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PERFORMING Artist Profiles: Lindsay Holler and Hazel Ketchum

SEWE, page 36

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Transformation Through Installation: Hirona and Riki Matsuda

V I S UA L Artist Profiles: Chamber Austelle Herb Parker Matt Wilson Collectors Feature: Bright & Allison Williamson Southeastern Wildlife Expo

Moving On/Up: Redux Relocates

Front and Center: The Best Productions Coming to Charleston

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WELCOME

The Wild Life. Sometimes this time of year really does feel like the Wild Life. Winter is typically a quieter time of introspection and growth, but the calendar is just as packed as ever with tons of events that keep us running from one thing to the next. Growth, however, is one major theme that showed itself throughout many of the articles. The addition of new contemporary gallery, Beresford Studios, and their aim to cultivate exciting young contemporary artists like Chambers Austelle, for one. The way that Bright and Allison Williamson grow their personal collection by purchasing artwork that relates to special moments or fun trips taken as a family, for another. The rising food trend centered on collecting edibles grown in the wild is a passion shared by many, with a fringe benefit that it necessitates a lot of time spent in nature. Growth is most obviously exemplified by the impending move of Redux Contemporary Art Center, a mainstay hub for Charleston’s contemporary art scene and working artists, into a much bigger home, farther up the peninsula. Growth is undeniable and with that comes consequences, both known and unknown. But everywhere we look, positive changes seem to be happening in the Lowcountry, and for that we applaud our community members 10 | thear tmag.com

who are the force behind that growth. It’s a wild world we live in, but life is undeniably great here in the Lowcountry. Here’s to a season of growth for us all, Best,

Stacy Huggins Geist Editor


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FabulonArt.com | 843-566-3383||| Susan@FabulonArt.com

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Chambers Austelle BIRDCAGE by Matt Dobie

chambersaustelle.com

his past summer, while teaching at Redux’s Kids Camps, artist Chambers Austelle was inspired by her young students to bring a new attitude to her personal practice. “I’m just going to go in like these children, and I’m going to make sure that I’m exploring and playing and having fun,” she says.

the work develop and flow, it was kind of easier starting with completely different materials,” says Austelle.

The imagery is both beautiful and haunting. “It can’t be just pretty,” says Austelle. “There has to be something a little off about it.”

And her concept still centers on society’s view of women and their relation to beauty. But unlike her previous work, inspired by fashion photography and the plight of the modern woman, there is a historical context. “I started thinking of it as a progression,” says Austelle. “After the war, there was the baby boomer period, and it was like it was a woman’s position to be in the home. Our culture has developed and obviously things have changed, but so much of that mindset and culture is still seen and expected in our everyday life and world.”

It’s not a departure from Austelle’s previous work, rather more of an evolution. She still uses vibrant colors and female subjects, but, for the first time in her professional career, she employs the use of chalk pastels and wax pastels in concert with her old standby, acrylic paint. “Giving myself the time to let

And so Austelle’s portraits could ostensibly be that of a 1950s housewife or that of a modern woman. This duality made all the more interesting by the revival of midcentury home décor. “Using this furniture in my works, people won’t be like, ‘oh that’s 1950s,’ because it’s so popular today

The result is her new body of work Birdcage, a collection of mixed media works in the vein of classic portraiture featuring women isolated in their home environs surrounded by their mid-century furniture and stylish house plants.

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“ It can’t be just pretty; there has to be something a little off about it.”

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as well. Which really parallels the message I’m trying to convey.” Birdcage will be the inaugural exhibition at Charleston’s newest contemporary art gallery, Beresford Studios, and the freedom given by gallery curator, Neal Rice, affords Austelle the opportunity to create her own world within the 400 square foot space. “This is an issue that so many people are living with constantly,” she says. “So let’s not just have it be this work on the wall. Let’s do an installation. Let’s really have this idea come to life.”

Upcoming Exhibition Birdcage FEBRUARY 10 – 26, 2017 Opening reception: FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10TH | 6PM Beresford Studios 20 Fulton Street, Charleston beresfordstudios.com

The installation aspect isn’t a separate piece of art; it’s the environment as a whole. It’s the midcentury pink couches (passed down from Austelle’s grandmother), it’s the fashionable houseplants, the oldies streaming out of the speakers, even the vintage mirror perfectly positioned so that, “If you’re sitting on the couch, you see yourself literally being one of the paintings.” Austelle’s stunning works of art not only delight the eyes and cause pause for deeper concentration, they also promote a dialogue that’s as important today as it was 60 years ago. AM

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Patricia R. Huff artist pastels & oils

Todd & Huff Art Center, Bohicket Marina Johns Island, SC patricia-huff.pixels.com | toddhuffcenter.com

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Herb Parker’s ENVIRONMENTAL SANCTUARIES by Matt Dobie

herbparker.us

he structure sits in a clearing surrounded by an island forest. It’s rectangular—24 ½ deep, 40 feet long, and 11 feet tall—with walls of woven saplings and a roof of thatched eelgrass. There are two entryways in opposite corners, and once inside, you follow a labyrinth around one

corner, then another, and then another, until you find yourself in a small sanctuary with six seats around a wooden table and an open skylight letting sunshine flood the room. No, you’re not in a J.R.R Tolkien novel or some trippy art film; you’re inside the latest work of nature-based sculpture artist Herb Parker. Parker has been a professor at the College of Charleston since 1991, but his particular brand of art has always kept him traveling—the previously described Laeso Labyrinth was constructed on Laeso Island, Denmark this past summer. Opportunities for his large-scale work have always been more prevalent abroad, primarily in Europe and Asia. But Parker isn’t bitter in the least about the lack of a comparable demand in Charleston. “In a way, I’ve always found that it’s best not to get too involved in a local way because you get complacent,” says Parker. “You get your work out and seen by a few people locally, but when you don’t have that, it forces you to reach out.” Nature has always been a fixture in Parker’s work, but it has evolved dramatically over the years. “They’re always

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architectonic,” says Parker. “And for many years, the initial idea was just to create a sanctuary. Like a quiet, contemplative space in the landscape. And then the idea of getting to it became important so it had more of a passage to it, a corridor of sod or earth, or some way of being involved in the environment to get to the sanctuary.” Hence the labyrinth—a conceptual idea mirroring the journey of inward exploration—the first of which Parker constructed at Charleston’s Waterfront Park for the 2004 Piccolo Spoleto Festival.

But prior to that, the idea of communication had become prominent in Parker’s work. In Japan in 2001, he designed a structure based on ancient Japanese pit houses comprised of two tower-like pods connected by a large gateway that was built at the base of one of the largest waterfalls in the region. “And it was loud,” says Parker. “So you had to yell to talk to people nearby.” As the structure was nearing completion, Parker stepped inside and, though he had his expectations, he was still surprised by WINTER 2017 | 21


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“For many years, the initial idea was just to create a sanctuary. Like a quiet, contemplative space in the landscape.”

the results. “[There was] a stone seat inside of each tower,” says Parker. “And they’re probably 15 feet apart. But inside you could talk in a whisper across it, and outside you had to yell to hear anybody. So that whole idea of a place of communication became very important.” That’s why every labyrinth since has at least two seats at the center, why in some cases he’s utilized the physics of sound to design his sculptures, like the Whispering Caves in Columbus, Ohio, and the Akerby Dialogue in Bergslagen, Sweden. Says Parker, “The whole idea became creating from the environment primitive structures, 22 | thear tmag.com

but giving people a place to sit down and reflect or discuss.” Parker may have his overarching concepts, but his artistic instincts have allowed his work to continue to evolve and morph, an aspect that is essential to him. “Thirty years of doing this,” says Parker, “and every one is different, which is kind of what makes it exciting. You don’t know exactly what you’re going to do and how it’s going to end up. Each time, each piece almost grows the next piece from it. And I’m always excited about what’s coming up next.” AM


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C O L L E C TO R S F E AT U R E

BRIGHT & ALLISON WILLIAMSON Bright, Allison, Ben, Henry, and Chief the Australian Labradoodle By Stacy Huggins Geist | Photography by Karson Photography

“I

’ ve always, since I was a little girl, been attracted to art.” As a child, Allison Williamson would always find a special object to collect from family trips…a piece of art, a special rock, a shell from the beach, and her children now do the same. “Sharks teeth!” one of the boys chimes in. “I started collecting things like that.” Her love for art spurred her to purchase a piece of art from any travels. “It 24 | thear tmag.com

doesn’t have to be expensive; you can buy a little memento off the street.” PRESERVING MEMORIES THROUGH ART “One of my favorite pieces of art is from a trip to New Orleans, and I was determined to find a picture of some jazz musicians. The paint was wet, it was somebody on


the street that was doing this, and he had four of them. I wish I’d bought all four.” The scene was painted from a performance at Preservation Jazz Hall the night before; Allison and Bright had actually been at the show and seen those same musicians. “Finding a piece of art, connecting with an artist, or finding a story — or when you travel, that will bring up a memory or connection with that point in your life — that’s what I like to surround myself with.”

“Finding a piece of art, connecting with an artist, or finding a story — or when you travel, that will bring up a memory or connection with that point in your life — that’s what I like to surround myself with.”

