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FOOD MATTERS

AN HONEST POTATO CHIP 20

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VOYAGES

WHY WHISTLER? 22

FEBRUARY 21�27, 2013 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

THE LUXE LIFE SEE PAGE 27




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ELEGANCE IN ASPEN’S CORE ,/VWRPUZ(ZWLUc 



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Experience is the Difference

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*VSK^LSS)HURLY4HZVU4VYZL (ZWLUc,/`THU(]LU\Lc  c-PUKTVYLH[^^^THZVUTVYZLJVT Exclusive Member for Aspen and Snowmass, CO

Š2012 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. A Realogy Company. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Each ofďŹ ce is Independently Owned and Operated. Coldwell BankerÂŽ, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Previews InternationalÂŽ, the Previews International Logo, and “Dedicated to Luxury Real EstateSMâ€? are registered and unregistered service marks to Coldwell Banker LLC.

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY




THE ASPEN OPEN

The Aspen/Snowmass Freeskiing Open takes over ButtermilkFebruary 21 – 24. Skiers come from all over the world to compete for cash on the X Games Slopestyle and Superpipe venues. Don’t miss the Bud Light Big Air Friday comp right above Bumps on Friday and the Rail Jam on Saturday. www.aspensnowmass.com/open

SKI & SNOWBOARD SCHOOL BLACK DIAMOND EXPEDITIONS

Offered weekly through March. Advanced & expert skiers join our top Pros for three days of exploring the most challenging in-bound terrain.

WOMEN’S EDGE Offered weekly through March. Whether you’re an intermediate skier looking to build condence in your abilities or an advanced skier eager for the challenges of double-black-diamond terrain, Women’s Edge provides an opportunity to advance your skills. Join women-specic, PSIA certied Pros for four amazing days of skiing. Snowmass.

SNOWBIKING AT ULLR NIGHTS! Join us for snowbike tours every Friday through March 29 at Ullr Nights! Meet at Four-Mountain Sports, Snowmass Base Village at 5:15 pm. Bring a helmet. Must be an intermediate skier/rider. $69. Reservations required. 970-923-1227 | www.aspensnowmass.com/schools

FOUR-MOUNTAIN SPORTS

Rent with Four-Mountain Sports and receive FREE overnight storage and transfer between each mountain. Eight convenient locations at the base of each mountain, providing the best gear and service! 970-920-2337 | www.aspensnowmass.com/rentals

CONNECT. SHARE. CHECK IN: Keep up with the latest on-mountain conditions, activities, events, packages & specials in Aspen/Snowmass!

THIS WEEKEND

Sip, Swirl & Sup Wine Dinner, element 47, Aspen February 21 “Old World vs. New World” 8 wines, 3 courses, $150 plus tax and tip. For reservations call 240-620-2146. Live Music, Limelight Hotel, Aspen February 21, 22, 23, 24 & 25 Damian Smith on 2/21, Deance Stringband on 2/22, Derek Brown Band on 2/23, Boureas on 2/24 & North Y Sur on 2/25. Yoga for Skiers & Snowboarders, Sundeck, Aspen February 22, 23, 25 & 27, 9:30 - 10:30 am Every Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. Mats provided. Must have ticket to load gondola. Bud Light Big Air Fridays, Fanny Hill, Snowmass Mountain February 22, 2 pm Make sure you use the hashtag #BigAir to win Bud Light gear! Registration is open to the public from 1 – 2 pm each Friday and costs $20. Live Music, Sneaky’s Tavern, Base Village, Snowmass February 22 & 23, 4 -7 pm Featuring Tom Ressel on 2/22 and DJ Ronnie on 2/23. OASIS, Aspen Mountain, February 22, 23 & 24 Ski-in/Ski-out champagne bar on Aspen Mountain! Ullr Nights, Elk Camp, Snowmass February 22, 5:30 pm Activities include: Ullr’s Ghost Ship, ice skating with free rentals, Viking sledding hill, s’mores by the bonre, live music, snowbiking, à la carte culinary celebration and indoor kid’s activities. Activities end at 8:30 pm, last download at 9 pm. 970-923-1227 | www.aspensnowmass.com/ullrnights Live Music, Ajax Tavern, Aspen February 23 & 24, 2 - 5 pm DJ Dylan on 2/23 and Dr. Robert – Beatles Tribute Band on 2/24. Iron Bartender, Terrace Bar at The Little Nell, Aspen February 24, 5:30 - 6:30 pm Come vote on concoctions by Aspen’s best bartenders! Limelight Dialogues, The Lounge at the Limelight Hotel, Aspen February 27, 5 - 7 pm Featuring Thomas Crum: Founder of Aspen’s Magic of Skiing Program.

Tell your friends & family about great deals! www.aspensnowmass.com/deals 

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STARWOOD PRIVACY AND VIEWS ASPEN

Come home to this exquisitely private Starwood family home, with views from Aspen Mountain to Buttermilk, including Mt. Hayden, Pyramid Peak and beyond. This home has a sunny, southern exposure with a host of amenities, including wonderful living spaces, outdoor hot tub and sauna, steam shower, beautiful decks and grounds. Separate caretaker’s unit. The only Starwood property of this quality in the price range! $3,995,000 Web Id#: AN127690 Peter Kelley 970.920.7376 | peter@masonmorse.com

SKI, BIKE, HIKE, FISHING RETREAT ON THE RIVER WOODY CREEK

This brand new ‘’soft contemporary’’ home is situated on the banks of the Roaring Fork River and on the Rio Grande Bike/Hike Trail System. Jump in the car and you are within 15 minutes of 4 World-Class Ski Resorts. This new home is the winner of many Design Awards with designer furnishings so you can move right in. Chic spaciousness for your large parties yet incredibly cozy for romantic intimate dinners for two. Four King Bedrooms en-suite, see the latest movies in the theater room, and catch up at work in the loft balcony office. Over 5100 sq.ft. plus 3 car garage on 19 acres. $5,100,000 Web Id#: AN127814 Renee Bowden 970.920.7390 | renee@masonmorse.com

thesource

Aspen | 514 E. Hyman Ave. | 970.925.7000 Carbondale | 0290 Highway 133 | 970.963.3300 Redstone | 385 Redstone Blvd. | 970.963.1061 Glenwood Springs | 1614 Grand Ave. | 970.928.9000

Find more at

masonmorse.com

FB/ColdwellBankerMasonMorse

TW/masonmorse

LN/Coldwell Banker Mason Morse

YT/MasonMorse1

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY




WELCOME MAT

INSIDE this EDITION VOLUME 2 F ISSUE NUMBER 14

DEPARTMENTS 08 THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

Subscriptions Dottie Wolcott circulation Maria Wimmer

14 From Aspen, With Love

Design Afton Groepper

20 food matters 22 voyages 27 Cover story 34 Around Aspen 37 LOCAL CALENDAR 46 CROSSWORD

FOOD MATTERS

AN HONEST POTATO CHIP 20

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VOYAGES

WHY WHISTLER? 22

FEBRUARY 21�27, 2013 • ASPENTIMES.COM/WEEKLY

CULTURE/CHARACTERS/COMMENTARY

FIND IT INSIDE

GEAR | PAGE 14

THE LUXE LIFE SEE PAGE 27

32 A&E

Late Winter Edition is on the streets!

Interim Editor Jeanne McGovern

12 Legends & Legacies 17 Wine Ink

It might be ski season in Aspen, but there’s a whole lot more happening than what you’ll find on the slopes. Arts editor Stewart Oksenhorn tells us what not to miss for the rest of this winter.

General Manager Gunilla Asher

ON THE COVER Created by Afton Groepper

Arts Editor Stewart Oksenhorn Production Manager Evan Gibbard Contributing Editors Mary Eshbaugh Hayes Gunilla Asher Kelly Hayes John Colson Contributing Writers Paul Andersen Hilary Stunda Amanda Charles Aspen Times staff Frannie the dog Contributing Partners High Country News Aspen Historical Society The Ute Mountaineer Writers on the Range www.aspentimes.com Sales Ashton Hewitt Jeff Hoffman David Laughren Dan Frees Louise Walker Read the eEdition www.aspentimes.com/weekly Classified Advertising (970) 925-9937

&IWX3J½GI7TEGIMR%WTIRŠ 2S[%ZEMPEFPI

100 East Main Street -J ]SY´VI PSSOMRK JSV žI\MFPI SJ½GI WTEGI JSV QIHMGEP PIKEP SV SXLIV TVSJIWWMSREP YWI [MXL KVIEX ZMWMFMPMX] SR 1EMR 7XVIIX TEVOMRK ERH KSSH ZMI[WSJ%WTIR1SYRXEMRXLMW[SYPHFIEKVIEXSJ½GIWTEGIJSV]SYV½VQ 'YVVIRXP]GSR½KYVIHJSVQIHMGEPYWIXLMW3,717 SF spaceLEW[MRHS[W SREPPJSYVWMHIW[MXLEREHHMXMSREP7*PS[IVPIZIPWXSVEKI EVIE8LIWTEGIMWFIMRKSJJIVIHJSVPIEWIERHFOR SALE

100EastMainAspen.com Look for it around town or online at:

www.snowmasssun.com/insnowmass

'EPP William Small, JD, CCIM 970-429-2419

www.snowmasssun.com 970-925-3414



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)EWX(YVERX%ZI%WTIR'3ˆBill@friasproperties.com


BRIAN HAZEN PRESENTS...

Ì AÄÎÌ ˜cÌΜÌŠßkÌ1ÁlÄr:kÄÎÌÄ«k˜ÌŠ˜ÌOkÎâl˜ EAST ASPEN COUNTRY ESTATE • Just minutes East of downtown Aspen towards Independence Pass • The ideal setting for the outdoor enthusiast. •  bed/. bath country home built with handhewn logs from Aspen Mountain • On  private fenced acres and overlooks a stocked trout pond, large manicured lawn, the Roaring Fork River and lush elk meadows.

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CHARMING 4 BEDROOM TOWNHOME … IN ASPEN’S HISTORIC WEST END • South-facing views of Aspen & Shadow Mountains • Attractive interior décor with custom cabinetry, marble and granite finishes • Fenced Backyard with outdoor Hot Tub • Mature landscaping offering Aspen, Cottonwood & Spruce trees for maximum privacy •Covered south-facing deck off Living Room

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THE RESIDENCES… ON BONITA DRIVE •  beds/ baths &  Powder Rooms (Each) • , & , sq ft (Unit /Unit) • Top floor Great Room overlooking Aspen Golf Course with stunning straight-on views of Pyramid Peak, Highlands, and Buttermilk • Located in a great family neighborhood on Bonita Drive

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FIVETREES PRIVATE ESTATE • Private, classic European style residence with four bedrooms and three and half baths • Separate one bedroom, one bath artist studio/ cottage is just steps away. • Master bedroom is on main level with elevator access for easy living. • Ski in/ski out access, backs up to open space, and expansive mountain views. • Co-listed with Chris Flynn.

,,

Brian Hazen, CRS vice president/broker associate 970.379.1270 cell 970.920.7395 direct bhazen@rof.net www.brianhazen.com FB/Brian-Hazen-Presents

TW/@BrianHazenAspen

Coldwell Banker Mason Morse Real Estate www.masonmorse.com LN/Brian Hazen

A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY




THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

SEEN, HEARD & DONE

CHEERS&JEERS

Team Snowboard Bums ‘R’ Us rolls through the Snowmass Village Mall on its float, “Sorry for Partying,” during the resort’s annual Mardi Gras celebration.

FIVE things Top 5 Things to Do on the Cheap in Aspen/Snowmass

O5

Ice skating at the Pond

O4

Bar menus

O3

People watching

O2 Live après-ski music

CHEERS | To Pitkin County for trying to educate people about what is — and what is not —recyclable locally. Now it’s up to us to follow the rules. We have faith. JEERS | To the Oscars and what is always an evening of good television. And cheers to the nominees and winners for bringing us quality filmmaking and acting in a world filled with far too much visual and virtual junk.

CHEERS & JEERS | To the town of Basalt and the recent police-chief debacle. Cheers for finally dropping the court battle and allowing the public to see a report about the professional conduct of former Chief Roderick O’Connor. But jeers for allowing the matter to become mired down in bureacracy and secrecy, and even more jeers for what seems to be an internal mess that was a longtime coming.

