. Yard with patio and mature landscaping. Backs-up to open fields. New roof and just painted interior.

Walk to Downtown Beautifully maintained Townhome. Three levels, 3BD, 1 car garage, bonus room on lower level with a wood stove, Cozy outdoor patio and landscaped front yard.

Tom Carr

Tom Carr

970-948-4103 marguerite.dykann@sothebysrealty.com www.AspenSnowmassSIR.com

Brenda Wild

970-379-2299 brendawildaspen@gmail.com

970.379.9935 www.aspenreinfo.com

Ryan & Matt Podskoch

970.379.9935 www.aspenreinfo.com

Marguerite Dykann

1bd/1ba furnished Aspen Condo. Views of Aspen Mt.. Adjacent to Hunter Creek Trail. Bamboo, Stainless, Pool, Jacuzzi, Tennis Courts. Walk or shuttle to Gondola, Restaurants, Shopping. 970-618-2696 mes2696@msn.com AspenRealEstates.co

Brenda Wild

970-379-2299 brendawildaspen@gmail.com

Real Estate Photo Ads ~ Aspen Times Weekly

970-925-9937 classifieds@aspentimes.com 30

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K L Y V May 22, 2014


Carbondale - $299,000

Carbondale - $648,000

Comm./Grand Junction-$639,000

Glenwood Springs - $1,150,000

Glenwood Springs - $668,500

Build your dream home at this premier location at River Valley Ranch. Spectacular Mount Sopris views overlooking fairway. Enjoy the many amenities of RVR Golf Community... golf, swimming, parks, hiking, biking and more.

VIEWS OF MT. SOPRIS Your next home is perched above the valley floor, beautiful views & all day sun. Over 2 acres, 7BD and an updated kitchen. New septic with drain field &irrigation. So much home for a great price.

Office/retail building 1 block from Main St. in beautiful downtown GJ. 10,000+ sqft.,offices, lobby, kitchen, conference rms & storage. Private parking lot & convenient street parking. Close to shops, restaurants, hotels & post office.

Creek-side home on fenced-in four acres in Canyon Creek, west of Glenwood Springs. 3 bedroom, 4 bathroom house with large kitchen and master bedroom. One fifth mile of creek side water, Two apartments, workshop and greenhouse.

PRICELESS VIEWS IN SPRINGRIDGE • 3,073 sq. ft. custom home • 1.37 acres • Built in 2007 - 3-car garage • MLS #134086

Tom Carr

970-379-2299 brendawildaspen@gmail.com

Call for Appointment Buyers agents welcome 970-376-3328

970.379.4997 michelle@vlgrealtors.com www.vlgrealtors.com

Glenwood Springs - $692,500.00

Snowmass - $1,635,000

970.379.9935 www.aspenreinfo.com

Under Construction: 5 bedroom, 3 ba, huge family rm, 3300 sq ft. 2 car over sized garage. Upgrades: Radiant heat, granite slab counter tops, hardwood flooring. 3.5 acres on cul du sac in Elk Springs SELLER Chance or Pam FSBO / Offering RE commission 970-309-5740

Brenda Wild

Spacious 5+BD home. End of road bordering ranch property. Gorgeous lot features a pond & sound of flowing water with a small creek. Constructed in 2008, this well-built home features windows throughout capturing scenic views.

Tom Carr

19ft, Sleeps 4, indoor & outdoor shower, AC, Awning, High end audio/video system. Call for more details! Price Reduced!! $38,500 obo. 970-948-0005

Michelle James

Now is the time to buy a home. Call a Realtor® today.

970.379.9935 www.aspenreinfo.com

Airstream Bambi Special Edition-2008

Trans portation

Dale Beede, CCIM

970-244-6615 dbeede@cbcworldwide.com www.grandjunctioncommercial.com

Audi All Road 2003

Audi Allroad 2013

Audi Quattro A6 Sedan - 2007

New Tires, windshield, engine coils, head gasket, oil pan 100,000 miles Runs great! $8,995 970.331.5312

Must Have - Audi Allroad 2013 Prestige - very luxurious. Black - tan leather, sunroof. Below KBB Like new was dealers car - one owner 20k miles, automatic AWD Fun, Fast, Safe. $41,000 970-379-4294

3.2, all options, brilliant black, amaretto interior, technology package, convenience package, premium package, new tires, new battery, 54,000 miles always garaged. $20,500 Call: 970-379-8555

FleetwoodTioga SL 31' 2003

Ford Explorer 2009

Harley Davidson FXDL Dyna - 2008

Excellent condition. 48+k miles. Sleeps 6-8 people. Lots of upgrades.