“This is where we actually got engaged, the actual spot at the old Pitt Street Bridge.” Allison’s mother-in-law was taking a painting class with local artist Leslie PrattThomas when she saw this painting in the final stages. “She said, ‘Oh my gosh, I have to buy that. That’s where my son just proposed!’ It’s exactly like what it looked like; the sky was orange.” Opposite that special painting is a large photograph by Andrew Cebulka. Taken from a bird’s eye view, the Williamson boys are lying in the surf as a wave rushes

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in around them. The image is relatively simple, but the saturated colors and the humor of the moment are striking. “I like blending old and new, photography and painting,” says Allison. There’s a large, stunning abstract by local artist Brian Coleman that hangs prominently in the dining room that is extra special to Allison. “I loved this piece in particular and I kept looking at it. Then the Emanuel shooting happened, and he donated this to the auction at Charleston Place. I walked in and I was like ‘Oh my gosh, that’s the painting I’ve been looking at, I’m bidding on it!’ It has this double special meaning, because the money went towards [Mother Emanuel Fund] and then he wrote a sweet email about why he donated this painting.” Coleman’s grandmother passing had compelled him to donate that particular painting. The work is certainly one of Coleman’s strongest, and it simply shines against the sea of grey wall above the fireplace. FINDING YOUR FIRST LOVE Allison ran a Russian ar t gallery in Park City, Utah for five years, where she became fascinated with Russian Impressionist art, and it allowed her to build a large collection of ar twork. Slava Roubanov is another Russian artist whose work Allison fell in love with. His work is all over their home. “I love his work. There’s always something emotional or dramatic in them,” she says. “Impressionism was the first art trend that I fell in love with. I did some classes with Parsons School of Design in Paris. We visited all the art museums and learned about the masters, and focused on the 26 | thear tmag.com


Impressionist era, so that’s why I was really drawn [to Impressionism].” Allison worked as a curator for the Don ZanFagna collection to help uncover his incredible catalogue of artwork. Decades of ZanFagna’s work had been packed away from sight. After the work was properly unearthed and catalogued, three museum

shows were organized. She became quite close with the family through the process, which made ZanFagna’s paintings and drawings in her own collection even more special to her. In 2010, Allison created the Charleston Artist Collective, an online gallery of local artists who create new works based on a theme WINTER 2017 | 27


Visual each month with a percentage of sales being donated to a local charity. “It’s a very diverse group of artists. I wanted to have some representational artists, some abstract, Squeakie’s a Folk artist. Some of the artists find me, some I find, to round out the group that we have,” she says. Giving individual attention to each of her Collective artists is very important to her. The entire Collective meets quarterly to discuss themes, charities, and shows, but Allison’s home is a revolving door; “The artists have been coming in here daily for six years!” Since our interview, Allison has opened a new brick-and-mortar space in the Old Village of Mt. Pleasant and launched Capitol Artist Collective in Washington, DC. The local artists and local giving focus of the Collective model have attracted new artists and directors from the offspring cities. It’s grown from a part-time gig into a four-city, full-time endeavor, and the artist roster only continues to improve. EMBRACING CHANGE “This wall is always evolving; we constantly change it.” This rotating gallery wall is filled with Charleston Artist Collective work, treated with an emphasis on approachability. Allison utilizes a wide variety of frames and styles of artwork that makes the wall dynamic, with depth and dimension, energy and balance. The eye constantly moves from painting to painting. “These don’t even have frames; they have Velcro 28 | thear tmag.com


Featured Gallery Wall Artists: Dee Schenck Rhodes, Slava Roubanov, Emily Brown, Squeakie, Susie Callahan, Way Way Allen, Cindy DeAntonio, Anne Darby Parker, Ann Keane, Shannon Wood, Emily Brown, Lynne Hamontree

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“ I turned around while we were having that meeting, and there was a Frida on the easel…I don’t think I’ve ever fallen in love with something so fast!”

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A clerestory of windows brings in loads of light to the central rooms of the house, bouncing off the color and lending an airy, bright feeling to it all. “When we bought it, the kitchen was right in the middle of the house. There was this little door into this dark room over there. The fireplace was double-sided, but brick. We just opened it all up; we wanted to make it a real family house. From the kitchen sink I can see the boys’ room; it’s a real open floor plan. Every room is lived in,” Allison says.

by Molly B. Right. It sparkles and changes throughout the day as the light changes. “I was in [Molly B. Right’s] studio with some clients who commissioned her to create a Salvador Dalí. I turned around while we were having that meeting, and there was a Frida on the easel…I don’t think I’ve ever fallen in love with something so fast!” After seven months of searching for the right image to commission Right, Allison finally decided on this particular image of Frida Kahlo against green wallpaper adorned with flowers. As fate would have it, Right was already working on a new Frida based that exact image, and it was just a week away from completion. “So I knew it was meant to be,” she says.

In the entryway lives a stunning, largescale bottle cap painting of Frida Kahlo

“We have a lot of African pieces mixed in… they’re true works of art to me.” Old African

strips!” On closer inspection, Allison has indeed used Velcro to hang several of the unframed painted panels.

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Visual wedding boxes, bracelets, belts, chokers, and sculptures are blended in among the contemporary objects underneath the bottle cap Frida and throughout the house. Before he was born, Bright’s parents lived in Africa, where his father worked as a doctor. Allison has gathered objects old and new, from the family, from their travels, and expertly layered them throughout their

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home. Bold patterns and bright colors are cleverly contrasted with neutral objects to give balance to the space. Allison and Bright’s twin 10-year-old sons are boys, through and through. Their room is filled with their own collections of small artifacts, just like their mother used to collect as a child. The boys have attended


camp at Huck Finn School in Mt. Pleasant, where they learn to make all sorts of things with their hands. Their log cabins, tomahawks, and miniature pinball machines fill the room. It is perhaps their philosophy to collecting artwork that makes the Williamson’s home so inviting and engaging: choose images and objects that have special meaning and surround yourself with them. Each one will bring you back to a memory, and serve as celebration of the special moments and the ones you love. AM

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image by Charleston City Paper

Matt Wilson’s FOUND OBJECTS by Amy Stockwell Mercer

airtightartwork.com

att Wilson’s workshop is filled with clutter and chaos. A large, waist-high table is littered with hammers, an old fan, and a toolbox. There are piles of old spoons, forks, and knives. Wilson is always on the lookout for “found objects;” he rummages junk shops and going-out-of-business hardware stores to add to his vast collection. Where one person sees a jumble of junk, he sees the beak of a Red-Tailed Hawk or the leg of a lobster. “It’s

taken me years to collect all my materials, and I’m continuously developing my skills to work with these materials. I spent most of my life as an artist working in 2-D, drawing and painting. When I moved here eight years ago (to work as Resident Artist at

See Wilson’s creations for yourself at SEWE 2017 or check his website: airtightartwork.com

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“I definitely think artists can bring awareness to the way people think and feel about the environment.”

Detyens Shipyard), I wanted to try a different medium, metal sculpture, and learned how to weld.” Welding is loud, hot, and physically demanding work. Wilson wears a mask to protect his face from the flames that transform utensils into a delicate bird, or dental tools into a crawfish. His sculptures are playful and unique. Many of the birds and fish are small enough to hold in your hands, and all reflect the natural environment. “I definitely think artists can bring awareness to the way people think and feel about the environment, in hopes of bringing forth proactive discussion and change.” AM

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FEBRUARY 16-19, 2017 sewe.com

SOUTHEASTERN WILDLIFE EXPOSITION Celebrates 35 Years by Stacy Huggins Geist

FIRST AND FOREMOST, THE SOUTHEASTERN WILDLIFE EXPOSITION IS A GATHERING OF THE PREMIERE WILDLIFE ARTISTS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO CELEBRATE THE SPORTING LIFESTYLE AND CONNECT WITH ENTHUSIASTIC PATRONS. The rest of the expo is just gravy dressed in duck boots and Barbour jackets. It’s a fascinating mashup of art and the natural world, with hunting and sporting thrown in the mix. Creating a work of art from memory is a gift that only comes with tremendous amounts of study and practice. Featured Artist Ezra Tucker has that special ability, and with it he creates some of the finest wildlife art around. However, Tucker’s work bears more of a resemblance to intimate portraiture than traditional wildlife art by 36 | thear tmag.com

ABOVE: Above the Peaks by featured artists Ezra Tucker, FACING PAGE TOP: Crowned Cranes by Ezra Tucker, FACING PAGE BOTTOM: Above Rocky Lake by Guest Artist, Sculptor Richard Loffler


removing all distractions of setting and imbuing his subjects with personality. Guest artist Richard Loffler is a sculptor from Saskatchewan, and Van Marshall is a carver from nearby Summerville, SC. Loffler creates his breathtaking bronzes with such stunning detail thanks to a close relationship with his local natural history museum. Marshall’s interest in birds was encouraged from an early age thanks to a copy of Audubon’s The Birds of America. It is not surprising that an appreciation for the natural world engenders such gifted representations through their artwork. The Belmond Charleston Place Hotel will be filled with dozens more fine artists from across the country. Renovations of the hotel’s grand ballroom will be finished just in time for the expo, and the exhibition hall is also getting a major facelift this year. Expect the 35th celebration of the expo to be a truly elevated experience. SEWE patrons can dive deeper into the expo through the VIP program and gain unparalleled access to exclusive opportunities while providing meaningful support to the artists. Patrons can attend the black tie gala or the boots-and-jeans

style soiree, enjoy VIP lounges, priority seating, and early access to all events. For just $150 more, you can host a visiting artist during their stay in Charleston. Suffice to say, it’s the best way to explore the world of SEWE from the inside out.