BUZZ WORTHY A s p en / S now m ass

At last! 100 percent of area ski terrain open

All of the regular terrain at Aspen Skiing Co.’s four ski areas was finally open for the first time this season Feb. 18 when Snowmass received nine inches of snow and added the trails Baby Ruth 2, West 1 and 2, and Adios Bowl and Upper Ladder to the mix, the company reported. Snowmass has all 3,362 acres open, including the 230 acres that was added on Burnt Mountain, according to spokesman Jeff Hanle. The other three ski areas hit the 100 percent open mark slightly earlier in the year, Hanle said. Aspen Highlands reported 1,028 acres open on Monday, while Buttermilk/ Tiehack has 470 acres. Aspen Mountain reports 675

acres open, but there are additional shots, steeps and gullies that boost the amount even higher. Those trails aren’t included in the skiable acreage figure because they can’t regularly be opened, Hanle said. So, in a strict sense, Aspen Mountain is more than 100 percent open. – Staff report A s p en / S now m ass

Another Journey for Jazz Aspen

If the lineup for the Labor Day Festival has a distinctly different feel this year, then Jazz Aspen Snowmass hit the bulls-eye. The nonprofit organization announced Feb. 14 the bulk of the mainstage performers for the 18th annual Labor Day Festival, and one of the headliners for the 23rd annual June Festival, and not only are all

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Be outdoors

POST US YOUR TOP FIVE THINGS jmcgovern@aspentimes.com

Stay in the know – Catch up on recent news & local events of them new to Jazz Aspen, but virtually all of them will be making their valley debuts. “One of the biggest things we hear is, people want to see bands they haven’t seen before,” Jim Horowitz, Jazz Aspen’s president and founder, said. “That was a goal, absolutely. At the beginning of each year, we start with: Who can we get who hasn’t been here before?” While the musicians might be making their first appearances in the Aspen area, they are hardly unknowns. Headliners for the Labor Day Festival are Journey, the rock band formed in 1973; Keith Urban, the 45-year-old New Zealand-born country singer who was a judge last season on “American Idol”; and singer-songwriter Jason Mraz, whose latest album, “Love Is a Four Letter Word,” reached No. 2 on the Billboard 200 chart.

“If it’s a tough water year, you’ve got to be creative.” 

O1

Also scheduled to perform at the Labor Day Festival, set for Aug. 30 to Sept. 1 in Snowmass Village’s Town Park, are San Francisco pop-rock band Train; the Denver alternative rock band Churchill; and the country group Little Big Town, which earned a Grammy Award last week for the song “Pontoon.” All of the aforementioned acts will be making their area debuts. Also on the bill are roots-rockers Grace Potter & the Nocturnals, who have performed in Aspen and Snowmass Village. One additional mainstage act is still to be announced. Among the headliners for the June Festival is singer-songwriter Jackson Browne, who will be making his Aspen debut. Two additional headliners have yet to be announced for the June Festival, set for June 21-23 at the Benedict Music Tent. – Stewart Oksenhorn

Jim Ingram, Aspen Whitewater owner, on the potential for another low water year

P hoto by J ill B eathar d


In a myriad of exceptional properties…

This one stands alone.

Nestled quietly in Aspen’s Prestigious West End — a most desirable neighborhood that has always offered a certain caché…drawing together some of the world’s greatest minds to the Aspen Institute…bringing the brightest and most talented musicians of the day to the Aspen Music Festival & School…and all this just a short walk away from this exceptional home…it certainly takes Aspen living up a notch. As you cross a quiet stream at the entrance, see what unfolds inside this home…you immediately see this retreat is something unique. It is a rare combination of location, thoughtful design and superior amenities.

Nonpareil – in a class of its own. $14,850,000 Furnished 6 bedrooms | 6 full, 3 half-baths | 7,451 sq ft

Tom Melberg

970.379.1297 tmelberg@rof.net

AspenSnowmassSIR.com A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY




THE WEEKLY CONVERSATION

VOX POP “What is the most extravagant thing you’ve ever done or purchased?” Pam Fisher A s p en

“A cruise in the Caribbean.”

Helen Violet N ew Z ealan d

“To come ski in Aspen.”

Stay in touch with what is going on in the community BY LOGGING ONTO THE E-EDITION OF THE ASPEN TIMES WEEKLY FOR GEAR TRENDS, AROUND ASPEN SOCIALITES, LISTINGS, EVENTS ...

James Squyres Washin gton

“Skydiving.”

Read the latest edition online at www.aspentimes.com/weekly

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V O X P O P C ompile d by julia krys


with JOHN COLSON

Concealed guns on campus? Who thought this one up? Why is it that a small minority of gun-toting advocates feel the need to warp our laws and our morals to the point where everybody, everywhere, can carry a gun hidden in a shoulder holster or an ankle holster or in a pocket as they go about the business of their days? Why on earth, for instance, would any sane person argue that students and teachers should be permitted to carry concealed weapons on campus? It’s happening, and it has been happening now for years. According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, in 2011 there were 18 attempts by state legislators to enact laws that called for concealed-carry weapons to be allowed on college campuses. Only two were passed, in Mississippi and Wisconsin. In 2012, the conference reports on its website (www.ncsl.org/issues) 16 such bills were introduced, and as of a report in August, only two of those were still pending. All the others had failed. Now, I attended the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and I can tell you that the idea of a student seated next to me in a monstrous lecture hall filled with perhaps 1,000 impressionable young minds with a gun in his pocket is a scary prospect indeed. For one thing, students of college age are not exactly well-balanced individuals. Most have just left home for the first time and find themselves utterly free of parental restraint (except, of course, for the umbilical cord of financial support). The result is that they dive deep into the ocean of flesh, booze and fun that faces them. I know because I was one of them, and my memories of those times are fond ones. But I also know that students are an impulsive, quick-to-anger lot. Having a gun close to hand would be a temptation I’d rather they not face because the results could too easily be tragic. But students should be able to defend themselves from being shot by a madman intent on killing as many and as quickly as possible, the gunson-campus advocates cry. Right. Such arguments echo other, equally nutty concepts, such as the “mutually assured destruction� doctrine that lies behind the international arms race.

There is an organization, Students for Concealed Carry, pushing for guns on campus, according to the New York Times. One member of this group, David Burnett, is a nursing student at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, and the only time he doesn’t have his gun (a .45 caliber Glock) is when he is in class because guns are prohibited there. He points to the slaughter at Virginia Tech in 2007 and appears to actually believe that if students had been carrying guns on the day that a crazed student killed 33 people, things might have been different. Personally, I don’t buy it. If students had pulled out their weapons and fired back, the greatest likelihood is that they would have shot each other and missed the madman, who ultimately killed himself. I have to wonder how things might have been different back in 1970 when National Guardsmen killed four students while trying to quell a campus protest against the War in Vietnam. If the kids had been packing heat and fired back, the result would have been mass carnage on a scale we can scarcely imagine. Certain misled people and groups seem to believe that possession of a gun in public imparts both wisdom and good aim in a firefight situation, both of which are highly questionable assumptions. If you watch films of people in a crowd where gunfire is breaking out, most simply duck and run — the most sensible reaction — while others scream and cower in corners and behind flimsy barriers. These people are in a panic, and the idea that they would suddenly become calm defenders of the public, if only they had a gun, is simply laughable. Soldiers are trained to shoot back when shot at, and so are cops. And we’ve seen too many examples where those instincts went horribly wrong and innocent bystanders were killed. Think of the death toll when untrained, panicky civilians start pulling out pistols and spraying bullets in every direction. Next, think hard about why anyone would want this to become more of a possibility.

HIT&RUN

jcolson@aspentimes.com

march 14-17, 2013 A s p e n / S n owma s s , C o lo ra d o

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

11


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

CLASSIC ASPEN

by TIM WILLOUGHBY

Harper’s Weekly published this scene of the Maroon Creek trestle using technology and artists The Aspen Times could not afford.

Technology and the Times the new Aspen Times office will not likely include a photographer’s darkroom. The paper has come full circle; there wasn’t one when the paper was founded, either. Scanning a century of Times editions provides a historical journey through newspaper technology. the aspen times’ first issue, in 1881, employed typical technology of the day. Each page, and there were only a few, was created with handset type. A weekly production schedule gave its founders, E.O. Connell and G. Lavelle, time to write, set the type and run off copies on a press that had been hauled over Independence Pass. Aspen’s most enterprising businessman, B. Clark Wheeler, took over in 1885, adding “editor” to his varied and storied occupations. Using the same slow and labor-intensive methods, he began publishing the paper daily. The challenge of a daily paper was not as daunting as it may seem because much of the paper was composed of constants. The masthead, ads that were all text, section titles and even headings such as “Silver Prices” needed only minor tweaks for production; only the news stories required daily

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typesetting. Specialists created printing blocks and sent them to the Times for national/state ads. The paper added locally crafted artwork to advertise for Aspen’s businesses. The local prints were small and primitive, and

and world news filled sections of all papers. Newspapers competed to print the best-told stories first and then encountered a technological leap. Two papers with better national and international news, Harper’s

Using the same slow and labor-intensive methods, he began publishing the paper daily. they often produced smudged copies. The Times endured local competition with, at times, two additional dailies vying for readers. When rail service reached town, papers from Denver arrived overnight, and papers from Chicago and New York were often a week late and entertained curious readers through the wee hours. National

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Weekly and Frank Leslie’s Illustrated, featured illustrations almost as lifelike as modern photographs. Nearly half of the page was covered with block prints carefully carved with lines so close and narrow you almost needed a magnifying glass to view their intricacy. Offering pictures worth a thousand words, as did Life magazine and

Look a century later, the illustrated papers appealed to a broader audience. Readers who only scanned the illustrations and headlines came away with an accurate impression of the state of the world. Some of America’s most notable illustrators contributed to Harper’s and Frank Leslie’s. Cartoonist Thomas Nast introduced images of Santa Claus, the Republican elephant and the Democratic donkey on the pages of Harper’s. Winslow Homer began his career drawing for the newspapers. The Aspen Times had to rely on the local talent pool and could not afford to pay staff to create complicated print blocks, even if only once a week. The final insult followed: Harper’s and Frank Leslie’s produced feature pieces about Aspen, complete with magnificent illustrations. While the beautiful and realistic artwork was often created from photographs, especially during the Civil War, it wasn’t until 1897 that newspapers printed photographs. Photographs in Aspen’s papers appeared decades later. I wonder what B. Clark Wheeler would think of today’s digital photography and color newspapers. What would he think of easily accessing a digital paper from anywhere in the world seconds after it is posted? Tim Willoughby’s family story parallels Aspen’s. He began sharing folklore while teaching for Aspen Country Day School and Colorado Mountain College. Now a tourist in his native town, he views it with historical perspective. Reach him at redmtn@schat.net.

C ourtesy of the A spen H istorical S ociety


LEGENDS & LEGACIES

FROM the VAULT

compiled by THE ASPEN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

C l ever c ost u mes

1900 M as qu erade B a l l

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y of the A spen H istorical S ociety

“The masquerade ball given by the Aspen Union Athletic club last night was a success far beyond the expectations of those who had the entertainment in hand,” declared the Aspen Tribune on Feb. 15, 1900. “About 150 couples were present, many of whom were costumed in glittering, gaudy, grotesque or artistic dress. All sorts of representations were in evidence and not a few were decidedly clever. Princes, pages, flower girls, fairies, knights of the court of King George, milk maids and numerous other characters were represented by the shapely young ladies and dignified young men of society. A more jolly or successful party has not been given in Aspen for many a day.”

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from aspen, with love

GEAR of the Week

NEED TO KNOW

250

$

· Ventilated double shell system · Multi-impact EPP liner · Recco avalanche rescue system · Detachable ear pads and neckroll

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P H O T O C O U R T E S Y of poc


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from aspen, with love

GUNNER’S LIBATIONS

by GUNILLA ASHER

NEED TO KNOW 1½ ounces Bulleit Bourbon ½ ounce Smith & Cross Rum ½ ounce Lustau Pedro Ximenez Sherry 1 spoonful Leopold Fernet Muddle 8 mint leaves with the sherry, and then add the rest of the ingrediens and crushed ice. Swizzle, top with more crushed ice, and garnish with 3 mint springs and powdered sugar.

Fresh Powder Mint Juleps aren’t just for Derby Day, at least not in the eyes of bartender Jim Meehan, of the Chefs Club at the St. Regis Aspen. Meehan proves it with his ski-town version of this classic cocktail, where the mint-inflected Fernet is a perfect addition to this sherry-sweetened Julep — and a garnish of powdered sugar brings it all home for après-ski. Gunilla Asher is the general manager of The Aspen Times. She writes about libations without any real training other than in the spirit of “She is not a connoisseur, but she is heavily practiced.”

