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ASPEN UNTUCKED WHERE’S PETER PAN?

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LIBATIONS AND THE WINNER IS...

MARCH 20 - 26, 2013 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

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FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14


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Charming home or Building Site on over and aCre in WeSt aSpen ASpen

Over an acre of land with most of it being flat and perfect for entertaining located in Pitkin County within the Pyramid Views Subdivision (formerly Aspen Tennis). Overlooking Maroon Creek with views toward Aspen Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Tiehack/Buttermilk ski areas and the Maroon Creek Golf Course. Enjoy the charm of the current four bedroom home remodeled most recently in 2013, that features a large, open floor plan for the living, dining and kitchen areas with vaulted ceilings, wood-burning fireplace and access to the outdoor terrace and decks. $4,595,000 Web Id#: WN131487

Carrie Wells

Previews Specialist 970.920.7375 carrie@carriewells.com

thesource

Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Ave. | 970.925.7000 Carbondale | 0290 Highway 133 | 970.963.3300 Redstone | 385 Redstone Blvd. | 970.963.1061 Glenwood Springs | 1614 Grand Ave. | 970.928.9000

Find more at

masonmorse.com

FB/ColdwellBankerMasonMorse

TW/masonmorse

LN/Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

YT/MasonMorse1

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION VOLUME 2 F ISSUE NUMBER 59

DEPARTMENTS 08 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION 12

LEGENDS & LEGACIES

14 FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE 16 WINE INK

37 AROUND ASPEN 40 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT 42 LOCAL CALENDAR 50 CROSSWORD CLOSING ENCOUNTERS

ON THE COVER

Photo illustration by Ashley Detmering

about the culinary arts, from creating menus and cooking to the business of running a

Circulation Maria Wimmer Art Director Afton Groepper

Production Manager Evan Gibbard Contributing Writers Gunilla Asher Amiee White Beazley Amanda Rae Busch John Colson Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Kelly J. Hayes Cindy Hirschfeld Barbara Platts Bob Ward Tim Willoughby High Country News Aspen Historical Society Sales David Laughren Ashton Hewitt William Gross David Laughren Max Vadnais Louise Walker Tim Kurnos

18 FOOD MATTERS students on the ProStart Culinary Team. In fact, this small group of kids is learning everything

Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott

Arts Editor Stewart Oksenhorn

34 VOYAGES

Reading, writing, arithmetic...and cooking? At Aspen High School, that’s the curriculum for

Editor Jeanne McGovern

Publication Designer Malisa Samsel

29 COVER STORY

51

Publisher Gunilla Asher

Read the eEdition http://issuu.com/theaspentimes Classified Advertising (970) 925-9937

restaurant. Food writer Amanda Rae gets a taste of what the team is up to, as they head to the 15th Annual ProStart State Invitational in Denver.

For a video of this property visit:

www.DivideSkiHome.com

Ski-in/Ski-out Perfection…

One of the very best ski in and out locations in Snowmass Village. Located directly off of Dawdler ski run in the prestigious Divide subdivision, this beautiful mountain home embraces all that makes up an incredible family ski retreat. Its majestic stone and timber exterior with expansive decks and porches fits right in on the Colorado slopes. This wonderful ski home is a fantastic opportunity to own the very best in Snowmass! $7,995,000 Furnished 7 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, 5,500 sq ft, 1.65 acres

Greg Didier

Terry Rogers

c 970.379.3980 Greg.Didier@SothebysRealty.com

c 970.379.2443 Terry.Rogers@SothebysRealty.com

www.AspenSnowmassDreamHomes.com

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SNOWMASS OFFICE 50 Snowmass Mall

www.AspenSnowmassRealEstate.com


endleSS potentiAl CARbondAle

Best lot in Missouri Heights‌37 acres overlooking the 300 acre Spring Park Reservoir with gorgeous Sopris views. This owner had first choice of all lots at Spring Park Ranches. The property features a Tuscan Style Villa consisting of four bedrooms, four and one-half baths with great water rights and agricultural exemptions. Best of all is the ability to build over 15,000 sq ft. with multiple dwellings and outbuildings, making it a perfect horse property. $4,950,000 Web Id#: WN133266

Christy Clettenberg 970.920.7398 | christyc@masonmorse.com bob Starodoj 970.920.7367 | star@masonmorse.com

CoRe Condo on the RiveR

hyAtt GRAnd ASpen

ASpen

ASpen

Johnryan Flynn 970.920.7366 | jflynn@masonmorse.com

Steve harriage 970.920.7396 | steve@masonmorse.com

Two-bedroom, two-bath central core condo with great rental history. Located on the river with stunning views this condo is just four blocks from the gondola. Walk right out your front door and enjoy the hot tub. This building has been newly remodeled with a contemporary exterior with an Elevator. $1,295,000 Web Id#: WN133131

One of the few Hyatt two story residences with spacious living and dining areas, your own media room and elevator. Beautifully decorated residence boasts old-world craftmanship and a full gourmet kitchen with granite counter tops and Viking appliances. Amenities included. $190,000 Web Id#: WN133202

thesource

Find more at

masonmorse.com

Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Ave. | 970.925.7000 Basalt | 727 East Valley Rd. | 970.927.3000 Carbondale | 0290 Highway 133 | 970.963.3300 Redstone | 385 Redstone Blvd. | 970.963.1061 Glenwood Springs | 1614 Grand Ave. | 970.928.9000 FB/ColdwellBankerMasonMorse

TW/masonmorse

LN/Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

YT/MasonMorse1

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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LUXURY & NATURE: YOU CAN ENJOY BOTH. We specialize in combining modern comforts with the beautiful outdoors.

FORUM PHI

Your lifestyle, personality and the land you call home inspire us to create a space that reflects who you are, how you live and what you dream your home should be.

ARCHITECTURE / PLANNING / INTERIOR DESIGN

T. 970.279.4157

FORUMPHI.COM

BE IN THE KNOW!

6

Learn what is happening at Aspen/Snowmass throughout the season.

CONNECT. SHARE. CHECK-IN.

WWW.ASPENSNOWMASS.COM/NOW

Keep up with the latest on-mountain conditions, activities, events, packages & specials in Aspen/Snowmass!

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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Brian Hazen presents...

The Residences…on Bonita Drive e uS 0pm O H :3

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These luxurious residences are over 5,300 & 5,500 sq. ft. each and consist of 5 Bedrooms, 5 Baths + 2 Powder Rooms. Located directly on the Aspen Championship Golf Course the homes boasts stunning views of Pyramid Peak. The Top Floor includes Great Room/Dining Room, Kitchen and Master Suite with vaulted ceilings. Four additional Guest Suites, generous Family Room with wet bar, separate Wine Room, Home Theater and spacious Outdoor Porch with fireplace. $7,950,000 PRiCe ReDuCeD: $5,495,000 each

Open House - east & West units Friday, March 18 from 2:30 - 5:30pm 813 & 815 Bonita Drive, Aspen

Brian Hazen, CRS Coldwell Banker Mason Morse Real Estate

vice president/broker associate 970.379.1270 cell 970.920.7395 direct bhazen@rof.net www.brianhazen.com FB/Brian-Hazen-Presents

TW/@BrianHazenAspen

www.masonmorse.com LN/Brian Hazen

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Items acquired from U.S Treasury Agencies auctions, U.S Marshalls auctions, seizures plus general order consignments which constitute majority of 550+seizures Lots plus general order Items acquired from and U.S Treasury Agencies auctions, U.S the Marshalls auctions, and consignments which constitute the majority of 550+ Lots

SEIZED ASSETS SEIZED ASSETS

4.31 Carat Very Rare GIA Alexandrite

AUCTION

37 Carat RARE GIA Paraiba Tourmaline Our 6th Year in Colorado 37 Carat RARE GIAJohns, Paraiba Tourmaline Signed Lithographs, Seriographs Etchings by Picasso, Chagall, Miro, Dali, Neiman, Jasper Ourand 6th Year in Colorado

4.31 Carat Very Rare GIA Alexandrite

Peter Max, Warhol, Pissarro, Hockney, Matisse, Renoir, Erte,Chagall, Rockwell, DeDali, Kooning andJasper many Johns, more. Signed Lithographs, Seriographs and Etchings by Picasso, Miro, Neiman, Original Art by Peter Max, Picasso, Chagall, Pissarro, Tarkay, Icart, Maimon, Tomayo, Dufy, Rivera, Penley and others. Peter Max, Warhol, Pissarro, Hockney, Matisse, Renoir, Erte, Rockwell, De Kooning and many more. Diamond Jewelry plusTarkay, Rubies, Sapphires, Tanzanites, Emeralds, Original Art by Peter Max, Picasso, Chagall, Pissarro, Icart, Maimon,Alexandrites, Tomayo, Dufy, Rivera, Penley and others. Tourmalines, Tahitian PearlsDiamond and More. Mens plus and ladies watches. Handmade Rugs, Original Bronzes Jewelry Rubies,Rolex Sapphires, Alexandrites, Tanzanites, Emeralds, Tahitian Pearls and More. Mens and ladies Rolex watches. Handmade Rugs, Original Bronzes AllTourmalines, Art and Jewelry Independently Authenticated and Certified 279 All Lots Jewelry-261 Works of Art “A Collection Only Seen in Museums and Authenticated the Finest Jewelry Stores” Art and Jewelry Independently and Certified 279 Lots Jewelry-261 Works of Art “A Collection Only Seen in Museums and the Finest Jewelry Stores”

Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso

Marc Chagall

Baccanale (Signed Etching)

SelfMarc PortraitChagall - Signed Self Portrait - Signed

The Man and the Big Blond (Signed Lithograph)

(Original)

Red RedGrooms Grooms Aspen Opera House, 3D, Proof

10 Carat GIA Burmese Sapphire 10 Carat GIA Burmese Sapphire

Aspen Opera House, 3D, Proof

Peter Max

PeteronMax Original Canvas Original on Canvas

Viceroyauctions.com Viceroyauctions.com

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Itzak Tarkay

Alex Alex Katz Katz Signed Lithograph

Itzak Tarkay Seated Women (Original) Seated Women (Original)

Signed Lithograph

Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

Signed Lithograph

Renoir Renoir

Baignaise Assise (Original Etching) Baignaise Assise (Original Etching)

315 E. E.Dean DeanStreet Street 315 23 23Carat CaratColumbian ColumbianEmerald Emerald

ASPEN ASPEN

For Directions DirectionsOnly OnlyCall Call(970) (970)920-3300 920-3300

Auction AuctionInfo: Info:(888) (888) 846-7040

18% 18%Buyers BuyersPremium Premium

Henri Matisse Henri SignedMatisse Lithograph

St. Regis Regis Aspen Aspen

Auction Auctionat at5:00 5:00PM PM Preview Previewfrom from4:00 4:00PM PM

Online Registration Code AC322 Online Registration Code AC322

Joan Miro Cant Joan De La Cortina, MiroSigned Cant De La Cortina, Signed

Saturday, Saturday,March March22 22

Free Registration/ID Required Free Registration/ID Required Armed Security onon Premises Armed Security Premises

Hand Colored and signed

Baccanale (Signed Etching)

Willem De Kooning Willem De (Signed Kooning The Man and the Big Blond Lithograph)

H. Claude Pissarro H. Claude (Original)Pissarro

Andy Warhol Flowers Hand Warhol Colored and signed Andy Flowers

29 cts. Signature Quality Tanzanite 29 cts. Signature Quality Tanzanite

Items Itemspictured picturedsubject subjectto toprior priorsale sale and andmay maynot notbe beavailable availableat atthis thisauction auction

Worldwide Shipping Shipping Available Available

Terms:Verified VerifiedChecks/ Checks/AllAllCredit CreditCards Cards Terms: Notaffiliated affiliatedwith withany any government agengy Not government agengy


Doug Leibinger‌

THE ASPEN VALLEY REAL ESTATE MARKET EXPERT

WEST BUTTERMILK www.ExtraordinaryAspenHome.com 6 bedrooms, 6 full, 4 half baths, 11,875 sq ft, 5.01 acres Price Available Upon Request

Castle Creek $5,850,000

Maroon Creek $3,950,000

Crystal River $3,450,600

Snowmass Village $3,350,000

Sopris Mountain Ranch $3,250,000

Coryell Ranch $2,660,000

Sopris Mountain Ranch $2,325,000

Snowmass Village $2,097,000

Frying Pan Valley $940,000

Doug Leibinger 970.379.9045

Doug.Leibinger@SothebysRealty.com

Doug.AspenAreaProperty.com

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

OPEN DAILY

VOX POP What can the ski industry do to ensure the sport remains popular?

