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MARCH 27 - APRIL 2, 2014 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

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WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION VOLUME 2 F ISSUE NUMBER 60

Publisher Gunilla Asher

DEPARTMENTS

Editor Jeanne McGovern

10 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION 12

LEGENDS & LEGACIES

14 FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE 16 WINE INK 35

38 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 39 LOCAL CALENDAR 46 CROSSWORD 47 CLOSING ENCOUNTERS

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WINEINK INTRIGUE IN A GLASS

MARCH 27 - APRIL 2, 2014 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

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CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

Circulation Maria Wimmer Art Director Afton Groepper Publication Designer Malisa Samsel

AROUND ASPEN

A&E A WRITER EXPOSED

Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott

Production Manager Evan Gibbard Contributing Writers Gunilla Asher Amiee White Beazley Amanda Rae Busch John Colson Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Kelly J. Hayes Cindy Hirschfeld Barbara Platts Bob Ward Tim Willoughby Louise Walker High Country News Aspen Historical Society Sales David Laughren Ashton Hewitt William Gross David Laughren Max Vadnais Louise Walker Tim Kurnos

18 FOOD MATTERS Human nature resists change — it’s a hard fact that bb’s Executive Chef Katie Lorenzen-Smith is

Read the eEdition http://issuu.com/theaspentimes

ON THE COVER

hoping to, well, change. She’s enticing diners with a new sharable plates menu spanning cuisines from around the globe. The challege is in breaking bb’s reputation as a brunch joint and spreading

Illustration by Ashley Detmering

Classified Advertising (970) 925-9937

the word that it’s now a dinner hotspot.

S a b b i a Ta l e n t i Classic Italian Ceramics

H a n d – Pa i n t e d D i n n e r w a re Large Decorative Pieces Special Order Ser vices Commission Art

Please join us for

THE SALON

SUNDAY APR 6 | 5 - 7 PM | $25

Includes wine and hors d’oeuvres

A diverse gathering of artists performing in the intimate setting of Justice Snow’s parlor curated by Andrea Clearfield and Alya Howe. Honey Don’t (Bill Powers & Shelley Gray) | guitarist Julian Mock sound artist Alyce Santoro | singer-songwriter Matt Haslett poet Wade Newsom | planetary gong artist Heidi Svoboda

Call 970 429 8192 or Visit AprilSalon.Evenbrite.com To Reserve your Tickets Now Limited Space is Available 205 S. Mill Street #221, Aspen, CO 81611 (Above Cache Cache)

at the WHEELER OPERA HOUSE OPEN 11AM-2AM DAILY 970.429.8192

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50 E Meadow Drive, Vail, CO 81657 9 7 0 - 4 2 9 - 8 8 6 9

|

w w w. s a b b i a t a l e n t i . c o m


Direct Ski in/Ski Out AcceSS Off ASpen MOuntAin ASpen

Only a handful of condos can boast that they have ski access directly from the unit onto Aspen Mountain and this is one of them. The living space opens to a large outdoor stone terrace adjacent to the Little Nell ski run at the base of Aspen Mountain. Completely renovated with tasteful, high-end materials such as Dornbracht fixtures, handhewn wood floors, custom slab stone countertops, Sub Zero, Viking and Dacor appliances. This slope-side location combined with a rare four bedroom floor plan, offers a coveted lifestyle. Premier rating yet never rented. Aspen Alps amenities include swimming pool, hot tub, on-site management, health club facilities and this unit comes with a deed parking space in the Aspen Alps garage $4,750,000 Web Id#: WN131592

Carrie Wells

Previews Specialist 970.920.7375 carrie@carriewells.com

thesource

Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Ave. | 970.925.7000 Carbondale | 0290 Highway 133 | 970.963.3300 Redstone | 385 Redstone Blvd. | 970.963.1061 Glenwood Springs | 1614 Grand Ave. | 970.928.9000

Find more at

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FB/ColdwellBankerMasonMorse

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LN/Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Carol Dopkin…

real estate WItH Horse poWer!

UNDER CONTRACT! Starwood Estate 7 bedrooms, 7 full, 2 powder rooms, 4,975 sq ft “like new” home $7,500,000 Turn-Key www.StarwoodEstate.info

14-Acre Ranch Near Aspen $2,999,000 www.WoodyCreekRanch.info

Trophy Ranch $3,900,000

Aspen Valley Downs $1,900,000

Great Family Home $1,099,000

Basalt Riverfront $2,750,000

McClure Pass 89-Acre Ranch $1,695,000

Snowmass Village Single Family $1,350,000

www.CanyonRanchCO.info

www.RiverfrontBasalt.info

AspenValleyDowns.info

RaggedBearRanch.info

www.AspenSchoolDistrictHome.info

SnowmassSkiAndGolf.info

CAROl DOpkin and Summer Star

Summer is a flashy 3 year old Hanorvarian/Paint cross born at Dopkin Ranch.

970.618.0187 cell

Carol@CarolDopkin.com

www.CarolDopkin.com

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COZY WeST enD HOMe ASpen This charming non-historical West End home includes a detached guesthouse plus separate artist studio or office. Perfect family backyard for entertaining. This home is located in the West End just a short walk to the Music Tent. Enjoy this home OR build your own single 5,700 sq. ft. dream home for $1,000 a square foot with five bedrooms and five bathrooms with garage. Plans in place from TKGA Architects with conceptual house designs. $2,795,000 Web Id#: AN131835 Scott Lupow 970.920.7394 | scott@masonmorse.com

VIeWS OF ASpen MOUnTAIn

YOUR OWn WILDLIFe SAnCTUARY

ASpen

CARbOnDALe Come settle in to this home, and you will not want to leave! This ranch-style house is surrounded by gorgeous gardens, mature trees, stunning view corridors and abundant wildlife. Inside you’ll appreciate the one-story living, central courtyard, natural light and pristine finishes. Everything you want, including peace and quiet tranquility, and all with easy access to Highway 82. $1,250,000 Web Id#: WN132836

The best located studio in Aspen. Rarely available south-facing studio with Aspen Mountain ski slope views! Very light and bright. Across the street from the Silver Queen Gondola plaza. Second floor. Granite counters and finishes, stainless appliances, wood-burning fireplace, split king bed plus pull-out sofa bed. $810,000 Web Id#: WN133053 Jane Moy Previews Specialist 970.379.1788 | jane@janemoy.com

Rod Woelfle 970.279.7612 | rod@masonmorse.com bob Starodoj 970.920.7367 | star@masonmorse.com

thesource

Find more at

masonmorse.com

Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Ave. | 970.925.7000 Basalt | 727 East Valley Rd. | 970.927.3000 Carbondale | 0290 Highway 133 | 970.963.3300 Redstone | 385 Redstone Blvd. | 970.963.1061 Glenwood Springs | 1614 Grand Ave. | 970.928.9000 FB/ColdwellBankerMasonMorse

TW/masonmorse

LN/Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

YT/MasonMorse1

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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LUXURY & NATURE: YOU CAN ENJOY BOTH. We specialize in combining modern comforts with the beautiful outdoors.

FORUM PHI

Your lifestyle, personality and the land you call home inspire us to create a space that reflects who you are, how you live and what you dream your home should be.

ARCHITECTURE / PLANNING / INTERIOR DESIGN

T. 970.279.4157

FORUMPHI.COM

BE IN THE KNOW!

6

Learn what is happening at Aspen/Snowmass throughout the season.

CONNECT. SHARE. CHECK-IN.

WWW.ASPENSNOWMASS.COM/NOW

Keep up with the latest on-mountain conditions, activities, events, packages & specials in Aspen/Snowmass!

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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Brian Hazen presents...

Ranch Living…Old Snowmass to Woody Creek

price reduced SnoWmaSS Canyon ranCh…on The roarIng Fork 282 acre property consists of two 141 acre tracts of land, each with a building right of 8250 square feet (with purchase of a Tdr). The historic Wheatley ranch was homesteaded in 1891 and the current owners are just the 3rd owners since.

almost 1 mile of “gold medal” roaring Fork river frontage, 3 spring-fed ponds, senior water rights and historic log cabins, farm house and outbuilding $8,875,000 prICe reduCed $6,900,000

The Compound… aT Woody Creek Immerse yourself in the Colorado Lifestyle. understated elegance and Italian charm epitomize this exquisite 35-acre ranch, with Woody Creek meandering the length of the property. perfect for any size family and intimate or formal entertaining, the Braun ranch features a stunning 5 bedroom

main residence. Charming guest house, adjoining state-of-theart horse barn, outdoor paddocks, irrigated pastures, tranquil ponds and meticulous grounds enhance an environment perfect for hiking, trail riding or fishing. a truly stunning ranch offering… just 15 minutes to aspen. new price- $21,750,000

Brian Hazen, CRS Coldwell Banker Mason Morse Real Estate

vice president/broker associate 970.379.1270 cell 970.920.7395 direct bhazen@rof.net www.brianhazen.com FB/Brian-Hazen-Presents

TW/@BrianHazenAspen

www.masonmorse.com LN/Brian Hazen

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION BALLET FOR THOSE WHO MISSED

out on Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s performances in February, or for those who couldn’t get enough, the group returns at 7:30 p.m. on March 29 at Aspen District Theatre. The encore will include the trio of choreographic works that were performed in February — choreographer Nicolo Fonte’s world-premier commission, as well as Cayetano Soto’s “Beautiful Mistake” and Norbert de la Cruz’s “Fold by Fold” — and it marks the winter season finale. Tickets for the event are available at www. aspenshowtix. com.

Lynn Goldsmith/Special to The Aspen Times. Members of the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet practice at the Aspen District Theatre.

CURRENTEVENTS

ART TWO RENOWNED ART PROFESSIONALS are participating in the Anderson Ranch Art Center’s Visiting Artists and Critics program this week. Nora Abrams, associate curator with the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver, is at the ranch and Oliver Herring, an artist based in Brooklyn, N.Y., will visit the Ranch March 29 through April 4 and will provide a lecture for the public at 5:30 p.m. April 3. Dinner will follow Herring’s talk in the Ranch Café ($18, RSVP by April 1 to 970-923-3181).