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WINEINK

words to DRINK by

by KELLY J. HAYES

A Worthy Inductee Who are the most important people in the wine industry? You could argue that they are the winemakers who craft the vintages. Perhaps the marketers or the bankers who sell the wines and fund the operations. Maybe they’re the consumers, those who buy the wines. But none of them would be able to pursue their role in the wine chain were it not for the efforts of the laborers, the field hands, the planters and the growers. And in California, the overwhelming majority Kelly J. of these hired hands Hayes are migrant workers of Mexican descent. This week the Vintners Hall of Fame, an adjunct of the Culinary Institute of America’s Napa Valley campus, inducted its seventh class of enshrinees. The most compelling member of the class is Cesar Chavez, an American-born farm worker who became one of the most significant labor leaders of our time. Chavez was instrumental in changing not just the California wine industry but also the lives of thousands of migrant workers. To this day, changes that were made in the 1960s and ’70s in response to the nonviolent protests that Chavez led have had an impact on how workers and the wine industry interact. The inclusion of Chavez in the VHOF is not just a nod to the role that he played in the organization of workers but an acknowledgement of the important part that these workers play in the industry. As Chavez was a leader of a movement, he also became a symbol of those who worked in the

fields and vineyards in California, toiling tirelessly for minimal wages in deplorable conditions. Born in Yuma, Ariz., in the late 1920s, Chavez became aware of inequality as a child when his family lost a patch of land during the Depression. The family followed the seasons in California, working the harvests. By Chavez’s count, he attended 38 schools before they finally settled in Delano, Calif., the heart of the table-grape industry in America. After a stint in the Navy, Chavez returned to California, where, inspired by the nonviolent tactics espoused by activists like Mahatma Gandhi, he became a community organizer working with farm workers who were harvesting table grapes and lettuce in California’s fertile fields. He first became a national symbol of a movement in 1968 when then-Democratic presidential candidate Robert Kennedy traveled to Delano to break bread with Chavez following Chavez’s 25-day fast in protest of labor conditions. In 1975, Chavez led a march of members of his United Farm Workers Union from San Francisco to Modesto, Calif., and the headquarters of America’s most profitable wine concern, E & J Gallo Winery. By the time the group completed its 110mile walk, 15,000 people had joined them. The march led then-Gov. Jerry Brown to propose, and the California Legislature to pass, the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act, one of the most significant pieces of

KJ’s Suggestion legislation of its kind. While far from ideal, things have changed dramatically for seasonal laborers in the wine industry. In Napa Valley, vineyard owners are assessed a fee per acre of land that goes into a fund to provide shelter for migrant workers. The funds support three dormitory facilities in the heart of the valley where more than 150 daily laborers share two-toa-room facilities. But perhaps even more dramatic have been the changes in perception and the relationship between farm workers and those who employ them. Today, as illustrated by the inclusion of Chavez in the VHOF, there is both recognition and appreciation among the wine community for the accomplishments and contributions of the workers who till, toil and pick. While it is a business and owners will forever try to keep labor costs to a minimum, there is a greater understanding of the need to maintain simple human decency as a key component of the workplace in the vineyards. Chavez is celebrated each year on March 31, his birthday, with official state holidays in California, Texas and Colorado, and there is a continued call to make the day a national holiday. In 1994, President Bill Clinton awarded Chavez posthumously (he died in 1993) with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. California has honored him with a spot in the state Hall of Fame.

One of my favorite Napa wineries is Ceja Vineyards, located in the Carneros region of Napa Valley. The Cejas are the descendents of Mexican farm workers who originally came to pick grapes in Napa under the brasero work programs in the early 1960s.

Ceja 2010 Carneros Chardonnay This wine took a gold medal at the San Francisco Wine Competition. Bright flavors, acidic, this Chardonnay is a treasure of the region.

Ironically, with his induction into the VHOF, Chavez will join Ernest and Julio Gallo, whom he feuded with and protested against, in the barrel room in the Culinary Institute in bronze relief. This is a bold statement on the part of the CIA’s Vintners Hall of Fame, and it demonstrates the kind of courage that legitimizes its mission. Congratulations to both the Chavez family and the VHOF. As Cesar would say sí se puede, “Yes, it can be done.” Kelly J. Hayes lives in the soonto-be-designated appellation of Old Snowmass with his wife, Linda, and a black Lab named Vino. He can be reached at malibukj@aol.com.

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Let Us

GUIDE YOU through Aspen For information on everything the Aspen area has to offer, pick up your copy of Winter in Aspen today!

WINTER 2012/2013

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from aspen, with love

FOOD matters

Chip Shot Honest Chips bring a new flavor to artisanal chips I have a weakness for smallbatch, artisanal food products, especially if they are locally made. One of my favorite discoveries from 2012 is a potato chip operation from Crested Butte called Honest Chips. CEO Megan Reamer began cooking potato chips in coconut oil several years ago when her son, Jackson, began grappling with Amiee white health issues and she beazley found that foods high in “good” fats helped his condition. Her chips are not a business, she says, but a part of “a movement to re-introduce healthy fats into the food supply.” > When and why did you start Honest Chips? We started selling potato chips cooked in coconut oil in August 2012 after about five years of making them for ourselves and our friends and family for picnics, dinner parties and such. We chose coconut oil because we only use “traditional” fats in our home cooking: lard, tallow, palm oil and coconut oil. We did this because these oils turned out to be an essential component of our disabled son’s diet that helped his digestion and his neurological condition. We kept hearing from our friends and family members that they tasted so good, so unique, that we should try to sell them. To be honest, we never really took that idea seriously because we didn’t have the time to pursue

it and we weren’t confident that we could possibly break into a $9 billion per year business dominated by global brand names like Lay’s. By late 2010 we started giving it some real thought, trying to figure out what we’d actually have to do from a supply, production and distribution standpoint. So in 2011 we contracted with some farmers who are friends of ours in Paonia and Hotchkiss to produce a few varieties of potatoes for us for the summer of 2012. So when those potatoes started coming out of the ground in August last year, we started frying them up, bagging them, and selling them at two local health food stores. It was a moment of truth since we really had no expectations whatsoever about whether anyone but us would like them or care that they were made in coconut oil, which was our chip’s real differentiation. > What has the reception of the product been like since then? As it turned out, the demand has been pretty spectacular, which is to say, almost more than we could handle. Because we were cleaning, slicing, frying and salting every single potato chip by hand, we couldn’t produce many bags at a time. We ended up having to work nights and weekends for the first few weeks as we struggled to find a rhythm to meet demand, both from our two local stores as well as the farmer’s markets in Crested Butte, Telluride and Basalt. In September

we started selling the chips online; we wanted to see if someone outside the Crested Butte-Aspen-Paonia triangle might like coconut oil potato chips. Apparently they do. We’ve sold thousands of bags of our potato chips so far to hundreds of consumers and more than a dozen health food stores in 44 states and eight countries (including United Arab Emirates, Australia and Switzerland). We’re still in a bit of shock that there is such a demand for potato chips cooked in coconut oil, especially internationally. After all, I’d be willing to bet that 90 percent of the world’s population is no more than a half a mile from a bag of potato chips they can buy. It’s the most popular snack food in the world. That folks are willing to buy these online and have them shipped halfway around the world is encouraging to say the least. And even more heartening really is the overwhelmingly positive response we’ve had to why we started this company in the first place: to highlight the role that nourishing traditional fats played in helping our family deal with my son Jackson’s ongoing health crisis, and to bring those fats to market in snacks. > What makes your product special? Two things really. First, we fry our potato chips in coconut oil and, as far as we can tell, no other potato chip company takes this expensive and difficult step. The result is a healthy potato chip that tastes better than any potato chip available today. Secondly,

we started this company to optimize our mission, not our profits. That mission: to spread the word that traditional fats like coconut oil are an important and healthy part of a balanced diet and to introduce those fats back into the food supply. So it’s a unique, great tasting product with an honest mission run by a family, not a corporation. > what are the benefits of coconut oil and why do you use this ingredient? Well, first and foremost coconut oil has been around and been consumed by humans for thousands of years. In fact, it’s a staple food for many tropical cultures: the milk, the flesh, the oil, and even the husk fibers are used in thousands of ways. It is a foundational part of the economy and the culture of many equatorial societies. The same is not true for polyunsaturated vegetable oils like canola, safflower, sunflower, corn or soybean oils. It was only after the steam engine became efficient enough around the turn of the 19th century that quantities of these vegetable oils became widely available and widely consumed. The reality is that although humans have been consuming “traditional” oils like lard, tallow and coconut oil for thousands of years, we’ve really only been eating industrially manufactured polyunsaturated vegetable oils for a bit more than a 100 years. What makes coconut oil in

st. valentine’s dinner 4 spectacular courses so beautiful, it will make her blush 2.14.13 $95++ www.element47aspen.com reservations 920-6330 20

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thinkstock photo


by Amiee white beazley

need to know Honest Chips are available at Crystal River Meats in Carbondale. For more information on Honest Chips, or to order online visit: www.honestchips.com.

particular so unique relative to polyunsaturated vegetable oils is that it’s incredibly stable under heat — largely due to the fact that it’s 93 percent saturated. When you eat the flesh of a fresh coconut you are eating coconut oil that’s in precisely the same molecular form as the oil we use when we fry potatoes in them. The same cannot be said of polyunsaturated vegetable oils that are industrially manufactured. Vegetable oils — because they are massively unsaturated — actually break down rapidly under high heat and pressure. The industrial manufacturing process of turning sunflower seeds into sunflower oil involves tremendous heat and pressure, to say nothing about chemicals (like hexane) that are used to bleach and deodorize the oil. These industrial manufacturing steps create oils that look — chemically — nothing like the oil you would find naturally in a sunflower seed if you were to eat a handful of them while watching a baseball game. Indeed, the vegetable oil industrial manufacturing process creates a large amount of free radicals and other difficult-to-digest by fat byproducts. Among foodies, these types of industrially manufactured contribute d photo

vegetable oils are called “Frankenfats” because they have undergone a massive chemical and physical transformation from their original form. The reason we eliminated these vegetable oils from our diet was because our 11-year-old son Jackson came down with some sort of immuno-neurological disease that we still don’t have a name for. What we found was that when we eliminated these polyunsaturated vegetable oils from his diet and substituted large amounts of “traditional” oils like coconut oil to his diet, his neurological condition improved significantly. At the time we didn’t have a sense of precisely why this was happening (we have a much better sense of why these types of oils affect him biologically), but we didn’t care: it worked so we kept on doing it. So we started using coconut oil (and raw butter and lard, etc.) to cook things in our house. Over the years, we came to realize that every single potato chip on supermarket shelves was made with one of the big three industrially manufactured vegetable oils: canola, safflower or sunflower oil. So we did what anyone would have done: If we couldn’t buy chips fried in coconut oil, we’d have to

make them ourselves. Because we have three other younger kids who love chips, we started making coconut oil potato chips with regularity. It was only after doing a lot of research about lipid chemistry that we realized all the reasons why traditional fats like coconut oil, butter and lard are better for human consumption (and for our son Jackson) than vegetable oils. It’s a remarkable complex chemistry involving terms like saturation, medium chain triglycerides and Lauric acid, but the sum of all that chemistry is that industrially manufactured polyunsaturated vegetable oils are generally a novel, denatured “Franken-food” that has unappreciated health risks associated with their overconsumption. Highly saturated fats that are processed with traditional low heat/low pressure methods represent not only an essential part of the human diet (and have for millennia) but they also taste really good.

thus far. Once we have those larger bags, we’ll be attempting to get into some grocery stores in Colorado like Whole Foods Market and expand to some more independent health food stores throughout the state. We’ve also developed some flavors over the last few months that we’re really proud of because they are so unique; if all goes well with finding new stores to sell our chips, those new flavors will be available in the spring. After that, if we are very lucky, we’d love to have the opportunity to bring healthy oils to other snack foods, and we’ve got our eye on a few different products outside of potato chips if we’re fortunate enough. We are definitely taking one step at a time though; the demand has been wonderful and our son Jackson’s story has touched so many lives that it really is an honor and a privilege to be doing all this.