FOR LUNCH

TEDDY THOMPSON CONNECTICUT

“You need to get kids to the mountains — invest in outreach programs to bring kids to the mountains and expose them to skiing.”

at the WHEELER OPERA HOUSE 328 E. HYMAN AVE. ASPEN 970.429.8192

BJpAdAms

and Comp Real Estate on Higher Ground

Any

TEDDY FRANLKIN

Aspen • Snowmass • Basalt

NE W YORK

“Encouraging the wider release of ski movies keeps me really excited about skiing — maybe it would be the same for others who are interested in the sport.”

MEREDITH OLGIVIE

319 Main Street | Carbondale Commercial what: Carbondale’s newest commercial structure, now under construction and due to be completed in August. Designed by Poss Architecture, this 3-story brick building combines historic exterior details with warm interior finishes, including Caesarstone throughout, concrete floors and tile wainscoting in the 948 sq ft, 1st floor retail space, and stained oak floors and acoustic grid ceilings in the 2nd and 3rd floor office suites, which range in size from 175 to 618 sq ft and share a kitchen. where: On the sunny side of the street in downtown Carbondale. why: A unique opportunity for both small start-ups and established companies in the vibrant urban core. Numbers: Lease prices, starting at $25/ft, triple net. | CarbondaleOffices.com

NE W YORK

“The industry should strive to be as cost-effective as possible so families can have affordable options to be able to take ski holidays.”

Karen Toth | 970.379.5252 | karen@bjac.net Aspen - Corner of Hunter and Hopkins AspenSnowmassProperties.com

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® ®

Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

VOX POP COMPILED BY CAROLINE DEROSA


THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

with JOHN COLSON

Second verse, same as the first — sort of TO RECAP from my last column, my two siblings and I are on a crosscountry mission to visit the haunts of our youth and catch up with old friends, basically in the name of getting it done while you still can. In case no one told you, none of us is getting any younger, and the pains and prospects of long road trips don’t seem to hold the allure they once did when you get right down to where the rubber meets the road. At least, that’s the common wisdom. But, not for the first time, I find myself doubting the veracity of that common thinking because we’re having a hell of a time despite those pains and sketchy prospects of road-trekking from Madison, Wis., to the environs of Washington, D.C., the scene or our misspent youth. Oh, we’ve had our moments, to be sure. For example, did you know that there is no way in hell to get from central Ohio to Wheeling, W.Va., in any kind of straight line, or even a very crooked one, without special foreknowledge? That’s our conclusion after overnighting at a motel in the middle of the state, around Upper Sandusky (that’s a little east of Dunkirk and a little west of Nevada on U.S. Highway 30, for the more detailminded of readers). The rains had set in overnight, and the weather gurus were talking about snow, so we planned to head southeast rather than northeast to escape the unpredictable early-March blizzards. But the white flaky stuff hit before we even got on the road and quickly deepened to the kind of half ice, half slush that makes driving treacherous at best. So we fled toward Wheeling, dropping down below the snow line as we rolled southeast but getting tangled up in a snarl of blue highways and towns that didn’t even show up on Google Maps (how can that even happen in this day and age?). Our transit across the unknown regions was complicated by the fact that my sister was in the navigator’s position (shotgun, that is) and she has a tendency to fall asleep if things get dull, as they tend to do in

southeastern Ohio. I was in the driver’s seat, and my grumpy brother was in the back, letting each of us know what we were doing wrong at an ever-increasing volume — but, as he loudly proclaimed after we got lost for the third time, we weren’t even listening to him, much less heeding what he had to say. Another part of the problem was we were laughing so hard we nearly had to pull over, which is typical of our family gatherings these days. Since Ma and Pa passed, we find ourselves so funny we think we should be on television, especially when we’re screwing up in some way as we go through one adventure or another. It was when we discovered we were heading northeast, into the heart of the monster snowstorm instead of southeast and away from it, that we decided Ohio really does not like tourists very much. Deep in the text of its state constitution, there must be a phrase to the effect of, “If you don’t know how to get there, you probably don’t belong there anyway. Just turn around and go back where you came from.” And its highway signage program is just confusing enough to bring about that general goal without endangering the state’s federal highway funding or other civil rights. Well, to hell with that. After a couple of false starts and wrong turns, we found ourselves tooling past the industrial zone along the Ohio River, with what looked to be a nuclear-plant cooling tower looming up on our left and a lot of hardscrabble housing and industrial-park sprawl all around. At least the weather was holding, the snowstorm was doing its thing well to the north of us, and we were bound for D.C. on interstates all the way. In the company of a couple of thousand strangers, with possibly the equivalent of the entire Roaring Fork Valley population passing us, or following, or surging ahead of us, we arrived just ahead of one of the worst storms of the winter. It was an act of giving for which we were brutally thanked repeatedly by our hosts. Onward through the fog.

Season No. 17 Richard Blanco • Carole DeSanti Nick Flynn • Karen Joy Fowler Tom Reiss • James Salter Maria Semple • Dani Shapiro

HIT&RUN

jbcolson51@gmail.com

Aspen Writers’ Foundation presents an evening with best selling author

MARIA SEMPLE TV writer for Ellen, Mad About You, and SNL Shortlisted for the Women’s Prize for Fiction Novelist, producer, and humorist

Friday | Mar 31 | 6pm Paepcke Auditorium | Aspen Meadows Resort $20 General Admission Aspen Show Tickets 970.920.5770 | aspenshowtix.com

aspenwriters.org A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

Roller-skating surpassed ice-skating in popularity in the 1890s.

ON A ROLL “For several months the youth of the country ate and slept with

their roller skates on, there was no place that was sacred from the invasion of this unmitigated nuisance”, the Aspen Times decried in 1885 as Aspen residents joined the national roller-skating craze.

Skaters, mostly young folk, flocked to the electrically lit Rink Opera House on the corner of Cooper Avenue and Monarch Street several nights a week. Friday evening was ladies night, and young women could skate for free; otherwise, skaters paid 25 cents during the day and 40 cents at night. The rink offered a hundred pairs of woodwheeled skates. The Rink Opera House hosted other entertainment and events and scheduled skating around a busy schedule. New management tightened up the rules with a promise to “exclude rude boys and improper characters.” Skating, mixed with dancing, even with masquerade carnivals, captivated the youngest generation; however, their elders viewed roller-skating as an unsavory, unsafe, fleeting fad of questionable social status. The Times described the trend, “Skating on the roller skate is like riding on a railway train, if management is good and we behave ourselves, we feel safe.” The craze ended as quickly as it began. Aspen youth returned to iceskating for the next two decades at

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Hallam Lake, on the Roaring Fork, at Stillwater and on Castle Creek at the Newman Mine and dam. Innovative rubber wheels, like those in the poster accompanying this story,

Operators opened the rink in the afternoon, tempting children away from home after school. The unsupervised evening sessions, as in the 1880s, attracted young men

THE ASPEN TIMES JOINED THE CRUSADE AGAINST ROLLERSKATING AND SHOCKED READERS WITH A REPORT THAT “TWO HOMES BROKE UP AND TWO GIRLS HAD GONE WRONG” AS A RESULT OF LAX RINK MANAGEMENT. THE PAPER AND PARENTS DEMANDED THAT EITHER MANAGEMENT HOLD SEPARATE DAYS OF SKATING FOR MALES AND FEMALES OR THE CITY TERMINATE THE LEASE. THE CONTROVERSY PERILOUSLY CUT THE OPERATORS’ RECEIPTS, AND AS WITH THE PREVIOUS ROLLERSKATING CRAZE, SKATERS WENT BACK TO ICE-SKATING. revived roller-skating nationally but not in Aspen. A new generation of Aspen youth took to skates in 1907 when skating promoters leased the bottom, hardwood floor of the Armory Hall, now City Hall. Almost immediately the arrangement angered parents.

Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

and women whose dances and other social activities customarily provided chaperones to monitor their activities. Father Servant, the priest of St. Mary Catholic Church, initiated a campaign against the rink. He told his parishioners not to patronize

the place and to keep their children at home. He preached that the rink was “not the proper place for young boys and girls anymore than a public dance where anybody is permitted to go is a proper place.” Parents descended on the City Council, demanding that the lease be terminated. One angry mother pleaded for closure because the rink was a place where young girls “mingle with men of bad character.” The Aspen Times joined the crusade against roller-skating and shocked readers with a report that “two homes broke up and two girls had gone wrong” as a result of lax rink management. The paper and parents demanded that either management hold separate days of skating for males and females or the city terminate the lease. The controversy perilously cut the operators’ receipts, and as with the previous roller-skating craze, skaters went back to ice-skating. Roller-skating surfaced again in Aspen a couple of decades later, this time without the controversy of previous generations. Perhaps desperate for distraction, perhaps in rebellion against the strictures of their youth, Depression-era elders skated alongside their children, rolling metal ball-bearing wheels on the Armory Hall floor. Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn2@comcast.net.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

SNOW JOB

1941 DOW N TOW N A SPE N

According to the Aspen Daily Times on March 20, 1941, getting around Aspen was “tough going. The big snow last week was just what the skiers wanted and has put a smile on many a rancher who depends on melted snow to irrigate his crops, but it also has put country roads and city streets in an almost impassable condition in some places. Several farmers have come to town afoot or on horseback, rather than risk losing the family car in the mud somewhere. In Aspen, where a good share of the drainage is done via the sidewalks, it has not been safe to venture out without high top boots.” This photo and more can be found in the Aspen Historical Society archives at www.aspenhistory.org.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GEAR of the WEEK

by BOB WARD

EASY-PEASY HEART RATE MONITOR

THE DILEMMA: In order to maximize your workouts, you like to monitor your heart rate and stay in your target zone. Problem is, you’re tired of chest-strap monitors and want something more convenient.