BENEFIT THE 3RD ANNUAL Aspen AIDS Benefit comes in the form of a fashion show at 9 p.m. on Saturday, March 29, at Belly Up Aspen. Models, dancers and actors will wear donated clothing — from high-end designers to street-wear lines —as they present fashion trends in Aspen. Apoc will provide music and there will be a silent auction, runway purchases, live DJ after-party and day-after trunk sale. For more details, visit www.AspenAidsBenefit.net.

COMPLETE LOCAL LISTINGS ON PAGE 39 8

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Ho m es A sp en L a n d & ff ec ti ve . E ar t. Se ns ib le . Sm

PAY T O T H E ORDER OF

D AT E

Home Buyerand 00/100

ousand seventy-five th

,000 home hase of $5,000 rc u P FOR

01/01/2014 $

00 . 0 0 ,0 5 7

DOLLARS

es m o H d n a d n a L en p s A

HOW MUCH HAS YOUR REAL ESTATE BROKER

offered to pay you?

If the answer is “nothing” then maybe you should re-think who you do business with. Why? Because Aspen Land & Homes is the ONLY full service broker in the Roaring Fork Valley that actually pays you when you buy a home – in fact, we pay you half of what we make. It’s a completely new – and much more sensible! – approach to buying real estate and it is making for some very, very happy clients. While our competition continues to do business the old way – we’re closing sales, opening doors, and giving buyers the money they deserve.

Call Aspen Land & Homes at 970.510.5124 or check out AspenProperties.com to find out how you can get paid when you buy a home.

Aspen Land & Homes Smart. Sensible. Effective.

Christopher Hewett, Managing Broker, JD 970.948.4853 (c) | 970.510.5124 (o) | Chris@AspenProperties.com | AspenProperties.com

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

VOX POP Which local nonprofit do you think gives the most back to the Aspen community? LESLIE DEROSA A SPEN

“I think the Aspen Education Foundation gives the most back to the Aspen communicty, as it helps our local schools.”

BJpAdAms

and Comp Real Estate on Higher Ground

Any

JACKIE FRANCIS

Aspen • Snowmass • Basalt

A SPEN

“I think the thrift shop gives back the most to the Aspen community. They donate to almost every single nonprofit. They are probably one of the most profitable thrift shops in the world, and they grant that money back to community organizations.”

CHRIS TYLER

319 Main Street | Carbondale Commercial what: Carbondale’s newest commercial structure, now under construction and due to be completed in August. Designed by Poss Architecture, this 3-story brick building combines historic exterior details with warm interior finishes, including Caesarstone throughout, concrete floors and tile wainscoting in the 948 sq ft, 1st floor retail space, and stained oak floors and acoustic grid ceilings in the 2nd and 3rd floor office suites, which range in size from 175 to 618 sq ft and share a kitchen. where: On the sunny side of the street in downtown Carbondale. why: A unique opportunity for both small start-ups and established companies in the vibrant urban core.

A SPEN

“I think the thrift shop in Aspen gives the most back to the Aspen community.”

Numbers: Lease prices, starting at $25/ft, triple net. | CarbondaleOffices.com

Karen Toth | 970.379.5252 | karen@bjac.net Aspen - Corner of Hunter and Hopkins AspenSnowmassProperties.com

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® ®

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V O X P O P C O M P I L E D B Y BA R BA R A P L AT T S


THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

with JOHN COLSON

Exploring our East Coast roots AND SO IT WENT, trekking eastward to explore our roots The month of March, in its most lion-like fashion, pursued us stormily eastward to the shores of the Potomac River, proving once again that only fools and polar explorers should venture onto the highways of the central and northern United States at this time of the year. Of course, we — myself, my brother and my sister — ignored all advice along those lines and, in early March, headed out on a cross-country trek from their hometown of Madison, Wis., to the environs of Washington, D.C. Neither snow nor rain nor gale-force winds would divert us from our mission to revisit the stomping grounds of our errant youth in suburban Maryland. Two previous columns have sketched out our travels, including dumb moves and foolish thinking that only brothers and sisters can get away with on a road trip. We actually made it to our destination — a friend’s house in the working-class suburb of Berwyn Heights, Md., just a short hop away from College Park and the University of Maryland, and a quick shot down any of several main travel arteries into the capital city itself. Our host, a 60-ish woman with the unlikely name of Herman, greeted us like long-lost friends, which we were, and immediately set about making us feel at home. It wasn’t until about eight days later that it became clear her patience was wearing thin, our welcome was wearing out, and we’d begun, metaphorically speaking, to stink like fish left too long in the refrigerator. In the interim, I had managed to drive deep into the heart of old Virginia to visit an old friend, a man I had been camping with in the eastern mountains, hitchhiked with across western Europe while dodging the Vietnam draft, among other adventures. We visited the Museum of the Confederacy in Manassas, near the site of the storied battlefield of Bull Run. It’s where the confederate army twice whipped their Union opponents, stirring up the yelling Rebels but discordantly convincing everyone involved that this was going to be a long, bloody conflict. At the museum, a man from Vermont dressed in Rebel attire displayed a table filled with Rebel artifacts. He admitted he was forced to explain several times a day how it was that he was regaling visitors

with Rebel lore in an accent that clearly told of his northern roots, but made it abundantly clear that he was an ardent Civil War buff dismissive of the locals’ insistence that he was one of the enemy and should rethink his place in the world. While there I learned from my buddy, Chip, that I needed to read “A Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War,” by H.W. Crocker III, an unrepentant believer that the South was in the right all along. We argued in a good-natured way about the politics of yore and today, and I concluded that his background as a southern redneck had won out over any progressive thinking he might have experienced in the 1960s, and he had reverted to type. But I will read the book, so we can argue some more. I also visited another old high school chum who had disappeared into the wilds of Southern Maryland (another bastion of southern mores and attitudes), where he clearly enjoyed the same kind of debating as I did. In the meantime, he worked as a mechanic and boatwright striving desperately to keep his neighbors’ creaking sailboats afloat and seaworthy. Our visit was fueled by massive quantities of seafood, including raw oysters that we were warned had been tainted by some kind of industrial effluent, and equally massive volumes of whiskey and beer. As part of the mobile party that was our lot, I answered innumerable questions about what it’s like to live in a state (Colorado) that had legalized the sale, possession and consumption of marijuana products in obstreperous defiance of federal laws to the contrary. Responses ranged from outright envy to vague confusion and doubts that the feds would permit this situation to go on for very long. Thanks to the tight time-frame of our visit, and the difficulty of getting myself moving in the mornings while burdened with hangovers of various depths and duration, I failed to find any of my other friends from those bad ol’ days, despite my firm conviction that they are all still lurking around the neighborhood. But, as they say, there will be time for such investigations in the future. For now, I’ve got to get back to work.

IGreat ncredible Places to Build a Home — Views and Great Locations Call Doug to find a homesite that’s perfect for you!

HIT&RUN

jbcolson51@gmail.com

Maroon Creek Club Homesite

Bring The Horses…

Perched above Maroon Creek Includes plans for a Robert Trown home Across the street from Tiehack Minutes to airport and downtown Aspen $3,950,000

360º views of the entire valley Relatively flat building site Year-round automobile access Total end-of-the-road privacy $575,000

Magnificent Homesite

Stirling Views – Stirling Ranch

35.41-acre West Sopris parcel Mount Sopris to Independence views Awaken to sunrise on Mt. Sopris Just 6 miles from downtown Basalt $535,000

Beautiful 3.64 acre lot, 360 degree views Incredible privacy, convenient location Equestrian facility, three miles of trails Spectacular wooded property $397,000

The Colorado Mountain Lifestyle

Spectacular Ruedi South Shores Lot

Fox Meadows in Missouri Heights Unobstructed 1.22 acre lot, gentle topography Build your dream home of up to 6,500 sq ft Borders 21 acres of community open space $225,000

Overlooking Ruedi Reservoir Private, gently sloping wooded lot Hiking and biking trails abound Located in gated rural subdivision $195,000

Privacy and Location Walking distance to Carbondale Build your dream home – .42 acre lot Unobstructed views toward Basalt Mountain Bordered by ranch land and open space $175,000

Doug Leibinger 970.379.9045 cell Doug.Leibinger@SothebysRealty.com

www.Doug.AspenAreaProperty.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

Panorama of Mill Street, from the top of 1890s City Hall on Durant. Willoughby collection.

A WALKABLE TOWN Aspen’s Transferable Development Rights and zoning

policies have favored development in town and concentrated larger commercial buildings in the downtown core. In the mining past, the city achieved the same goals without manipulation; a compact city with a central commercial core developed as a logical consequence of a walking customer base. It would be inexact to describe Aspen as “pedestrian and bicycle friendly” back then. The unpaved streets sloshed with mud in spring and dried to dust in summer. Horses and wagons disbursed the dust and the byproducts of large animals. Sidewalks were rare except in the downtown core, so pedestrians carefully picked their way down Aspen’s broad streets. Businesses located in the downtown core were a short distance from most of Aspen’s population. The amphitheater defined the western fringe of town and the river formed the eastern boundary. No matter how unsteadily exhausted workers walked from the mines on the mountains, they could quickly reach a business in town or settle into a saloon. Travelers to Aspen arrived at one of two railroad depots. The Denver and Rio Grande station, close to

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where Pitkin County Library is now, presented a short walk to the Hotel Jerome. Midland passengers faced a one-block walk to the Clarendon Hotel.

many two and three story buildings surrounded them a century ago. Mill Street has always been one of the two busiest business streets. At the Aspen Mountain end, a large brick

NO MATTER HOW UNSTEADILY EXHAUSTED WORKERS WALKED FROM THE MINES ON THE MOUNTAINS, THEY COULD QUICKLY REACH A BUSINESS IN TOWN OR SETTLE INTO A SALOON. When you examine photographs like the enlargement of Mill Street in the photo accompanying this story, or a bird’s eye view map of Aspen from the 1890s, you notice that only recently has downtown built up to the extent of mining-era Aspen. Three fires destroyed many of the original wood buildings. Although landmarks like the Wheeler and the Collins Block, now home to Fendi, stand out in modern Aspen,