> What are the company’s future plans? In the next month we’ll be introducing a larger (5 ounce) bag of potato chips, which will be a big step for us since we’ve only sold smaller snack-sized bags in limited quantities

Amiee White Beazley writes about dining, restaurants and food-related travel for the Aspen Times Weekly. She also works at Woody Creek Distillers in Basalt. Follow her on Twitter @awbeazley1, or email awb@ awbeazley.com. A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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VOYAGES

DESTINATION | canada

by Paul Andersen

Summer in Wonderful Whistler

Comparisons to Aspen are elusive. The mountains are festooned with blue-green glaciers. The air is humid and mild. The forests are primal and impossibly tall. On a summer visit to Whistler, the Coastal Mountains of British Columbia unfolded with wonder. In Aspen, Whistler-Blackcomb is mostly known for skiing since it usually ranks among the top ski resorts in North America. The snow depths are something to marvel at as revealed by directional signs at the top of the resort that stand 30 feet off bare ground. Gazing up at them gives you an idea of how much snow accumulates from wet Pacific storms. I visited Whistler at the invitation of the Whistler Forum for Leadership and Dialogue – a kind of sister program to the Aspen Institute, though on a smaller scale. The “Wild Spirit” five-day seminar I ran with William Roberts, president of the Forum, would take place in the forests and mountains in and around Garibaldi National Park. Participants would delve into nature and the native Squamish culture. My co-moderator was Chief Ian Campbell, tribal head of the Coast Salish people. From Vancouver, gaping at the views along the Sea-to-Sky Highway, I saw ragged peaks jutting above timbered ridges and felt my pulse quicken at the thought of getting closer to them. At sea-level the fjordlike Strait of Georgia stood placid and reflective. All highway signs were written both in English and in Squamish, though I learned later that this is an oral language. That lesson came at the start of the seminar at the Brew Creek Lodge, a

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few miles south of Whistler. When I opened the seminar with the first reading – Thoreau’s essay “Walking” – Chief Campbell announced that he had done none of the readings as a way of honoring his oral culture. I shifted gears accordingly and let the program evolve. The result was a nice balance of oral and written material. We spent two days at the lodge discussing Thoreau, Muir, Leopold and others. Afternoons were spent hiking through the rain forest of the Callahan Valley and visiting the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Center as Chief Campbell described his cultural union with nature. The third morning we drove to Whistler, slung on backpacks and rode the tram up to Blackcomb Rendezvous Lodge from where a sea of glacial peaks extended in all directions. We hiked three miles back on the ridge to a beautiful basin and set up tents around gem-like Turn Lake. All around us were high peaks and glaciers. Without hesitation I dropped my pack, wrapped a jacket around me, and headed up one of the ridges. I had to see a glacier up close, and I wasn’t disappointed with my proximity to ice and snow in August. Massive peaks jutted up as far as the eye could see in a primal landscape of mountains being formed by the crushing weight of ice. This view recalled the Pleistocene Epoch, and it didn’t take much to imagine thousands of feet of ice covering the entire region as had been the case during the last ice age 10,000 years ago. That night we gathered around a huge flat boulder and took turns reading poetry from our seminar notebooks. Dinner was a pre-made

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curry dish we had packed in from an Indian restaurant in Whistler. A brilliant show of stars completed the perfection of the night as we silently communed with the Wild Spirit of nature. The next morning, Chief Campbell led only the heartiest of us in a ceremonial bathing in icy Turn Lake. We packed up and hiked back to Blackcomb, where we boarded the Peak-2-Peak Gondola, a cavernous aerial capsule that crosses a deep canyon to Whistler Mountain Roundhouse. After lunch and our final seminar discussion, we boarded another tram and cabled back to the valley floor where a pro mountain bike race was in progress. The village was festooned with banners, crowded with spectators and pumping techno music. Whistler in summer is a bustling alpine village with a mountain buzz, a strong native legacy and an international culture at the edge of the Pacific Rim. A winter visit is now on my bucket list. Paul Andersen is a freelance writer, book author and regular columnist for The Aspen Times. His latest book, “Moonlight Over Pearl,” is a collection of short stories about Aspen.

TOP to BOTTOM: Mountain-forming glaciers mantle huge peaks to the south of Blackcomb in British Columbia; at a vantage above the clouds on Blackcomb, the ski runs of Whistler stand before a sea of mountain peaks in the Coastal Range; Wild Spirit seminar participants camp at Turn Lake, a short hike from the top of Blackcomb; the Peak-2-Peak gondola connects Blackcomb and Whistler across a dizzying gorge.

photos by paul an d ersen


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$1,195,000 ASPEN RIVERFRONT 2 bedroom 2 bath, 2 balconies In-town end unit on the river Pool, sauna, assigned parking

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VACATION RENTALS

REAL ESTATE

SINCE

1974


The Veuve Clicquot Champagne pop-up bar on Ajax speaks to the upscale Aspen visitor and local.

Life’s Been Good To Me So Far: Faking It As The Rich And Famous by Andy Stonehouse

my friend leveled with me as I told him about the general agenda for our Aspen weekend, the idea being “pretend to be Paris Hilton. Go all out. Don’t end up in jail.”

photo courtesy of the little nell

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This BMW M6 Coupe seems right at home outside the Hotel Jeome, where the bell staff will happily unload your suitcases and valet park your car.

“Our BMW is going to carry some heavy gravity. But if you wear a fur coat, you’ll look like Kelsey Grammer, and they’ll laugh us back to Beaver Creek.” Like everyone else living outside Pitkin County, I’d always sensed a certain peculiarity with Aspen’s relationship with its famous visitors: They come to town to pretend that nobody notices they’re here, and you largely oblige them, though you are indeed fully aware of their presence. So what’s it actually like to roll around with the weight of a Grammy winner and her entourage, insufferable dog in tow and weird concierge requests played to the hilt? Not so bad, it turns out. Those folks with the private jets bigger than the American Airlines commuter do get very special treatment, but according to the community’s

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highest-ranking celebrity handlers, they mostly tend to be pretty nice about it in return. With a few glaring exceptions.

Inside information

Sadly unable to convince anyone to loan us some time in their Gulfstream G650, we’d opted for the next-best tool to connote immediate presence: a new BMW M6 Coupe, one of the fastest, most wildly distinctive, rear-wheel-drive subsupercars on the market. With 560 twin-turbocharged horsepower and a paint job (the notat-all exotic Sakhir Orange Metallic) that allows the car to be seen from space, I braved the Interstate 70

passes with ultra-high-performance summer tires to make our entrance, avoiding incarceration and very much enjoying the non-frozen portions of the trip. At the Jerome, still vitally fresh from its 4 1/2-month, Todd-Avery Lenahan/Rowland + Broughton high-luxe makeover, the M6 seemed to have found an appropriate home, and we were quickly surrounded by the cowboy-hat-wearing staff, eager to help us in any way we desired. This, we discovered, might be the biggest secret to those living the big life: You will always receive morethan-enthusiastic service. Your every wish will be catered to. At times, you will require a lacrosse stick to keep the bellmen and room cleaners and

photo by an d y stonehouse


RGY: O Y G CERT ADAM CONTURE O N PIA THE FU REN FOR TING CHILLDAYS

experience

WINTER WORDS

FIT EP BENE ED AS H & LISZT E S I N N I S AT I O N E D V M O R IMPR S PERFO HALL A I G E E ARN C T A

and the power of stories

KAREN RUSSELL

ELISSA SCHAPPELL

Karen Russell, whose debut novel Swamplandia! propelled her to literary stardom, and Elissa Schappell, whose new book Blueprints for Building Better Girls has made her one of the hottest editor-authors on the literary scene, will share the stage to discuss books, careers, and their longtime friendship.

MARCH 4 ALL EVENTS 6PM / DOORS 5:30PM | PAEPCKE AUDITORIUM

TICKETS $20 GENERAL ADMISSION

[author reading + book signing]

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GROUP and STUDENT/EDUCATOR discounts available

FIND OUT & JOIN ASPEN WRITERS’ FOUNDATION aspenwriters.org 970.925.3122

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sponsored by The Aspen Times and Aspen Public Radio

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Fred water Deluxe filtered water from the world-famous aquifers of … Santa Monica, Calif.? Hipster water. Probably the favorite of Jennifer Aniston. $21 a liter online. Good we did not drink it, after all. www.fredspot.com.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The newly renovated Hotel Jerome’s J-Bar, guest room and spa — all luxurious and perfectly appointed. OPPOSITE PAGE: Suites at Little Nell come complete with wet bar, sitting area and fireplace.

front-desk attendants from providing you with too much help. However, if you are like two of the Jerome’s most recent, high-profile guests (Christina Aguilera and Alanis Morissette), your entourage will help keep you safely isolated from too much public contact as you settle into one of the hotel’s three, refurbished executive suites. Somehow, in the flurry of intense courtesy and the bellman’s instructions on how to operate the in-room cappuccino maker and the iPad that serves as your electronic concierge connection (a nice touch, indeed), our bags did indeed temporarily disappear. So we contemplated our own junior suite’s celebrity-friendly larder — “everything is complimentary except the Fred-brand bottled water in the fridge,” we were told, our interest now piqued in that exclusive and dangerous Fred water — and settled around the suspiciously mirror-topped coffee table while the bags were rediscovered. Then the cheese plate arrived. I was hoping for

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Cristal, as well, but they were on to us already. “This is not bad at all,” my friend noted. Critical to the complete satisfaction of guests with their own reality series, and even those without, veteran Jerome concierge James Cryer said he prides himself on providing just as much service as the hotel’s now-even-more-high-end clientele desires — noting that Daryl Hannah had been in the hotel’s very attractive new Living Room bar the night before. “With higher rates comes a certain expectation of service, and we’re working very hard to maintain that,” he noted. “We’re getting more recognizable celebrities, but they mostly want to be treated like everyone else.” Cryer, who grew up in Los Angeles and says he attended junior high with Paris Hilton (“She likes to cause the scene — and she’s more of a Little Nell kind of client”), also deals with the typical routine of catering to celebrity diets. And as for the

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over-the-top requests? “It’s never anything like asking for a cheetah in their room,” he said dryly. “But I did spend almost five hours one time doing the legwork for a client who wanted to land a helicopter in our courtyard so he could go on a raft trip on the Upper Arkansas. I was going to call in a high-altitude-capable helicopter from Grand Junction, and I got a permit to land it on the Rio Grande field – and then I told the client the exorbitant price that all would cost. And he decided to pass on that.” Cryer says his biggest coup is being able to land his highflying guests the off-peak dinner reservations they often desire, which for some reason always seem to be in the restaurant dead zone of 7:30 p.m. Cache Cache, Matsuhisa and Pinions always top the list, be it stars such as Bill Murray, Cheech Marin or Mick Jagger – all of whom are pretty cool in person, he said.

“That’s the witching hour, and sometimes even the general manager won’t call you back with a request like that,” Cryer said. “So sometimes I have to drop the name, mention that this person is going to come in and they should anticipate a higher bill, and they can put them in a high-visibility location if they want. That’s where being a long-term concierge comes in.”

A home for high-rollers

True enough, things are indeed a bit different at the Little Nell, the more well-established nexus for high-roller visits. On a tour of the 1,900-squarefoot Little Nell suite, retailing for about $5,000 per night and situated literally spitting distance from the

J - B ar an d S pa P hotos by J ason Dewey ; g uest room photo by d avi d marlow


BMW’s menacing M6 Coupe gondola, I began to understand the appeal of the hotel to those Alist clients. You’ve heard the stories of the days when the sparring Trump clan decamped there, The Donald taking one side of the joint and Ivana settling into her own set of suites; turns out that’s all true. Katriona Hembury, the Little Nell’s pleasant and very British guest-relations manager, explained that the hotel’s long-established position as go-to spot for celeb visits has drawn the occasional paparazzo to the lobby – but in the hotel’s efficient approach, they’re asked to check their camera equipment or to kindly vacate the premises. “Our guests are paying for that privacy, and we do everything to honor their requests,” Hembury said. “We want our staff to be aware of who they are, but we also don’t want them to be asking for autographs, either. You can come here, be yourself, and we won’t shout about it.” In her eyes, the Little Nell’s guests understand what they’re getting themselves into. Otherwise, they’ll cross the street and end up in the pool at 39 Below. “Most recently, it’s been a lot of high-end international businessmen from Australia and Brazil,” Hembury said. “We also had a group of Ukrainian diplomats who did not want to tell us who they were or

what they were doing.” And what about the tales of celebrities behaving badly? Hembury said that, like Cryer’s clients, people are, for the most part, low-key and pleasant, but occasional problems do arise. “I would say that my experiences with that caliber of guests have been 99 percent positive, but there’s just that 1 percent that ruins things. In our eyes, spitting on staff members or destroying rooms is not acceptable,” she added. For the majority who do exhibit good behavior, the Little Nell is more than happy to cater to requests ranging from private shopping trips (“They’ll sit outside Fendi while their staff goes inside and picks stuff out,” Hemburg said.) to arrangements to head off to Silverton for heli-skiing, plus the typical desires for first tracks with private ski instructors. (I had hoped for a bit of dirt on how the Aspen Skiing Co. caters its on-mountain offerings to the occasional celebrity skier or snowboarder request, but they graciously declined to discuss their policies.) Tour complete, my friend and I settled into Campari and sodas and yet another local artisan cheese plate at the Nell’s Element 47 and theorized what it was going to take to pull off this lifestyle. “You’re going to have to write ‘Marley and Me,’” my friend said. “Or maybe some young-adult book with werewolves. Otherwise, we’re out of luck.”

Guest R oom P hoto courtesy of the little nell ; car photo courtesy of B M W

We are not sure why the German carmakers are so enamored with the sleek rooflines of 1970s American cars, but it seems to be the inspiration for a whole new generation of two- and four-door luxury import coupes, of which the new M6 is a very striking example. Built with the same mind-bending, physics-defying mechanics as the four-door M5, the automobile’s adjustable steering, suspension and throttle response allow the 4.4-liter twin-turbocharged V8 to hit 60 MPH in just over four seconds. A ride to an electronically limited 155 feels like you’ve ignited solid-fuel booster rockets – upgrade to the $8,700 carbon-ceramic brakes, and stops will be just as breathtaking. But it’s that long and slick body design that’s the M6’s most compelling feature, though the oversized doors and low seating position do practically call out for valet parking versus tight garage spots. An avalanche of real carbon-fiber trim (including the entire roof) plus many hides’ worth of hand-stitched Merino leather help create a cockpit-styled experience. Winter usage is plausible, provided you seek out the right rubber and take a conservative approach to the throttle. www.bmwusa.com/standard/content/vehicles/2013/m/m6coupe/default.aspx

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ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MUSIC/ART/FILM/literature

The heart of arts season Arts and cultural offerings abound in winter

Singer-songwriter Brett Dennen will perform a free outdoors show in March at Snowmass Base Village. Dennen also contributed to the John Denver tribute album “The Music Is You,” due for release in April.

the days are getting longer. The snowpack is getting (ever so slightly) deeper, and the surface is softer. The lifts are running later. But the season isn’t getting any longer, so naturally you’re feeling the squeeze to get in your ski runs while the gettin’s good. And while you’re putting in extra time on the slopes, don’t neglect the off-mountain activities. There’s a whole lot of culture to fit in before Aspen shuts down for the spring offseason.