WHY IT WORKS:

THE FIX: MIO Alpha strapless continuous heart-rate monitor.

GET IT

199

$

at the Ute Mountaineer or www.mioglobal.com.

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Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

First and most important, it fits comfortably on your wrist, thanks to a well-designed, sturdy but stretchy strap. The strap must be tight in order to measure your heart rate, but this didn’t require cutting off circulation to the hand. An easily readable display allows you to watch your heart rate and slow down or speed up as needed to stay in your preferred “zone.” It also measures total time of a workout, average heart rate and time spent in your preferred zone. Ideal for runners, cyclists and uphillers, who tend to make few or smooth, regular wrist movements, but could pose problems if you’re jumping rope, lifting weights or doing CrossFit. MIO Alpha comes with a long-lasting, rechargeable battery and functions well as a wristwatch when you’re not working out.

BONUS: For the truly data-inclined, MIO Alpha is equipped with Bluetooth technology to wirelessly transmit your workout information to a smartphone or computer.


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HOW MUCH HAS YOUR REAL ESTATE BROKER

offered to pay you?

If the answer is “nothing” then maybe you should re-think who you do business with. Why? Because Aspen Land & Homes is the ONLY full service broker in the Roaring Fork Valley that actually pays you when you buy a home – in fact, we pay you half of what we make. It’s a completely new – and much more sensible! – approach to buying real estate and it is making for some very, very happy clients. While our competition continues to do business the old way – we’re closing sales, opening doors, and giving buyers the money they deserve.

Call Aspen Land & Homes at 970.510.5124 or check out AspenProperties.com to find out how you can get paid when you buy a home. Aspen Land & Homes Smart. Sensible. Effective.

Christopher Hewett, Managing Broker, JD 970.948.4853 (c) | 970.510.5124 (o) | Chris@AspenProperties.com | AspenProperties.com

For a video of this property visit:

www.SnowmassSkiHome.com

Exceptional Mountain Retreat… Snowmass Village Ski-in, ski-out via Adam’s Avenue Ski Run – ski out your door down to the Base Village Gondola. Stunning home with European stone architecture. Amazing views and an exceptional location. Master suite with fireplace, high ceilings and glamorous bath. Perfect floor plan for quiet, intimate evenings or entertaining larger groups. Extensive landscaping with stream and waterfall. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 4,570 sq ft, .92 acres $10,995,000 Furnished

Terry Rogers

970.379.2443 cell Terry.Rogers@SothebysRealty.com

AspenSnowmassDreamHomes.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

WINEINK

BLENDING WINE AND PICTURES EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE you’ll crack the pages of a book and find the pairing of pictures and prose so powerful that you are transported to a different place and state of mind. Such is the case with “Perspective Napa Valley,” a recently released coffee table book commissioned by the Napa Valley Vintners. Turning the pages KELLY J. of “Perspective Napa HAYES Valley,” it is impossible not to long for a sojourn to the source of the marvelous photographs taken by former filmmaker turned photo artist Sam Aslanian. It is equally impossible to read the text written by longtime Napa Valley resident and winery guru Terry Hall without gathering a local’s view of this magical valley. Napa is to American wine what Aspen is to American skiing. It is an iconic place that transcends the commercialized and media-driven images to exceed expectations when the reality is actually experienced. While both places are well-known repositories of glamour and wealth, Napa and Aspen are special because their incomparable beauty was nurtured and transformed by visionaries who saw their potential. As a ski town, Aspen was pioneered by passionate European outdoorsman and skiers, in much the same way, and in the exact same era of the 1950s and ’60s, that Napa evolved under the influence of early winemakers, many also of European heritage. When I opened and perused “Perspective Napa Valley” for the first time, I was on the patio café in St. Helena in the heart of Napa Valley. I felt as though pages of the book and the setting were one in the same. And when I opened it again, a month or so later, in my home in Old Snowmass, I felt was ingesting the magic of a place far, far away for the very first time. I got both a contact high and a thirst for a visit. As a filmmaker, Sam Aslanian toiled in the studios and post-

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production houses of Hollywood for nearly three decades, turning out, amongst other projects, music videos for artists like Joni Mitchell, Michael Jackson and U2. But he always longed to one day live in the Napa Valley, a place where his parents had owned a home and that had been a touchstone for him since his youth in San Francisco “My first significant wine experience came when I was 17,” he recalled in a recent telephone interview from his current home in the hills above Napa. “A high school teacher of mine told me that I had to try the Louis Martini 1974 Cabernet. I did and it was a revelation. I bought a case and held it into the late ’80s.” Making a life change, Aslanian moved with his wife and daughter to Napa a few years ago. Around the same time, he decided that still images would replace moving images in his life. “I really loved photography, but I was I looking for new way to express things,” he said. “I was in Italy taking digital pictures of these beautiful buildings and sites that people have been painting or photographing for years. I thought there had to be a better way to depict them.” His “better way” came when he set his digital camera aside and began taking photos on film, really old film. “I began to buy old, expired rolls of film on eBay,” he said. “The photographs began to have this amazing quality and I was never quite sure what they would be like until they were developed. I remember taking a whole day’s worth of photos in Paris and when I developed them there was nothing, the film was bad.” An analogy to buying a case of old wine that has gone bad comes to mind. But it was this aesthetic and this unconventional process that would ultimately inform the pages of “Perspective Napa Valley.” “I really wanted to shoot the beauty of the valley, so one day I took some of my photos to Linda Reiff (president of the Napa Valley Vintners, a trade organization that promotes the local wine industry) and told her what I wanted to do. She got

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it right away and we were off and running.” For the next 18 months, Aslanian shot more than 3,000 photos, all using the expired film concept he had fallen in love with. “The photography spoiled me,” he noted. “I would get up in the morning and see there was fog on the other side of the valley, and I would grab my stuff and head out for the day to shoot. It was wonderful.” The photos included dramatic landscapes, photos of valley events, details of wineries and documentary-like images of workers bringing in the harvest. What sets them apart is the medium used to produce them. There are many great photographers who could have captured beautiful images in the valley, but the shots in “Perspective Napa Valley” resonate as being timeless, and yet perfect documents of the time we live in. The melding of Aslanian’s modern eye of a contemporary filmmaker with a technology that is rapidly becoming extinct gives the photographs a feel that is unique to the book and images produced. Culling, or curating, the 3000 photographs into the 87 that eventually graced the book was a Herculean task. Aslanian credits Terry Hall, who worked with the

Napa Valley Vintners for many years before opening his own consulting/public relations agency in St. Helena, for keeping it all on track. “Terry has such an even keel. He brought flow, framework and a narrative to the project,” Aslanian said. Hall also supplied the structure by writing the text that ties the images together. His spare but eloquent passages give just enough context to the photos without distracting from the visual elements. Something to which all writers should aspire. Alas, acquiring a copy of “Perspective Napa Valley” is more easily desired than completed. You can go to the Napa Valley Vintners website at napavalleyvintners. com. Or, perhaps more agreeably, you can take a trip to Napa and purchase the book at any number of wineries. If you would like to look at Sam’s beautiful photos and share Terry’s insights, “Perspective Napa Valley” will also be on display this month in the lobby of the Pitkin County Library. Stop by. It’s intoxicating. Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soonto-be-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@aol.com.

COURTESY PHOTOS


BY KELLY J. HAYES

UNDER THE INFLUENCE Each week I will recommend a wine that I was drinking while penning this piece. THIS WEEK: Etude 2010 Pinot Noir Carneros Etude has a quarter-century history making wines in a corner of Carneros that takes advantage of the typically cooler climate of the region and an atypical patch of volcanic soils. This is a solid offering from the Etude team and it is great Pinot to pair with food. Black cherries and a solid ruby color make it a pleasure to drink.

“Perspective Napa Valley,” which will be on display at the Pitkin County Library, transports the reader to California’s wine country.

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

FOOD MATTERS FOOD MATTERS

CHEFS CLUB

ASPEN HIGH’S PROSTART CULINARY TEAM HEADS TO STATES — AND THEY’RE ON FIRE AT SEVEN MINUTES until service, the tiny kitchen is abuzz with the sweet sounds of a gourmet meal in the making: fat sizzling in a hot pan, a wire whisk tickling metal bowl, the pop-whir of a miniature blowtorch. Four young chefs in spotless white jackets stand elbow-to-elbow at their respective stations, shaking pans, sprinkling seasonings, and polishing serving plates while volleying commands and status updates: “Chris, as soon as you’re ready, let me AMANDA know!” RAE “Hot, behind! Hot, behind!” “Scallops are done! Nicole, you can use this burner.” “Is that enough of the purée?” “Dessert’s done!” “Coming in with the lamb behind you, Gigi.” “Forty seconds!” “DONE!” The crew shares a satisfied sigh and a round of high fives. Then each member grabs a fork and knife, and one by one digs in to their masterpieces: seared scallops with sugar snap peas, shiitake mushrooms, and bacon; rack of lamb with vegetables and red wine sauce; brûléed chocolate ravioli with mascarpone filling and Chambordraspberry coulis. Clearly, this is no ordinary kitchen. In fact, it’s not quite a kitchen at all, just a pair of butane burners set atop a stainless-steel work table in classroom 1106 of Aspen High School. Just like the soccer and football teams running drills outside, Aspen High’s ProStart Culinary Team is gearing up for game day of its own. On Friday, March 21, after two more of these practice runs simulating the 15th Annual ProStart State Invitational at Johnson & Wales University in Denver — during which the budding chefs must prepare two plates each of an original appetizer, entrée, and dessert in 60 minutes or less — Aspen will compete against 24 other Colorado high schools. The team that wins earns the chance to compete again at the National ProStart Invitational in Minneapolis in May. The stakes: more than $1 million in scholarships. Aspen High School’s ProStart

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Culinary Team is the competing arm of a two-year hospitality and foodservice management program accredited by the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation. Business courses are woven into students’ regular course load, serving as a feeder of sorts to culinary institutes and universities. (Pass two national exams, earn credits toward college.) “The ProStart curriculum is economics based, with the model being a restaurant,” says instructor Morgan Henschke. “We cover résumé-writing to costing to training to storage to receiving — everything about owning a business.” At competition, each team is judged on its menu — which must cost $75 or less per portion, priced to each pinch of salt — taste and appearance of food, sanitation, and spirit. Every detail matters. Now, between bites, the students are vocal with praise and critiques. The scallops, ringed with apricot-soyginger glaze and trout roe, receive rave reviews. The dish was assembled by returning senior Gigi Mottier, who apprenticed in two kitchens in France this summer and will attend Johnson & Wales in the fall. Senior and team leader Nicole Zell’s lamb is cooked perfectly as well. Nobody is particularly happy about the reduced size, from 3 racks to 2 per plate, but the team was chastised for too-large portions at the Western Slope Open at Colorado Mesa University on Feb. 22. Junior newcomer Chris McNamara, who parlayed a gig as a pizza chef at Goodfellows in Snowmass to a spot in the prep kitchen at the Maroon Creek Club, assisted with the entrée and dessert. Today he tested out a new preparation: tourné potatoes, peeled into little footballs, to replace less-skillful mashed potatoes, and concocted a creamy potato-carrot purée from the scraps. At competition, each team’s waste is measured, which factors into the final score. Everyone agrees that less cream in the purée will prop the potatoes higher on the plate, another crucial detail in plating. A touch more salt next time; otherwise McNamara nails it. Senior Jennifer Coombe handrolled chocolate ravioli, from dough made by replacing some flour with cocoa powder and filled with mascarpone and raspberries. One square broke open during cooking.