Ford Explorer 2009 $15,000 XLT 82500 Sunroof. CD player. Luggage rack. Ellie (970) 920-1160 $15,000 (970) 920-1160

8400 Miles, 2-Tone Blue Suede Pearl, 6 speed, 96 cu. in. Immaculate Condition!

BMW X5 2007

Dodge Ram 3500 2006

2007 BMW X5. Excellent Condition. 85K miles, AWD, 6-Cyl. 3.0 Liter, Great gas mileage. Moon Roof, Heated Leather, Recent New Tires.

5.9 Turbo Diesel, 6 speed manual, 89K miles, Brand new tires, new brakes, running boards, BMW drop down hitch.

$20,500 OBO 970.948.7455

$33,000 Josh in Silt 719-989-0774

Harley Davidson Heritage 2012

Jeep Wrangler - 2000

Jeep Wrangler 2012

Jeep Wrangler Rubicon - 2007

KAWASAKI KLR 650cc 2007

1900 miles, Leather bags, 103 cubic inch motor.

SUMMER READY! 44k, Auto, Oversized Tires. Great Condition. In Eagle, CO

Best buy in Aspen, only 2,600 miles, freedom hard top, also included full soft top, “Never used” auto, AC, PS.

2 door, 20K miles

$15,500 970-618-6280

$23,412 970-948-7271

Asking $23,000

$8900 970-390-3020

13,500 miles also includes two pelican (hard) cases best in market for touring! Contact Ben $3,900 970-987-4001

Kawasaki Ninja 650R 2006

KTMSMC 625 2005

Land Rover Discovery SE 2003

Mercedes Itasca Navion Iq. 2011

Phazer II Snowmobile 1991

2006 Kawasaki Ninja 650R 12,000mi. in good condition. New tires and battery. Includes stock handle bars, wind screen, and cover. Contact Pete plhar04@gmail.com $4200 OBO.

KTM SMC 625 2005 $3,100.00 Good condition. 8300 miles 970-274-1259 $3,100.00 970-274-1259

115k miles. Great condition. New belts, water pump, power steering hose. 110k service done. Heated seats, dual sunroof, black leather. Very well Maintained. 6,500 obo 970-309-4060

‘SOLD’

Fresh air kit long track, ski skins, runs and looks great 3,781 miles .

$34,500 Maddy 970-379-3694

Asking $12,000 OBO. Please call: 970-379-4850

970-984-7082

$1200.00 Call David 970.618.2003 A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Sundowner LQ Horse Trailer 2001

Volkswagon Toureg 2007

Volvo xc70 2002

3 horse slant w/Mangers, 8'6" short wall, Dinette, A.C., Heat, Shower, Solar, Hayrack, Lg. Fridge, Rear Tack Fully self contained, Lovingly maintained

Red. 4 door. Excellent condition. 62k Auto transmission. V6 AWD. Bike rack. Heated seats. Leather seats. jayeng1990@gmail.com

$25,500 970-948-2156

$13,000 970-404-1144

Auto Parts/ Accessories 4 Tiresfrom Chevy HHR 16" 100.00 2 Yokohoma with Discount Tire Cert. Carbondale Good condition. Adele Hause 5 2 0 5 9 1 2 6 8 3 adelehause@gmail.com

Computer/Supplies

Merch andise

Pro Comp All Terrain set of 4 tires 315/75r16

970-977-1030 Autos

AVALANCHE AUTOMOTIVE LLC

05 Subaru Outback Auto. 152K. We finance anyone with approved credit. BUY HERE PAY HERE. Hwy 24 in Minturn. (970) 827-5336.