Laughs: Despite the rumors, and the apparent ongoing efforts, the U.S. Comedy Arts Festival isn’t coming back to Aspen, at least not this year. While we wait and hope, the Wheeler Opera House’s Aspen Laff Festival (Feb. 21 through 23) does an admirable job of ensuring we are not deprived of the best medicine (and pointing out the humorous side of Aspen’s altitude and shortage of black people). The third annual festival closes with the return of Christopher Titus, whose stand-up show, “Neverlution,” was a throwback to the U.S. Comedy Arts Fest years. Leading up to Titus are Colin Quinn, Bobby Slayton, Jake Johanssen and panel shows on elective surgery and Congress and lady parts. Dramatic journey: Director Lon Winston leads Thunder River Theatre into the classic Eugene O’Neil

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landscape of alcohol, dysfunction and the agonies of the Tyrone family of Connecticut with a staging of “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” O’Neil’s autobiographical, Pulitzer Prize-winning drama. The production opens Feb. 22, with dates through March 9 at Carbondale’s Thunder River Theatre. Flashback: Want to be taken back to the era of classic rock? Or prog-rock, soft-rock? ZOSO promises “the ultimate Led Zeppelin experience” (Feb. 24, Belly Up). English prog-rock pioneers YES, with three original members, play three of their classic albums in their entirety in their Aspen debut, a rare club appearance (March 12, Belly Up). Another group of U.K. origin, America, brings its soft-rock songs (“Ventura Highway,” “Sister Golden Hair”) to town (March 15, Belly Up).

P hoto by S tewart O ksenhorn


by STEWART OKSENHORN

Beatles fans have two chances to twist and shout: Doctor Robert, from Crested Butte, plays a free après-ski set Feb. 24 at Ajax Tavern, while Beatlemania now is featured in a benefit for the Aspen Camp for the Deaf (March 9). Document: “Under African Skies” (Feb. 27, Wheeler) is an examination of the politics behind Paul Simon’s 1985 album “Graceland,” which earned criticism for Simon’s apparent breach of the boycott of South Africa. On a more exhilarating note, the film brings back to life the music of “Graceland,” sounding as brilliant as ever.

Read: Karen Russell’s “Swamplandia!” tells of the Bigtrees, a family of island-dwelling Florida alligator wrestlers, adapting to changing times. It was a finalist for the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for fiction. Russell speaks with fellow novelist Elissa Schappell on March 4 in an Aspen Writers’ Foundation Winter Words event at Paepcke Auditorium. Discover: Making their local debuts: Big Easy funk group the New

Drink: The tradition of the end-ofski-day beer gets elevated with a new event, the Après-Ski Cocktail Festival (March 14 through 17, Snowmass Village). Cocktail gal Kim Haasarud, who has written recipe books on mojitos, margaritas and more, along with other drink experts, leads sippers on a tour of gins, cognacs and singlemalt scotches. Also on the menu are fondues, pre-ski fruit smoothies and warm beverages, including hot chocolate that is not necessarily for kids.

Jazzed: The buzz is big on Pedrito Martinez (March 29 and 30, JAS Café), a Cuban-born percussionist and singer whose regular shows at a New York nightclub have drawn raves. The buzz also is growing on Jazz Aspen’s series of jazz shows at the Little Nell.

Do good: Vital, a nonprofit group founded by part-time Aspenite Yvonne Neuman, is launching its local presence with a concert (March 2, Wheeler) by Ádám György, a Hungarian pianist who has made multiple appearances at Carnegie Hall.

Rock out: Put the name Robert Earl Keen (March 30, PAC3, Carbondale) on a marquee in this valley, and watch the fans line up for a night of rowdy, Texas-style folk-rock. The 57-year-old singer-songwriter isn’t coasting; his last album, 2011’s “Ready for Confetti,” is on a par with older classics like “Gringo Honeymoon.”

Kids stuff: Aspen High School takes on the musical “In the Heights” (March 8 through 10, Aspen District Theatre), an affectionate look at a Dominican-American neighborhood in New York City. The 2008 production took several Tony Awards, including for best musical.

C ontribute d photo

Spring fling: Brett Dennen, the California redhead with a superior batch of songs and an endearingly goofy stage presence, launches springtime in the Rockies with a free outdoor show (March 22, Snowmass Base Village). Flick: Former University of Colorado film student Derek Cianfrance announced himself with 2010’s edgy “Blue Valentine.” He returns with “The Place Beyond the Pines” (released nationally March 29), a hit at the Telluride Film Festival. The film reunites Cianfrance with “Blue Valentine’s” Ryan Gosling, who plays a motorcycle stunt rider on a collision course with the law. Co-stars include Bradley Cooper and Eva Mendes.

Play Dead: Deadheads have two reasons to bust out the tie-dye. The Mickey Hart Band, led by the former Grateful Dead drummer, plays an upto-date brand of fusion/funk (March 2). Dark Star Orchestra has done its ultra-faithful re-creation of Dead shows past numerous times in the area, but its next appearance here is a nice twist — an all-acoustic show in a theater setting (March 29, Wheeler).

Classical music: Conrad Tao (March 16, Wheeler) first came to Aspen as a 10-year-old violin student. How things have changed. Tao has switched to piano, added composing to his pursuits and is all grown up (19, actually). And he’s become a classical-music star: His compositions have been commissioned by the Hong Kong Philharmonic and Dallas Symphony, Forbes included him in its list of “30 Under 30” young people making an impact on the world, and he was featured in last summer’s seasonopening Aspen Music Festival concert. This recital has Tao playing Chopin, Prokofiev, Meredith Monk and Tao’s own “vestiges.”

Pick: Icons from different ends of the acoustic spectrum — the traditionalist Del McCoury and the envelope-pushing Sam Bush — team up as a duo (March 21, Wheeler).

Comedian Bobby Slayton will perform Feb. 22 in the Wheeler Opera House’s Aspen Laff Festival.

Orleans Suspects (March 6, PAC3, Carbondale); Hammond B3 organist Tony Monaco (March 15 and 16, JAS Café Downstairs@the Nell); Andy Grammer (March 27, Wheeler); Red Hot Chili Peppers drummer Chad Smith’s side project, Bombastic Meatbats (March 30, Belly Up); experimental rockers Minus the Bear (April 3, Belly Up); hard rockers Great White (April 5, PAC3); and ’90s hitmakers Soul Asylum (April 12).

Leap in: The Aspen Santa Fe Ballet company, already heralded around the world, might just be hitting its stride. It makes its debut in Russia, the motherland of classical dance, next week. Last week, it gave performances in its Aspen hometown that had audiences searching for superlatives. It repeats that program (March 16, Aspen District Theatre) in an evening that might have even more emotional resonance: Sam Chittenden, a company star for 15 years, takes his final bow from the ASFB.

Download: John Denver might not have been the epitome of cool while he was alive. But 16 years after his death, his cool factor is about to get a boost. The tribute album “The Music Is You” (April 2 release date) lines up 16 artists with plenty of hip cred: Lucinda Williams, Brett Dennen, Train, Dave Matthews. The album opens with My Morning Jacket doing a stirring version of “Leaving on a Jet Plane” and closes with Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros’ trippy take on “Wooden Indian.”

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aroundaspen

The SOCIAL SIDE of TOWN

by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

More Hall of fame fame The Aspen Hall of Fame is such a wonderful gathering of mostly local Aspenites, and there were so many attending this year that I decided to run some more photos. This year the inductees were Pat Fallin, Joe Edwards and Michael Kinsley. (I ran their photos in the column last week.) Mary Undercurrent ... This is eshbaugh hayes the time of year to finish up your federal and state income tax papers and get them to your accountant!

Carol Klein and Marjorie DeLucca.

fame

fame

Shayne Morgan Sledge and Torre.

Mark Haldeman with Lucy and Gary Nichols.

fame Becky Young, Doug Kinsley, Peggy Devilbiss and Eric Smith.

fame

fame

Marsha Brendlinger, Becky Ayers and Betsy Ratcliff.

Tim McFlynn, Bill Stirling and Barbara Bussell.

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P H O T O s by M A R Y E S H B A U G H H A Y E S


Look for the FIRST ANNUAL

Glamorous Woodrun Estate! â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Snowmass Village

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WINTER 2013

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Find it on line at:

vwww.aspentimes.com/artinaspen 970-925-3414 If you are interested in having copies delivered to your business, please call 429-9123.

GARRETT REUSS c 970.379.3458 GarrettReuss@SothebysRealty.com

AspenSnowmassSIR.com

C L ASS

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ahitian Pearls, Black Pearls, Grey Pearls: Magical names that evoke the singularity and the origin of this BIJOUX DE LA MER. A gift from the god ORO, King of the Firmament, the Tahitian pearl develops its perfect shape and colors in the deep turquoise waters of French Polynesian lagoons. The secret treasures of coral islands, they were widely considered a royal symbol. Yvan Mignot of Mignot St Barth has brought his exquisite Tahitian pearls to Aspen. Stop by today and see why these extraordinary pearls have long been regarded as a nameplate of class and elegance.

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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by MARY ESHBAUGH HAYES

fame Linda Lafferty and Andy Stone.

fame

Two moms of racers with Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club at the Hall of Fame banquet are Madeleine Osberger and Emily Ramsford.

fame Lee Baxter and Sandie Smith.

fame

fame

Josh Agenbroad and Kelly Krumrie.

Jim Breasted, Merle Dulien and Jeannie Carter.

fame Lorna Peterson with John and Linda Keleher. John was named to the Hall of Fame last year.

fame

Amory Lovins and Marty Pickett.

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CURRENTEVENTS

February 21 - 27, 2013

Live Entertainment

The History of Magic in Snowmass with Doc Eason 7 - 9 p.m., Snowmass Chapel, Snowmass Village. The story of how a little hole-in-the-wall bar in the Rocky Mountains became a bright star in the heavens of the magic world, as told by the guy who was there — Doc Eason. While this is not a magic show in the strictest sense of the word, there is magic in it that supports the story. An informative and compelling evening. Bring the kids. No charge. Call 970-923-6192.

Thursday Aspen Laff Festival: Colin Quinn 8:15 - 9:25 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. From “Saturday Night Live” to “Tough Crowd” to the lights of Broadway with his “Long Story Short,” Quinn is the acknowledged comic master of brainy, ascerbic political scourgings. This is his first stop back in Aspen since the middle years of the HBO/U.S. Comedy Arts Festival, so expect him to be loaded, primed and ready to cut loose. Call 970-920-5770.

Boo Coo 7 - 11 p.m., St. Regis Resort, Aspen. Dynamic, eclectic music duo featuring Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-927-6758.

Aspen Laff Festival: Marion Grodin 7:15 - 8 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. Opening the festival is a free show featuring Marion Grodin, daughter of actor/director Charles Grodin and priestess of all things New Yorkcentric. After writing for network sitcoms and selling six screenplays, it dawned on Marion that her father hadn’t nicknamed her “Mouth” for nothing. This veteran of TV shows takes a break from writing her first book to go a little Manhattan metro, riffing on such subjects as J-dating, doorway vending and having her therapist come see her at a comedy club. Call 970-920-5770.

Live music with Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 4 - 7 p.m., The Wildwood Bar in The Wildwood Hotel, 40 Elbert Lane in Snowmass Village. Live music for après-ski. Call 970-9238200. Vid Weatherwax and Roberta Lewis 4 - 7 p.m., 8K Lounge, Viceroy Snowmass. Contemporary jazz. Call 970-923-8000. Axis LP 2:30 - 6 p.m., Bumps, base of Buttermilk, Aspen. Live music. Call 970-920-0991. Jackson Emmer 4:20 - 6:30 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Live music featuring old-time, country, and new American music. Après-ski meets banjos and pretty twang. Call 970-925-9955.

Magician Doc Eason 6 - 10 p.m., The Artisan at the Stonebridge Inn, 300 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village. Featuring a four-time Academy of Magical Arts award winner, including two consecutive years as the Closeup magician of the year, the W.C. Fields magic bartender of the year and lecturer of the year. Call 970-923-7074.

James Newman Band 9 p.m., Aspen Brewing Co. Call 970-920-2739. Martin Sexton (solo) 9 - 11 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. “Fall Like Rain,” Martin Sexton’s latest offering, as EP, finds this artist again asking relevant questions and challenging the status quo. On this record, the artist subtly and seamlessly blends infectious tunes with a powerful message. Call 970-544-9800.