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“Should we make an extra one, in case that happens at comp?” Zell asks. Her cohorts agree. The pasta is either slightly too thick or needs a moment more in the boiling water, but everyone agrees that the crispy brûlée coating — Coombe dredges each ravioli in sugar before torching — shows skill. “We’re playing with so many different things,” says Zell, who interned four nights a week at Cache Cache Restaurant last summer and heads to the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., in the fall. She grins. “We are so good right now. Go team, go team!” To say the Aspen High School ProStart Culinary Team is the underdog in Denver would be both a diss and a compliment. Last year, the team took third at States, earning $56,000 in scholarships. But it was the first time in five years that Aspen had competed at all — likely because the class was reportedly making microwave quesadillas with prepackaged shredded cheese. Henschke, a French teacher at Aspen High School, saw an opportunity to change that. She revived the ProStart program, ordering textbooks and persuading Chris Lanter, executive chef of Cache Cache, to become official ProStart mentor. She also arranged for other culinary professionals and community members to share their skills with students. “I see myself more as a facilitator than as a teacher,” says Henschke, who, since she’s not technically a

chef, goes by Chief. “When I started teaching this class, I said, ‘Maybe we can go watch Western Slope…then we ended up competing and went to States!” “Western Slope is the scrimmage,” Lanter confirms. “We got third this year. If we had matching hats we would have won first. The top teams were three-quarters of a point apart.” During practice (alternate senior Hallie Stuart is absent today) Lanter presides over a color-coded spreadsheet and an iPhone timer. He’s the mellow, analytical yin to Henschke’s eagle-eyed, upbeat yang. “Watch your space, guys, work clean!” she chirps encouragingly throughout practice. “Good talk!” “I didn’t realize how much I would enjoy seeing these guys get so much better,” Lanter says. “This emulates the intensity and pressure in a busy kitchen.” He pauses. “Well, you don’t normally cook like this; in a kitchen you have three prep guys and a butcher who comes in at 6 a.m….but there’s a direct relationship. It’s fun to be around students who are interested in their craft.” Full of food that one might find on any of Aspen’s top menus, the team is confident. How will they win at States in Denver? “Staying organized, not stressing out, and having fun with it,” McNamara says. “That’s the biggest part.” Amanda Rae is rooting for Chris, Gigi, Hallie, Jenn, and Nicole on Friday. GO TEAM!

PHOTOS BY AMANDA RAE


by AMANDA RAE

PROSTART STATS 5 students 15 practices 1 scrimmage 61.5 hours in the kitchen 17.5 pounds of lamb 58 average time, in minutes 1 goal: NATIONALS!

ABOVE: Aspen High School’s ProStart Culinary Team — Nicole Zell, Hallie Stuart, Chris McNamara, and Jennifer Coombe (left to right) —are in the zone during a recent practice. INSETS: ProStart mentor Chris Lanter, executive chef of Cache Cache Restaurant, watches Jennifer Coombe brûlée hand-rolled chocolate ravioli.

North of Nell, Unit 3K One Bedroom, one bath at the base of Aspen Mountain, adjacent to the Gondola. Underground parking and storage area. Walk to restaurants, buses and entertainment.

Offered at $1,600,000

North of Nell, Unit 2N Three-bedroom condominium located at the base of Aspen Mountain in Aspen’s best located building. Nicely appointed deluxe category unit. Great rental potential.

Offered at $2,400,000

Chatfield Avenue Single Family Home

Old Snowmass Ranch Six Acre Horse Property

Remodel the existing 3345 sf, four bedroom home or development opportunity on this 18,603 sf lot located on Aspen Golf Course. Magnificent mountain views.

Keep the historic log home and build an additional home of up to 5,750sf plus guest house. Capitol Creek frontage, complete water rights and majestic mountain views.

Offered at $4,400,000

Price reduced to $2,390,000

Chatfield Avenue Lot

Golden Horn Building

17,410 square feet lot in the Cemetery Lane area. Unobstructed views of Aspen Highlands and Buttermilk ski areas. Adjacent lot/home also available for purchase.

Prime Aspen core commercial building on the Cooper Avenue Mall across from Wagner Park. Four incomeproducing units.

Offered at $8,440,000

Offered at $4,400,000

JOE RACZAK BROKER

jraczak@sopris.net • 970-925-1510 • 970-927-4800 • raczakrealestate.com • 0234 LIGHT HILL ROAD

SNOWMASS, COLORADO 81654

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

MAKE IT Created with Bartlett pears, Aviation Gin, Benedictine, maple syrup, Pimento Bitters, lemon juice and Barritts Ginger Beer

SMUGGLING PEARS Much like last year, the Great Après-Ski Pub Crawl served up some interesting libations; a few I liked, a few I did not. Take, for example, the overall winner — Justice Snow’s The Mooserwirt. Not my thing; maybe it was the quail-egg garnish. But this year’s audience favorite — Chefs Club’s Smuggling Pears — now we’re talking. Mixologist extraordinaire Anthony Bohlinger’s concotion was right up my alley. Made with gin and ginger beer, it was reminiscent of a mule, but the added twists of maple syrup, Benedictine, bitters and lemon juice (not to mention the most delicate slice of fresh pear ever) made it different. For me, it was the best of the bunch, a refreshing cocktail I would happily sip at après ski or après hike or just any ol’ Sunday afternoon. Gunilla Asher is taking a break from the bar scene, so we’re turning this page over to you. Email jmcgovern@ aspentimes.com with what cocktails you’re mixing, what libations you’re drinking and what tastes have tempted your tastebuds, and we’ll share them with our readers. Cheers!

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Ski Snowmass…

WITH THESE SKI ACCESSIBLE CONDOMINIUMS!

CRESTWOOD 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 1,720 sq ft $1,575,000

Capitol Peak at Base Village $825,000

Ridge Condominium $1,395,000

Capitol Peak at Base Village $700,000

Woodrun Place $695,000

Timberline $695,000

Snowmass Mountain $685,000

Timberline $715,000

Timberline $405,000

Knowledge and Experience… Put 30 Years to Work for You! Chris Lewis 970.379.2369 cell 970.923.2006 office Chris.Lewis@sothebysrealty.com

AspenSnowmassSir.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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Your BEST FRIEND is waiting for YOU!

S a b b i a Ta l e n t i Classic Italian Ceramics

H a n d – Pa i n t e d D i n n e r w a re Large Decorative Pieces Special Order Ser vices Commission Art

BUDDY

Buddy, also known as Thurman, is a friendly, athletic, handsome, oneyear-old Cattle Dog mix who gets along well with people and other pets. Originally from the Black Hat area of New Mexico. Turned in because of housing.

CHICKEN

Chicken is a gentle, timid, ten-year-old, retired sled dog who gets along well with other dogs. She is shy with people, and will require love and patience in order to slowly come out of her shell.

RONNIE

Sweet, affectionate, two-year-old Shihtzu mix who was released to the shelter so dirty, scared and matted that the groomer spent three hours grooming him in order to ultimately reveal a clean, beautiful, lovable mutt.

SPYDER

Spyder is a handsome, 4-yearold Lab/Australian Cattle Dog mix. He is a really nice dog and easy with everyone—people and other dogs. Super affectionate!

JACKIE

205 S. Mill Street #221, Aspen, CO 81611 (Above Cache Cache) 50 E Meadow Drive, Vail, CO 81657 9 7 0 - 4 2 9 - 8 8 6 9

|

w w w. s a b b i a t a l e n t i . c o m

Beautiful, friendly, 12-year-old American Foxhound/ Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. Jackie is a retired sled dog.

OPEN 7am-6pm EVERY DAY 970.544.0206

MOWGLI

Sensitive, 2-year-old husky who was retired early from dog sledding because he suffers from seizures. Fine with people + other dogs, but nervous with new people. Needs an understanding, loving home.

ZOE

This sweet, mostly blind, 9-year-old miniature Schnauzer female was turned in to the shelter because her owner was ill and could no longer take care of her. Very deserving of a home at this point in her life.

AGUILLA, ROSIE AND LEA

One-year-old Chiweenies (Chihuahua/Dachshund mixes) found abandoned in Texas. Cute as buttons and becoming more outgoing every day! Aguilla is very friendly and loving. He is the only male and loves his sisters. Rosie is very affectionate, used to be more comfortable with women—but now likes anyone who handles her gently. Lea is still a bit timid with most people but slowly coming out of her shell as she learns it is safe to trust people.

Since Oct. 2007: Friends of the Aspen Animal Shelter’s spay/neuter campaign has neutered over 12,500 dogs + cats and our shelter has rescued well over 2,000 dogs + cats from death row in shelters in Colorado and beyond.

CLEO

Beautiful, friendly, soft-spoken 10-year-old Husky mix female. She is a retired sled dog looking for a loving home. She is very outgoing with people. What a cute face she has.

JIM

Outgoing, energetic, 12-yearold American Foxhound/Husky mix male. Good with people and other dogs. A retired sled dog. Came to the shelter with his sister Jackie (see below). So handsome!

ALLIE

TIMBER

Soft-spoken, sleek, friendly, 10-year old Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. She is a retired sled dog who deserves a comfortable, loving home.

SAM

4.5-year-old gorgeous Lab/Pit Bull mix female. Such a sweet girl. Allie is happy, friendly, affectionate and energetic. Turned in because of housing.

Strong, energetic, black/white 5.5-year-old female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull—larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing + loves people. Best as only pet.

Aspen/Pitkin Animal Shelter

101 Animal Shelter Road

www.dogsaspen.com

Are you ready

For Spring in Your New Home???

Welcome to Aspen in the WEST END Call me for a preview of this fabulous property!

Aspen Real Estate

620 E. Hyman Ave, Aspen CO

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Julie Mandt 970-379-9525• mandtie@rof.net


THE CASTLE CREEK SANCTUARY 4 bedroom / 4.5 bathroom 10,536 sq ft residence over 14 secluded acres dramatic creek front setting and manicured grounds $15,000,000 DALE POTVIN L AY N E S H E A

970 948 4001

THE EPITOME OF THE WEST END 3 bedroom / 3 bathroom 2,828 sq ft victorian 3 indoor fireplaces 7,500 sq ft corner lot with views of aspen mountain $4,500,000 BILL STIRLING DAWNETTE SMITH

R

E PR D IC U E C E D

970 948 8287

EXCEPTIONAL CONVENIENCE AND SIZE 5 bedroom / 3 bathroom 1,906 sq ft condo direct views of aspen mtn from top floor 200 yard walk to lift 1a $1,995,000 DAWNETTE SMITH BILL STIRLING

970 618 1422

T H E R A N C H AT R O A R I N G F O R K 4 bedroom / 2.5 bathroom 2,365 sq ft home premiere fishing access along roaring fork river mount sopris views $559,000 L AY N E S H E A DALE POTVIN

970 379 4781

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FROM ASPEN, WITH LOVE

ASPEN UNTUCKED

by BARBARA PLATTS

Is Aspen home to an extraordinary number of people with Peter Pan Syndrome? Perhaps.