Mar ch 27 - Apr il 2 , 2014

building housed City Hall on the east side of the street, diagonally across from the three-story Clarendon hotel which, while not as tall as the Jerome, had as large a footprint. Large commercial buildings lined both sides of Mill between Hyman and Cooper. Evidently B. Clark Wheeler intended this to be the business core; he laid out the streets, had first choice in lot ownership, and located his Aspen Times offices just

off the west side of Mill. The upper floors often hosted dentists’ and doctors’ offices, especially in the Collins Building and the Emmet Block where McDonald’s is now. Lower floors housed retail and specialty shops, and mining stock/insurance company offices. Most Aspen pedestrians satisfied their needs within strolling distance in the 1890s. Mill Street offered three paint and wallpaper shops in addition to several tailors, a couple of shoe stores, and the major clothing store in town, Weinbergs. Alex Fort, a ‘sanitary plumber,’ occupied a spot on the street as did William Heper, an electrical engineer who also designed steam pumps and boilers. You could visit the Candy Kitchen for ice cream, candy, or fireworks while shopping on the same street if your taste ran along more adult lines, the Free Coinage Drug Store and W. H. Berger’s supplied liquor and items for ‘opium or tobacco habits.’ Cigar stores close to the hotels turned a large trade as well. And if such tastes put an early end to your walking days, W. E. Turley and A. Wilson, two Mill Street undertakers, stood nearby, ready for business. Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn2@ comcast.net.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

WOMEN’S ORGA N IZATIONS

1913 P I T K I N COU N T Y

ON AUG. 5, 1913, the Aspen Democrat-Times reported on the formation of the Women’s Civic Improvement Club of Pitkin County, noting that “the reception room of the Hotel Jerome was filled last night with a large number of women of Pitkin County’s most prominent in matters of a public nature designed for the general good.” The gathering was in response to the call for a meeting of the women of Pitkin County for the purpose of organizing “for civic betterment, improved facilities in travel and especially the influencing of the immediate construction of the needed highway between Carbondale and Granite, through Aspen and Twin Lakes, etc.” Lottie B. Deane, who was elected president, said, “It being the expressed desire of some of the women of this county to get together and organize for the purpose of rehabilitating their cities and towns. ... It is a well-proven fact that in union there is strength, and as an organized body, the women of Pitkin County can and will be a power for great good. Let us band together and be one for our county and for our state.” This photo and more can be found in the Aspen Historical Society archives at www.aspenhistory.org.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GEAR of the WEEK

by CINDY HIRSCHFELD

WORK ETHIC THE DILEMMA: You want a lightweight glove for these warm spring ski days, but don’t want to drop a lot of dough.

THE FIX: Flylow’s Tough Guy glove.

WHY IT WORKS:

GET IT

30

$

flylowgear.com. Gene Taylor’s (Snowmass Mall); Basalt Bike and Ski (Willits); Cripple Creek Backcountry (Carbondale).

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Mar ch 27 - Apr il 2 , 2014

They may look like that pair of work gloves you picked up at Lowe’s last summer (and, surprisingly, don’t cost a lot more), but they perform a lot better on the slopes. The gloves are triple-baked with Sno-Seal, a waterproofing treatment made from beeswax. Yet the leather and canvas fabric are still highly breathable, and also supple. I’ve used these gloves at the ski area and in the backcountry, and they’ve kept my hands just the right amount of warm, without getting clammy. Plus, they’re bomber durable. Heck, I might even try gardening with them this summer.

BONUS: Despite the name, the gloves fit my ladylike hands just fine; sizes range from XS to XL.


$6,250,000 RIVER PARK – 124 N SPRING ST

$3,395,000 CLARENDON #4

$4,850,000 CONTEMPORARY MOUNTAIN HOME

Luxurious 4 bedroom 4-1/2 bath unit Serene setting on the Roaring Fork River Rooftop hot tub; perfect for the entertainer!

3 bed 3 bath townhome on two levels Cathedral ceilings, large living room and master suite Private patio and large pool area

Elegant & sophisticated 5 bedroom 5+bath home Open living & dining areas indoors and outdoors Two-car garage, hot tub, built-in BBQ

$2,950,000 GREYSTONE #814

$3,895,000 VICTORIAN REMODEL

$850,000 FASCHING HAUS WEST #12

Remodeled 3 bedroom 3-1/2 bath townhome High ceilings, glass atrium, 3 levels, 1 car garage Views of Aspen, Smuggler & Red Mountain

3 bed 3 bath contemporary remodel of historic Victorian Quiet location near the pedestrian walk/bike path Unique opportunity

$1,600,000 SILVER GLO #309 Beautifully remodeled top floor corner 3 bedrooms and 3 baths Excellent core location

Well-located furnished 2 bedroom 2 bath unit Few blocks to the Silver Queen Gondola and downtown Complex offers outdoor heated pool & parking

$1,149,000 PENTHOUSE CONDOMINIUM

$1,095,000 CONVENIENCE 101 Relax on your patio in a quiet, park-like setting Convenient ground floor location Pools, hot tubs, tennis courts and ample parking

Top floor fully renovated unit High ceilings, wood floors, open floor plan Fabulous pool area, conference center & parking

TOP ROW: Colin Kruger, Bill Small, Anne Burrows, Sam Green, Tim Clark BOTTOM ROW: Dennis Jung, Chuck Frias, Will Burggraf, Sybrina Stevenson, Sonny Danna

FriasAspen.com realestate@friasproperties.com 970.920.2000 888.245.5553 property management

vacation rentals

real estate

since

1974 A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

WINEINK

WINEINK: THE WORLD IN A GLASS PICK A BOTTLE OF WINE from the shelf. Open it. Pour it. Drink it. For many people that is how wine works. Simply taste and enjoy. And there is certainly nothing wrong with that. But if you delve a little deeper, pay a little bit more attention to the liquid in the glass and use your senses to experience the wine you have poured, an KELLY J. entire world awaits. HAYES You can actually take a journey simply by sipping some wine. Those who read this column know that I frequently riff on the fact that wine is the universal elixir; that if you know even just a little bit about wine you’ll inevitably also acquire knowledge about geography, geology, technology and the other “ologies.” That’s because wine comes from all over the world, reflects the various soils of Mother Earth and relies on physics and science for production. If you want to know more about wine then the first thing you have to do is drink wine. That sounds silly, I know, but the more wines you taste the broader your base of experience will become. Drink just pinot noir and that will be all you know. But if you try some sangiovese, or a little grenache, every once in a while you will start to understand the differences that mark the different grape varietals. Throw in a little Australian shiraz, maybe a bottle of California cabernet, or an Argentinian malbec, and you will not only come to recognize the unique nature of the grapes as they reveal themselves, but you will also begin to learn a bit about places where those wines come from and the people who make them. Begin by always reading the labels and picturing the places where your wine comes from. Even if you have never been to New Zealand, if you open a bottle of Kim Crawford sauvignon blanc, think about the things that say “New Zealand” to you. Maybe it’s the “Hobbit” movies that Director

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Peter Jackson made or maybe it’s the pictures you’ve seen of skiers on the glaciers of the South Island. Check the vintage and try to think about where you were in your life at the time the grapes were grown that make up the wine you’re about to drink. Note the alcohol level and try to remember that when you take your first taste. You don’t have to get all geeky, just think a little about what you hold in your hand and things will begin to become interesting. Next, pour the wine and take a look at it in the glass. No need to swirl, but tilt the glass and let the wine run up to the rim. What color is it? If you have a white wine, is it clear like water, or does it have the yellowish color of, say, apple juice? If it is a red wine, is it light enough to see through, or is it so dark that you are staring into a pool of deep blue grape juice? Is the color the same all over, or is the edge of the wine opaque or orange? All of these are clues as to the varietal, the age and the origin of the wine. Set the glass back down and look at the place where the wine met the rim and see how it drains back into the bowl of the glass. Is it slow, or does it break up and run easily back down the sides of the glass? These are the fabled legs, and they are indicators of the alcohol level and viscosity of the wine. Now comes the fun part. Put your nose deep into the glass and give it a couple of quick sniffs followed by a deeper inhalation, and, without thinking about it too much, quickly say the first things that come to mind. Do you smell grass in that sauvignon blanc? Does that red wine reek of wet mud? Maybe there is something that reminds you of chocolate or vanilla. It is amazing how much you know if you don’t think about how little you know. Just open your nose and free your mind, and you’ll likely find that there are many scents in a glass of wine that are familiar to you. Of course, all of this really is just foreplay for tasting the wine. And that really is the point isn’t it? But

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before you just take a gulp, take an extra second or two to really taste the wine. Take a bit of liquid and let it sit on your tongue. Is it sour? If so, you have some acidity in the wine. Does it make your mouth pucker? That’s a sign of tannins. Does it have a flavor that reminded you of what you just said when you gave the wine the smell test, or are the flavors completely different? Most importantly, do you like the wine? Now this might sound like a lot of work and too many things to think about when all you want to do is open a bottle of wine and have a glass. But in reality it’s not so hard at all. It is just a matter of thinking a bit about the experience and getting the most out of the money you have already invested in a wine. For those who really care about wine, people like winemakers, professional tasters and sommeliers, tasting can be a complex business. Great tasters deduce the provenance of the wines they drink, by going through the same process just described and by layering their levels of knowledge over the sight, smell and taste tests. A great taster may look at a wine’s color and deduce

that it is a particular grape and see that it has some age on it. They may watch the legs run down the side of a glass and know from experience that it has a certain level of alcohol. When smelling the wine, they may detect herbal, floral or fruity notes. They may smell vanilla and understand that the wine has been aged in a particular wood that gives off unique flavors and aromas. They will use all of this information, coupled with their knowledge of vintages, regions and the practices of individual winemakers, to identify what is, and sometimes more importantly what is not, in a glass. Tasting is not a parlor trick. It is the practice of paying attention and then using what you know to better appreciate a wine. I’m not suggesting you spend more time studying your wine than you do enjoying it. But if you’re mindful of what is in your glass, the world of wine can provide so much more than you may think. Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soonto-be-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@aol.com.


by KELLY HAYES

UNDER THE INFLUENCE Jessup Cellars 2010 Table for Four: You’ll have to go to Yountville in Napa Valley to get this one as they only sell direct, but a visit to the gallery/tasting room will be worth your while. Winemaker Rob Lloyd created this blend of cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, merlot and petite sirah from one of the greatest Napa vintages in years. It will need time to mature, but even in its infancy it shows the signs of greatness. Dark and rich with notes of chocolate, leather and spice, the tannins are big and the fruit is powerful. A keeper if you can get it.