Axis LP 3 - 6 p.m., Base Camp, Snowmass Village. Après-ski live music. Call 719-685-4410. Boo Coo 7 - 11 p.m., St. Regis Resort, Aspen. Dynamic, eclectic music duo featuring Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-927-6758. Karaoke 10 p.m., Red Onion. Karaoke fun. Call 925-9955.

Smokin’ Joe and Zoe 7 - 11 p.m., St. Regis Resort, Aspen. Eclectic local music duo performs. Call 970-927-6758.

Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 4 - 7 p.m., The Limelight Hotel, 355 S. Monarch St., Aspen. Après-ski live music. Call 970-925-3025. Savoy with J-Flash 10 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St. Instrumentalists turned seasoned producers Gray Smith and Ben Eberdt, plus live drummer Michael Kelly, have taken elements from almost every sub-genre of electronic music and mashed them together in Savoy to create a truly unique and captivating sound. Call 970-544-9800. Vid Weatherwax solo piano, 4 - 7 p.m., 8K Lounge, Viceroy Snowmass. Contemporary and New Orleans jazz, Latin, R&B and blues. Call 970-923-8000. The Intervention Band with Josefina Mendez 8 - 10:30 p.m., Westin Snowmass Resort, Snowmass Village. Jazz and bossa nova with Josefina Mendez (vocals), Tom Paxton (bass), Tim Fox (piano), and Bob Levey (drums). Call 970-948-2225. Friday Aspen Laff Festival: Bobby Slayton and Robert Hawkins 9 - 10:30 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. The New York Daily News called the motor-mouthed, motor-witted Bobby Slayton “armed and dangerous.” Robert Hawkins, the fevered master of free association, has twice graced the Wheeler stage with the Rooftop Comedy Festival and once with Standup Smackdown. Call 970-920-5770. Aspen Laff Festival: Comics on Congress and lady parts 6 - 7:30 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. The Laff Fest talent takes on everything from stupid stump speeches to stupider proposed legislation in this freewheeling, unrehearsed panel. Call 970-920-5770. Aspen Laff Festival: Nick Griffin and Tammy Pescatelli 7:15 - 8 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. Forget that Tammy Pescatelli has done the full late-night circuit, been in the “Last Comic Standing” final five or played all over Comedy Central. She is the funniest hard-core Italian-lady comic out there. And as for Nick Griffin’s matinee-idol good looks, they conceal one of the sharpest new comedic talents out there, with offbeat observations that are dead-on. Seven times on Letterman, Conan and Ferguson, this is his first time in Aspen. Call 970-920-5770.

PHOTO BY STEWART OKSENHORN

Patrick Fagan 4 - 6 p.m., Two Old Hippies, 111 S. Monarch St., Aspen. An intimate showcase with singer-songwriter Patrick Fagan. Call 970-925-7492.

Michigan acoustic quintet Greensky Bluegrass, with mandolinist Paul Hoffman, will perform Feb. 26 at PAC3 in Carbondale. Axis LP 6:30 - 10 p.m., Little Mammoth Steakhouse, upstairs on the Snowmass Village Mall. Live music. Call 970-923-8892. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 4 - 7 p.m., The Vue Lounge, Westin Snowmass Resort, 100 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. Live music for après-ski. Call 970-923-8200. Boo Coo 7 - 11 p.m., St Regis Resort, Aspen. Dynamic, eclectic music duo featuring Chris Bank and Smokin’ Joe Kelly. Call 970-927-6758. Rocky Mountain Rob, “No Strings Attached” 6 - 8 p.m., The Edge, Timberline Condominiums, 690 Carrige Way, Snowmass Village. Solo entertainment. Early acoustic blues and folk on harmonica. Call 970-923-4000. NorthYSur 4 - 7 p.m., Hotel Jerome, Aspen. Blending sounds of North and South American jazz and bossa nova. Call 970-222-7752. The Crystal Method with Berkel Beats 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St., Aspen. The Crystal Method — Ken Jordan and Scott Kirkland — is known for its enduring dancefloor anthems (“Now Is the Time,” “Keep Hope Alive”), airwave smashes (“Trip Like I Do”) and willingness to collaborate with an array of talent. Its platinum-status debut album, “Vegas” (released in 1997), is one of the biggest-selling electronic albums of all time. “Divided By Night,” its Grammy-nominated 2009 studio album, took the duo to new heights. Call 970544-9800. Twirp Anderson, Cash Cashman and Randall Utterback 3 – 6 p.m., The Edge restaurant/bar at the Timberline, 690 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village. Trio of longtime locals offers acoustic tunes — country, Celtic, bluegrass, John Denver tunes, covers and requests. Call 970-927-9116.

Vid Weatherwax and Chris Bank 4 - 7 , 8K Lounge, Viceroy Snowmass, Snowmass Village. Contemporary and New Orleans jazz, Latin, R&B and blues. Call 970-923-8000. Saturday Aspen Laff Festival: “Comics on ... Elective Surgery” 6 - 7 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen Festival talent convenes again to take on one of Aspen’s favorite spectator sports — the ins, the outs, the nips, the tucks and the eeks. Go to www.aspenshowtix.com for tickets. Call 970-920-5770. Aspen Laff Festival: Jake Johanssen and Troy Walker 7:15 - 8:45 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. A self-confessed raconteur of weird stories, it’s no wonder that Jake is one of David Letterman’s favorite comics. With more than 35 Letterman appearances (not to mention a handful of Conan O’Brien, Jay Leno, and “Politically Incorrect” gigs), Jake is no stranger to late-night TV. Those appearances gave Jake the exposure he needed to land his own HBO comedy special, “This’ll Take About an Hour.” Paired with Jake is the 2012 “New Faces” winner, Troy Walker, back for a full set and further adventures in dating, geekdom and the virtues of being Prince. Call 970-920-5770. Aspen Laff Festival: Christopher Titus 9 - 10:30 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. The man whose explosive one-man show, “The Neverlution,” blew the doors off the first-ever Laff Fest returns with his newest project, ready for unveiling just for the Aspen audience. Titus’ edgy, jaw-dropping, true-life stories are a launching pad for the kinds of comedic insights the world hasn’t seen since George Carlin — witty, insightful and left-in-stitches funny. Call 970-920-5770.

Twirp Anderson, Cash Cashman and Randall Utterback 3 – 6 p.m., The Edge restaurant/bar at the Timberline, 690 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village. Trio of longtime locals offers acoustic tunes — country, Celtic, bluegrass, John Denver tunes, covers and requests. Call 970-927-9116. Sunday Doctor Robert: Beatles Tribute Band 3 - 6 p.m., Ajax Tavern, Aspen. Crested Butte band is back in Aspen for a free apres-ski event, showcasing timeless Beatles tunes. Call 970-309-8744. Jackson Emmer 10 a.m. - noon, Victoria’s Espresso Bar, 510 E. Durant Ave., Aspen. Emmer and his band perform old-time, country and new American music. Think banjos, bootstomping, and tender, lonesome twang. Call 970-920-3001. Jazz Brunch 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center. Live music from the Roaring Fork High School Jazz Septet, plus a warm fire and brunch. Call 970-922-2342. John Michel and Michael Jude 4 - 7 p.m., The Limelight Hotel, Aspen. A duo from the John Oates Band performs. Call 970-404-2494. Josh Wilde 4:20 - 6:30 p.m., Red Onion, Aspen. Live local music. Call 720-468-1884. ZOSO: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin 9:30 p.m. Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St. In 1995, ZOSO was formed to create the most mesmerizing and accurate portrayal of what Rolling Stone called the biggest band of the 1970s — Led Zeppelin. Each member was selected to portray both the appearance and playing styles of Zeppelin members Robert Plant, Jimmy Page, John Bonham and John Paul Jones. Call 970-544-9800. Smokin’ Joe and Zoe 7 - 9:30 p.m., Victoria’s, 510 E. Durant Ave., Aspen. Versatile music duo performs. Call 970-927-6758. Vid Weatherwax solo piano 4 - 7 p.m., 8K Lounge, Viceroy Snowmass. Rhythm and blues/ variety. Call 970-923-8000.

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Monday The Green with New Kingston 9 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St. Formed in 2009 on Oahu, Hawaii, The Green blends roots reggae with traditional Hawaiian vibes. Its latest single, “Liar,” is out now on Easy Star Records and the group’s sophomore album, “Ways & Means,” spent four weeks at No. 1 on Billboard’s Reggae Chart. Its self-titled debut album was named iTunes best reggae album of 2010. Call 970-544-9800. Jan Lisiecki in concert 7 - 8:30 p.m., Snowmass Chapel, 5307 Owl Creek Road, Snowmass Village. Seventeen-year-old Jan Lisiecki, of Calgary, Alberta, performs all of the Chopin etudes, Opus 10 and Opus 25 (plus a couple of surprises that he will announce at the concert). This performance is free; arrive early for a good seat. This concert is sponsored by Larry and Margaret Marsland, the Westin Snowmass Resort, Aspen Skiing Co. and Snowmass Chapel. Call 970-300-1330. Open Mic Night 9:30 p.m., Red Onion, 420 E. Cooper Ave., Aspen. Check out what Aspen’s songwriters and musicians have to offer. Call 970-925-9955. Tuesday Magician Doc Eason 6 - 10 p.m., The Artisan at the Stonebridge Inn, 300 Carriage Way, Snowmass Village. Featuring a four-time Academy of Magical Arts award winner, including two consecutive years as the Closeup magician of the year, the W.C. Fields magic bartender of the year and lecturer of the year. Call 970-923-7074. Retro Tuesday 9 p.m., Syzygy restaurant, 308 E. Hopkins Ave., Aspen. Music and dancing to the hits of the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s. Admission is $5 for the first 20 people in the door, then $10. Call 310-606-1305. Takah Tuesday live music 9:15 - 11:55 p.m., Takah Sushi, Aspen. Trenton Allen and friends. Call 970-925-8588. Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 5 - 8 p.m., The Wildwood Bar in The Wildwood Hotel, 40 Elbert Lane, Snowmass Village. Après-ski live music. Call 970-923-8200. Wednesday Damian Smith and Terry Bannon 4 - 7 p.m., New Belgium Ranger Station, slopeside on the Snowmass Village Mall. Live music for après-ski. Call 970-236-6277.

Photography showcase and silent auction 7 - 9:30 p.m., Iris Gallery, 520 E. Hyman Ave., Aspen. Strafe Outerwear hosts a mountaininspired photography showcase and silent auction featuring the work of various local photographers. All proceeds benefit Alpine Initiatives, an Aspen-based nonprofit that engages winter-sports enthusiasts in sustainable community development projects around the globe. Call 303-523-0690. Friday George Stranahan: Looking Back 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. An exhibit featuring work by George Stranahan, a lifelong photographer and inductee in the Aspen Hall of Fame. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday. Free and open to the public. Call 970-9274123. “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” 7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Thunder River Theatre, Carbondale. Eugene O’Neill’s masterpiece. He is the only American playwright to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and four Pulitzers. Go to www.thunderrivertheatre.com for more information. Additional performances March 1 through 3 and March 7 through 9. Call 970963-8200. Saturday Opening reception: Lorriane Davis 5 - 7 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center. Featuring the oil landscapes and still-life work of artist Lorraine Davis. Appetizers and cash bar. Call 970-922-2342. Theatre Aspen Costume Gala 6 - 11:30 p.m., location to be announced. Join Theatre Aspen for the nonprofit’s 30th-anniversary-season Costume Gala. The evening will feature dinner, a DJ, silent and live auctions, games, dancing, and over-the-top costumes. The event raises funds for the organization’s year-round education program and an award-winning summer repertory theater. Call for table and ticket information. Call 970-925-9313, ext. 205. “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” 7:30 - 9:30 p.m., Thunder River Theatre, Carbondale. Thunder River Theatre presents Eugene O’Neill’s masterpiece. He is the only American playwright to win the Nobel Prize for Literature and four Pulitzers. Go

Whitewater Ramble 9:30 p.m., Belly Up Aspen, 450 S. Galena St. This Coloradobred “dance-grass” quintet combines the elements of mandolin, fiddle, acoustic guitar, upright bass, drums and vocals to explore the musical boundaries of multiple genres and to fuel its own mixture of original music and innovative cover-song interpretations. No cover charge. Call 970-544-9800.

Vid Weatherwax solo piano 4 - 7 p.m., 8K Lounge, Viceroy Snowmass. Contemporary and New Orleans jazz, Latin, R&B and blues. Call 970-923-8000.

The Arts Comedian Colin Quinn will perform Feb. 21 in the Wheeler Opera House’s Aspen Laff Festival.

Thursday Train Dreams Book Club 6:30 - 8 p.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. Michael Chabon’s “Telegraph Avenue” is packed with characteristic boisterous, brilliant language and lovable, vital characters. Join in if you’ve read it and like to talk about books. Call 970-429-1900.

to www.thunderrivertheatre.com for more information. Additional performances March 1 through 3 and March 7 through 9. Call 970963-8200.