I DON’T WANT TO GROW UP BEING PAN IN ASPEN

ALL CHILDREN, except one, grow up. That is how the story starts and how it’s been told over and over for more than 100 years. In novels, in plays, in movies and sequels to those movies, we have heard the tale of the boy who chose to stay a kid forever while the rest of us had to accept the fate of growing old. J.M. Barrie wrote BARBARA both the original play PLATTS and the novel about the character that we have learned to love and remember over generations as Peter Pan. All children, except one, grow up. Well, no offense to J.M. Barrie, but I believe he made this sweeping statement without having ever first set foot in Aspen, Colo. Usually the No. 1 complaint in this town from girls searching for eligible bachelors or adults observing the shenanigans of their preceding generation is that the town is filled to the brim with boys (and some girls) who refuse to grow up. This problem has been coined the Peter Pan Syndrome. The ailment is essentially a failure to launch — a resistance, even a protest — to growing into maturity. This

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resistance is often paired with an avoidance of responsibility and an eagerness to have nothing but fun. Aspenites who have this syndrome are likened to the famous Pan himself. Except they fly underneath a pair of skis and/or a mountain bike in favor of using fairy dust and happy thoughts. And, instead of heading for the

or compete in the rigorous Power of Four races. There is also no age when it becomes a faux pas to close down the bars and open them again the next morning. We have the option to be man-children here, and that freedom is both a blessing and a curse. But what’s so wrong with being Peter Pan? After all, he’s the hero

IF WE FORGET THE CHILD WITHIN, WHAT BETTER PLACE TO REMIND US THAN ASPEN, THE NEVERLAND OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS. second star on the right and straight on till morning, they have the second whisky shot of the night and then alternate with Pabst Tall Boys until dawn. Aspen is their Neverland and there is no need to grow up because everyone is having far too much fun staying young. A Peter Pan can exist anywhere, however the trait flourishes here because it’s unreasonably hard to grow up. Our town promotes youth in both its best and worst forms. There is no age limit for the ambitious Aspenite who wants to hike all of Colorado’s fourteeners

Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

of every story he’s in. His jejune demeanor makes him loved and adored by all of his friends and he can pick up a girl from her bedroom window with a relative amount of ease. The boy has endless adventures with his fairy sidekick, who is a badass in her own right, and he gets to fight pirates. Not to even mention that whole flying thing. Why not aspire to be a Pan? Because we all know that the refusal to become an adult stems from a powerful, underlying fear that growing up is simply just growing old. This point hits home

for me and others in their 20s who are constantly fighting a game of tug-o-war between wanting to remain a kid and feeling the pressure to grow into an adult. The rebellion against adulthood usually feels like the only way to maintain some control over the changes that are happening all around us. There is no clear answer for when or how to grow up. No manual exists that tells me when it’s important to stay in and polish up my resume and study for the GRE or when it’s absolutely necessary for me to go out with friends and get into a snowball fight or jump off the Devil’s Punchbowl. For me, the answer relates to a theme I’ve had in many of my columns: finding the best in both worlds. We shouldn’t shut out Peter Pan and our childlike selves just as we shouldn’t try and resist the inevitable truth that we’re growing up. And if we forget the child within, what better place to remind us than Aspen, the Neverland of the Rocky Mountains. Barbara Platts wishes she could be a bit more of a Pan, but usually finds more similarities with Wendy. Reach her at bplatts.000@gmail.com or follower her @barbaraplatts.

P H OTO B Y BA R BA R A P L AT T S


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New Listing

Tranquility in the West End • Warm and inviting home offering privacy in the quiet West End! • 4 bedrooms, 4 full, 2 half baths, 4,874 sq ft • Impeccably maintained & recently upgraded • High level of new finishes and amenities • Main level master with private porch and hot tub • Wonderful living spaces indoors & out • Media room, 2 car garage • Large south & west-facing deck to soak up the sun with views towards Tiehack • Close to the amenities of downtown Price Upon Request Craig Morris | 970.379.9795 New Listing

Rose Camp

Highlands Ski-In/Ski-Out

397 acres bordering National Forest 3 bedroom, 3 bath, 4,391 sq ft log cabin Direct access to back-country activities Luxury “off the grid” solar independent living $5,000,000 Mark Overstreet | 970.948.6092

Magnificent Views from Silverlode 5 bedrooms, 5 baths, 3,566 sq ft Alluring livability of a spacious floor plan Heated 2 car garage, 2 fireplaces Views from Aspen Mountain to Mt. Sopris $4,895,000 $4,195,000 Llwyd Ecclestone | 970.456.6031

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Build up to 9,000 sq ft in Aspen Highlands Only ski-in/ski-out lot available Spectacular views of Tiehack Cliffs Includes Ritz Carlton Club amenities $4,350,000 Tom Hineline | 970.355.4575 Zack Feast | 970.404.7654

Slopeside Luxury at Aspen Highlands 4 bedrooms+office, 5.5 baths, 5,748 sq ft Wood beams, granite & marble throughout 150 yard walk to the Exhibition lift Includes Ritz-Carlton Club privileges $4,485,000 $3,975,000 Turn-Key Furnished Ed Foran | 970.948.5704

Riverfront Sanctuary 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, 4,232 sq ft Above the banks of the Roaring Fork River “Wall of windows” open to the deck Just 10 minutes to Aspen or the airport $4,250,000 Tom Melberg | 970.379.1297

Maroon Creek Club Homesite Perched above Maroon Creek Includes plans for a Robert Trown home Across the street from Tiehack ski lift Minutes to airport and downtown Aspen $3,950,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

rtfully uniting extraordinary homes with extraordinary lives. F

Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014


New Listing

Finger Barn Ranch

Maroon Greens Townhome

Own a piece of Aspen’s storied past! 2 wooded lots on 4.17 acre building site Stunning Roaring Fork River frontage Purchase lots for $1,995,000 or $1,895,000 $3,800,000 Raifie Bass | 970.948.7424

Spacious 4 bedroom townhome Ski access to the new Tiehack lift On the Maroon Creek Club fairway! Private underground parking, elevator $4,350,000 $3,750,000 Ed Zasacky | 970.379.2811

Private, Sunny, Convenient

An Equestrian’s Dream! Sophisticated 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 4,937 sq ft home on 70 irrigated acres with views Large decks, indoor & outdoor riding arenas Remodeled apartment above 4-stall barn $3,995,000 $3,695,000 Partially Furnished Sandy Smith | 970.948.3955 Noël Hallisey | 970.379.1977

West Aspen duplex at Red Butte 4 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 3,449 sq ft Multiple decks with views of Pyramid Peak Easy access to Aspen Golf Course & trails $3,295,000 Raifie Bass | 970.948.7424

Stylish Core Half Duplex • 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 2,236 sq ft, 3-level half duplex • Stylish and fully accessorized • Spacious kitchen with black granite counters and dumb waiter • Separate office, 2-car garage with heated driveway • Top living floor has beautiful views of Aspen Mountain • Just 2 blocks from the Wheeler Opera House • Impeccably maintained $3,495,000 Furnished Craig Ward | 970.379.1254

Aspen View Lot Plans for 6 bedroom, 8,130 sq ft home on .81 acre beautifully wooded lot Panoramic views of the Roaring Fork Valley City of Aspen Building Permit is approved $3,950,000 $3,695,000 Andrew Ernemann | 970.379.8125 AspenViewLot.com

The Colorado Mountain Lifestyle... 5 bedrooms, 4 full, 2 half baths, 5,325 sq ft Extraordinary craftsmanship 35+ dramatic acres, great for horses Stream, pond, and impeccable landscaping $3,250,000 Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

AspenSnowmassSIR.com Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

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T he natural beauty of Aspen/Snowmass inspires our passion for living the “Aspen idea”… in body, mind and spirit.

Nature’s Show… Relax on the deck as the spectacular sunsets present a different show each and every day! Views of not only Aspen Mountain and Mt. Sopris, but also Independence Pass. Exquisitely cared for inside and out, this mountain home with its over-sized yard is award-winning. Located a few minutes east of Aspen, skiing, hiking, biking are easily accessed. $3,600,000 New Price $3,400,000

Penney Evans Carruth c: 970-379-9133 o: 970-925-2811 Penney.Carruth @ SothebysRealty.com

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THE INDUSTRY:

THEN, NOW (AND BEYOND) by SCOTT CONDON

THIS SEASON EVOLVED into a good one for the ski industry primarily for one simple reason — snow. When people see snow in their backyard playgrounds, that fires them up to go skiing or riding, said Kelly Davis, research director for SnowSports Industries America, an association for retailers of equipment, apparel and accessories. Many Rocky Mountain resorts have experienced a well-above-average if not epic season in terms of snowfall. The Midwest and East Coast have been pummeled by the now-infamous polar vortex — at times creating conditions so harsh that people stayed off the slopes. Resorts in the hills of the Southeast have benefited from a bigger-than-usual burst of winter. The only area suffering is the Pacific West, which finally started receiving some snow in February after a dry first half of the season. Snow is the variable that makes or breaks a ski season. Snow conditions account for about three-fourths of the variance in how many times people ski and how much they spend in ski shops from year to year, Davis said. The economy, gas prices and other variables do little to influence the trends. “We’re snow farmers,” Davis said.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY (LEFT) AND ASPEN SKIING CO.

Michael Berry, longtime president of the National Ski Areas Association, said ski resorts in all regions except California are putting up “healthy” numbers. It remains to be seen if the decreases in the number of skiers in the West Coast will be offset by gains in other regions because of great snow conditions, he said. About 25 percent of skier visits each season are recorded after March 1, Berry said. March typically determines if a ski season is good or great, he said. For Aspen Skiing Co., excellent snow conditions have been a boon for business. Roaring Fork Valley residents are hitting the slopes with a vengeance, and overnight visitors are well aware of the snowpack. “We’ve seen a lot more locals on the mountains, given the conditions,” said Christian Knapp, Skico vice president of marketing. “We’re also pleased with the results (of destination visitors) so far.”

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JUST HOW EPIC HAS IT BEEN? BRYAN STRIKER ALBERS, ILL.

“Overall, last year, you could see grass right now, so this is amazing. It could snow until Fourth of July as far as I’m concerned. Summer will be here sooner or later, but yeah, let it snow. I’m ready for some more winter. I’d rather snowboard as long as I can. And if it’s like last year, it’s summer the next day practically, so it’s the best of both worlds.”

BILL VADNAIS REDMOND, ORE.

“I got Day 96 in today. The base up there (Aspen Mountain) is incredible. You can always ski up there someplace. I remember in years past, you couldn’t do that all the time. You start to lose the snow a little earlier, but there’s a lot of snow up there now.”

STAN CHEO ASPEN

“Epic season — one of the best I can remember in like 26 years of ski seasons here. Way better than last year — tons more early snow. We could always use more, but it’s staying super-consistent.”

PAT MILLIGAN CHICAGO

“Winter has been easygoing. The people seem to be in a good mood because the snow has been good. But Aspen is generally quieter than it used to be. It really is. There used to be a lot more action on the street all day long.”