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

FOOD MATTERS FOOD MATTERS

DARING TO BE DIFFERENT THE NEW BB’S FINDS ITS NICHE—IN EVERY CORNER OF THE WORLD ASPEN IN LATE MARCH is marvelous. If the snow is sweet — and it is: fat flakes are falling outside my window as I write this — spirits are high. Powder-filled bluebird days become the norm, and sunlight stretches longer each day. Basketball burns up big-screens around town and apparitions of summertime motorcycle adventures break onto the horizon. AMANDA And, love ’em or hate RAE ’em out on the hill or carrying skis askew down Durant Avenue, spring breakers at least infuse our nightlife scene with energy worthy of a Red Bull advertisement. It’s March Madness, in every sense. I like these annual guarantees, but because I’m human and it’s spring, I also crave change. So, before end-of-the-season burnout creeps in, I seek any shred of newness in our ever-evolving town — not always an easy feat. On a recent Friday following a seemingly endless buffet of art openings, boutique parties and après charity events, a pal suggested we dine at bb’s. This struck me as new, sort of. I sheepishly admitted that I’d only returned to bb’s once since it relaunched in December with a new format: open for dinner only, with a menu of globally influenced small plates, and having dropped “kitchen” from its name. Perhaps, like lots of other locals, I plain forgot that the second-floor space no longer serves breakfast or lunch — meals best enjoyed outdoors in spring, summer and fall on that wrap-around patio with Ajax views. “It turns out that people don’t want to eat dinner at the same place where they’ve had breakfast and lunch,” said rep Allison Miller when I asked about the switch back in December. “(Owner) Bruce (Berger) wants a place that’s an

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expression of his culinary interests, where he can experiment with different foods and formats, and dinner offers the best opportunity to do that.” Now, four months later, I wondered: How’s that going? If our recent experience — during which almost all 68 seats in the dining room were occupied, set to a playlist at times foreign and familiar — is any indication, the new bb’s may be ready to hit its stride. “It definitely took some time, and it’s still taking time, for people to know we’ve changed the concept,” says Executive Chef Katie Lorenzen-Smith. “But the response from everyone is incredibly positive. Our challenge has been getting the word out, getting our name known, and getting away from being ‘the brunch place.’” As a fellow behind-the-scenes gal, I pick up on Lorenzen-Smith’s frustration when she adds, “Unfortunately, people aren’t necessarily accustomed to change in this town.” But they are well traveled, and bb’s menu of 28 sharable plates span far corners of the globe: Thailand (green papaya salad with pickled carrot and spearmint), Italy (tempura calamari with pepperoncini and charred pineapple), Russia (savory cones filled with dill crème fraîche, smoked salmon, and salmon roe), Japan (chilled ramen salad with braised beef short rib and spiced edamame purée), France (housemade boudin sausage with white bean cassoulet), even Poland (a pierogi threesome, one each stuffed with kimchee, hatch green chile, and twice-baked potato). There’s a foie gras “bon bon” with toasted cashew and sea salt-black pepper caramel; roasted yam with pancetta and Roaring Forties Blue cheese; and flatbread with Serrano ham, chorizo, and Oaxacan cheese. (Just don’t call ’em tapas; there’s nothing

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Executive Chef Katie Lorenzen-Smith puts the finishing touches on a dish at bb’s.

particularly Spanish about any of the offerings.) “Variety lets people explore different cuisines, different tastes,” Lorenzen-Smith says. “Before, we were primarily American. (Now) I have quite a bit of Asian influence: steamed pork belly buns; anticuchos, skewered kobe beef with Peruvian pepper sauce that has a bit of spice.” Traditional Rockefeller-style oysters are fire-roasted and topped with Chinese sausage, braised spinach, and hijiki aioli; lettuce wraps feature kung pao sweetbreads, water chestnuts, and Thai chili; ahi tuna crudo is festooned with dainty grapefruit pearls and shaved lotus root. For traditionalists, there’s also a selection of simply prepared entrées, such as whole-roasted bronzino, grilled 14-ounce ribeye, half a roasted chicken, and a onepound kobe meatball. Like any chef worth her salt, Lorenzen-Smith carefully considers her customers’ preferences (see “Top Tastes,” opposite), even if they

skew on the safe side. “When we first went to this menu, we had a nose-to-tail dish, pretty much the whole pig,” she says with a small sigh. “We changed (that) to a rack of spareribs — more our concept — and they’ve been a great seller ever since.” Offseason brings reduced hours (after April 20, bb’s will close two days per week) and a chance for Lorenzen-Smith to dream up new summer menu items showcasing local produce, such as heirloom tomatoes and Palisade peaches. At last, I ask the million-dollar question on everyone’s mind: Any chance that awesome patio might reopen during the day? “I’m not sure,” Lorenzen-Smith says cautiously. She’s fielded this inquiry before. “We’re still working on what we’re planning on doing this summer. It’s definitely something we’ve been talking about….” Amanda Rae has spring fever. You? amandaraewashere@gmail.com


by AMANDA RAE

TOP TASTES Since bb’s December relaunch, diners have determined these dishes menu MVPs: —Pork Belly Steamed Buns —Kale and Brussels —Black Truffle Risotto Cake —Truffled Lamb Meatballs

IF YOU GO bb’s 525 E. Cooper Ave. 970-429-8284 bbskitchen.com Open daily 5:30-10 p.m.; bar until midnight.

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Remodel the existing 3345 sf, four bedroom home or development opportunity on this 18,603 sf lot located on Aspen Golf Course. Magnificent mountain views.

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The dining room at bb’s is warm and modern.

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

BY LOUISE WALKER

MAKE IT 1.5 ounce Apple Cinnamon infused Makers Mark 1 ounce White Crème de Cacao .75 ounce port clove syrup (see recipe below) Splash of club soda Garnish with 1 cinnamon stick

FIRESIDE FIZZ Last week I had the pleasure of spending the afternoon in the lounge at Aspen Meadows to try what has been its only recurring signature cocktail for 3 years running, the Fireside Fizz, invented by lovely bartender Chris Decker. I had a confluence of wishes from the first sniff of the fabulous aroma of this drink. I wished it was colder and snowing. The warmth and coziness emanating from my glass was intoxicating — it would be the perfect accompaniment for a chilly snowy evening. The apple and cinnamon-infused bourbon warms the cockles while the white crème de cacao gives an undertone of chocolate and just the perfect amount of sweetness. Homemade port clove syrup adds a little depth and binds the flavors, while the splash of soda gives that playful fizz to the finish. DEVINE. Gunilla Asher didn’t make it to the bars this weekend, but she’ll share another favorite drink with us soon. In the meatnime, email jmcgovern@aspentimes.com with what cocktails you’re mixing, what libations you’re drinking, what tastes have tempted your tastebuds and we’ll share them with our readers. Cheers!

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Port clove syrup 2 parts inexpensive port wine 1 part sugar 15 whole cloves per 3 cups port wine Reduce by 1/3 over heat. Apple & cinnamon-infused Makers Mark 750 ML Makers Mark 8-10 cinnamon sticks 4 apples Let marinate in a glass container for 2 weeks


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THE

Maverick is a fantastic American Bulldog/Hound mix. We think he is about 2 years old and weighs about 70 pounds. This guy is definitely one of the best dogs we have come across. He is super sweet with a great personality. He is such a love, everyone who meets him absolutely adores him. He gets along well with other dogs and is fine with cats but really loves his people. This boy is very loyal, happy, well mannered, looks you lovingly right in the eye and did I say SWEET?, very sweet! Mav is calm in the house and well behaved when left alone. He LOVES his walks, hikes and being outside too- a great exercise buddy. Maverick has a gentle nature, is housetrained, not a big barker, and gives great hugs! He has been neutered, is current on his vaccinations and is micro chipped. If you are interested in this very special dog please fill out an application on www.luckydayrescue.org or call Sarah on 970-618-4108 with questions. LUCKY DAY ANIMAL RESCUE OF COLORADO

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AspenSnowmassSIR.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

ASPEN UNTUCKED

by BARBARA PLATTS

Aspen’s spring weirdness, including costumes and neon, can be seen every March and April atop the mountains and throughout town. Photo courtesy of Aspen Skiing Co.