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FOR THE OUTDOORSY FOLKS • DockDogs, cast net, and fly fishing demos at Brittlebank Park • Birds of prey and retriever demos at Marion Square • Audubon the Film and Jeff Corwin at the Gaillard Center FOR THE FOODIES • Chef demos at Marion Square • Fair-style food court at Brittlebank Park • SEWE Soiree—a massive oyster roast and barbecue with live music held at the Bus Shed AM

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pegasus4@comcast.net www.peggyeverett.com

SEWE

Feb 17-19, 2017

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PAINTING A NATION: HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL LANDSC APES

GIBBES MUSEUM OF ART Through April 23, 2017

FROM THE HIGDON COLLECTION By Amy Stockwell Mercer

PAINTING A NATION: HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL LANDSCAPES AT THE GIBBES MUSEUM OF ART IS A TIMELY EXHIBITION THAT WILL AROUSE FEELINGS OF NATIONAL PRIDE IN VIEWERS. The Higdon Collection includes 23 stunning works of art from the mid 19th century. Artists like Jasper Francis Cropsey whose Autumn Afternoon, Greenwood Lake exemplifies the intention of Hudson River artists to showcase the dramatic beauty of nature. During this time, artists were building a national identity through romantic and dramatic depictions of the country’s unspoiled wilderness. In later years, Hudson River artists began to look west and these works reflect the great expansion of 40 | thear tmag.com

the country. Albert Bierstadt’s view of the Cathedral Rocks: A View of Yosemite demonstrates this broadening vista for many artists, and the embrace of natural world as a source of inspiration. The Hudson River School was coined to identify a group of landscape artists living in New York City, several of whom built homes on the Hudson River. This was the first native art school in America, and artists were looking to create their own national identity separate from European painting. In her essay “From Sea to Shining Sea: Inventing a National Narrative,” Dr. Linda S. Ferber of the New York Historical Society writes, “Many Hudson River School paintings invoke the seasons, just as many others allude to times of day. Nature’s cycles and seasons are important tools of


landscape narratives as carriers of poetic, religious, and even national significance. The brilliant fall colors of North America’s untouched deciduous forests were also imbued with patriotic significance.”

Ann and Lee Higdon grew up in New York and purchased a 19th century home overlooking the Hudson River in the 1980s. They moved to Charleston in 2001 when Lee Higdon began his tenure as President of

Often these artists were inspired by stories of

LEFT: Autumn Afternoon, Greenwood Lake,

1873, by Jasper Francis Cropsey (American, 1823–1900); oil on canvas; 11 x 19 ½ inches; Courtesy of the Higdon Collection

ABOVE: Lake George, 1857, by John W. Casilear (American, 1811–1893); oil on canvas; 20 x 30 inches RIGHT: Cathedral Rocks, A View of Yosemite, ca. 1872, by Albert Bierstadt (American, 1830– 1902); oil on paper mounted on canvas; 19 x 13 ¾ inches; Courtesy of the Higdon Collection

exploration, and Sunrise at Grand Manan by William Hart illustrates the dramatic beauty of New Brunswick, Canada’s coastline.The crashing sea is framed by a rocky shoreline as the sun rises over the ocean with its golden hues drawing the viewer’s eye deep into the setting.The viewer is alone and enveloped by the beauty of nature. Equally lovely but quieter examples of nature’s beauty are seen in several paintings of Lake George such as Autumn Mist, Lake George, NY, by Alfred T. Bricher and Lake George, by John W. Casilear.

the College of Charleston. Their collection is the result of comprehensive research and a lifelong passion. Gibbes Museum Curator of Exhibitions Pam Wall says, “We have a strong collection of early American landscapes by artists such as Thomas Coran and Charles Fraser, and the Higdon Collection enhances the American landscape story with these works from the 19th century.” AM

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Visual hironamatsuda.com @rikimats

T R A NS FO R M AT I O N T H ROU G H I NSTA LLAT I O N : HIRON A & RI KI MATS UDA Interviewed by Stacy Huggins Geist

Local artists and sisters Hirona and Riki Matsuda have been tapped to create an entire world for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s fifth annual Groundhog Day benefit concert at the Charleston Music Hall on January 13. As a visual arts-based institution, it seems fitting to have the visual arts represented equally in this showcase of inspiring performing artists. We love their individual artistry and were immediately intrigued at the idea of their collaboration on such a large scale. HOW DID THIS PROJECT COME ABOUT? WHO APPROACHED WHOM? Mark Sloan from the Halsey reached out to us because of our involvement with Charleston Music Hall’s set designs in the past. Riki has also done some installation work at the Halsey over the years and really likes the team there. HAVE YOU TWO COLLABORATED ON SOMETHING THIS BIG BEFORE?  Yes - we’ve worked on quite a few large installations and exhibitions together. One of our favorites was when we worked with BACE League of Charleston for the set for Brave Baby’s album release. We suspended a 30-foot moon from the rafters of the stage and used the surface of the moon as a projection screen.  42 | thear tmag.com


AS SISTERS AND COLLEAGUES, WHAT KIND OF INFLUENCES DO EACH OF YOU ABSORB FROM THE OTHER?  Well, being that we grew up together, our ideas and aesthetics stem from the same place.  Those similarities combined with our high mutual respect for one another’s work, make for a pretty ideal collaborative team.  Our individual work is definitely different, and that lets us bounce ideas back and forth to get to the core of a project.  So when we start to collaborate, there is a nice flow and unspoken direction toward the finished project. CAN YOU TELL ME A LITTLE ABOUT YOUR WORKING CONCEPT FOR THIS INSTALLATION? During our planning for the project we found that thinking about exhibits we’d seen and what elements captivated our attention was the best way to approach the set for Groundhog Day. Without giving away too much, we decided that lighting, repetition, and motion will be key elements on the stage.  YOU BOTH USUALLY WORK ON A SMALLER, MORE DELICATE SCALE. HOW DO YOU ENVISION TACKLING THE CHALLENGE OF SUCH A LARGE SPACE? We collaborate as often as possible and work in scales that range from miniature to grand.  What we’ve found through adapting size and subject is that delicacy isn’t bound by scale; rather it’s about how you approach the subject.  Sometimes working larger actually makes it easier to get the desired effect. AM

Upcoming Exhibition Groundhog Day V benefit concert JANUARY 13, 2017 | 8PM Charleston Music Hall 37 John Street | charlestonmusichall.com WINTER 2017 | 43


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MOVING ON/UP: AFTER 14 YEARS, REDUX RELOCATES TO THE UPPER PENINSULA By Stacy Huggins Geist

Redux Contemporary Art Center is moving to 1056 King Street in early 2017; the exact date is dependent on construction progress, projected for March 2017. For more info, visit reduxstudios.org or call 843.722.0697.

Charleston has always attracted artists of all disciplines, for both its stunning natural beauty and its cosmopolitan qualities. One can enjoy all the benefits of culture and city life set in the slower pace of the South, with beach weather nine months of the year. Factor in the city’s overall prosperity and enthusiasm for the arts and it’s easy to see why so many aspiring and established artists make Charleston home. With the explosion of national and international attention that Charleston has received in the last 10 years, space is at a premium, and the market is ultracompetitive. Property owners can extract exorbitant rates that non-profits and artists can barely keep pace with, as development and gentrification are transforming neighborhoods practically overnight. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION With all that in mind, and an eye toward the future, Redux’s Board of Trustees has been diligently searching for the

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organization’s next home for more than five years. The new home has finally been found, and construction was well underway at the time of publication. After 14 years on St. Philip Street, Redux is moving on and moving up the peninsula to 1056 King Street. Chairman of the Board Francis Ervin has been instrumental in leading the search for Redux’s new home. “1056 is the right decision for us because it allows Redux to continue its mission downtown. The location allows us to expand our outreach programs with the Dee Norton Lowcountry Center for Children and [ John L. Dart] Library across the street, and to be a vibrant cultural center for arts in the expanding Upper King community,” says Ervin.

“The location allows us to expand our outreach programs with the Dee Norton Lowcountry Center for Children and [ John L. Dart] Library across the street, and to be a vibrant cultural center for arts in the expanding Upper King community.” — Francis Ervin

TAKING THE LONG VIEW “What stood out the most about this space was the blank slate it offered to allow us to design our new home to our own specifications. We had been searching for a location that was large enough to allow Redux to expand its studios, classes, and exhibition space. At 15,000 square feet, this space more than doubles our current location and will allow Redux to sustain its mission for years to come,” Ervin continues. “We have committed to a 10-year lease with options to renew. Our developer, Boneworks Property Management, believes in our mission and understands what Redux brings, not only to its development, but also the community. We believe 1056 King will be Redux’s home for the next 14 years plus.” 

FROM THE ARTISTS’ PERSPECTIVE Studio artist Stephen Elliott Webb believes that “One of the many advantages of our new home will be an increased camaraderie among the artists. I already see this happening as the excitement builds toward the move. The artistic potential of more than 40 artists working together could be astounding!” AM

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MARCH 1 – 5, 2017 charlestonwineandfood.com #CHSWFF

C H A R L E S TO N WINE + FOOD F E S T I VA L

TO REALLY LEARN ABOUT A PLACE, YOU HAVE TO LOOK AT THE FOOD CULTURE. NOT THE TRENDY NEW RESTAURANT, BUT THE GROWERS, THE PURVEYORS, THE ONES WHO ACTUALLY MAKE THE FOOD THAT WILL END UP ON YOUR PLATE.