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SO, WHO’S SKIING? It appears that the season is going to be solid both at Aspen-Snowmass and for the U.S. industry overall. That begs the question: Who is participating in snow sports? The answer gets Davis excited. Research commissioned by SnowSports Industries America showed there were about 12.2 million skiers and 7.4 million snowboarders last season. Within the universe of skiers, 8.1 million self-identified themselves as alpine skiers, a 19 percent drop from the season before. Another 5.4 million identified themselves as freeskiers, a 46 percent increase. (SnowSports Industries America eliminated the people who duplicated answers to determine there were 12.2 million skiers overall.) Freeskiers tend to be younger people who use all-natural and man-made features in search of a good time, Davis said. They’re using terrain parks or building ramps to launch off in snowy backcountry slopes. “They’re having a blast,” she said. Word-cloud research, where responses by skiers are examined for common themes, shows that “freedom” popped up most among freeskiers for why they love their pursuit, she said. And because most freeskiers tend to be younger than 35, Davis said it bodes well for both ski resorts and snow-sports retailers.

A ONE-HUMPED CAMEL The ski industry was addicted to baby boomers for a couple of decades. “In the 1980s it was a one-hump camel — everybody was 30-something,” Berry said. The ski industry realized it needed to do more to replace boomers or face a slow death. Skier visits would tail off as boomers aged and gave up the sport. NSAA’s demographic study from surveys at resorts last season shows a healthy multigenerational spread. About 53 percent of skiers and snowboarders at resorts are between ages 18 and 44 compared with 37 percent who are 45 and older. However, the average age of participants keeps creeping up. It was 38.5 years old last season compared with 33.2 in 1997-98, according to NSAA. “Clearly, the loyalty and staying power of older participants has been a plus for the industry,” the NSAA demographics study said.

Berry said baby boomers haven’t dropped out of skiing as quickly or in as large of numbers as feared. “We’ve enjoyed the benefits of the baby boomer for a long, long, long time,” he said. For Aspen-Snowmass, news on the age front is mixed. Knapp said Skico’s average customer is older than the average age for the industry as a whole. However, there is a “statistically significant” drop in the average age this season, he said. One reason is pricing and promotion aimed at younger skiers and snowboarders, particularly early and late in the season, Knapp said. Skico is aiming some of its efforts at potential customers who are out of college and facing the challenges of starting careers and families. They don’t necessarily have a lot of money or time, Knapp said, so Skico has tailored specials to appeal to them.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY (TOP) AND BY KARL HERCHENROEDER


WHO IS SKIING?

Profiles from 2012-13 season

39.1% 24% Skiers and snowboarders who are single

Skiers and snowboarders from a household with children still at home

65 & OVER 5.5%

Males versus females

17 & UNDER 9.6%

55 - 64 11.7%

18 - 24 13.2%

45 - 54 19.8%

25 - 34 20.3%

35 - 44 19.8%

AVERAGE AGE: 38.5

70.8% 29.5%

11.7%

Snowboarders per overall visits

Minorities per overall visits

Snowboarders per overall visits

GETTING ‘EM HOOKED It makes sense that Skico wants to draw younger skiers and snowboarders to Aspen-Snowmass. It has one of the strongest retention rates in the industry, Knapp said. “We have an incredibly loyal clientele,” he said. That spans international and domestic visitors, young and old. You have to imagine that most Skico customers are pleased this season, given the snow conditions. The snowpack east of Aspen is 126 percent of average. Buying habits support the theory. Knapp said customers are spending extra time on the slopes rather than finding something else to do off-slope while they are on vacation. It’s a concept called “capture,” as in capturing an extra day of lift-ticket revenue. “Our capture has been very good,” Knapp said. Knapp said snow isn’t the only factor that drove business up this season. Alterations to a major promotion this season also paid dividends, he said. “Our bread-and-butter package is The Perfect Storm,” Knapp said. Customers receive a free day of lift tickets, equipment rentals and lodging when they buy a four-day package. Skico and partners offered The Perfect Storm with three rolling deadlines throughout the season. There was one deadline for purchase in previous seasons and the eligible part of the season was more concentrated.

From households with incomes greater than $100,000

54% 21%

45.1%

From households with incomes less than $50,000

41.9%

Skiers and riders who say they use a terrain park

Self-identified skill level: Advanced/expert vs. intermediate

27%

Source: National Ski Areas Association Demographic Study

PHOTO COURTESY OF ASPEN SKIING CO.; GRAPHIC BY ASHLEY DETMERING

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THE SEASON IN SALES You can tell a lot about how a ski season is evolving based on the sales by retailers of snow-sports equipment and apparel across the country. This year has been cold and snowy across most of the country, and it shows, according to Kelly Davis, director of research for SnowSports Industries America. The only retailers facing a tough time over the first half of the season are those in the Pacific West, where snow came late. SnowSports Industries America and Leisure Trends collect data from 1,200 retailers to get a picture of how sales are going during the season. Here’s what they found for their latest report, which reflects sales from August through Jan. 31. • Skis, snowboards and other equipment are up 4 percent from last year to $670 million. Sales of units sold are up 5 percent. • Ski jackets, pants, gloves and other apparel are up 3 percent from last year to $1.2 billion. Sales of units are up 2 percent. • Sales of accessories — everything from backcountry beacons and probe poles to action cameras — were up 14 percent to $952 million. Sales of units are up 10 percent. SnowSports Industries America estimates sales of equipment, apparel and accessories will top $3.5 billion by the time the season ends in April. Skiers who have been holding out for a big purchase of their favorite boards at a reduced price are probably out of luck. There won’t be a lot of merchandise to carry over from this season to next season, so retailers won’t be desperate to unload in Labor Day sales, Davis said. “I hope everybody got what they wanted because the shelves are getting pretty bare,” Davis said. — by Scott Condon

RICH, WHITE GUYS While NSAA’s demographic study shows the ski industry has a wide range of age among participants, it doesn’t come as a surprise that skiers and snowboarders also tend to be wealthy, white and male. About 58 percent of participants are men and 42 percent women, according to NSAA. In an independent participant study in all snow sports — including snowshoeing and cross-country skiing — SnowSports Industries America found the split to be 62 percent men and 38 percent women. NSAA’s surveys showed that 54 percent of skiers

and snowboarders are from households with an annual income greater than $100,000. Minorities accounted for only 11.7 percent of total visits by skiers and snowboarders, the study showed. Lack of diversity aside, ski-industry officials generally feel comfortable about the future, according to Berry. At certain times of the season — Christmas and New Year’s, President’s Day weekend and parts of spring break — “we’re out of capacity,” Berry said. In other words, resorts are accommodating as many skiers and snowboarders as they can. That’s a nice problem to have.

U.S. skier visits { in millions }

59.8

60.5

51.0

56.9

?

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

Source: National Ski Areas Association. NSAA President Michael Berry said 57 million skier visits is an average season. This year is average or better for every region except California, where resorts are suffering from a lack of snow. March often determines if a season is good or great, he said.

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PHOTO BY ROB SMALL; GRAPHIC BY ASHLEY DETMERING


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VOYAGES

ESCAPE ARTIST | REDSTONE, COLO.

by AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY

THE RUBY OF THE ROCKIES NEEDS A HOTEL TO MATCH ITS SPLENDOR FEW PEOPLE KNOW the incredible history and intrigue that is rooted in the fabric of Redstone, Colo. Imagine if you can, one of the wealthiest men of the day, John Cleveland Osgood, finding a place rich in mineral resources, a place where he could create his own personal utopia. He spends enormous amounts of money to craft a company town in the AMIEE WHITE European tradition, BEAZLEY providing individual cottages for his workers with plumbing and electricity, a dorm for bachelors, civic buildings and of course a mansion of his own where can host leaders of government and business. You think Redstone is remote now? Think about getting there from New York City in 1900. It must have been quite an adventure. Part of Osgood’s story now notes that perhaps he brought in workers from Europe that didn’t speak the same language because he was trying to keep them from literally speaking with one another, to inhibit discussion of unionization. Or that he tried to keep his workers happy with the amazing infrastructure of Redstone so that their wives and children would

be content and they wouldn’t want for more. While we will let history shape the story of Osgood’s legacy, he did leave us with the beauty of the historic town of Redstone, one I return to again and again. The potential of this Rocky Mountain town, located about 15 minutes from Carbondale on Route 133 along the scenic West Elk Loop, is incredible. The main “boulevard” is dotted with antique stores, art galleries and a general store where kids can get ice cream and candy. In the summer it is magical; in winter, it is quiet and nearby there is of course great backcountry skiing and ice climbing. When I think of Redstone, I think of its enormous potential, not for expansion, just improving on what the town already has — beautiful natural surroundings, unique historic buildings with architectural charm, great Colorado people. I realize that people want to see a place like this. That this “Ruby of the Rockies” is truly ready to shine. The issue is this: the “Ruby” needs a place that will draw in travelers to want to stay and explore. But unfortunately, in its current condition, the magnet to Redstone is not and will not be, The Redstone Inn. The first floor of the Inn retains the beauty and charm of any historic

hotel. The Grille serves hearty and healthy fare, as well as great local beer. The sitting rooms are still centered around large fireplaces and the Gustav Stickley furniture in the main first floor rooms are beautifully indicative of a time when craftsmanship was revered. But that is where the Redstone Inn’s charm ends. The lack of hotel services (there are none beyond check-in ), the convoluted floor plans due to years of adding on and restructuring, slanted plywood decks, and rooms that, while clean, offer less than your basic chain motel motif, were disappointing — a missed chance to extend the charm of this town, which is on the Register of National Historic Landmarks. There were no activities that could be accessed in an organized way for guests to enjoy like snowshoeing, cross-country skiing or tours the nearby Redstone Castle. It was not a resort, but a place to crash for the night. We spent one night, got up early and left. That is not a way to retain visitors to a destination, nor help the artists and merchants who depend on the business from those visitors. To the people and civic leaders of Redstone, you must demand more from this town landmark. This is the face of your town and

you deserve better. I say to the owners, The Gilmore Collection of Grand Rapids, Mich., if you need inspiration on how to give life to The Redstone Inn, look to examples like Grafton, Vt., which has this amazing history and buildings that were saved by a nonprofitprivate partnership to make the town viable. If The Gilmore Collection ownership, which appears to have more knowledge of the restaurant industry than hotel and tourism, is not willing to properly and heavily invest in this historic property, and bring Redstone into financial and cultural security, I ask who will? It’s time to solidify Redstone as the “Ruby of the Rockies” with an anchor resort to honor the history of the community. Amiee White Beazley writes about travel for the Aspen Times Weekly. Reach her at awb@awbeazley.com or follow her @awbeazley1.

While the town of Redstone remains charming, its signature hotel, The Redstome Inn (left), could use an upgrade.