WHEN ASPEN GETS WEIRD

A ROUND UP OF THE BEST CLOSING DAY PARTIES IN THE VALLEY LAST ST. PATRICK’S DAY, I was skiing Aspen Mountain with my older cousin, Chace, when we came across a gathering at Buckhorn cabin. Skiers and snowboarders were decked out in funky green outfits and dancing on all possible surfaces, from the picnic tables to the rooftop of the cabin. It was my first season in Aspen and I was thoroughly mesmerized by the rambunctious sea of green in front of me. Chace turned to me as BARBARA we unclicked our skis PLATTS and said, “Just so you know Barb, Aspen gets really weird in the spring.” And so launched a season filled with funky sunglasses, neon leggings and strange hats; a time from midMarch until late April with bluebird days, warm temperatures and plenty of reasons to party. It’s springtime again, Aspen, so pull out all the neon you own. If you don’t have any, find some fast, because things are about to get weird. March 30 - Sunlight Closing Day-Beach Party Pond Skim Spectacular About 30 minutes south of Glenwood Springs is Sunlight Mountain Resort. This ski mountain is often overshadowed by Aspen’s four mountains, but the closing day Beach Party Pond Skim Spectacular will give the other closing parties a

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be the National Weed Day and is also Easter Sunday this year. So essentially we have two closing parties, pot day and the end of Lent, all on the same Sunday. Things will indeed get a bit crazy. Snowmass’ Schneetag (German for “snow day”) will take place at the Spider Sabich atop the Burlingame lift. Teams of four people build a craft to go down a ski hill and glide across a pond. Many of the “boats” don’t make it all the way across, but that’s part of the fun.

run for their money. The celebrations take place at the base of the mountain with live music by The Poser Band and boat drinks galore. Sunlight season passes are awarded to the person with the best costume and the best pond skim attempt. April 6 - Buttermilk Closing DayBacon Day Bacon everywhere — heaven never comes so close as it does each year on Buttermilk’s closing day. Samplings of bacon dishes are available at various lifts on the mountain and bacon libations are sold at Bumps Restaurant at the base. Get there early to get the best bacon treats and stay late to enjoy a bacon-fueled party. April 13 - Highlands Closing Day Highlands Closing Day is the party that tops all of the rest. From the

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base of the mountain to the top of Highlands Bowl at 12,392 feet, skiers and snowboarders are decked out in animal suits, neon onesies and vintage ski outfits. The outrageous costumes make Halloween look conservative. The party is throughout the mountain most of the day, but once the lifts close, all partiers converge at the base to drink and dance for several more hours. Warning: At this party, debauchery and mayhem are not just accepted, they’re encouraged. Start looking for your outfit now because the thrift stores in town will be picked through by the beginning of April. April 20 - Snowmass Closing Day-Schneetag Both Snowmass Mountain and Ajax closing days are scheduled for April 20, a day that is considered to

April 20 - Ajax Closing Day Although there is no official closing day party at Aspen Mountain, the base will be bustling with stoned snow bunnies, party people sipping on Veuve Cliquot and Aspen Beer guzzlers. Both Ajax Tavern and Sky Hotel will be raging for the last official après session of the 2013-14 season. As my second season comes to a close in Aspen, I’m prepared for celebration with a drawer full of neon tights and shirts that are ready to be worn and a general willingness to get weird at a moment’s notice — my cousin taught me well during my first season. So, let’s go out with a bang as we say goodbye to an incredible winter. Barbara Platts will be taking public transportation to all of these parties and she suggests you stay safe and do the same. Reach her at bplatts.000@gmail.com or follow her @barbaraplatts.


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Whitman Fine Properties ted a v ti ller Mo Se

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A short walk to the gondola & downtown • Mountain views and spacious private patio • Great building with outdoor heated pool, ski shuttle and on-site management. • $1,400,000

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BRINGING LIGHT INTO THE DARKNESS FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS, RESPONSE HAS BEEN AN ADVOCATE FOR VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT by AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

THE INVITATION ARRIVED on Jill Gruenberg’s desk on a Thursday morning. It was for a wedding — a wedding that three and a half years earlier may have seemed implausible to the future bride. She has been long abused and was at one time a “client” of Jill Gruenberg, the Response Advocacy and Prevention Program Coordinator. When Gruenberg met her, she was pregnant with her first child and realized the violence wouldn’t end there. If she had the baby and remained with her abuser in the home, the abuse would continue and he would likely inflict violence on their child as well. The woman reached out to Response, which has been operating in the valley for an impressive 30-plus years. After almost two years of legal and emotional challenges, she was free — free to raise her child in safety, free to learn how to love and be loved. Now she is in a healthy and nurturing relationship with a second child and a wedding on the way.

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Stories and experiences like this keep Gruenberg and the extending family at Response going. “Just to get to walk beside her through all of that, and get to see that transformation happen, it touched me that we were a small part of that,” says Gruenberg. Gruenberg has been with Response for nine years tackling many roles, including providing counseling, legal advocacy, school-based violence-prevention education, community outreach and working with victims and other agencies to ensure those who need a haven from domestic or sexual abuse have access to Response’s services. “I’m incredibly passionate about empowering women, letting them know they have options, and helping them to find their voices,” she says. “The goal is to provide non-judgmental support, whether someone is leaving or staying. It is difficult work, but it’s so rewarding

to see transformation, or change, or enlightenment happen for someone. That is enough to fuel me even when things are difficult.” Logan Hood, Response’s executive director, explains that while domestic and sexual abuse are difficult topics to discuss and address, there is a silver lining when victims are finally able to make a change. “It’s about bringing light into a dark place,” she says. Hood began her work with Response in 2008 when she became

Jill Gruenberg is the Advocacy and Prevention Program Coordinator at Response.

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PHOTOS BY AUBREE DALLAS


Executive Director Logan Hood looks though case files at Response. Hood loves her job because it brings light into a dark place, she said.

a crisis hotline volunteer. The Response hotline – 970-925-7233 – continues to be the first contact many victims have with Response. It is a 24hour confidential pathway to resources for those who aren’t sure which way to turn, or just need someone with whom to talk. “Abuse can happen at any time, in any community,” says Hood. “We listen. We don’t want victims to feel isolated. We want to provide the space for them to unpack their story and to build trust.” The hotline is just one way the Response organizes community support for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. More than 10,000 volunteer hours go into making this organization tick every year, which provides its services and programs for free. Hood notes the community involvement in things like the Coordinated Community Response Team, which gathers together members of local law enforcement agencies, social service agencies, the District Attorney’s offices in Aspen and others. The team gathers every other month to look at how our community is working on victim safety and offender accountability pertaining to sexual assault and domestic violence.

TEACHING ADVOCACY Response’s Helpline Advocacy Training Program is being offered this spring beginning April 28. For more information, or to download a volunteer application, call 970-920-5357, or email bea@responsehleps.com. Response also hosts the Women’s Financial Empowerment Series, where all women can benefit from insight and understanding of their finances. The series takes place every Tuesday in April from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the El Jebel community Center. $50 for series. Scholarships available. To register, visit responsehelps.org or call 970-920-5357. Funded through local and state grants, donations and fundraising, Response presents the annual Chocolate Classic at the Hotel Jerome on Valentine’s Day to raise awareness and funds. In its 20th year, 30 restaurants and more than 800 people attended February 2014’s Chocolate Classic, raising approximately $32,000 for Response.

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A big part of Response’s volunteer work is in prevention and education. Last year, Response conducted 31 community and school education programs, reaching more than 400 students with messages about cyber-bullying, sexual consent and coercion, teen dating violence awareness and overall healthy relationships. “Programs continue to grow,” says Gruenberg. “The idea is to get students to realize even if they aren’t in a dating relationship yet, they are in relationships – with family and friends. They have an idea of already what’s acceptable and what’s not, what makes them feel good, what doesn’t make them feel good. We try to get them to understand the components of a healthy relationship, using communication, respect and trust, and equality and honesty.” It’s vital, Hood and Gruenberg say, to educate young adults about these topics early when attitudes, habits and peer relationships are forming and being tested. Shelley Supplee started as an advocate with Response in 1986 and has been a board member since 1994. She is also involved with the education efforts. “Peace begins at home,” she explains. “We want students to be aware of the fundamentals of (personal) relationships and the implications of relationships at home. We want them to know how treat each other – family, friends and community.” For the Teen Dating Violence seminars, Gruenberg is assisted by two college-age women, both Aspen High School graduates to discuss their experiences in abusive relationships they had while in high Gladys Augello-Martinez handles Spanish-speaking support groups at Response.

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school. Both are former clients of Response. “There is a tendency to think this doesn’t happen in Aspen, it’s never going to happen to me,” says Gruenberg. “These two young women are not far removed from the kids we are talking to and are effective in breaking down some of those myths and delve deeper. They help kids recognize what are the red flags, recognize them before they are entrenched, and talk about bystander intervention, so friends can support other friends, step in and challenge abuse — boys and girls.” Gruenberg says that for these particular volunteers, helping to educate is a part of the healing and transformation of their own personal experiences. “They incorporate this work into their lives in such a positive way. It’s been incredibly therapeutic for them. One is an advocate with us on our hotline, and both have brought this work with them to their local colleges,” she says. “Our biggest mission,” says Hood, “is for people to know that after the hurt there is hope. There is a life after abuse. You can feel safe.”

Administrative Assistant Bea Lowick, background, and intern Amanda Smith are part of the team at Response who collectively work to bring joy and strength into the lives of abuse victims.

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VOYAGES

ESCAPE ARTIST | NAPA VALLEY

FESTIVAL ALERT: CELEBRATE THE ART OF LIFE AT NAPA VALLEY’S FESTIVAL DEL SOLE IN JULY FOOD. ART. WINE. Music. Dance. Opera. Jewels. Yoga. Jazz. Napa. If you are now planning your summer adventures, Festival del Sole, one of America’s premier music and lifestyle festivals, should be at the top of your list. Festival del Sole is scheduled to blend world-class music, AMIEE WHITE theater and dance BEAZLEY with the region’s finest wine and cuisine in celebration of the good life July 11-20. The festival features more than 60 cultural adventures and performances by renowned artists and emerging talent, gala events at Napa Valley wineries, resorts and estates, free community concerts, a wellness series promoting healthy living, and arts education initiatives. Setting the tone for this year’s extraordinary lineup, the festival, now in its ninth year, kicks off July 11 with Grammy Award-winning violinist Joshua Bell’s performance of Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” in the courtyard of the Tuscan-inspired

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Castello di Amorosa. Throughout the week guests will enjoy events like “A Taste of Napa,” which showcases more than 50 Napa Valley wineries, food artisans and chefs, as well as cooking demonstrations and wellness talks; wellness conversations at Bardessono Hotel and Spa, plus rejuvenating “Yoga in the Vineyards,” which pairs vineyard yoga with wine tasting; and the first West Coast performances by the Sphinx Symphony Orchestra, the world’s only all black and Latino professional orchestra comprised of top musicians from around the country, which will act as the festival’s orchestra-in-residence. On Friday, July 18, there is a luncheon and private sale of rare Tiffany & Co. diamond and gemstone jewelry at Auberge du Soleil. Tiffany & Co. chief gemologist Melvyn Kirtley will be on hand to discuss the treasures. Following the sale is this year’s centerpiece of the festival – a dance gala featuring ballet sensation Polina Semionova performing with an all-star cast of eight principal dancers from American Ballet