46 | thear tmag.com

photo by Andrew Cebulka

by Stacy Huggins Geist


Andrew Cebulka

Back in November, the festival honored some of the Lowcountry’s premier farmers and growers with a tribute dinner that raised funds for Lowcountry Local First’s Growing New Farmers Program. A beautiful short video produced by local media company Hed Hi Media was debuted, featuring 2013 graduate Stephen Wilson, set against the backdrop of the LLF Dirt Works incubator farm on nearby Johns Island. Wilson eloquently spoke to the program’s impact on his life, and the very real gap that could exist if more young people don’t get into farming.

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As the festival continues to grow year after year, it’s comforting to know there are some things that you can bet on. The Culinary Village in Marion Square is the epicenter of the festival action. The Opening Night: Rooted in Charleston kick-off bash will return to Marion Square this year to celebrate the best and brightest chefs and distinctive foodways of Charleston. Our favorite ‘good buy’ ticket is the Locals’ Sunday Culinary Village, where Charleston residents can get a great discount on admission to sample everything the Culinary Village has to offer for five long hours. You can hustle around

Andrew Cebulka

Charleston Wine + Food Festival will bring culinary stars from across the country together, but this year the producers will join their counterparts in the kitchen and the spotlight.


the tasting tents and artisan market, watch cooking demos, and chat with chefs; then grab a brew from the biergarten and enjoy live music in a more relaxed setting.

Frank Stitt and Kevin Johnson, and include lessons in foraging from the sea experts Mark and Kerry Marhefka of Abundant Seafood, to name a few of the participating experts. Foraging: What’s All the Buzz

Pinot NV! (sponsored by Art Mag) is without a doubt one of our favorite events of the festival. Every great bottle of Pinot around will be represented at the gorgeous William Aiken House, which is ultra-conveniently located on King Street, just a few blocks from the Culinary Village.

Andrew Cebulka

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Andrew Cebulka

Group excursions like Hams + Half Shells will educate guests about heritage hog breeds and why they matter. Caught on Capers will bring guests together for a special lunch on Capers Island with renowned chefs

Maria Rodriguez

Splurge on tickets for A Few of My Favorite Things: Champagne + Caviar with Ruinart, the oldest Champagne house in the world, or Diamonds of the Kitchen: Truffles and the House of Krug dinner at Circa 1886 to indulge in the most decadent culinary luxuries available.

Karson Photography

Fresh Future Farm Lunch is a family-style, four-course luncheon with wine pairings that will educate patrons on the urban farm’s mission to bring quality produce to the food desert of North Charleston.


Andrew Cebulka

Other events to engage your creative side: Pecha Kucha + Wine + Food features food trucks and short presentations from culinary leaders; Nassau Street Sideshow will turn Lewis Barbecue into a carnival; What the Pho? features Asian dishes in a late-night experience; and Namaste Bubbly provides a more active alternative to Sunday brunch. Toasted wraps up the entire festival with the BBQ to end all BBQs on Sunday afternoon at the Cigar Factory. Make sure to check out the offerings from Fox Bros. BBQ in Atlanta and Rodney Scott of Hemingway, SC, the

Join Art Mag at Pinot NV Saturday, March 4

Karson Photography

explores the growing trend of foraging and creates a space where enthusiasts can learn from the experts, complemented by a stellar lunch with Chef Ben Berryhill.

latter of whom will be opening a Charleston location soon. Whatever your preference—highbrow to down home—there are plenty of events to choose from at the Charleston Wine + Food Festival. The festival organizers have done a stellar job of creating engaging experiences that combine education and indulgence, and make the festival more relevant than ever through the exploration of our food culture.

AM

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CULINARY

ARTIST P ROF I L E

Chef Matt Canter of Park Café by Stacy Huggins Geist

730 Rutledge Ave, Charleston 843.410.1070 theparkcafechs.com

uilding a successful restaurant in a city full of glittering jewels requires a perfect storm of talent and gumption. When The Park Café’s owner-operator Xan McLaughlin tapped his former colleague Chef Matt Canter to step up to the role of executive chef, they managed to create that secret recipe to success, and it shows at every turn.

Charleston to work at The Ocean Room on Kiawah Island. Since then he’s also worked at Charleston Grill and FIG, and taught at the Art Institute of Charleston. As he created the dinner menu, Canter wanted to make it “more approachable for the regular clientele, as well as interesting

Chef Canter began working in restaurants as a teenager: “I needed a job because I wanted to buy a Jeep,” he says. And not just any Jeep; he wanted a 1977 CJ-7 with a 302 V-8. He had to get special permission for the school bus to let him off at the sports bar where he washed dishes to save money for his dream Jeep. From that young age, he knew that he wanted to be a chef and went straight to New York to study at the Culinary Institute of America just three weeks after he graduated high school. After culinary school, he worked at RitzCarlton resorts in Florida before moving to 50 | thear tmag.com

to people who wanted to venture outside the tourist area.” Approachable, interesting, thoughtful, creative, and unpretentious are culinary values that resonate with Canter.


Canter wanted to make Park Café

“ more approachable for the regular clientele, as well as interesting to people who wanted to venture outside the tourist area.”

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culinary is it or else’…working at the Art Institute broke me of that; helped me develop a sense of talking to people and making sure people are receiving the proper criticism when necessary and also receiving the proper praise. The latter obviously overwhelming the former, in my opinion.”

“I just like making food that’s soulful” “I just like making food that’s soulful,” he says. During the cold, short days of winter, Canter features dishes that are deep in flavor like short ribs or coq au vin. He elevates the flavors through premium ingredients, to create plates that feel comforting and familiar. Canter’s time teaching has given him a great perspective on how to lead in the kitchen. “Teaching definitely broke me of some things I had picked up in the past from previous chefs, about leadership, about nurturing, about teaching, about coaching. In the past, I’ve seen chefs lay the book down say ‘this 52 | thear tmag.com

Developing his staff into strong culinary workers is central to Canter’s leadership in the kitchen. Canter says, “I’d rather take the extra time and energy and financial responsibility on somebody and train them and develop them as an individual. In my opinion, a chef ’s primary goal is to develop his or her people…I want everybody who works here, when they eventually move on, to be better and to able to carry themselves with confidence in what they learned.” Canter looks for a strong character over most anything else. “I can teach anyone how to cook, but I can’t teach them how to have a good work ethic,” he says. His personal character and culinary expertise shine, in both the flavor and the presentation, which keeps this neighborhood darling of a restaurant relevant. During our interview, one of the neighborhood regulars leaned over and shared a compliment to the chef: “I’ve never needed salt here!” That is quite possibly the highest praise possible for any chef, anywhere. AM


R EC IP E

BROKEN ARROW RANCH ANTELOPE LOIN

— with —

SEA ISLAND RED PEAS, SALSA VERDE, PETITE MUSTARD GREENS, & SMOKED SEA SALT by Chef Matt Canter of The Park Café

I N GR E D IE N T S serves 4 FOR THE ANTELOPE:

4 antelope loin, 6 ounces each, silver skin removed kosher salt coarsely ground black pepper toasted and coarsely ground juniper berries

P ROC E SS 1. Generously season the loins with salt, black pepper, and juniper berries, up to 30 minutes before cooking.

2. Place peas in a sauce pot and add the sachet; use whatever flavors you like. I recommend onion, carrot, any bacon scraps, fresh thyme, rosemary, and bay leaves.Your sachet should be about the size of a tangerine.

3. Cover the peas with chicken stock about three finger widths above the peas

FOR THE RED PEAS:

1 qt. dried Sea Island red peas, soaked overnight then drained 1 herb sachet - see below  1 cup slab bacon cut into thick lardons, fried until soft but not crispy - save for serving

4. Bring sauce pot to a simmer and cook for 30-45 minutes, tasting at 30 minute mark for completion.  

5. Allow peas to cool at room temperature so they continue to soak up flavors in the stock. When cooled, drain the cooking liquid and set the peas aside (this can be done days in advance). 

6. Combine all ingredients in a FOR THE SALSA VERDE:

1 bunch of flat leaf parsley 2 fresh jalapeno, minced 1 small shallot, finely minced  3 garlic cloves, finely mixed 1 cup extra virgin olive oil the zest of one lemon

bowl and mix to combine, season with salt and dried chili flakes for extra heat TO SERVE:

7. Warm the bacon in a sauce pot then add the red peas.  Add just enough chicken stock to cover. Set aside

8. Heat a heavy bottom

tablespoons of canola oil. Just as the pan begins to smoke add the antelope loins and sear evenly on all sides until the spice rub develops a nice crust.  Add about a tablespoon of butter to the pan and baste the loins for about a minute. I recommend serving antelope on the rare side because the meat is very lean and can be easily overcooked.

9. Allow the loins to rest for 5 minutes.  

10. Re-heat red peas and finish with butter and salt to taste. I like to add something green to the peas for a bit of contrast like minced Parsley or oregano.

11. Spoon peas and some of the broth into a wide dinner bowl. Slice each loin into 3 even medallions and place on top of the peas.

12. Drizzle the salsa verde on top of and around the medallions as much or as little as you like.

13. Finish with smoked sea salt on the medallions and a handful of baby mustard greens or arugula around the antelope.

sauté pan with about 2 WINTER 2017 | 53


culinary

Modern Foraging IN THE LOWCO UNT RY by HUNTER GARDNER Photos by ANDREW CEBULKA

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What is our modern relationship with nature? It seems that, despite its omnipresence, nature has paradoxically become a place that we must go to, when in fact nature is all around us. This disconnect tempts us to forget the most wonderful and essential characteristic of nature: provider. Foraging, the search for edible goods in the wild, is a practice that allows those who partake to be in reverence of the natural world. Foraging could be explained simply as a radicalization of the ‘eat local, eat organic’ culture—but this only captures part of the intrigue for those who forage. Rather, it comes from a propensity for frugality, adventure, and a connection to Mother Nature herself.