19th century glass front Chinese cabinet w/ 2 drawers. $1,500.00 Aspen Good condition. Bill 907-925-6228

Macbook Air 11" $825 Purchased in February for $1,100. Excellent condition with 120 gig ssd drive, 4 gig memory, and over 11 hours of battery life. Includes one year applecare warr a n t y . E a g l e 970-390-9787 [cid:7FAD23B6-4D4B-4C6 9-B38E-5900777FA925]

Furniture/Home Furnishings LEATHER RECLINING SOFA

Cameras/Photo Equipment Excellent condition. 70 wide, 39 height, 36 deep. Two different reclining positions. Makes a comfy bed. $400. Call Tim 970 948 4890

Collectibles

Jewelry RON"THE GOLD GUY "

Vintage Chamonix Ski Poster, mounted on linen, framed & in mint Condition. 50”x40” Perfect for your mountain ski home! $1,100 OBO Terry: 678-464-3858

Computer/Supplies

$4,000 Call 563-506-3326

Pickups

Dell Business Class Latitude Laptops $199.00

W/ 1 Year Warranty. 16 Year Old Austin Company Sells Dell Equipment at 70-80% Off Retail. Delivered Direct to Your Door. Order by 4pm and your laptop or computer ships the same day. Order online at DiscountElectronics.com

Ford F150 1986 Extended cab $900 970.376.3686

Electronics Sony 40 inch LCD Television. Bravia Model KDL-VX40XBR1. Excellent condition. In Basalt. $199.99 firm. Call 9703790742 for more info.

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Call Jesse at: 512-459-0146 or email internet@discount electronics.com

Want To Buy/ Merchandise Want to purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K L Y V May 22, 2014

Jeep Wrangler Bumper $85. Good condition bumper, works on 2007 to 2014 Jeep Wranglers. Eagle 970-390-9787

REPUTABLE GOLDSMITH paying CASH for gold, silver, platinum jewelry, gold or silver coins, nuggets, sterling silver sets. Many loyal customers thank me for BEST RETURNS, BEST SERVICE and convenient appointments. I Recycle, Remake, and Repair. For today's spot see: ronthegoldguy.com. Call Ron (970) 390-8229

Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Soft Top $525 Purchased in 2010 for over $1,700. Works on 2007 to 2014 Unlimiteds. Great condition with less than one month use. Eagle 970-390-9787

Clutter Clearing

Newly licensed in January, and building clientele. 4 hand massage from husband and wife. $100 for 90 minutes!

Transform your Life This Clarity is a Gift Deborah 970-948-5663

Computers Canoes/Kayaks/ Row Boats

USED RAFTS

14ft. VanguardS.B. 15ft Vanguard S.B. Very Good Condition.

$2200 Each!

SOLD THEM!!!

We sell new equipment, OEM and compatible brand supplies for all printers. Brother Authorized Service.

Call us for estimates! (970) 241-3819 or (800) 723-5911

Call today... (970) 319-1832

Xerox 7125 Heavy Duty Business Copier. Nearly new. Scans, e-mails, faxes, letter, legal and 11x17, color, 2-sided, etc. Does everything a business needs! $6,500 new, now $3,000. Lewan & Assoc. servicing available. 970-925-6295

Feel the power. 80 percent of adults in households earning $100,000 or more read a newspaper in print or online each week.

Construction

Golf Scooter Honda 50CC Like new condition, only 1100 miles Great summer ride. Get over 100 miles per galon. $2400 970-309-2416 bego_gen@hotmail.co m

GOLF MEMBERSHIP ASPEN GLEN CLUB No initiation fee $595/month 970 456-7551

Snowmobiles

All types of stone and masonry works as well as landscaping & yard maintenance. 970-379-3081 or 970-928-0759

gerardobi@hotmail.com multyserviceconstruction.com

Please Recycle

Seven Elium carbon ti road bike for women approx. 5'5". Campy Record Triple. Mavic Wheels. Meticulously maintained. Great Ride. $1875. 970 925-5995

!Best massage you have ever had! Melody our new girl is here to give you a fantastic massage 20%off Oriental Massage: Clean, cozy, and comfortable. If you would like a massage by a professional Asian Masseuse come & experience a perfect body massage!! 818-913-6588 aspenorientalmassage.com