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Theatre, San Francisco Ballet, Staatsballett Berlin, Stuttgart Ballet and National Ballet of Canada. The program includes the pas de deux from Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake,” “Eugene Onegin” and “The Sleeping Beauty;” Carl Maria von Weber’s “Le Spectre de la Rose,” and Sergei Prokofiev’s “Romeo and Juliet.” That evening will be a patron dinner at Hall Wine’s newly reimagined St. Helena location, where a light instillation by Graham Caldwell will complement the Chihuly glass sculptures that permanently hang from the tasting room ceiling. As the night closes, two of the world’s leading opera stars, Maria Agresta and Matthew Polenzani, will perform a moonlight serenade from the windows of the historic building. “It’s a rare occasion where the absolute finest are brought together in one extraordinary day – the art of gemology, dance, viticulture and contemporary art,” says the festival’s marketing and operations director, and former Roaring Fork Valley resident, Sonia

Tolbert. “In essence, this one day represents what the festival is all about – celebrating the art of life.” On Saturday evening, July 19, is a star-studded 80th-birthday tribute to actress Sophia Lauren at Lincoln Theater and Far Niete Winery. The evening includes the debut of the L.A. Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra, conducted by Carlo Ponti, son of Sofia Lauren. Ponti will present the world premiere of “Sinfonietta per Sofia,” a piece composed for her birthday occasion by Daniel Brewbaker. Following the concert, there will be an intimate dinner in honor of Loren given by friends like Robert Redford and other Hollywood stars. Other highlights of the 10-day festival include: – A concert at Opus One featuring the Bouchaine Young Artist Series All Stars under the baton of guest conductor Dmitry Sitkovetsky. – Jazz legend Arturo Sandoval headlines the glamorous Annual Gala at Meadowood Napa Valley, featuring an extraordinary evening of gourmet cuisine, live music, and a live auction supporting the festival and local arts education programs. – Sun-drenched vintners’ luncheons and patron dinners each day at more than 20 of Napa Valley’s top wineries, estates and resorts – including Alpha Omega, Beaulieu Vineyard’s Rutherford House, Castello di Amorosa, Chimney Rock, Gargiulo Vineyards, Grgich Hills Estate, Jaffe Estate, Keller Estate, Martin Estate, Meadowood Napa Valley, Newton Vineyard, Robert Mondavi Winery, The Hess Collection and Vineyard 29. – Violinist Pinchas Zukerman makes his festival debut with performances at Lincoln Theater, Castello di Amorosa and Weill Hall at the Green Music Center in Sonoma. – A performance of “Trouble in Tahiti,” Leonard Bernstein’s candid portrait of marriage in the suburbs, directed by his daughter, Jamie Bernstein.


by AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

IF YOU GO... What: Napa Valley Festival del Sole Dates: July 11 through 20 Single concert tickets start at $39. The Allegro Pass (from $99) provides preferred seating and after-parties at popular locales around the valley. The VIP Pass (from $700) delivers insider access with vintner’s luncheons and patron dinners along with prime concert seating, VIP Lounge access and concierge service. To purchase tickets, visit www.festivaldelsole.org, or call (888)337.6272.

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AVH_MCCN_ATW_halfpg_horz 11/19/13 9:03 AM Page 1

Aspen Valley Hospital and Mayo Clinic Working together. Working for you. Aspen Valley Hospital is one of a select number of hospitals in the country – and the first in Colorado -- to become a member of the Mayo Clinic Care Network. That means local physicians have Mayo Clinic expertise at their fingertips: eConsults, treatment recommendations, the latest research and access to some of the best medical knowledge in the world -- right here at home. Visit us online at avhaspen.org or call 970.544.1296 to learn more.

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AROUNDASPEN

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

TIME CAPSULE AND MCARTHUR BIRTHDAY THE SUMMER OF 2013 was full of special events such as the unearthing of the time capsule, which was buried on the grounds of the Aspen Music Festival during the Aspen Design Conference in 1983. The exact site of the capsule was lost until Barbara Shaw told how she had filmed the burial of the tube and MARY also had a map. ESHBAUGH Aspen architect HAYES Harry Teague was on hand at both the burial and the unearthing of the tube. National Geographic magazine dug up the time tube and made a film, which Teague showed at a February gathering of members of the Aspen Historical Society and the Press. Aspenite Cheryl McArthur held a birthday party for herself last summer, inviting many of her friends to a luncheon in the sunny dining room of Pyramid Restaurant, located upstairs over Explore BookSellers. Undercurrent ... Aspen is full of Carpetbaggers.

TIME CAPSULE Joe Zanin, Peter Dahl and Charlie Paterson.

TIME CAPSULE Ruth Owens, Jacqueline Hutton and Sarah Challinor.

TIME CAPSULE Chris Council and Andrew Travers.

TIME CAPSULE Karl Herchenroeder and city councilwoman Ann Mullins.

TIME CAPSULE Kelly Murphy, the new director of the Aspen Historical Society, architect Harry Teague and his daughter, Sarah Teague.

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AROUND ASPEN

BIRTHDAY Gigi Whitman, Karen Lord, Mary Eshbaugh Hayes and Donna Wiedinmyer.

BIRTHDAY Joany Lebach, Tara Sheahan, Luann Robinson Hull and birthday girl Cheryl McArthur.

BIRTHDAY Leslie Hull, Michelle Rosenfeld and Kaytlyn Shepherd.

BIRTHDAY

BIRTHDAY

Barbara Fleck and Madeleine Larson.

Lita Heller and Holly Dreman.

BIRTHDAY Nancy Lovenzen and Amy Denicke.

BIRTHDAY Joany Lebach and Barbi Benton.

BIRTHDAY Joy Myers, Susan Brady and Leslie Hull.

BIRTHDAY Judi Altman and Patty Kent.

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/LITERATURE

by KARL HERCHENROEDER for THE ASPEN TIMES

SEMPLE RETURNS TO ASPEN TO DISCUSS ‘BERNADETTE’ WHEN NOVELIST MARIA SEMPLE is working, she spends half

her days walking. It’s how she frees herself from the corners she’s written herself into. She’ll write and go for a walk, and then repeat. It’s a process that helped her write six drafts in about a year for her second novel, “Where’d You Go, Bernadette.” Semple returns to her hometown March 31 for the Aspen Writers’ Foundation Winter Words series, and it will be the last stop on the “Bernadette” tour. After Aspen, she will begin work on her third novel. “I came up with an idea that has a lot of energy and that kind of makes me shutter and get excited, but I don’t know if it’s really going to be the one,” she said. “When I do sit down to write it, if it still has the kind of urgency and I feel like the resonance, then that’s a good sign.” Her debut novel, “This One is Mine,” was a scathing take on Los Angeles, the city where she found success as a television screenwriter in the 1990s. Semple, the daughter of famed L.A. screenwriter Lorenzo Semple Jr., said it was on “Beverly Hills, 90210” that she found she wasn’t fit for drama, leading her to three years of work on the sitcom “Mad About You.” She is also credited for working on “Suddenly Susan,” “Ellen” and “Arrested Development,” but it was “Mad About You” that she most enjoyed. “I could kind of draw more from my own life,” she said. After finding success on television, Semple, who has always enjoyed novels, felt restless and attempted “the scariest thing I can think of.” As a novelist, she said, you are far more exposed than in screenwriting. You are no longer part of a group, and you have no one else to blame if the writing fails. “When you’re writing a novel, it’s just so purely all you,” she said. “It feels like a much greater emotional risk, and you feel much more exposed, but it turns out that I like that. I get

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off on that. It kind of pushes me as opposed to hinders me.” Semple continues to be amazed by “Bernadette,” which has spent almost a year on the Los Angeles Times best-seller list for paperbacks and about seven months before that on the hard-cover list. The story takes place in Seattle, where Semple relocated after L.A. Bernadette Fox is an accomplished architect who abandons her career in a rage of professional disillusionment, personal frustration and familial circumstance, namely her 15-year-old daughter, Bee. Semple’s real daughter was six when “Bernadette” was written, and Semple said that if there is anything she drew from reality, it’s the unconditional love she has for her daughter, for whom the book was written. “It really is a gift to her, because I

feel like an unsuccessful, complicated, bad mother in a lot of ways, that I failed her in a lot of ways,” she said. “I also know that the love I have for her is greater than all that, and I hope that this book somehow articulates all of that.” A graduate of New York City’s Barnard College, Semple said she has never been one to procrastinate. She may put off other things, but never writing, and she said some people don’t understand that. Whether it’s someone asking her to volunteer her time or go to lunch in Seattle, she’s never afraid to explain what comes first. “With female novelists, I think it’s much more a problem with them. People always just think that you don’t have to write that day — like you can do the other thing that they want you to do,” she said. “There’s a big

force every day, kind of keeping you from writing, and you have to push through it. And it certainly turns you into a bitch.” It has been about three years since Semple was in Aspen, and when she returns, she’ll spend time at the library or in the West End, where she was raised. Her brother and local Aspen character, Lo Semple, will moderate the Winter Words discussion. Maria, who requested that Lo do the interview, is looking forward to the humiliation he might set off. “I thought it might be a good chance for him to throw me some really embarrassing questions and perhaps create some fireworks,” she said. “I just hope he doesn’t make me cry for some reason because he certainly would know how to.”

herk@aspentimes.com

Maria Semple, screenwriter and author of “Where’d You Go, Bernadette,” will appear for a 7 p.m. talk at the Paepcke Auditorium on March 31.