THE THRILL OF THE FORAY Foraging, in its nature and in its philosophy, is pure. Though foragers span the breadth of the everyday outdoorsmen to heralded chefs, the allure of foraging is not a means to an end, but often an opportunity to be in nature and find a change of pace. “I started [foraging] as a way to get out of the kitchen and escape from everyday life,” says Chef Josh Keeler of 492, who was introduced to foraging while living in Vermont. “It is a way to just be alone or take a walk and get some sunshine.”

Chef Josh Keeler

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Foraging inspires education. Keeler says his experiences have given him the opportunity to teach younger cooks things that they would have never experienced otherwise if they didn’t get out of the kitchen. For those who grew up in Charleston proper like Matt Lee, foraging was an urban adventure.

“You found your path over brick walls and under porches.You knew exactly where the grapefruit tree was, the pomegranate, all the fig trees, and mulberries,” says Lee, whose co-authored book Lee Bros Charleston Kitchen includes an entire essay devoted to foraging within Charleston’s city limits. Of course, nature is not always a safe place. Woody Collins of Beaufort says he and his foraging partner have come across lethal foes like the water moccasin, diamondback, and timber rattlesnakes. The thrill of the adventure often lies in finding new ground--but this is prized information. “For every mushroom patch I share with someone, I keep three to myself,” says Chef Keeler. CHARLESTON’S YIELD Nature’s provisions can be bounty or bust, and fortunately Charleston boasts an array of unique horticultural treats.

“For every mushroom patch I share with someone, I keep three to myself” — Chef Keeler 56 | thear tmag.com

Golden Chanterelle mushrooms—the third most sought after mushroom in the world according to Collins—are plentiful for local foragers, and cannot be cultivated by traditional means.


“It is supposed that the host tree has to be at least 60 years old and a hostspecies relationship has to exist for somewhere around 20 years before the mushroom system bares its fruit,” notes Collins.

“Charlestonians had a knack for finding the good stuff—in the gardens and back alleys, sidewalks and public parks” – Matt Lee While western North Carolina and the Pacific Northwest are popularly cited as foraging hotbeds, Charleston’s subtropical climate and international port contribute to a diverse natural menu.

HOW TO FORAGE RESPONSIBLY • Use the 1/3 Rule: Never pick more than 1/3 of a yield

• Avoid picking from small batches, which could become larger yields in the future

• Be respectful of trees by properly pruning

• Cut mushrooms above the ground and don’t uproot grounded plants

• Forage for personal use or sell directly to an educated consumer who will not resell

Furthermore, the frugal nature of the archetypal Southerner has always drawn Lowcountry denizens to foraging. “Charlestonians had a knack for finding the good stuff—in the gardens and back alleys, sidewalks and public parks,” says Lee. “You used to see it everywhere, grandmothers with a jar of loquats topped off with vodka on the kitchen window.” In addition to rural and urban foraging, Charleston benefits from a niche: beach foraging. Keeler has found wild pears, arugula, and sea beans through beach foraging— though the latter of which, while plentiful, can also prove troublesome. “You learn through repetitive tasting. In the springtime [sea beans] can be great, super tender, and less salty, depending on the tides and where they are harvested.” WINTER 2017 | 57


BY THE BOOK & OFF THE TRAIL Weaving throughout the practice of foraging is a delicate thread of both shared and unspoken understandings among foragers, chefs, and regulators. For both urban and rural foragers, going on a foray often means crossing property lines.

“Like you were never there, you want to leave it better than you found it.” – Matt Lee

Grow Food Carolina Team, photo by ChristopherShane

However, according to Lee, trespassing now and then has never been seen as much of an issue. In fact, foraging is often a relief to property owners. “In most people’s eyes, [loquats] are a nuisance that you have to pay someone to come remove before they stain your driveway.” With less prevalent species, Lee simply holds himself to a cer tain standard—for example, trimming only the most ter tiary stems of rosemary from a neighbor’s bush, 58 | thear tmag.com

not unlike a landscaper might sculp. “Like you were never there,” says Lee. “You want to leave it better than you found it.” And then there is the relationship between those who forage and those who are willing to buy. While selling to a direct consumer has always been legal, it wasn’t until recently that headway was made for South Carolina foragers to sell to distributors like GrowFood Carolina. In 2014, Sara Clow of GrowFood, along with Clemson University, DHEC. and Tradd Cotter of the upstate’s Mushroom Mountain, were able to pass new state regulations for foragers. This included a mushroom foraging accreditation course with each graduate receiving a forager number allowing them to sell to distributors. However, this process will likely not be applied widely to other foods due to strict DHEC and FDA criteria, which analyze these decisions based on stringent microbiology standards. And so, whether for authenticity or a bit of walk-the-line thrill, there is perhaps a degree of rule-bending. “The black market is still alive and well,” says Clow. “There are a number of known foragers and a number of known chefs who love foragers.” AM


flavor’s all you knead.

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Lindsay Holler and Hazel Ketchum “WOMEN &” by Hunter Gardner

lindsayholler.net hungrymonkmusic.com

omen are more interesting than men. And until there is some kind of paradigm shift financially, socially, politically, etc., this will continue to be true because voices trying to be heard are always more interesting than voices that are already being amplified. However, even with all else equal, perhaps one realm where women will invariably be more interesting than men is art. That’s because women are nature’s creators and nurturers, which naturally makes them artists. Not necessarily innately better than their male peers, but just more—interesting. And it is a very interesting time to be a woman. Which is perhaps what made the “Women &” series at the Charleston Music Hall an instant success—emerging from the ether, a manifestation of the zeitgeist. The concept originated as a one-off show, when Charles Carmody of the Charleston Music Hall and long-time Tom Waits fan Lindsay Holler put together the tribute show 60 | thear tmag.com

“Women & Waits” in 2015. Holler noted that, “We had an over the top example of a gruff masculine voice, which created such an interesting contrast to an exclusively female ensemble.” Co-producer Hazel Ketchum of The Hungry Monks added, “We have to approach the music in a unique way since we can’t full out copy the sound of the artist’s voice. The audience already loves the song, and to hear it live with a different voice is fun and interesting.” In 2016, “Women &” expanded into a four-show series that spanned from Bob Dylan to Radiohead. In 2017 a fifth installment will be added, the first being “Women & The Rolling Stones” on Friday, February 24th. The diverse line up will feature singers ranging in age from 18-63, and welcomes two “Women &” newcomers: Eden Fonvielle of the V-Tones and Jill Lewis, a classically trained Soprano.


Why The Rolling Stones? “One thing we look for when choosing artists to cover is diversity within an artist’s catalog,” said Holler. “The Stones offer rock ‘n roll, blues, country—and there’s a lot of meat on the bones with these songs.”

And of course there’s plenty of stage panache up for grabs. “We love the challenge of a voice and personality like Mick Jagger to sink our teeth into,” said Ketchum. The singers will be backed by Holler and Ketchum’s bands the Western Polaroids and The Hungry Monks, respectively. “As we rehearse, it becomes a collaboration,” said Ketchum in regards to working with the different singers. “Ideas emerge and soon we have a full-on gospel treatment of a Neil Young song or a New Orleans treatment of a Dylan song.”

“We love the challenge of a voice and personality like Mick Jagger to sink our teeth into.” — Hazel Ketchum

For Carmody, this is the programming he craves. “I want to be producing more shows in house [and work] with local musicians as much as possible—this series combines both.” Added Holler, “We have a vibrant local music scene, and it needs the vital support from concert goers in order to sustain and continue to flourish.” The next artist to be covered in the “Women &” series will be announced at the show on February 24th. AM

Tickets are available at the Charleston Music Hall box office and charlestonmusichall.com. WINTER 2017 | 61


performing

FRONT AND CENTER: The Best Productions Coming to Charleston By Stacy Huggins Geist

This is a banner season for Charleston in terms of music and musical theatre. The lineups at some of our favorite venues boast, in almost equal measure, big name artists and shows we’ve always wanted to see and brand new names that we can’t wait to see and hear on stage.

year. Musical Director Bill Carson has curated a line-up of all-star local musicians that pulls from the entire musical spectrum. Watching the genre-bending camaraderie on stage elicits warm, precious feelings of joy and inspiration. Look for a special installation by visual artists Riki and Hirona Matsuda, who are both sisters and collaborators. Rufus Wainwright FEBRUARY 17

CHARLESTON MUSIC HALL 37 John Street, Charleston charlestonmusichall.com

Groundhog Day V JANUARY 13

The fifth annual Groundhog Day concert is a magical show we look forward to every 62 | thear tmag.com

Head to YouTube and search “Choir! Choir! Choir! Rufus Wainwright Hallelujah.” It’s a gorgeous performance by Wainwright accompanied by 1,500 singing strangers at the Luminato Festival in Toronto. If that video doesn’t move you to tears, or at least give you chill bumps, it’s quite likely you do not have a beating heart.


Women & The Rolling Stones FEBRUARY 24

The “Women &” series returns. See our interview with creators Hazel Ketchum and Lindsey Holler on page 60 for more details. Valerie June MARCH 5

The tagline ‘Organic moonshine roots music’ will make perfect sense when you hear Valerie June sing the opening notes of “Workin’ Woman Blues.” This Tennessee-native grew up singing in the church, learning from everyone around her.