Ski Doo Summit Highmark 1000 X $ 2000 Aspen Good condition. Well Maintained 970-710-1026 Colin marshacr@yahoo.com

Lost Specialized Globe 17" 21spd town bike $350 Adam (970) 309-1747 aoskier@aol.com

Health & Beauty LASER TATTOO REMOVAL

Pets - Dogs

Bicycles/Mopeds

62cm Carrera road bike $825 (obo) Ultegra, new Ritchey carbon fork, new Shimano A500 wheels and tires Adam (970) 309-1747 aoskier@aol.com

Giant Anthem 0 XL SRAM X.0 $900 Aspen Good condition. Paul 970-618-6343 paul@zgtec.com. Fast bike.

(970)668-0998

Belgian Tervuren

litter 9 weeks, 1st shots, dew claws, dewormed, exceptional show quality. Michele 970-456-5177, v.gotlove@me.com Woman's Ibis Mountain Bike Ibis 2012 small women's specific mountain bike with carbon frame, Avid Elixir hydrolix brakes, Fox float in rear, lock shock with 130mm travel in the front, Shimano shifters with Shimano derailleur in the back. Great, lightweight all around MTB.$3,000. M o r e i n f o c a l l 970.306.9543 leave message.

• Ross Dickstein, MD alluremedaesthetics.com

Titanium Hand Built Merlin Road Bike. Size 50 cm In Carbondale come test drive.Triple chain ring. $975.00. Call Linda 970-618-4752.

Miscellaneous Merchandise Are you a coffee drinker but cannot find a large enough fresh selection? Here at Coffee Fool we sell 200 different varieties of fresh coffees straight from our roasting plant. We only ever sell the very finest, 100% high grade coffee in whole bean and 8 different grinds so you can brew your coffee any way you like. If this is your first time ordering with us, send us an email after you place your order and we will credit you back priority mail shipping as a welcome. Check us out at www.CoffeeFool.com But be warned! One sip and you too may become a Coffee Fool!

Jamis Comet 54" Road Bike $500 Aspen Paul 970-618-6343 paul@zgtec.com. Ultegra, Tripple. Great bike.

Please Recycle

Office

LEICA M9P Camera Pkg 4 Lens Superb condition. Call for details.Burnham W Arndt 970 925 8772 arndtburnham@gmail.c om

Volkwagen GTI - 2002 Fun to drive - 2.8 liter, 6 cylinder, 6 speed manual! 2 door hatchback, leather interior, heated front seats, premium stereo, great gas mileage. 165K miles.

Bicycles/Mopeds

Massage Therapy

Repairs most brands of computer printers at our location or yours.

info@avalancheautosales. com

Subaru Legacy Wagon 1999 2400.00 Limited edition. Hatchback. Good condition. 223K Manual transmission. AWD. Heated seats. Power windows. 970-989-8433 ymt1117@msn.com

Miscellaneous Merchandise

Hyde Drift Boat! Good Condition! $3000. Call Rick (970) 379-4630

Cleaning Service

aspensoothingtouchmassage.com

Antiques

in great condition with 80-85% remaining tread. Asking $450obo. Located in Gypsum Call with questions!

Volvo xc70 2002 208k miles. Good condition. Heated leather seats. All wheel drive. $4000 970-379-7618

Boats-Fishing

Landscaping, Mowing & Tilling Eusebio Esparza Landscape Services • Landscaping • Gardening • Fencing • Carpentry • Lawncare • Snow Removal

970.319.7454

eusebioesparza7@gmail.com

Painting

Service

Directory

Randall Painting • Painting • Staining 25 Years Experience Licenced & Insured. Call 970-274-1289

!!LOST DOG!! Goes by the name "Boomer", *Pit Bull mix, male, White with Brown spots. Extremely friendly! Boomer went missing from our farm in Gypsum last Thursday afternoon, if you have seen him, have him, or know who may have him PLEASE call: Larry Walker @ (970)376-4508, OR Dani Walker @ (970)401-4933, or email: walkcpra@gmail.com,w e are Extremely sad that he is missing, as he is not just a pet, but a part of our family and we miss and love him deeply! PLEASE HELP BRING BOOMER HOME TO HIS FAMILY!! $$There is a CASH R E W A R D , N O QUESTIONS ASKED$$