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THELISTINGS SNOWMASS VILLAGE ONGOING TERESITA FERNANDEZ — All Day, Elk Camp Restaurant, Snowmass Ski Area, Snowmass Village. Esteemed artist and 2013 ArtCrush Aspen Award for Art honoree Teresita Fernandez will create a new mural for the 2013-14 winter season at the restaurant at Elk Camp in Snowmass. MIFFY FOUNTAIN AND MY MELODY — All Day, The Overlook at The Westin Snowmass Resort, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass. Two largescale sculptures by internationally renowned contemporary visual artist Tom Sachs are on display outside the main entrance of the West in Snowmass Resort.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 SING-A-LONG AND S’MORES WITH TOM PAXTON — 3:30 p.m., Fire Pit at the Westin Snowmass Resort, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. DAMIAN SMITH & TERRY BANNON — 4 p.m., The New Belgium Ranger Station, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. Enjoy live music for après ski. AXIS LP — 7 p.m., Little Mammoth Steakhouse, 315 Gateway Building, Snowmass Village. Live music with Patty & Larry Herd

THURSDAY, MARCH 27 APRES-SKI YOGA — 4:30 p.m., Erica Berens Yoga, 45 Village Square, Village Mall, Snowmass Village. Join Erica for an all-levels nourishing yoga class. Perfect after a day of snowsports or work to create balance, clear your mind, and release tension. FREE COMMUNITY PASTA DINNER — 5 p.m., Snowmass Chapel, 5307 Owl Creek Road, Snowmass Village. Come join us for a free, hot pasta dinner from 5-6 p.m. in the Creekside Room at Snowmass Chapel. SMARTY PARTY TRIVIA NIGHT — 5:30 p.m., The New Belgium Ranger Station, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. Hosted by Greg Studley, Ranger Station Smarty Party Trivia features laughs, good food, great beer, and assorted prizes. MAGIC AT THE ARTISAN — 6 p.m., Artisan Restaurant, Stonebridge Inn, 300 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village. Snowmass Legend Doc Eason performs his unique style of interactive magic and comedy.

MARCH 27- APRIL 2, 2014

THE STORY BIBLE STUDY — 6:30 p.m., Snowmass Chapel, 5307 Owl Creek Road, Snowmass Village. Condensed into 31 chapters, The Story sweeps you into the progression of Bible characters and events from Genesis to Revelation. Using the text of the NIV Bible, it allows the stories, poems and teachings of the Bible to read like a novel.

FRIDAY, MARCH 28 LIVE MUSIC FOR APRES SKI WITH DAMIAN SMITH & TERRY BANNON — 4 p.m., The Vue Lounge at the Westin Snowmass Resort, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village.

SATURDAY, MARCH 29 LIVE MUSIC FOR APRES SKI WITH THE TRUE STORY BAND — 4 p.m., The Bar at Wildwood Hotel, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. The True Story Band features Damian Smith, Terry Bannon & Aaron Taylor. VID WEATHERWAX & ROBERTA LEWIS — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village. Live contemporary, Latin & N’Orleans jazz, R&B and blues.

SUNDAY, MARCH 30 VID WEATHERWAX — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village. Live contemporary, Latin & N’Orleans jazz, R&B and blues.

MONDAY, MARCH 31 SING-A-LONG AND S’MORES WITH TOM PAXTON — 3:30 p.m., Fire Pit at the Westin Snowmass Resort, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. Family friendly interactive entertainment at the Westin fire pit

TUESDAY, APRIL 1 APRES-SKI YOGA — 4:30 p.m., Erica Berens Yoga, 45 Village Square, Village Mall, Snowmass Village. Join Erica for an all-levels nourishing yoga class. Perfect after a day of snowsports or work to create balance, clear your mind, and release tension. ANDERSON RANCH ARTS CENTER OPEN HOUSE — 5 p.m., Anderson Ranch Arts Center, 5263 Owl Creek Road, Snowmass. Visit with artists-in-residence in their studios, shop at the ArtWorks Gift Store for art supplies (or a Mother’s Day gift!) or bring the kids to participate in a fun activity! Free community event. Dinner is $18, RSVP by March 28.

970-923-3181

ASPEN ONGOING AMY SILLMAN — 10 a.m., Aspen Art Museum, 590 N. Mill St., Aspen. The first museum survey of New York-based painter Amy Sillman will contain drawings, paintings, and ‘zines, as well as the artist’s recent forays into animated film. 970-925-8050

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 LIVE MUSIC: THE STEEPWATER BAND — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. Join us at Chair 9 at the base of Ajax, for daily live music! SMOKIN’ JOE AND ZOE — 6 p.m., Hotel Jerome, 330 E. Main St., Aspen. Local eclectic male female music duo. MICHAEL FRANTI & FRIENDS — 9 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. Musician, humanitarian, and children’s book author, Michael Franti, is recognized as a pioneering force using music as a vehicle for positive change as well as his unforgettable, high energy shows with his band, Spearhead. $95 GA / $185 Reserved.

BOO COO — 7 p.m., Saint Regis Hotel, 315 E Dean St., Aspen. Dynamic music duo featuring Smokin’ Joe Kelly and Chris Bank. COCKTAIL PARTY WITH MICHAEL FRANTI — 7:30 p.m., Justice Snow’s, 328 E Hyman Ave, Aspen. Join Aspen Yoga Society and friends at an intimate cocktail party at Justice Snow’s in downtown Aspen to mingle with Michael Franti and learn more about his foundation Do It For The Love, bringing the gift of live music to those with life threatening illness, veterans and children who need it most. This event is $300 and includes the Yoga and Live Music Extravaganza from 4:30-7 p.m. on March 27th ($100 value). $300 - includes Yoga/Music event. 970-429-8192. LIVE MUSIC — 9 p.m., BB’s Lounge, 525 E. Cooper Ave. Suite 201, Aspen. $5 wines and wells, $4 draft beers! Join us for a great night! LARRY & PATTY HERD — 9 p.m., BB’s Lounge, 525 E. Cooper Ave. Suite 201, Aspen. Live Music Rock Blues Jazz. MICHAEL FRANTI & FRIENDS — 10 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. THURSDAY NIGHT KARAOKE — 10 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave., Aspen.

THURSDAY, MARCH 27

FRIDAY, MARCH 28

LIVE MUSIC: HANNIBAL BROWN — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. Join us at Chair 9 at the base of Ajax, for daily live music!

SKI HISTORY TOUR: ASPEN MOUNTAIN — 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., Ambassador Hut, Top of Aspen Mountain, Aspen. Learn about local history while on skis. Presented by the Aspen Historical Society, a tour of Aspen Mountain with an emphasis on mining and the history of skiing.

YOGA AND MUSIC EXTRAVAGANZA — 4:30 p.m., The Aspen Institute, Doerr-Hosier Center, 845 Meadows Rd., Aspen. Join Aspen Yoga Society to celebrate LIFE at a Yoga + Live Music EXTRAVAGANZA with Michael Franti’s to benefit Michael’s Do It For The Love Foundation, bringing the gift of live music to those that need it most. ASPEN MUSIC FESTIVAL PRESENTS THE MET: LIVE IN HD — 5:30 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, 320 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen. The great Renee Fleming returns to one of her signature roles in Dvorak’s soulful fairy-tale opera. SPRING BACKCOUNTRY AWARENESS EVENING — 6 p.m., The Limelight Hotel, 355 S. Monarch St., Aspen. Powder to the People presents its third and final backcountry awareness evening of the 2014 season, featuring speakers Blase Reardon and David Swersky. Free (donations appreciated)

BRADMAN’S ONE MAN BAND — 4 p.m., Aspen Brewing Company, 304 E. Hopkins Ave., Aspen. Americana, folk rock, bluegrass, classic rock, and originals. Ranked #1 Americana musician in the Roaring Fork Valley by reverbnation.com. LIVE MUSIC: MATTHEW MOON — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave., Aspen. Join us at Chair 9 at the base of Ajax, for daily live music! TRAVIS BLAIR APRES ACOUSTIC — 4:20 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen. Acoustic Big Hillbilly playing rebel country favorites. Always free. DEREK BROWN BAND — 7 p.m., The St. Regis Aspen Resort, 315 E. Dean, Aspen. Joyful, upbeat, artistic live music every Friday at the St. Regis.

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Coming Soon!

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CONGRATULATIONS TO JIM AND JACKIE!

Long-time shelter residents and siblings, twelve-year-old Jim and Jackie have been adopted TOGETHER. They recently moved to their new home in Ft. Collins with their loving family. As retired sled dogs, they are no longer pulling dog sleds, but they are still pulling at everyone’s heart strings! Jim and Jackie were very popular with our shelter volunteers. They went on many walks and hikes throughout their time here. Even at 12, they were very energetic. Bon voyage, Jim and Jackie.

CHICKEN

Chicken is a gentle, timid, ten-year-old, retired sled dog who gets along well with other dogs. She is shy with people, and will require love and patience in order to slowly come out of her shell.

MOWGLI

Sensitive, 2-year-old husky who was retired early from dog sledding because he suffers from seizures. Fine with people + other dogs, but nervous with new people. Needs an understanding, loving home.

RONNIE

Sweet, affectionate, two-year-old Shihtzu mix who was released to the shelter so dirty, scared and matted that the groomer spent three hours grooming him in order to ultimately reveal a clean, beautiful, lovable mutt.

ZOE

This sweet, mostly blind, 9-year-old miniature Schnauzer female was turned in to the shelter because her owner was ill and could no longer take care of her. Very deserving of a home at this point in her life.

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CLEO

Beautiful, friendly, soft-spoken 10-year-old Husky mix female. She is a retired sled dog looking for a loving home. She is very outgoing with people. What a cute face she has.

ROXY

Large, beautiful 9-year-old Sharpei/ Rottweiler/Hound mix. Not for the novice owner. Very protective of home. Blossoms once she knows you. Will be great with responsible owner.

TIMBER

Strong, energetic, black/white 5.5-year-old female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull—larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing + loves people. Best as only pet.

Aspen/Pitkin Animal Shelter

101 Animal Shelter Road F

3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 1,659 sq ft $2,745,000

Soft-spoken, sleek, friendly, 10-year old Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. She is a retired sled dog who deserves a comfortable, loving home.

SAM

4.5-year-old gorgeous Lab/Pit Bull mix female. Such a sweet girl. Allie is happy, friendly, affectionate and energetic. Turned in because of housing.

6-year-old domestic short-hair, tabby markings + white feet. He would do best in an indoor/ outdoor home. Enjoys people. Very engaging. Must be ONLY pet.