After she moved to Memphis, she fell in love with old-time country. Those country-blues influences can be heard, but her sound is completely fresh and arresting. St. Paul & The Broken Bones MARCH 16-17

The first time we heard “Flow with It (You Got Me Feeling Like)” from the new album Sea of Change, dancing was the immediate and inevitable reaction. This sophomore album has a richer, fuller sound that more closely echoes the power and energy of their live performances. This will be the sexiest St. Patty’s day ever with lead soulman Paul Janeway commanding the stage.

NORTH CHARLESTON PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston coliseumpac.com

Once FEBRUARY 21-22

This award-winning musical is based on the award-winning film of the same name, which was one of the loveliest stories of collaborative artistry and chemistry that

ABOVE: Valerie June, RIGHT: St. Paul & The Broken Bones

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blossoms in the unlikeliest of moments. Like the metaphor of a flower blooming from a crack in the pavement, Once is enchanting and hopeful against all odds. Norah Jones MARCH 10

Possessing what can truly be called a unique voice, Jones’s new album Day Breaks returns to her jazz origins. Organist Dr. Lonnie Smith, drummer Brian Blade, and saxophonist Wayne Shorter join Jones on her sixth album; it’s a lovely blend that fans of both her pop sound and jazz roots will appreciate.

comparisons to Norah Jones and John Prine. Interestingly enough, Lee toured with Jones early in his career, opening for her tour in 2004. He’s also a graduate of the University of South Carolina, where he studied English and education. Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella MARCH 14-15

Every girl (and boy) who’s ever worked a meaningless job for a horrible boss has had the Cinderella dream…your soul mate comes along to rescue you from the drudgery of daily life. This updated version is complete with an empowered Cinderella motivated to affect change in the world around her, not just in her own circumstances. That’s a princess we can get behind. AM

Amos Lee MARCH 12

The inimitable Amos Lee has another singular voice, blending a soulful, funky sound with emotive lyrics that have drawn

ABOVE: Nora Jones, LEFT: Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella

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DAMN. GOOD. THEATRE.

Charleston

JAZZ

festival

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wearable

LEXUS

C H A R L E S TO N

FA S H I O N WEEK charlestonfashionweek.com

MARCH 14 – 18, 2017 By Emily Reyna | Photos by Karson Photography

66 | thear tmag.com


CONSIDER THIS YOUR OFFICIAL NOTICE. CLEAR YOUR CALENDARS FOR MARCH 14TH-18TH—LEXUS CHARLESTON FASHION WEEK RETURNS TO MARION SQUARE, LOCATED IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN CHARLESTON, SC. The air is thick again with excitement for the annual CFW. There’s a fresh feel to the week, especially with the new sponsorship by Hendrick Lexus Charleston. Now is the time to start thinking about what runway shows to attend, what shopping to do in the Style Lounge, and the multiple fashion events that will be popping up around town.

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THROUGHOUT THE WEEK THERE WILL BE A DIFFERENT FOCUS FOR EACH NIGHT: Opening Night on March 14th, Locals Night on March 15th, Rock the Runway Competition on March 17th, all culminating with the Fashion Finale on March 18th where the Emerging Designer Winner will be announced in the most dramatic night of them all. CFW’s mission is to cultivate up-and-coming designers and models on their path to a career in fashion. That vision continues to strengthen year after year. Fostering a creative community that pushes designers is central to CFW’s brand identity. This year, the scope will widen, and the depth of field will grow, even adding in layers of incentives for emerging talent to bring their best. Within one year of their CFW debut, four emerging designers from CFW 2016 went on to show at New York Fashion Week, including Destini Hoffman, Jon Milner, Lisa N.

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Hoang, and Storm Dorris. Their success is a testament that CFW is a true pathway to New York, preparing designers for meaningful opportunities in the national fashion industry. Looking forward, this year the Emerging Designer Competition is expanding to all 50 states, which is the first time the competition has welcomed entries from beyond the southeast. Fern Mallis, creator


WINTER 2017 | 69


of NYFW, will judge the Emerging Designers Competition and provide feedback on their collections. Additionally, one semifinalist from the Emerging Designer Competition will be named in the Belk Southern Designer Showcase, giving that designer the opportunity to be featured in select Belk stores and on Belk.com in Spring 2018. The winner will also be given the opportunity to present their collection to the Belk headquarters and receive a cash prize of $2,500. For models, the Rock the Runway Model Competition is back to discover upand-coming models to the fashion industry. Success doesn’t happen overnight, and these are just some of the methods to how actual growth happens. 70 | thear tmag.com

One unique key to CFW is the local community involvement. Passionate, talented creatives and local businesses are the fuel that keeps Charleston on fire. When you attend a runway show, shop in the Style Lounge or the Belk Tent, you are sure to encounter local business owners, designers, and creatives who contribute to the overall success of CFW. It’s mutually beneficial to everyone involved: bringing new ideas and visitors to our community while simultaneously launching emerging talent to a national stage goes hand-in-hand with supporting the local businesses we all work so hard to foster in Charleston.


FASHION WEEK NIGHTLY SCHEDULE March 14th: Opening Night March 15th: Locals Night March 17th: Rock the Runway Competition March 18th : Fashion Finale

Last year, Amy Driggers, local designer and owner of Taxidermy, took to the Style Lounge to showcase her exotic handbags made of python and lizard in bright, flashy hues. Her designs were spotted all over the CFW Village, and on every blog post and Instagram feed. Her brand has grown exponentially since then, in part due to participating in this greater vision that keeps collaboration at its core. Having other creatives to encourage you and keep you accountable results in growth of design, business, and brand. Though Charleston Fashion Week is focused on the fashion community, the energy and enthusiasm extends to the Charleston community as a whole. It is a culture that speaks to inclusivity and growth, rather than comparison and competition. The coming of spring and changing of seasons, Charleston Fashion Week will bring out fresh talent and new inspiration for designers and the community alike. AM

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f FACEBOOK PAGE or GROUP for YOUR BUSINESS? by Ashley T. Caldwell, CEO @ The Modern Connection

FACEBOOK MARKETING IS ETERNALLY EVOLVING, AND YOU’RE LIKELY NOTICING A SHIFT IN YOUR FACEBOOK BUSINESS PAGE. Businesses are seeing less organic (non-paid) reach than ever before. And Groups are starting to resurface as an effective way to position your business on Facebook.   Facebook Groups are organized around interests. You’ll need to be strategic when setting up your Group, as you will likely (but not always) use an interest topic for the group name, not your actual business name. If you create a group, you’ll want to identify and curate interest around your business topic or industry and then position your business— and yourself—as an expert in that topic.

 

For example, if you are a jewelry artist, create a Group about handmade jewelry called something like “Handmade Jewelry Lovers.” You’ll be the admin of the group, set group rules and then use the group to provide value to the members while subtly promoting your own jewelry line. People will share their local 72 | thear tmag.com

finds, their own jewelry, maybe some tips and tricks for DIY, but you’ll be in the center of it all. As the group leader, you’re clearly established as THE expert. As a result, you’ll have an easier time making sales and bringing your audience to your blog, online store, or anywhere else you’d like to take them.

 

So which is right for you?  

FACEBOOK PAGE PROS:

F  Public, so anyone can see your posts, and anyone can “like” you. F  Plethora of effective and super targeted advertising options. F  Functionality with a business in mind. F  Your existing community likely already “likes” you.

 


F  Organic reach is dwindling, and it’s

F  Viral potential—friends and customers can add their friends.

harder to get your posts seen without paying for ads.

FACEBOOK GROUP CONS:

FACEBOOK PAGE CONS:

F  Content gets buried in the constant stream. F  Often turns into a broadcast channel (which is the opposite of what it should be).  

 

F  Requires extra time to manage the content and to moderate the group members. F  People don’t search for business groups, so if they’re looking for your business, they’ll want to find a page. F  You’re the “party” hostess 24/7, so prepare to be engaging daily.

FACEBOOK GROUP PROS:

F  Lots of engagement because people join groups they truly WANT to be in. F  Admin control allow you to set the rules. F  Privacy options: can be setup as a private or public group.

F  No advertising options (as of the time of publication). Every business needs a Facebook Page, but if you have the creativity and time to dedicate to also admin a Facebook Group it’ll be a homerun for your business.

WINTER 2017 | 73


Visual Arts

openings & Events THROUGH MARCH Lions and Tigers and Bears at The Vendue

Matt Story

George Ayers

Robert Lange

thevendue.com/art

FEB 3

Christopher Stott

Attention to Detail, Featuring the work of 30 world-renown realist painters with an emphasis on time-orientated works at Robert Lange Studio robertlangestudios.com

Eric Wert

Kate Long Stevenson

MARCH 10

74 | thear tmag.com

Focus In, Featuring Alan Jackson, Kate Long Stevenson, and Greg Hart, at The George Gallery georgegalleryart.com


FEB 3 Tribute to Foremost Animalier, Count Bernard de Claviere d’Hust at Dog & Horse Fine Art dogandhorsefineart.com

MARCH 3 Majestic Motion, featuring Karen Keene Day at Mitchell Hill

FEB 18 Betty Foy Botts at Mitchell Hill mitchellhillinc.com

MARCH 14 -18 Fashion Week, featuring Brian Nash at Mitchell Hill mitchellhillinc.com

Visual Arts Openings & Events THROUGH MARCH: Lions and Tigers and Bears The Vendue An animal-related theme focusing on the surreal and nontraditional that combines more than 30 artists, many showing their work in Charleston for the first time.