Announcements Aspen Homeless Shelter Needs Your Help! Donate today at 405 Castle Creek Rd. #16 or at our website

www.aspensafetynet.org


WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by ANDREW TRAVERS

BOOK REVIEW

‘LIVING THE LIFE’ MUCH TO SKI TOWN readers’ disappointment (or at least mine), no author has yet been able to deliver “The Great American Ski Bum Novel.” This elusive, hypothetical work of fiction would capture the seasonal rhythms of a ski town, the interior lives of people who build their lives around mountains and who spend six months of the year sliding down them — in short, it would do for skiing what “Solo Faces” did for rock-climbing and use the ski bum life as fodder for literature. David J. Rothman’s “Living the Life: Tales From America’s Mountains & Ski Towns” may be non-fiction — part memoir, part reportage, often something in-between — but it’s the closest thing I’ve found to my

by JOE DIPIETRO | edited by WILL SHORTZ

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Pat Nosed around Univ. divisions Early third-century year Univ. in Troy, N.Y. Quarter back, possibly Like some workers Edison’s middle name Irish chemist? Irish arborist? Harvey of Hollywood China’s Zhou ___ How pastrami is usually ordered Serenaded “Scary Movie,” for one Love letters? Irish secretary? Targets for a delivery One may take you in Mists Bird on a Canadian dollar All-human bridge? Barely bite When the day’s done, to Donne Irish algebra teacher? Missile Command maker Noodges Big name in restaurant reviews “Hard ___!” (nautical command) Digs of pigs When the day’s done, to Denis End of a game? Long, angry

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complaint Irish woodworker? Lie Part of a dishwasher California county or its seat Beat Jack-in-the-pulpit, e.g. Finger-pointer ___ City (Baghdad area) Lie Irish mountain climber? Family nickname Canadian blockhead Suffix with zinc Victory goddess Set crowd, maybe Where the Storting meets Light reddishbrown horses Irish dogsled racer? 1979 Roman Polanski film Places for fuel Places for panels Fall shade Some investment bonds, for short Band with the 1974 No. 1 hit “The Night Chicago Died” Irish health care worker? Irish painter? Do sometimes called a “natural” Support “So true” Yard filler, maybe Snorkeling locale Director von Sternberg Put up with “___ not!”

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Ties Problem in bed, for some Like some bands with only modest Western popularity Light quanta Burning sensation? Calvary inscription Richard of “A Summer Place” ___ Bums (Brooklyn Dodgers nickname) Suddenly strike Novel ending Rice dish Anklebones ___-Caps (candy) Steal, as a vehicle Chaucer work that invokes the book of Job, with “The” Tony-winning actress Judith Still-life subject Jai alai basket ___ Johansson, 1959-60 world heavyweight champion AAA service Protestant denom. One who bugs people? Riddles with bullets Christmas Day urging Compact Positive principle Versatile bean Pith helmet Voiced some pleasure Breeze Quote Advantage, with “up”

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“Tony n’ ___ Wedding” Springfield Plateau area Pour Numismatist’s classification Preinstalled iPhone browser Setting set Montréal suburb Côte St.-___ Hard drive malfunction Pear or quince Utah city One of the Gandhis Foot bone Indian princesses Orphic hymn charmer “Let’s shake!” Prepare the first course, say Pitcher Hershiser Lighting expert? “Great” birds Marie Curie, e.g.: Abbr. About Got sick “I’ll be right with you” Some distance races Marks (out) Depressed-looking Cover with new shingles She married Bobby on “The Sopranos” Social welfare org. Eastern wrap: Var. Bonito relatives Possible water contaminator Tailored Barbra’s “Funny Girl” co-star

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mountaineering triumph — it’s a meditative, observant and gracefully written take on skiing, not as a sport but as a way of life. Unlike other sports, he observes, “skiing does not create a bounded playing field but rather accepts and transforms the places where we pursue it.” It can also, Rothman shows, transform the people who pursue it.