Movie Night 6 - 8 p.m., Woody Creek Community Center. Judy Colaneri hosts movie night. The film is “The Way,” starring Martin Sheen, written and produced by Emilio Estevez, about a 500-mile walk across the Iberian Peninsula (Spain) from the Pyrenees in France to the northwestern corner of Spain along the pilgrimage road called the Camino de Santiago. Free. Spanish meal provided for $5. Call 970-922-2342.

Sunday Live Poetry Night 6:30 - 9 p.m., Victoria’s Espresso & Wine Bar, 510 E. Durant Ave., Aspen. Hosted by the Aspen Poets’ Society and featuring live music with singersongwriter Hugh Burrows, plus an open mic for poets and featured poet Rett Harper. Open to all poets and listeners. Free. Call 970-379-2136.

Tom Elder book signing and discussion 6 – 7 p.m., Explore Booksellers, 221 E. Main St., Aspen. Local author Tom Elder presents and discusses his new book “It’s All About the Timing,” a rollicking tale of romance and malfeasance, passionate love and rampant greed taking place in a small resort town near and dear to our hearts. Call 970-9255336.

Aspen Film Motion Picture Awards Party 5 - 11:30 p.m., Caribou Club, Aspen. Walk the red carpet into Aspen Film’s annual Motion Picture Awards Party, featuring cocktails, dinner, dancing and a live telecast of the 85th annual Academy Awards. This event, along with a live and silent auction, benefits Aspen Film’s education and film programming. Call 970-925-6882, ext. 308.

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Monday George Stranahan: “Looking Back” 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. An exhibit featuring work by George Stranahan, a lifelong photographer and inductee of Aspen Hall of Fame. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday. Free and open to the public. Call 970-927-4123. Monday Docs: “Rising From Ashes” 7:30 - 9 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. This encore film sold out at Filmfest last fall — and for good reason. Amid the heartache of post-genocide Rwanda, a group of cyclists led by cycling pro Jock Boyer began importing bikes with the hopes of resurrecting the sport and daring to dream of the Olympics. Forest Whitaker narrates an inspiring story of redemption and second chances (82 minutes). Call 970-920-5770. Tuesday Writing Your Story with Paul Anderson 5:30 - 7 p.m., Basalt Regional Library Conference Room. Call 970-927-4311. Wednesday Painting class 10 - 11:30 am, Woody Creek Community Center. A drop-in painting class with instructor and artist Eliza Rogan. Bring your own wet or dry materials, no oils. The class will work from a still life or figures. First class free. Members $10; nonmembers $20. Sign up at info@woodyc3.org or call to reserve a spot. Call 970-922-2342. Art Talk: Kelly Alford 6 - 8 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. The Wyly Women Artists Series presents Kelly Alford, creator of the popular iota brand, to discuss her rich career and the women artists who inspire her. Free and open to the public. Call 970-927-4123. Teen Poets’ Asylum 2:45 - 4 p.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. An open-mic poetry club that encourages young people to share favorite works or personal creations. It meets the fourth Wednesday of every month. Refreshments provided. Call 970-429-1900. Wyly Art Club, Part II 3:30 - 5:30 p.m., Wyly Community Art Center, 99 Midland Spur, Basalt. For ages 6 to 8, offered Wednesdays through April 10. Registration is required. The projects are geared to cultivate creativity and introduce visual arts skills. Tuition is $110 plus a $25 studio fee (members receive 10 percent off). For more information and to register, visit www.wylyarts.org. Call 970927-4123.

Tom Ressel 8 - 10 p.m., Cantina, 411 E. Main St., Aspen. Local musician Tom Ressel plays favorite tunes in the bar and lounge area. Call 970-925-3663.

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Theatre Aspen season auditions 10 a.m. - 6 p.m., Red Brick Arts Center, Aspen. Season auditions for “Les Miserables,” “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” and “Fully Committed” will be held by appointment. Call 970-925-9313, ext. 200, or visit theatreaspen. org for character breakdowns. Must be experienced and trained singers.

Fe b r u ar y 2 1 - 27 , 20 1 2

Rock Docs: “Under African Skies” 7:30 - 9 p.m., Wheeler Opera House, Aspen. Twentyfive years ago, Paul Simon released his landmark work “Graceland” to equal parts acclaim and controversy. The album burst musical boundaries and brought together diverse cultures, but it split public opinion as Simon was accused of breaking the United Nations’ cultural boycott of South Africa, then a linchpin in the strategy to fight the nation’s intolerable system of apartheid. “Under African Skies” triumphantly closed out the Wheeler’s 2012 MountainSummit Festival and brilliantly demonstrates how an accident of creative friendships can become the wedge that finally splits longstanding injustice. Call 970-920-5770. Argentine tango 6:30 - 10 p.m., Red Brick Dance Studio, Aspen. Fundamentals of tango salon from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Practilonga (guided practice and social dancing) from 8 to 10 p.m. Weekly through Feb. 13. Call 970-948-3963.

The Community Thursday Aspen Rotary Club Breakfast Meeting 7 - 8:30 a.m., Hines Room at Aspen Meadows, 845 Meadows Road, Aspen. The Aspen Rotary Club meets every Thursday morning for a speaker presentation and buffet breakfast. Membership is made through nomination and sponsorship by a current member, but the club welcomes guests to attend and learn more about Rotary, even without a clubmember invitation. Call 970-618-2219 for more information about membership.

Kevin Wright: “Spirit Bears” 7:30 - 9 p.m., Aspen Center for Environmental Studies, 100 Puppy Smith St. A free Naturalist Nights presentation. Wright made a trip to British Columbia to observe the spirit bear for four days with guide Marven Robinson, who explained the bear’s natural history and importance to the culture of the Gitga’at First Nation. This is a white phase of the black bear called kermodism. With only approximately 400 in the world, a proposed pipeline through the Great Bear Rain Forest could pose a serious threat to the bear. Wright is a district wildlife manager for Colorado Parks and Wildlife and has worked with the valley’s black bears via the Aspen black bear research project and countless human-black bear conflicts. Call 970-9633977. Sparks: After-School Class 4 - 5:30 p.m., Snowmass Chapel, 5307 Owl Creek Road, Snowmass Village. Sparks is a faith-formation class for youngsters in kindergarten through sixth grade. Each week, the class explores different topics, including powerful lessons and stories about the human spirit, what it means to walk in faith and how one can make a difference in the world. Snacks, games, crafts and fun included. Contact charla@snowmasschapel. org for more information. Everyone welcome. Call 970-300-1213. Senior Skiing 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Highlands, Snowmass and Aspen Mountain. Local and visiting seniors older than 60. Monday and Wednesday: Highlands. Thursday: Snowmass. Saturday: Aspen. Call 970-920-5432. Speaker Series: “Light & Fast Ski Mountaineering” 7 - 8:30 p.m., Ute Mountaineer, 210 S. Galena St., Aspen. Featuring Bryan Wickenhauser, a four-time U.S. Ski Mountaineering Team member and a two-time Elk Mountains Grand Traverse winner. Join him for a slide show and clinic on how to travel more efficiently through the mountains. Learn cutting-edge tips and tricks. Seating is limited. Call 970-925-2849. Hotel Jerome History Tour 1:30 p.m., 330 E. Main St., Aspen. The Hotel Jerome has been at the center of Aspen life since the doors opened in 1889, and it underwent an extensive remodeling in the fall of 2012. $15 per adult and $12 per senior; children 12 and younger are free. Offered by the Aspen Historical Society. Call 970-925-3721. Fermented Foods 101 5:30 - 8:30 p.m., ACES at Rock Bottom Ranch, 2001 Hooks Spur Road, Basalt. Did you know that you probably eat or drink a fermented food every day? Bread, yogurt and cheese are all common fermented foods. Learn the benefits and delicacies that fermented foods offer. At this hands-on class, participants make and take home a variety of fermented foods, such as yogurt, cheese, vegetables and kombucha, along with recipes and resources for continuing fermentation projects at home. Registration is $25 for members and $35 for nonmembers. Call 970-927-6769. Explore Mentoring With the Buddy Progran noon - 1 p.m., Aspen Volunteer Fire Department, 420 E. Hopkins Ave. Come discover what the Buddy Program is all about — having fun and making a difference. Adults who are interested in becoming a Big Buddy are invited to take a complimentary tour of the fire station and trucks, enjoy a free slice of pizza and learn more about the Buddy Program’s volunteer opportunities. RSVP to heather@buddyprogram.org. Call 970-920-2130. Friday “Aspen’s Past to Present” 1 - 2:30 p.m., downtown Aspen. Tour Aspen’s historic downtown, filled with indian legend, mining folklore and local tales. $20 per person. Reservations required; call or visit www. aspenwalkingtours.com. Call 970-948-4349. Baby sign-language class 10:30 - 11 a.m., Pitkin County Library, Aspen. You and your baby will learn how to communicate with and learn from each other using a variety of simple signs. Chelsea Bridges will teach this free, six-week course, through Feb. 22. For babies under 24 months and their caregivers. Take the whole course or individual classes. Sign up in the children’s room or call 970429-1900. Class size is limited.

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GE 27

LUCY

Gentle, friendly, affectionate, 3-year-old Pit Bull female found wandering the streets of LA. Hardest dog to photograph to show how sweet she is. Please visit her!

TARA

8-month-old Cattle Dog mix female. Adorable and super friendly. Loves everyone—kids and other dogs. She is full of exuberant puppy energy and very playful with balls, toys, etc. She is a great selfentertainer, too.

ALLIE

4-year-old gorgeous Lab/Pit Bull mix female. Such a sweet girl. Allie is happy, friendly, affectionate and energetic. Turned in because of housing.

CLYDE

Found wandering loose at the Maroon Bells. An adorable, happy, friendly, twoyear-old Chihuahua/ Dachshund mix.Gets along well with people + other dogs. A bit shy.

Lots of great cats. See dogsaspen.com

DERMA

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Large 7-year-old Gorgeous Siberian black/tan Sharpei/ Husky female, Rottweiler mix approximately 4 years old. Athletic, with lots female. Must be the only pet. Has of good energy, and guarding issues w/ affectionate with everyone. Would do toys and food. Needs best in a home with an an owner with the owner knowledgeable time and patience to work with her. about Huskies.This is a Loving once she gets very sweet dog! to know you!

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ICE

Gentle, soft-spoken, 13-year-old Husky 3-year-old Pit Bull mix female. Tall + mix. Gets along well gorgeous. Best with with people + other male dogs. Enjoys dogs. Shy with hikes. Great strangers, but bonds personality + very tightly with people sociable. Loves once she knows them. people. Has been at Has separation the shelter for a long anxiety, so she will do time but would best in a patient, really enjoy a loving knowledgeable home. home with her very own family.

TIMBER

Soft-spoken, sleek, friendly, 9-year old Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. She is a retired sled dog who deserves a comfortable, loving home.

970-925-3414

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WOODY

Handsome, friendly, three-year-old Pitbull mix male found wandering the streets of Aspen. We named him Woody. Doesn’t understand boundaries and becomes playfully aggressive. Requires a knowledgable adult home.

SARGE

7-year-old male Rottweiler. Friendly + sweet. Loves people. Perfect except for severe separation anxiety. Would do best in a home with constant companionship. Ask staff for info.

JACKIE

Beautiful, friendly, 11-yearold American Foxhound/Husky mix who gets along well with people and other dogs. Jackie is a retired sled dog who came to the shelter with her brothers.

SAM

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Outgoing, energetic, 11-yearold American Foxhound/Husky mix male. Gets along well with people and other dogs. A retired sled dog. So handsome!

CLEO

Strong, energetic, black/white 5-yearold female Boston Terrier mix with a splash of Pit Bull— larger than a typical Boston. Outgoing and very friendly. Loves people. Best as only pet.

Beautiful, friendly, soft-spoken 9-year-old Husky mix female. She is a retired sled dog looking for a loving home. Outgoing with people.

Aspen/Pitkin Animal Shelter

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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

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ALL FOR $125...OBO WHAT A DEAL! Call 970-456-2033 Rifle

Thousands of others have proven this by selling their vehicle in this section.

4 Sale

925-9937 • www.aspentimes.com/placead "VUPT

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$10,500 Chuck - 970-618-7393

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$9000 970-948-0480.

NEED WHEELS FOR WINTER TIRES?

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$18,939.00

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Can you fix just about anything? Advertise your handyman business in the Service Directory. Classifieds@ cmnm.org.

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Call Donna at 970-927-2015 for more information.

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RENTED!

LONG-TERM RENTAL ~ BEAUTIFUL SPOT! FURNISHED. VIEWS. 1.25 MILES OUT OF TOWN. 3-Stories & unobstructed views. 4BR, 4.5BA Pets ok. $8500

Charlie Hodge (443) 983-4557

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41


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$300/month. 970-250-2582.

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)JEF8IJMF:PV4FFL Need more people but, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want anyone to know your business is taking applications and resumes?