JAN 13: 53 63 73 Fabulon, 5-8pm Featuring the works of Laura McRae Hitchcock,

Susan Irish, Hampton R. Olfus, Jr, Eugene Horne, and Meyriel Edge. Not wanting to call it 5 over 50, this show is a way for the older set to show that we are still vibrant, active, and relevant.

FEB 3: Attention to Detail Robert Lange Studio, 6-9pm Featuring the work of 30 world-renown realist painters with an emphasis on time-orientated works.

FEB 3: Tribute to Foremost Animalier, Count Bernard de Claviere d’Hust Dog & Horse Fine Art, 5-8pm

FEB 11: Not Your Typical Love Story Fabulon, 5-8pm Celebrating all diverse interpretations of love and have a less commercial representation of a time that was all about WINTER 2017 | 75


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161 Calhoun St | 843.953.4422 halsey.cofc.edu

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Contemporary Art

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3. Halsey Institute of

GE

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135 Meeting St | 843.722.2706 gibbesmuseum.org

2

VENDUE

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4. Charleston Museum

3

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2. Gibbes Museum of Art

EY

34 Prioleau St | 843.958.6484 citygalleryatwaterfrontpark.com

30

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1. City Gallery at Waterfront Park

360 Meeting St | 843.722.2996 charlestonmuseum.org

Art Center 136 St Philip St | 843.722.0697 reduxstudios.org

CHURCH

KING

5. Redux Contemporary

S. BATTERY

MURRAY

Visual Arts Openings & Events respecting people¹s need for compassion and acknowledgement.

FEB 17 – 19: Southeastern Wildlife Exposition Fine Art Exhibit Belmond Charleston Place

FEB 18: Betty Foy Botts Mitchell Hill, 11-5pm Abstract-wildlife artist, was recently given the honor to paint for the White House Tree Lighting Ceremony as the 76 | thear tmag.com

GA representative, presents her latest works on birch panel for her SEWE show.

MARCH 3: Charleston Gallery Association Art Walk Various Galleries, 5-8pm

MARCH 3: Majestic Motion, featuring Karen Keene Day Mitchell Hill Renowned equine artist, Day combines experience


Odeith will paint a site-specific mural in
real-time, while 
NYC’s DJ Wolf drops beats to get the crowd 
moving at Society 1858’s annual Winter Party celebration. Guests will have the chance to win original works by many of Charleston’s finest visual artists.

GIBBES MUSEUM THROUGH JAN 15: Realm of the

MARCH 3: Art of Design, 11am

Featuring Vern Yip, acclaimed Interior Designer, HGTV Designer & Host, and New York Times Best Selling Author

Spirit: Solomon R. Guggenheim Collection and the Gibbes Museum of Art

Losing Ground, Anthony Dominguez

Vasily Kandinsky (1866-1944)Composition 8, July 1923Komposition 8Oil on canvas55 1/8 x 79 1/8 inches (140 x 201 cm)Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New YorkSolomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift37.262

UPCOMING EVENTS & EXHIBITIONS

THROUGH APRIL 23: Painting a Nation:

Hudson River School Landscapes from the Higdon Collection JAN 28 – APRIL 30: History, Labor, Life: The

Prints of Jacob Lawrence JAN 28 – APRIL 30: Painting the Southern

HALSEY INSTITUTE JAN 2 – MARCH 4:

Coast: The Art of West Fraser FEB 10: Graffiti in the Garden, Society

1858 Winter Party, 8-11pm Internationally-acclaimed street artist

Anthony Dominguez and Ronald Ramsey, Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

MARCH 10: We The People

and inspiration while using a palette knife and large sweeping gestures to create the power of the horse on canvas.

Fabulon, 5-8pm How artist respond to racism, show support, spread kindness and empathy, demonstrate how art and artist can be instruments

MARCH 3: Our Skies Anglin Smith Fine Art, 5-8pm A group show of paintings of Lowcountry skies.

MARCH 10: Focus In, Featuring Alan Jackson, Kate Long Stevenson, and Greg Hart The George Gallery, 5-8pm Expressing a modern vision in a historic environment,

Greg Hart

Focus In pulls together the works of three Charleston artists to celebrate the movement of a more visible contemporary art scene growing in our city.

of change.

MARCH 14-18: Fashion Week featuring Brian Nash Mitchell Hill WINTER 2017 | 77


Visual Arts

DOWNTOWN

Gallery Guide

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30

33 32 31

20 19 18 15 13 12 16

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14

5

6

17 11 10

98

7

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3 2

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Join us for the Charleston Gallery Association Art Walk: MARCH 3, 2017

78 | thear tmag.com

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DOWNTOWN 1. Courtyard Art Gallery 149 E Bay St | 843.723.9172 courtyardartgallery.com

2. Coleman Fine Art 79 Church St. | 843.853.7000 colemanfineart.com

3. Carolina Antique Maps and Prints 91 Church St. | 843.722.4773 carolinaantiqueprints.com

4. Dog & Horse Fine Art & Portraiture 102 Church St. | 843.577.5500 dogandhorsefineart.com

5. Charleston Renaissance Gallery 103 Church St | 843.723.0025 charlestonrenaissancegallery.com

6. Helena Fox Fine Art 106-A Church St 843.723.0073 helenafoxfineart.com

7. Ellis-Nicholson Gallery 1 1/2 Broad St | 843.722.5353 ellis-nicholsongallery.com

8. Laura DiNello 111 E Bay St | 843.764.9941 lauradinello.com

9. Cecil Bryne Gallery 7 Broad St. | 843.720.3770 cecilbyrnegallery.com

10. Edward Dare Gallery 31 Broad St | 843.853.5002 edwarddare.com

11. Martin Gallery 18 Broad St | 843.723.7378 martingallerycharleston.com

12. Ann Long Fine Art 54 Broad St | 843.577.0447 annlongfineart.com

13. Rebekah Jacob Gallery 54 Broad St | 843.577.8081 rebekahjacobgallery.com

14. Spencer Art Galleries 55 Broad St | 843.722.6854 spencerartgallery.com

15. Ella Walton Richardson Fine Art 58 Broad St | 843.722.3660 ellarichardson.com

16. Mary Martin Gallery of Fine Art 103 Broad St | 843.723.0303 marymartinart.com

17. Stewart Fine Art 12 State St. | 843.853.7100 suesteartpaintings.com

18. Bird’s I View 119-A Church St 843.723-1276 birdsiviewgallery.com

19. Gaye Sanders Fisher Gallery 124 Church St | 843.958.0010 gayesandersfisher.com

20. John Carroll Doyle Art Gallery 125 Church St | 843.577.7344 johncdoyle.com

21. Charleston Artist Guild 160 East Bay St | 843.722.2425 charlestonartistguild.com

22. Graffito 151 E Bay St | 843.727.1155 graffitocharleston.com

23. Anglin Smith Fine Art 9 Queen St | 843.853.0708 anglinsmith.com

24. Hagan Fine Art 27 1/2 State St | 843.901.8124 haganfineart.com

25. The Vendue 19 Vendue Rg | 843.577.7970 thevendue.com

26. Robert Lange Studios 2 Queen St | 843.805.8052 robertlangestudios.com

27. Horton Hayes Fine Art 30 State St | 843.958.0014 hortonhayes.com

28. Gordon Wheeler Gallery 180 E Bay St | 843.722.2546 gordonwheelergallery.com

29. Lowcountry Artists Gallery 148 E Bay St | 843.577.9295 lowcountryartists.com

30. Corrigan Gallery 62 Queen St | 843.722.9868 corrigangallery.com

31. Atrium Art Gallery 61 Queen St | 843.973.3300 atriumartgallery.com

32. Alkyon Arts and Antiques 120 Meeting St | 843.276.5899 alkyon.us

33. Meyer Vogl Gallery 122 Meeting St. | 843.805.7144 meyervogl.com

34. Principle Gallery 125 Meeting St | 843.727.4500 principlegallery.com

35. Atelier Gallery 153 King St | 843.722.5668 theateliergalleries.com

36. Sportsman’s Gallery 165 King St | 843.727.1224 sportsmansgallery.com

37. Sylvan The Sylvan Gallery 171 King St | 843.722.2172 thesylvangallery.com

38. Reinert Fine Art 179 King St. | 843.345.1785 reinertfineart.com

39. John Pope Antiques 180 King St | 843.793.4277 johnpopeantiques.com

40. LePrince Fine Art 184 King St. | 843.442.1664 leprince.com

WINTER 2017 | 79


1. Julia Santen Gallery

4. Real Estate Studio

188 King St | 843.534.0758 juliasantengallery.com

7. Studio 151

214 King St | 843.722.5618 17 dunesproperties.com/the-realestate-studio/ R 5. Chuma Gullah Gallery GE HU 188 Meeting St | 843.722.1702 gallerychuma.com

2. Audubon Gallery 190 King St | 843.853.1100 audubonart.com

3. Charleston Craft Co-op

6. One of A Kind Art andMO

161 Church St | 843.723.2938 charlestoncrafts.org

175 Church St | 843.579.9725 studio151finearts.com

8. Tate Nation 257 King St. | 843.568.9911 tatenation.com

9. Jennifer Black

RR

Fine Craft

I N St | 843.534.1774 SO 74 NNMarket SO N H O Joneofakindgallery.com

265 King St | 843.763.0861 lowcountrystudio.com/Jennifer.htm

I N T E R S TA T E

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1. Grand Bohemian Gallery 55 Wentworth St 843.724.4130 grandbohemiangallery.com