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PHOTOS BY AMIEE WHITE BEAZLEY


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AROUNDASPEN

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

LES DAMES D’ASPEN LUNCHEON ONCE EVERY WINTER, Les Dames d’Aspen holds a luncheon honoring directors of the nonprofit organizations for which it raises funds. It’s held at the Little Nell Hotel, and also present are new residents and business owners to Aspen. In the 30 years of its existence, Les Dames MARY has given $3.5 million ESHBAUGH for the arts in Aspen HAYES and the Roaring Fork Valley. In 2013 the group gave about $100,000 to Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Theatre Aspen, the Aspen Writers’ Foundation, Jazz Aspen, the Aspen Music Festival, the Robert Harth Memorial Fund, Aspen Filmfest, the Aspen Historical Society and scholarships for local students pursuing university art degrees. Les Dames is very much a social group, with members taking hikes, having skiing days, bicycling, golfing, luncheons and dinners, concerts, and art-gallery lectures. Anyone interested in joining should call Christine Aubale Gerschel at 970-925-9028. Flmmaker John Heminway will be showing his film “Battle for the Elephants” on March 22 at the Wheeler Opera House. It is a National Geographic film and has shown on PBS. Attendance is free. At 6 p.m. there will be a reception, the screening will be at 6:45, and at 7:45 there will be a panel discussion with questions and answers. John is the son-in-law of Aspenite Marilyn Wilmerding. Undercurrent ... it’s time for spring picnics in the snow!

LES DAMES Officers for Les Dames d’Aspen are, from left, Vice President Bridget Badon, Social Secretary Elizabeth Bonan, President Christine Aubale Gerschel, Vice President Billie Pierce Erwin and Recording Secretary Carol Dobson.

LES DAMES Jeffrey Hinkin, Ken Badon and Peter Dahl.

LES DAMES Richard Auhll and Martha Smilgis.

LES DAMES Junior Vice President Rosie Whipple-Andrew, Jennifer Homskay and Tracye Tackbary.

LES DAMES Jess Bates and Jennifer Speck.

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AROUND ASPEN

LES DAMES Jean Phillipe Malaty, executive director of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, and Kaitlin Windle, development director of the ballet.

LES DAMES Greg and Billie Erwin.

LES DAMES Gayle Rasmussen and Sherry Achi.

LES DAMES Jim Horowitz, director of Jazz Aspen, and Jamie Kravitz and Mo Le Mee of the Aspen Writers’ Foundation.

LES DAMES Pat Marquis and Linda DeSoto.

LES DAMES Diane O’Connell and Holly Reed.

LES DAMES Ali Lee, owner of the new restaurant Zeno, and Billie Erwin.

LES DAMES Christin Cleaver and Macey Morris.

LES DAMES Martha Meagher and Shirley Millard.

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/LITERATURE

by JAKE COYLE for THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

A SPOONFUL OF SUGAR animals, she faces a giant Mickey FOR MOST SCRIBES who have doll in the corner, telling him he can toiled in the movie industry, portraying stay there “until you learn the art of Hollywood as a healing paradise is subtlety.” roughly equivalent to regaling a lobster She doesn’t treat Disney much of the soothing properties of a boiling better, nor her would-be collaborators: pot of water. writer Don DaGradi (Bradley Hollywood has always, and probably Whitford) and the songwriting will always, chew up authors. From Sherman brothers, Robert (B.J. Novak) “Sunset Boulevard” to “In a Lonely and Richard (Jason Schwartzman). She Place” to “Barton Fink,” we’ve often is resolute in keeping sentimentality, had the writer’s perspective on the trite showmanship or dancing painful life of movie scripting. Now, in penguins from her tale. Disney’s “Saving Mr. Banks,” we have The Disney team are puppy dogs, the studio’s. obedient but pleading with big eyes to No one, needless to say, winds up be let off the leash. As the mustached face down in a swimming pool in the Disney, Hanks (well-suited for the Disney version. part, belying only the slightest hint of “Saving Mr. Banks,” directed by John Disney’s strong-arm side) absorbs her Lee Hancock (a sure studio hand of contempt for his “silly cartoon” with a inspirational tales like “The Blind Side” quick wince. But he’s equally dauntless and “The Rookie”), is based on the in the certainty of his mission, a zealot true story of the tug of wills between for the fantasy “Mary Poppins” author P.L. Travers of storytelling. (Emma Thompson) and Walt Disney (Tom Hanks). Finally drawn by Disney’s They’re all flummoxed by money and years of entreaties to adapt her demands, her books, the extremely particular British writer arrives in mythic 1961 Los like not having red in the film: Angeles like a dark cloud indignant of “I’ve simply gone sunshine. off the color,” She peers warily at “Los Ang-uhsays Travers. lees,” as she calls it, from the back As these lines, window of the limo that’s been sent to from the script pick her up. Her chipper driver (Paul by Kelly Marcel Giamatti) is infuriatingly American. and Sue Smith, She flinches when he calls her home “Inger-land” and, worse, says “no problemo.” It’s just the start of the unpleasantness for Travers, “Saving Mr. Banks” who recoils at the thought of March 20, 7:30 p.m. handing over her very precious Crystal Theatre, Carbondale characters — “my family,” she Also released on DVD says — to Disney. When she arrives in a hotel room strewn with baskets and stuffed

suggest, it’s extremely pleasurable watching Thompson in the role. With pursed lips and folded arms, she’s a force of condescension. But she’s also a haunted woman. In a flashback that runs intermittently throughout the film, “Saving Mr. Banks” explores the roots of Travers’ fiction in the reality of her upbringing. Her childhood in rural Australia at the start of the 20th century was poor and tragic because of her sick and alcoholic father (Colin Farrell), the Mr. Banks in need of saving. The background explains the source of Travers’ Poppins and gives “Saving Mr. Banks” something genuine about artists and the drive for storytelling. (Don’t expect straight history here. Travers, for one, didn’t end up a fan of Disney or the “Mary Poppins” movie.) But it also leads it into the very same

kind of sap Travers wailed against. “Saving Mr. Banks,” a Disney movie about a Disney movie (timed for the 50th anniversary of “Mary Poppins”), is a feature film advertisement not just for the Mouse House, but for the Hollywood dream factory. Just as Travers is eventually won over by her Hollywood adversaries, the strong sentimental pull of “Saving Mr. Banks” overwhelms, too. Resistance is futile. We’re helpless before Hollywood, done in by the simple, undefeatable power of a little song and dance. “Saving Mr. Banks,” a Walt Disney Pictures release, is rated PG-13 by the Motion Picture Association of America for “thematic elements including some unsettling images.” Running time: 126 minutes. Three stars out of four.

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Late Winter Edition is on the streets!

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THELISTINGS

MARCH 20 - 26, 2014

LIVE MUSIC: HANNIBAL BROWN — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. AUDITIONS — 4 p.m., Rio Grande Building (behind Pitkin County Library), Aspen. Auditions for the Hudson Reed Ensemble’s 2014 season of ‘Six Scenes from Shakespeare.’ Details at www.hudsonreedensemble.org or 970-429-8175 DAN FORDE AND DENNIS JUNG — 4:20 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen. THE YELARADO TOUR: YELAWOLF WITH SPECIAL GUESTS — 10 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen.

MONDAY, MARCH 24 SEE ‘Maidentrip’ shows Monday at the Wheeler Opera House as part of the Monday Docs series.

Aspen.

ONGOING AMY SILLMAN — 10 a.m., Aspen Art Museum, 590 N. Mill St., Aspen. 970-925-8050.

THURSDAY, MARCH 20 LIVE MUSIC: MARK NUSSMEIER — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. BOO COO — 7 p.m., Saint Regis Hotel, 315 E Dean Street, Aspen. AGES AND AGES — 7:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen. LIVE MUSIC — 9 p.m., BB’s Lounge, 525 E. Cooper Ave. Suite 201, Aspen. STAFFORD BROTHERS — 10 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen. THURSDAY NIGHT KARAOKE — 10 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen. VID WEATHERWAX - KEYBOARDS & VOCALS — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village. MAGIC AT THE ARTISAN — 6 p.m., Artisan Restaurant at Stonebridge Inn, 300 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village.

FRIDAY, MARCH 21 LIVE MUSIC: SARAH PEACOCK — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave,

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TRENTON ALLAN’S ACOUSTICAL MYSTERY TOUR — 4:20 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen. ‘INTERIOR TO EXTERIOR - FACT TO FANTASY’ — 6 p.m., The Little Nell Building, 501 E. Dean St., Aspen. LAVAY SMITH & THE RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS — 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., The JAS Cafe Downstairs, 675 East Durant Avenue, Aspen. 970-920-4996

BRADMAN’S ONE MAN BAND — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. LIVE MUSIC: BRAD MANOSEVITZ — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. LAVAY SMITH & THE RED HOT SKILLET LICKERS — 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m., The JAS Cafe Downstairs, 675 East Durant Avenue, Aspen. 970-920-4996 FREE THE HONEY — 9 p.m., Justice Snow’s, 328 E Hyman Ave, Aspen.

DEREK BROWN BAND — 7 p.m., The St. Regis Aspen Resort, 315 E. Dean, Aspen.

JES GREW FT. BROCCOLI BROS — 10 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen.

THE COMPANY MEN — 8 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, 320 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen.

LIVE MUSIC FOR APRES SKI WITH THE TRUE STORY BAND — 4 p.m., The Bar at Wildwood Hotel, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village.

STEEL PULSE — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen. LIVE MUSIC FOR APRES SKI WITH DAMIAN SMITH & TERRY BANNON — 4 p.m., The Vue Lounge at the Westin Snowmass Resort, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village.

VID WEATHERWAX & ROBERTA LEWIS — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village.

SUNDAY, MARCH 23

VID WEATHERWAX - KEYBOARDS & VOCALS — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village.

VID WEATHERWAX - KEYBOARDS & VOCALS — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village.

SATURDAY, MARCH 22

LIVE MUSIC WEEKENDS — 4 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen.

LIVE MUSIC WEEKENDS — 4 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen.

Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

BRADMAN’S ONE MAN BAND — 4 p.m., Aspen Brewing Company, 304 E Hopkins Ave, Aspen.

LIVE MUSIC: DJ DYLAN & FRIENDS — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. THIS MUST BE THE BAND — 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen. OPEN MIC — 10 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen.

TUESDAY, MARCH 25 MAGIC AT THE ARTISAN — 6 p.m., Artisan Restaurant, Stonebridge Inn, 300 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village. LIVE MUSIC: MARK NUSSMEIER — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. JOSEFINA MENDEZ JAZZ — 6 p.m., Hotel Jerome, 330 E. Main St., Aspen. JOHN BROWN’S BODY — 9 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena Street, Aspen. LIVE ACOUSTIC MUSIC — 10 p.m., The Red Onion, 420 East Cooper Ave, Aspen.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 DAMIAN SMITH & TERRY BANNON — 4 p.m., The New Belgium Ranger Station, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. LIVE MUSIC: THE STEEPWATER BAND — 4 p.m., Chair 9, 675 East Durant Ave, Aspen. VID WEATHERWAX - KEYBOARDS & VOCALS — 4:30 p.m., 8K Lounge Viceroy Snowmass, 130 Wood Road, Snowmass Village.


$6,250,000 RIVER PARK – 124 N SPRING ST

$3,395,000 CLARENDON #4

$4,850,000 CONTEMPORARY MOUNTAIN HOME

Luxurious 4 bedroom 4-1/2 bath unit Serene setting on the Roaring Fork River Rooftop hot tub; perfect for the entertainer!