Place a confidential help wanted ad! Mid-Valley Biz Center TU'M4'BWBJM 4'(30443&/5 1SJWCBUI$BMM

Aviation

Hangar Space Available Rifle Airport 4UJMMMPPLJOHGPSMJHIU UXJO TNBMMKFUXJUI QPTTJCMFQBSUOFSTIJQ -POHUFSN FDPOPNJD MPDBMSBUFT $BMM GPSRVPUF

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Office 135 W. Main, Aspen $600/mo. Call 970-379-3715

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You receive a â&#x20AC;&#x153;blindâ&#x20AC;? e-mail address in your ad and an â&#x20AC;&#x153;apply onlineâ&#x20AC;? button that both forward to YOUR e-mail, yet keeps your company completely confidential.

This service free with your help wanted ad! Call 866-850-9937 or e-mail classifieds@cmnm.org to place your ad!

Aspen - $300,000

Aspen - $314,000

Aspen - $3,200,000

Basalt - $695,000

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Tory Thomas

Mary Ellen Sheridan

Peter Kelley

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Basalt / Willits - $429,000 -JHIUBCPVOETJOUIJTDPSOFS TRGU CE CB8JMMJUTUPXO IPNF'FBUVSJOHBCVOEBOUXJO EPXT TPBSJOHDFJMJOHT XPPE MBNJOBUFGMPPSJOH EFDLGBDJOH HSFFOCFMU TFQBSBUFPGGJDFOPPL LJUDIFOXJUIHSBOJUFDPVOUFS UPQTOFXhGSJEHF UPQGMPPS NBTUFSTVJUFXJUISPPNZCBUI MBSHFEJOJOHSPPNPGGFSTGMFYJCMF TQBDF(BSBHF GFODFEQBUJP DPWFSFEQPSDI MBVOESZSPPN /FXCPJMFSJOTUBMMFE

Sally Shiekman-Miller  TBMMZ!TBMMZTIJFLNBODPN www.AspenSnowmassSir.com

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Greg Didier

Commercial Aspen

Commercial Eagle - $80,000

Commercial Rifle

Want to own Eagle County? 0XOUIFPOMZMOBILE GSBODIJTF5VSO LFZCVTJOFTT(SFBUQPUFOUJBM.BLF ZPVSPXOIPVST"--FRVJQNFOUJOWFO UPSZJODMVEFT.FSDFEFT4QSJOUFS7BO 8JMMUSBJO

FOR LEASE  TGXBSFIPVTFJOMJHIUJOEVTUSJBM [POJOH"WBJMBCMFJNNFEJBUFMZMBSHF PWFSIFBEEPPSTGPSUSVDLBDDFTT'FODFE PVUTJEFTUPSBHF NP///'MFY MFBTFUFSNTZSNJO1VSDIBTFQPTTJCMF

Commercial Condos for Sale. 0OMZ5ISFF3FNBJOJOH*OUIFSFOPWBUFE $SBOEBMM#VJMEJOHCMPDLTGSPNUIF (POEPMBTG TUBOETUUP  TG$POUJHVPVT (SFBUWJFXT HSFBUMPDBUJPO

Bob Langley

  CPC!KPTIVBDPDPN

El Jebel - $425,000

Snowmass Village - $649,000 -PWFMZSFNPEFMFECE CB TRGUUPXOIPNFXJUI HSBOJUFDPVOUFSUPQTBOEHSFBU TUPSBHFJOUIFLJUDIFO IBSE XPPEGMPPST WBVMUFEDFJMJOHTBOE SPDLTVSSPVOEFEHBTGJSFQMBDFJO UIFMJWJOHSPPN TQBDJPVTNBTUFS CBUIXJUIUSBWFSUJOF JOVOJU XBTIFSESZFSBOEMBSHFTPVUI GBDJOHEFDL"GGPSEBCMF)0" GFFT POFEPHJTBMMPXFEGPSFJ UIFSPXOFSTPSSFOUFST

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 - 1-3 PM 387 Summit Drive $POUFNQPSBSZCFECBUIIPNF $VTUPN$BCJOFUSZ IBOEDSBGUFENFUBM TUBJSSBJMT$VTUPNUJMF UBTUFGVMMZSFNPE FMFELJUDIFOHSBOJUF/FXSPPG

Sally Shiekman-Miller  TBMMZ!TBMMZTIJFLNBODPN www.AspenSnowmassSIR.com

Marianne Ackerman 970-379-3546 Kathy Westley 970-379-8303 XXXQSPQFSUZTIPQJODDPN

42

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

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Fe b r u ar y 2 1 - 27 , 20 1 2

Ginny Cassano

 EBOUIFNPVOUBJONBO!DFOUVSZUFMOFU



Kari Meskin

 LMNFTLJO!HNBJMDPN

INDEPENDENT BROKER

Vail - $8,400,000

Your listing Westhaven Dr. -Cascade Village Building  4R'U#VJMEJOH4LJJOPVU"D DFTTUP$IBJS $BTDBEF7JMMBHF-JGU "44*(/"#-&&/5*5-&.&/54 4R 'UJODMVEFT$POEPhTDPNNFSDJBM

SUSAN BIRD

03 -)3&"-&45"5&"6$5*0/4$0. TVTBOCJSE!MFTMJFIJOENBODPN

in front of thousands each weekâ&#x20AC;Ś Aspen Times Weekly 970-925-9937

classifieds@aspentimes.com


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A S P E N T I M E S . C O M / W E E K LY

45


WORDPLAY

INTELLIGENT EXERCISE

by Catherine O’Connell on behalf of the Aspen Writers’ Foundation

BOOK REVIEW

NOTEWORTHY

Gone Girl Meet Nick Dunne, a former magazine writer whose job has fallen victim to the rise of the Internet. He has a big problem. It’s his fifth wedding anniversary and his wife, Amy, has disappeared. Their marriage has been somewhat turbulent since they left New York for his hometown on the Mississippi River, and it’s no secret that Amy has had trouble finding her place in the provincial setting. Now she’s gone, and it looks like he may have had something to do with her disappearance. Meet Amy Dunne. She loves Nick desperately. But despite her best efforts to be the perfect wife, something is lacking in their once torrid relationship, something she is trying desperately to regain. At least

by Patrick Berry

| edited by WILL SHORTZ

that’s what she’s written in her diary. As if her life hasn’t already been a big enough challenge trying to live up to an alter-ego named Amazing Amy, the main character of her parents’ best-selling children’s books. Meet the Elliots, Amy’s parents. The perfect married couple, they arrive on the scene to help in the search for their only child. They believe in Nick. After all, he has been a good husband to Amy. Or has he? Where was he the day Amy disappeared? Who cleaned up blood on the kitchen floor? And why does Nick have a second cell phone? Gillian Flynn writes with delicious prose as she draws us into the psychological thriller, incorporating

1

I HEARD YOU THE FIRST TIME

2

3

4

5

6

17

7

1 Wallop 6 Gray piece 10 Cricket club 13 Fair-minded 17 “Funeral Blues” writer 18 “Pity is for the living, ___ is for the dead”: Twain 19 Kaplan of “Welcome Back, Kotter” 20 Info from a debriefing 22 Somewhat redundant 1965 country song? 26 Journalist Couric 27 ___ Lang, Superboy’s love 28 1951 Cooperstown inductee 29 Increases, with “up” 30 Somewhat redundant Milton Bradley game? 35 Show featuring the L.V.P.D. 38 Oktoberfest collectibles 39 Cotillion attendee 40 Power in sci-fi 41 Kneeler’s offering 43 Ambient musician Brian 44 Org. that fines polluters 45 Chicken bred for its meat 49 Somewhat redundant size? 54 Roof projection 55 Constitutional 56 Bedtime preyer? 57 “Nick News” host Linda

46

60

Song featured in “Animal House” 61 Bakery array 62 Reacted to a bad call 63 Mr. Bill appeared on it: Abbr. 64 Somewhat redundant 1960s spy series? 69 Sound of heartbreak 72 Picks up 73 Cartoon beagle 74 Hit the roof 78 Like some passages in a symphony 80 Elton John nickname 81 Deli appliance 82 O’Neill’s “___ Christie” 83 Somewhat redundant literary genre? 88 Scrammed 91 Brief laugh 92 Flamboyant stole 93 Machiavellian concerns 94 John of Salisbury 95 Pink lady ingredient 96 “The things I put up with!” 99 Buff 100 Somewhat redundant theater production? 106 Glinda’s creator 107 Clock face number 108 Repo justification 109 Core philosophy 112 Extremely redundant 1963 caper film? 118 “Ta-da!” 119 Patron saint of

A S P E N T I M E S W E E K LY

F

120 121 122 123 124 125

sailors Cut and collect 128-character set Job title abbr. Cooper Union’s location, briefly Haute cuisine it’s not Chews (out)

DOWN

1 2 3

Not look perky, say Visibility reducer Skull session result 4 Comb row 5 Ancient Roman author Quintus ___ 6 In accordance with 7 Goalie’s jersey number, often 8 A Waugh 9 Human speech mimickers 10 Shearing shed sound 11 Swallow, as costs 12 Clearly low on patience 13 Peter Pan rival 14 Not as content 15 Percussive dance troupe 16 Musician’s rate 19 Will Geer’s role on “The Waltons” 21 Minus 23 Refined 24 Animal whose head doesn’t make a sound? 25 Common check box on surveys 31 MTV’s earliest viewers, mostly 32 & 33 Plastic shields and such

Fe b r u ar y 2 1 - 27 , 20 1 2

34 35 36

Equal: Prefix Tangy salad leaves Amendment guaranteeing a speedy trial 37 Part of the front matter 42 Mosaicist’s supply 44 South Dakota Air Force base 45 Not on deck, maybe 46 R&D sites 47 Unchanging 48 Walk while dizzy 50 Wimbledon champ Gibson 51 Shakes up 52 Very impressed 53 Crystal Cave is one 58 Common middle name 59 E Day debuts 61 Emergency 62 Captain who says “Well, gentlemen, between ourselves and home are 27,000 sea miles” 65 Fill up on 66 Perfume sampling spot 67 Roman calendar day 68 Overused 69 One way to go to a party 70 “What a calamity!” 71 Inclination 75 Big East sch. 76 Proust’s “À la Recherche du Temps ___” 77 Sweet meet? 79 Nabisco treats sold only seasonally 81 Hidden 84 Athens’s home

35

36

the recession and modern day turnof-speech into her story in a way both unique and intelligent. Weaving us seamlessly between present and past, she keeps us under her spell as we follow Amy and Nick’s twisted dance around each other. Years ago I was invited to sit on a panel with Gillian Flynn. After reading her dark portrayal of a self-abuser in her first book, Sharp Objects, I was surprised at how normal she was when I met her. But she clearly has a dark side. I don’t know what she’ll choose to write about next, but I’m already afraid.

9

10

11

37

31

49

39

55

40 45

52

69

70

71

78

65

83 89

101

102

85

86

103

118 122

1950s TV star Duncan 86 Do as expected 87 Old World deer 89 Body blow reaction 90 World capital situated in what was once ancient Thrace 95 How bad news is often received 96 Attests 97 “Music for the Royal Fireworks” composer 98 Open conflict 100 End note?

93

97

98

99

104

105

108

113

109

114

115

110

111

116

117

119

120

121

123

124

125

101 Nickname of jazz’s Earl Hines 102 Joins 103 Cheney’s follower 104 Slow on the uptake 105 “___ Body?” (first Lord Peter Wimsey novel) 110 Marine threat 111 Skinny 113 Satisfied 114 “Breaking Bad” network 115 Great Leap Forward overseer 116 BlackBerry buy 117 Slam

77

87

92 96

107

112

75

81

91 95

106

85

84

90

94 100

74

80

82

76

63 68

73

79

48

59

67

72

88

58

62

66

47

54

57

61 64

46

53

56

60

21

34

44 51

16

29

33

43

15

25

32

50

14

28

38 42

13 20

24 27

41

12

19

23

30

ACROSS

8

18

22 26

‘Gone Girl’ Gillian Flynn 432 pages Crown Publishing Group, 2012

­— Last week’s puzzle answers — S P A R T A

T O U P E E S

A L M O N D S

S E T A T

S P L A S H

K A F F E E K L A T S C H

O B A M A

L E M U R S

R E P O T A C E D I T C A I N S H E

T S I L P E R N I R U P G R E E M I S S I N P U I N N E D A S H I E A V M I N E I T Y T B E R E M E N L A B E S U P D U K E A R E D

S E C R E T

A R K I N

L I E V

A L L E Y T W R E A P O L Y O D E L E X T O H E V O R E N G R E E E E R Y I M S S A S T R E A K I N O R T N E A

R E A L P O L I T I K R E D D O T

B A R T O V E R A E R I D U B S O N I N T M R E B E R A L S O R I P T R E Z A D K R R E S P I R U L E L I G L E M E R G A N T I E N

A B S V I E W A L L Y D E E D U C T E N T H E G R S O L R B I C O L A U M A N P A T A O N E L A C L E H O D D A W G A O R I R T E N L I N G A C T


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