Alpenblick – 1 Block To Gondola

Since Oct. 2007: Friends of the Aspen Animal Shelter’s spay/neuter campaign has neutered over 12,500 dogs + cats and our shelter has rescued well over 2,000 dogs + cats from death row in shelters in Colorado and beyond.

ALLIE

JACK

OPEN 7am-6pm EVERY DAY 970.544.0206

AGUILLA, ROSIE AND LEA

One-year-old Chiweenies (Chihuahua/Dachshund mixes) found abandoned in Texas. Cute as buttons and becoming more outgoing every day! Aguilla is very friendly and loving. He is the only male and loves his sisters. Rosie is very affectionate, used to be more comfortable with women—but now likes anyone who handles her gently. Lea is still a bit timid with most people but slowly coming out of her shell as she learns it is safe to trust people.

Mar ch 27 - Apr il 2 , 2014

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Residences At The Little Nell – Next To The Gondola

3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2,800 sq ft $1,095,000 1/8th interest

Pat Marquis

970.925.4200

pat@aspen4sale.com

www.Aspen4Sale.com aspensnowmasssir.com

• Real Estate Specialist • Master Certified Negotiation Expert • Certified International Property Specialist


WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by MARK BILLINGSLEY on behalf of THE ASPEN WRITERS’ FOUNDATION

BOOK REVIEW

‘THE SON’ IN “THE SON,” Philipp Meyer has crafted an intriguing, interesting, and challenging novel. The characters are not drawn, they are painted — stroke by stroke, lovingly and brutally, exposed to all — in their very own words. On the one hand it seems astonishing that Meyer’s characters can elicit so many different responses and reactions as he follows them through the different periods of their lives, but therein also lies their authenticity and depth. None of them are perfect human beings; sometimes their actions and the way they see things are even reprehensible, and yet at other times they seem like old friends or family. You might not always like them, sometimes you even hate them, but you can’t help but try to understand them. The book begins with young Eli McCullough, the first male child born in the new republic of Texas, living on the family homestead on the frontier. At fourteen Eli, already a skilled woodsman by IAN LIVENGOOD / edited by WILL SHORTZ

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BRIGHT IDEAS When this puzzle is done, the circled letters, reading counterclockwise from the top, will spell a phrase relating to the puzzle’s theme.

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Expands, in a way Sister of Helios ___ room Elite unit Gambling mecca Saint’s home, for short Venomous African tree-dweller Start of a motivational comment attributed to 86-Across Justin Timberlake’s “Cry ___ River” [That makes me so uncomfortable] Lockup Middle of the comment Toolbar feature Director Nicolas Record Facial moisturizing brand “Power” suffix Sticks in the closet? End of the comment College major, briefly Commercial lead-in to Pen Rocket Cousin of “Ugh!” Osaka-to-Sapporo dir. Law firm department Fired on Good-for-nothing

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Resort city in 1945 news Small scene Restricted part of an urban area Ball player? Prominent feature of an Obama caricature Ray Charles hosted it in 1977: Abbr. Couple at the altar? Start to show one’s real potential So Birthplace of Buddha, now Pitcher Mike with 270 wins Christmas cookie ingredient Plagues Eponymous German physicist Combined with Watering hole for Homer and Barney Coin collector Pelican’s home, for short See 23-Across The Durbeyfield girl, in literature Dr. Seuss animal It has paper denominations from 5 to 500 Ex-Fed head Bernanke Some body work, in slang Zippo alternatives Nickname for 86-Across Barrel of fun? Saffron-flavored dish Brow line? Development of 86-Across … as

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depicted in the middle of this grid World capital on the slope of an active volcano Dolph of “Rocky IV” More chilling Throw around D.C. mover and shaker: Abbr. Scandinavian coin Actor Christian

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French kiss recipient, maybe “How silly of me!” Bit of a code Stockpile View that may cost you extra Security Council veto Ins Near future Hardly enough The French way? It may be delayed by a storm: Abbr. United Center team Update, say Garden State casino, informally, with “the” Outback native Crunches crunch them Yoga base ___ of relief Nondairy item in the dairy aisle Ones without a leg to stand on? Part of a moving line Blues Brothers wear Nosedives Utmost: Abbr.

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50 54 55 56 58 60 62 67

68 70 71 72 74 75 76 77 79 80 84 87 88

Farm mother “My word!” Stag, maybe “The fish that got away” and others Comic Wanda Hurried “Death Magnetic” band Drinking binge Accessory for the 91-Across Many an Al Jazeera viewer Pioneer org. Five-time Super Bowl champions, informally Barak’s successor Sharp pains Travel agency listings Cabooses Starts of news articles Deli stock with seeds Tight What an electric current does not flow through Relaxed, say Difficult weight Appropriate flowers for Mother’s Day? Bootleggers’ banes Exams offered four times a yr. Certain Bach composition “For sure” Gooey campfire treat “Not ___ shabby!” Cesare Angelotti in “Tosca,” e.g. It gets you off schedule Place to store hay German article

10 20

11

12

41

42

48

49

53

39 43

44

56

70

71

82 88

92

108

58

66

72

84

85 91

100

95

101

102

104

109

110

115

116

118

119

74

90

99

68

73

94

98

67

80

89

103 107

36

62

79

93 97

35

47

57

83

87

34

52

65

78

96

46

61

77

86

33

51

64

81

17

40

45

55

69

32

50

60

76

16

28

38

63

15

22

31

59

14

25

30

54

13

21

27

37

106

9

24

29

75

8

19

23 26

59

and outlaws, many of them old acquaintances, making a mean living from the spoils that they manage to “liberate.” Running in concurrent chapters are the stories of Eli’s son Peter and his great-granddaughter Jeanne, told in their own voices. Peter is a much different man from his father; sensitive, thoughtful, and emotionally scarred from the depredations of Eli. It would be easy to think that Peter is a weakling and a coward, but he has hidden strengths. Peter is trapped in a loveless marriage, humiliated by family and ranch-hands alike, and constantly bullied by his father. When he is finally pushed too far he resorts to actions that, in the end, may ultimately bring new life to the family. This is a compelling and engaging read, a sprawling story tracing a family’s fortune through time and place, catastrophe and triumph, from battlefield to boardroom, with equal parts brilliance and hubris.

and provider for the family, is taken by a roving band of Comanches, his family killed and the homestead pillaged and burned. For the next few years Eli lives the life of a young Comanche warrior, adopted by a war chief, learning the ways of his new tribe. When the inevitable destruction of the tribe is finally wrought, Eli finds himself alone and ill-prepared to return to what passes for white civilization. He is a young man caught between two cultures. When he tries to adapt to the normal life of a townsman in the 1850s, the results are disastrous (for everyone except Eli). Eventually, after seducing the local judges wife, “borrowing” a few horses and generally making a nuisance of himself, he is given the choice of joining the Texas Rangers or to be left swinging from the nearest tree. He opts for the Rangers, which will at least give him a small chance of making it into his twenties. Eli finds himself fighting Indians

105

111

112

113

114

117 120

121

— Last week’s puzzle answers — 89

Third line on many a ballot: Abbr. 90 Sunbathing evidence 94 One with bills piling up? 95 “My Name Is ___,” gold album of 1965 97 “Tell me about it!” 98 One of two parts of a British puzzle? 99 ___ page 100 Canine 101 D.C. mover

102 Pi ___, “Life of Pi” protagonist 106 100s of ordinary people? 107 Fanatic 108 Geometry fig. 109 Had something 110 Bring into court 111 “___ = Politics” (TV slogan) 112 Guys 113 Food Network host Sandra 114 “It’s f-f-freezing!”

S E X T

I L E S

B U A G T H

R S T U

M G M L I O N

E D A M

N E H I

C K O F A I N E R X E S I P S S F O U R R L A P U A S S E W I N T S E A P G O S R O U C H E T R O S T I N E C E M P R N S H I B L E P O O R M T H U S E I G N R O O T A N D Y

B R O N X H E L L O S R O S E E D S

R A I L E S C U F P E R R E F O U R E R N A Y L R X G A O T O B E M A R X I L O N I K O F E S U T A S H I S O L S P A T U R N A M S A T E E P

L E E M E S I A S S W S T E R O W D O B E S M E S C T H O F O M U S T S L A W L B A S O R X C N E T G V E F O X T C O F D O L E L E D D

W I N E R Y L I M A R A R E R

A M O L E M O N I C A

F O L L O W I N G T H E

T U T U

S T E P

A E G I S E S

G N U S

V I E R S V P D I S H A X B A A C T O R X O O N I E O W E L L


CLOSING ENCOUNTERS

IMAGE of the WEEK photograph by AUBREE DALLAS

| 03.20.14 | Aspen | CORA TRACEY, 4, A STUDENT FROM WILDWOOD SCHOOL, PETS KITTY, A 1-YEAR-OLD CAT UP FOR ADOPTION AT THE ASPEN ANIMAL SHELTER.

Have a great photo taken in or around Aspen? Send your high-resolution images our way along with the date, location and caption information. Send entries to jmcgovern@aspentimes.com

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

47


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Like No Other in West Aspen! Rarely available Aspen country estate 6 bedrooms, 7.5 baths, 5,607 sq ft 1+ acre with pool, waterfall & pond Truly a delight for the senses $9,950,000 $9,750,000 Furnished Susan Hershey | 970.948.2669

Estate Living on Maroon Creek 2.88 acres with extensive creek frontage 6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, 5,660 sq ft Over 1,100 sq ft of deck spaces Less than 5 minutes from Aspen Highlands $8,950,000 $5,850,000 Furnished Mark Haldeman | 970.379.3372

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Log Mountain Contemporary Home 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 5,256 sq ft Detached caretaker/guest house Views and sounds of Castle Creek Total privacy & end of the road seclusion $5,850,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

Ideally Located Aspen Townhome 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 2,785 sq ft Handsome, with light & contemporary flair Opportunity to combine with townhome next door for family compound $5,400,000 Furnished AnneAdare Wood | 970.274.8989

AspenSnowmassSIR.com

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

Atw 03272014  

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