3 bed 3 bath townhome on two levels Cathedral ceilings, large living room and master suite Private patio and large pool area

Elegant & sophisticated 5 bedroom 5+bath home Open living & dining areas indoors and outdoors Two-car garage, hot tub, built-in BBQ

$2,950,000 GREYSTONE #814

$3,895,000 VICTORIAN REMODEL

$850,000 FASCHING HAUS WEST #12

Remodeled 3 bedroom 3-1/2 bath townhome High ceilings, glass atrium, 3 levels, 1 car garage Views of Aspen, Smuggler & Red Mountain

3 bed 3 bath contemporary remodel of historic Victorian Quiet location near the pedestrian walk/bike path Unique opportunity

$1,600,000 SILVER GLO #309 Beautifully remodeled top floor corner 3 bedrooms and 3 baths Excellent core location

Well-located furnished 2 bedroom 2 bath unit Few blocks to the Silver Queen Gondola and downtown Complex offers outdoor heated pool & parking

$1,149,000 PENTHOUSE CONDOMINIUM

$1,095,000 CONVENIENCE 101 Relax on your patio in a quiet, park-like setting Convenient ground floor location Pools, hot tubs, tennis courts and ample parking

Top floor fully renovated unit High ceilings, wood floors, open floor plan Fabulous pool area, conference center & parking

TOP ROW: Colin Kruger, Bill Small, Anne Burrows, Sam Green, Tim Clark BOTTOM ROW: Dennis Jung, Chuck Frias, Will Burggraf, Sybrina Stevenson, Sonny Danna

FriasAspen.com realestate@friasproperties.com 970.920.2000 888.245.5553 property management

vacation rentals

real estate

since

1974 A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

43


WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by KEVIN TAYLOR for HIGH COUNTRY NEWS

BOOK REVIEW

‘IN THE LIGHT OF JUSTICE’ IT’S UNTHINKABLE that kids in America would ever be allowed to play “slaves and masters,” writes Walter Echo-Hawk, but we don’t see anything wrong with Junior strapping on the trusty ol’ cap-shooters for a game of “cowboys and Indians.” Echo-Hawk, a Pawnee tribal member and lawyer who has toiled for 35 years in federal American Indian law, has written a provocative book that examines the tragic and continuing effects of colonial conquest and its resulting “settler” mindset. He does this without ever scolding his readers and succeeds in pointing a way toward eventual healing. “In the Light of Justice” shines its own light onto often-overlooked issues, explaining that what many whites think of as history — a bygone era of treatymaking, frontier warfare and taming the West — is, to most American Indian people, actually current events. by JEREMY NEWTON / edited by WILL SHORTZ

IT’S BETTER THIS WAY

NOTEWORTHY James Anaya, a human-rights investigator for the United Nations, agrees. In his foreword to the book, Anaya writes that, during a tour of American Indian country in the wake of the U.S. endorsement of the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, he was struck “by … the deep, still open wounds” left by Manifest Destiny. It’s disturbing, Echo-Hawk notes, that former colonists who rebelled for the sake of freedom treated, and continue to treat, indigenous people in the manner of 500 years of Western European colonialism. The doctrines of conquest and discovery have not only unjustly destroyed indigenous economies and societies; they have harmed the land, as well, by treating it solely as a resource to be exploited. And yet those doctrines are still cited by federal courts today. Echo-Hawk devotes a chapter to the 1

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So over Touching words? Gently floats “Seinfeld” cohort 1965 R&B #1 song with the repeated lyric “Can’t you see that I’m lonely?” “Too rich for me” *He bested Leonidas at Thermopylae Nick of “Lorenzo’s Oil” Medicinal qty. Dashed ID Monitor setting, for short Balloon *Off-roader, often What an iPod plays in Stuff in sacks Flying fisher Roughhousing Jokester Glassfuls in restaurantes Country buggy Places for studs Air *Annual draw for snocross fans Union leader? Close up Like Advil or Aleve: Abbr. “That may be true, but …” It’s low for gas guzzlers: Abbr. Home to King Harald V “___ good cheer!” Doesn’t bring up *Iconic feature of comedy

69 70 71 72 73 75 76 78 79

87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 97

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114 115 116 117 118 119

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

Line at the Louvre Bomb shelter? Sub side, maybe D.D.E. challenger “Revenge R Us” author Suffix with peace Bent beam Biting remark? *Founder of Marvel’s School for Gifted Youngsters Of two minds TALK LIKE THIS! Teen headache Got back to, in a way Prefix with cycle Give one’s O.K. Google datum Robed performer “Nothing seems to go my way” *Frequent problem faced by algebra students Pump up Chichi getaway A street drug, briefly Rural call Stoop *Horror flick starring Humphrey Bogart as a mad scientist, with “The” Something LOL-worthy Water, wryly Canadian coin named for a bird “The ___ Project” (Fox comedy) In hot water? Thrive

DOWN

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Something dirty kept in a cell? ___ de la Société Complain, complain, complain “Kid-tested” breakfast cereal 50/50 “Admit it!” J.Lo’s birthplace Shot caller Danger for Indiana Jones Spring river breakup Siren, say Not so great Member of the music industry’s former Big Four Part of a Napa Valley tour Whack-___ With 58-Down, a patient process? … or a hint to two consecutive letters in the answer to each of the seven starred clues What one might go for a spin in? Any “cha” in the cha-cha-cha How lines of latitude run Mount Zion’s land: Abbr. Couples Scratch, say Rest stop “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind” per H. P. Lovecraft Cousin of a gazelle

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67 68 73 74 77 80 81 82 83 84 85

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Mar ch 20 - Mar ch 26, 2014

Drink with two lizards in its logo Club “Bleah!” Have second thoughts about “Clueless” and “Bridget Jones’s Diary” Sponsorships Serengeti prey Put away for safekeeping Hugs and kisses, at times Paint variety Type-A friend from “Friends” One turning to the right Lose everything Certain bean Hair-razing stuff? Loud beast heard in theaters See 16-Down Bamboozled Like gathering storm clouds No-holds-barred ___ and Thummim (sacred Judaic objects) “Need ___?” (query to hitchhikers) Baron’s blade They’re 18 to 21 Things for here and now More pink, perhaps It can be prickly Jib, e.g. John Candy’s old comedy program Motor with some muscle You might get stuck with them Book after

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need for what he calls an American land ethic, something, he writes, that Aldo Leopold suggested as early as 1948. Without a new way to engage with the landscape, “the American people cannot fully mature from a nation of immigrants and settlers recovering from a rapacious frontier history of Manifest Destiny and stride toward a more just culture … and resolve to become more ‘native’ to place.” In 10 focused chapters, EchoHawk maps the way from the dark legacy of conquest to the light of justice. The “clothes of the conqueror,” he concludes, do not well fit the American ideals of liberty and justice.

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ACROSS

6

“In the Light of Justice” Walter Echo-Hawk 325 pages, softcover: $19.95 Fulcrum Publishing, 2013

109

99

103 110

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— Last week’s puzzle answers — 86 88 92 93 94 96 97 98 99

Galatians: Abbr. Nutritional info Photogs’ choices It may help catch a fugitive Like Brando’s Don Corleone Disappear, as a trail “Good heavens!” Eject, as froth Retired govt. agent Co. making arrangements

100 Dutch wheels 101 Member of the old Chero-Cola product line 102 “Chop-chop!” 104 Radius, e.g. 105 Seed casing 106 Jump on ice 109 Jet crew, briefly 110 Quick time-out 111 Scream at a ring 112 Bit of love talk 113 Drag

F O O D A P B S D A N T E A R G O T

R I P A

E L H I

S H E S

H O L Y W B H O R L A Y I I Z E T P Y S U B E A R E L I N E I L B H O M U R O M N O T B E S O S Y H R I M E R D E R E E N S

E L I T I S T E D S R I A L T O

N E A R A S P P E T A A S U E T P E E T R R T E O U S C A S K B A

S C U D

T A P E R I E N D D Y C S M I A N Z Y Y D C E R G E T B I R N A

E M B R A C E O P T I C A R A B I A N

P T O E E R A S E A T S C H O F T S E S D D R E E Y R M M E R I T S T S D C R E H E E S M O I M U P I S E N N A O I S E R D S C E O A S P

G E T S O U T

O N E S E C E D E N V A E I I S P O S T W O I N C E H R

L A R Y N X E S

E R I T U

A L T O S

M Y E Y E

O L S E N

N O O S E

L I T

D O O Z Y P O I N T

H A T E

O D O R

N C A A

D E N S

E R I E

R E A D

A T M


CLOSING ENCOUNTERS

IMAGE of the WEEK photography by AUBREE DALLAS

| 03.16.14 | Aspen | JAKE SCHMITT SHAKES UP A SPICY PATRIOT AT THE JBAR ON SUNDAY AS PART OF THE GREAT APRÈS-SKI PUB CRAWL.

Have a great photo taken in or around Aspen? Send your high resolution images our way along with the date, location and caption information. Send entries to jmcgovern@aspentimes.com

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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An Unrivaled Experience

• The most extraordinary new home to be offered in Aspen • 6 bedrooms, 6 full, 4 half baths, 11,875 sq ft, 5+ acres • New construction, clean contemporary lines, exceptional attention to detail, warm and inviting finish details • Panoramic rooftop living room with phenomenal views • Close proximity to town, yet with privacy • An unrivaled experience in a home of this caliber in the Aspen valley $23,750,000 Furnished Doug Leibinger | 970.379.9045

Ski-In/Ski-Out Montana Estate

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4 acres in the serene & tranquil Big Sky area Ski-in/ski-out on Moonlight Basin 6 bedrooms, 6 full, 4 half baths, 16,113 sq ft Theater, rec room, sauna, steam room $27,000,000 $24,000,000 Furnished Larry Jones | 970.379.8757

Private Western Town & Lodge 3,500 acres to entertain family & friends Lodge - 5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths, 6,300 sq ft Authentic 20,700 sq ft replication of a genuine Wild West town $23,000,000 Furnished Mark Overstreet | 970.948.6092

New Listing

Unmatched on Red Mountain

Mountain Zen Defined Majestic mountain setting with an English and Asian aesthetic 5 bedrooms, 6 baths, 8,963 sq ft Private, yet close to town and schools $21,000,000 Furnished Penney Evans Carruth | 970.379.9133

5 bedrooms, 5 full, 2 half baths, 9,013 sq ft Custom & extraordinary touches throughout Inviting outdoor spaces, sunken hot tub Close up views of Aspen & Aspen Mountain $16,000,000 Furnished Craig Morris | 970.379.9795

Lives Like a Ranch! 5 bedrooms, 6 full, 2 half baths, 9,160 sq ft Exquisite landscaping with pond & beach Neighboring Moore Open Space Bring your horses and snowmobiles $15,750,000 $13,400,000 Penney Evans Carruth | 970.379.9133

AspenSnowmassSIR.com

Aspen | 970.925.6060 Snowmass | 970.923.2006 Basalt | 970.927.8080 Carbondale | 970.963.4536

Atw 03202014  

In this week's edition, we look at the state of the ski industry and who's really hitting the slopes, get a taste of what Aspen High's ProSt...

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