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‘Living the Life’ David J. Rothman Conundrum Press, 2013

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dreamed-of ski novel. A second-generation ski bum, Rothman tracks his life on snow in 38 sections, from ski lessons on the East Coast (“sort of like math, but more fun, although the mistakes hurt more”), to seasons in Crested Butte and Telluride, to pushing into the backcountry, converting to telemarking, and teaching his son. The book’s episodic structure reflects the often-absurd juxtapositions of ski town life. Stories of tragic on-mountain deaths of friends sit next to silly haikus about being naked in the snow and portraits of quirky mountain characters. A series of spot-on “Top 10” lists skewers the egos of telemarkers. This is no chest-pounding tale of

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— Last week’s puzzle answers — 105 ___ noir 106 “The Hunter (Catalan Landscape)” painter 107 Fertilizer ingredient 108 Bit of stagnantwater growth 109 Lucrative Internet biz 111 War on Poverty prez 112 What can open files?

T A R P S T E E P L A T P C M O O H N A P G R E P O L E C L A R S S N L C O L A A T E U T O N G S H I H L P A L I L E O N U R G E G O O S

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I M S O S U R E

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CLOSING ENCOUNTERS

IMAGE of the WEEK

photography by MICHAEL MCLAUGHLIN

| 05.16.14 | Belly Up Aspen | STEPHEN STILLS PICKS AWAY ON HIS GRETSCH GUITAR DURING THE FIRST SET OF HIS PERFORMANCE ON MAY 16 AT THE BELLY UP ASPEN. STILLS PLAYED IN FRONT OF A PACKED HOUSE AND PERFORMED A MIXTURE OF HIS SOLO MATERIAL, SONGS FROM BUFFALO SPRINGFIELD, CROSBY, STILLS, NASH AND YOUNG AND A FEW COVERS FROM OTHER ARTISTS.

Have a great photo taken in or around Aspen? Send your high resolution images our way along with the date, location and caption information. Send entries to jmcgovern@aspentimes.com

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Elk Haven at High Aspen Ranch • John Muir designed home in private gated community in Missouri Heights • 6 bedrooms, 6 full, 2 half baths, 6,569 sq ft • Expansive entertaining areas, bunk room, loft, gourmet kitchen, 2 wet bars, rec room, media center, • Incredible views of Mt. Sopris • BBQ, fire pit, Jacuzzi, and waterfall • Trout pond, creek, irrigated meadows • Ranch amenities include fitness & locker rooms, catering kitchen, ranch manager, pool, and access to miles of BLM land $3,995,000 $2,485,000 Furnished Llwyd Ecclestone | 970.456.6031

Basalt Home on Frying Pan

Incredible West End Opportunity

4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 3,997 sq ft Fenced yard, inviting terraces, gardens Walk to downtown Basalt A fisherman’s paradise! $2,750,000 Carol Dopkin | 970.618.0187 www.RiverfrontBasalt.info

Shadowbrook with Ski Slope View Ski-in/ski-out to Fanny Hill on Snowmass Top floor 2 bedroom, 3 bath, 1,295 sq ft unit Den with Murphy bed acts as 3rd bedroom Private deck, complex pool & Jacuzzi $1,265,000 Furnished Kathy DeWolfe | 970.948.8142

Build a single family home on 6,629 sq ft lot in the prestigious West End FAR of 3,242 sq ft, R-6 Zoning Views of Aspen Mtn. and Shadow Mtn. $1,750,000 Carol Hood | 970.379.0676

Built for Today’s Living Situated on 45 unrestricted acres 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 4,835 sq ft Every modern day amenity Endless unobstructed preserved views $1,250,000 Partially Furnished Laurie Laing | 970.379.0195

Gateway to Snowmass 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2,164 sq ft tri-level home on a hillside Outdoor entertainment area with BBQ Breathtaking views towards Indy Pass $1,295,000 Margi Crawford | 970.948.6116

Rarely Available Riverfront Home 3.2 acres on the Roaring Fork River 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 3,597 sq ft French doors, waterfront deck, sunroom Virtually flat bank for easy water access $1,549,000 $1,199,000 David Harris | 970.379.1513

AspenSnowmassSIR.com

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536


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