2. Alterman Studios 36 George St | 843.577.0647 altermanstudios.com

MIDTOWN 3. Surface Craft Gallery 49 John St | 843.530.6809 surfacegallerycharleston.com

4. Art Mecca 427 King St | 843.577.0603 artmeccaofcharleston.com

5. Ben Ham Images 416 King St | 843.410.1495 benhamimages.com

6. Mitchell Hill 438 King St | 843.564.0034 mitchellhillinc.com

7. King Street Studios 511 King St | 843.628.5515 thecharlestonphotographer.com

Improve your online presence Increase your client base Strengthen your brand loyalty

8. Sanavandi Gallery 66 Spring St. | 843.937.0107 sanavandiart.com

9. Molly B. Right 68 Spring St | 843.568.3219 mollybright.com

10. The George Gallery 50 Bogard St | 843.579.7328 georgegalleryart.com

themodernconnection.com (843) 718-2988

Your hostess: Ashley T Caldwell CEO of The Modern Connection

11. The Southern 2 Carlson Ct | 843.642.8020 thesouthern.gallery

UPTOWN 12. Cone 10 Studios 1080 Morrison Dr 843.853.3345 cone10studios.com

WINTER 2017 | 81


DOWNTOWN Culinary Arts N

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DOWNTOWN 1. Oak Steakhouse

2. Fast & French 36 George St | 843.577.0647 fastandfrenchcharleston.com

3. Bull Street Gourmet 120 King St | 843.722.6464 bullstreetgourmetandmarket.com

4. Queen Street Grocery 133 Queen St | 843.723.4121 queenstreetgrocerycafe.com

5. Bin 152 152 King St | 843.577.7359 bin152.com

6. 82 Queen 82 Queen St | 843.723.7591 82queen.com 82 | thear tmag.com

72 Queen St | 843.577.2337 poogansporch.com

8. Husk

1

13. Blossom

7. Poogan’s Porch

KING

17 Broad St | 843.722.4220 oaksteakhouserestaurant.com

2

25 24 23 22 19 18 17 15 16 13 14 12 VENDUE 10 11 9 STATE

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5 6 78 QUEEN

CHURCH

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Dining Guide

37

76 Queen St | 843.577.2500 huskrestaurant.com

9. McCrady’s 2 Unity Alley | 843.577.0025 mccradysrestaurant.com S. BATTERY

10. Minero 153BMEUBay RRASt Y | 843.789.2241 minerorestaurant.com

11. Drawing Room 19 Vendue Range 843.414.2334 drawingroomrestaurant.com

12. Cypress 167 E Bay St | 843.727.0111 cypresscharleston.com

171 E Bay St | 843.722.9200 blossomcharleston.com

14. The Gin Joint 182 E Bay St | 843.577.6111 theginjoint.com

15. Magnolias’s 185 E Bay St. | 843.577.7771 magnoliascharleston.com

16. Poogan’s Smokehouse 72 Queen St. | 843.577.2337 poogansporch.com

17. Slightly North of Broad 192 E Bay St | 843.723.3424 snobcharleston.com

18. High Cotton 199 E Bay St | 843.724.3815 highcottoncharleston.com


19. Craftsmen Kitchen 12 Cumberland St 843.577.9699 craftsmentaphouse.com

20. Fulton Five 5 Fulton St | 843.853.5555 fultonfive.com

21. Kitchen 208 208 King St | 843.725.7208 kitchen208.com

22. Bar at The Spectator 67 State St | 843.724.4326

23. Grill 225 225 E Bay St | 843.266.4222 marketpavilion.com

24. 5 Church 32B N Market St | 843.937.8666 5churchcharleston.com

25. Burwell’s Stone Fire Grill 14 N Market St | 843.737.8700 burwellscharleston.com

26. Peninsula Grill 112 N Market St 843.723.0700 peninsulagrill.com

27. Charleston Grill 224 King St | 843.577.4522 charlestongrill.com

28. Circa 1886 149 Wentworth St 843.853.7828 | circa1886.com

29. Hank’s Seafood 10 Hayne St | 843.723.3474 hansseafoodrestaurant.com

30. Cru Café 18 Pinckney St | 843.534.2434 crucafe.com

31. FIG 232 Meeting St 843.805.5900 | eatatfig.com

32. Élevé at the Grand Bohemian 55 Wentworth St 843.724.4144

grandbohemiancharleston.com

33. Sermet’s Downtown 276 King St | 843.853.7775 sermetsdowntown.com

34. Cristophe Chocolatier 90 Society St | 843.297.8674 christophechocolatier.com/

35. Muse 82 Society St | 843.577.1102 charlestonmuse.com

36. Co 340 King St | 843.720.3631 eatatco.com

37. Ted’s Butcherblock 334 E Bay St | 843.577.0094 tedsbutcherblock.com

MIDTOWN 38. Virginia’s on King 412 King St | 843.735.5800 holycityhospitality.com

39. The Westendorff 114 St Philip St | 843.400.0026 thewestendorff.com

40. Pane e Vino 17 Warren St | 843.853.5955 panevinocharleston.com

41. 39 Rue de Jean 39 John St | 843.722.8881 holycityhospitality.com

42. Coast 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

43. Michael’s on the Alley 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

44. Vincent Chicco’s 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

45. The Victor Social Club 39 John St | 843.722.8838 holycityhospitality.com

46. Halls Chophouse 434 King St | 843.727.0090 hallschophouse.com

47. Monza 451 King St | 843.720.8787 monzapizza.com

48. Closed For Business 453 King St | 843.853.8466 closed4business.com

49. Fish 442 King St | 843.722.3474 fishrestaurantcharleston.com

50. O-Ku 463 King St | 843.737.0112 o-kusushi.com

51. Basil 460 King St | 843.724.3490 eatatbasil.com

52. Cocktail Club 479 King St | 843.724.9411 locu.com

53. The Macintosh 479 King St | 843.789.4299 themacintoshcharleston.com

54. Rarebit 474 King St | 843.974.5483 therarebit.com

55. Belmont 511 King St locu.com

56. 492 492 King St | 843.203.6338 492king.com

57. Bay Street Biergarten 549 E Bay St | 843.266.2437 baystreetbiergarten.com

58. Hominy Grill 207 Rutledge Ave 843.937.0930 | hominygrill.com

59. Lana 210 Rutledge Ave 843.720.8899 lanarestaurant.com WINTER 2017 | 83


68. Brown’s Court Bakery 199 St Philip St 843.724.0833 brownscourt.com

MIDTOWN 17

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76

69. WildFlour Pastry 73 Spring St. | 843.327.2621 wildflourpastry.com

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70. Parlor Deluxe

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207A St Philip St 843.900.7574 parlordeluxe.com

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71. Warehouse

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45 ½ Spring St 843.202.0712 wearewarehouse.com

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72. Trattoria Lucca

US MB

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74

41 Bogard St | 843.973.3323 luccacharleston.com

73. Elliotborough Mini Bar

.P ST

18 Percy St | 843.577.0028 elliotboroughminibar.com

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64 63 61

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75. Mercantile and Mash

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56 55 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 46 47 41-45

701 E Bay St | 843.793.2636 mercandmash.com

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76. Taco Boy

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60. Sugar Bakeshop 59 Cannon St | 843.579.2891 N HOU sugarbake.com CAL

61. Five Loaves Café 43 Cannon St | 843.937.4303 fiveloavescafe.com

62. Xiao Bao Biscuit 224 Rutledge Ave xiaobaobiscuit.com

63. Stars 495 King St | 843.577.0100 starsrestaurant.com 84 | thear tmag.com

630 King St | 843.577.5393 barsacharleston.com

64. Prohibition 547 King St | 843.793.2964 prohibtioncharleston.com

65. Indaco 526 King St | 843.727.1228 indacocharleston.com

66. The Ordinary 544 King St | 843.414.7060 eattheordinary.com

67. The Grocery 4 Cannon St | 843.302.8825 thegrocerycharleston.com

217 Huger St | 843.789.3333 tacoboy.net

UPTOWN 77. Luke‘s Craft Pizza 271 Ashley Ave. lukescraftpizza.com

78. Dell‘z Uptown 511 Rutledge Ave 843.641.0352

79. The Daily 652 King St | 843.619.0151 shopthedaily.com


52

MT. PLEASANT

90

UPTOWN 89 88 E

TRE PEACH

87 86

S

H ES

T ER

CYPRES E

MAPL

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IN ET

POPLA

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26

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E GROV

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80

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80. Leon’s Oyster Shack

LIN

698 King St | 843.531.6500 leonsoystershop.com LO CK

W O

O D 81. The Park Cafe

730 Rutledge Ave 843.410.1070 theparkcafechs.com

82. Royal American 17

970 Morrison Dr 843.817.6925 theroyalamerican.com

83. Fiery Ron‘s Home Team BBQ 126 William St | 843.225.7427 hometeambbq.com

84. Edmund’s Oast I N T E R S TA T E

1081 26 Morrison Dr 843.727.1145 edmundsoast.com

85. Butcher & Bee 1085 Morrison Dr | 843.619.0202 butcherandbee.com

86. Tattooed Moose 1137 Morrison Dr 843.277.2990 tattooedmoose.com

87. Rutledge Cab Co. 1300 Ritledge Ave 843.720.1440 rutledgecabco.com

Culinary events JAN 4 – 22: Charleston Restaurant Week

JAN 29: Lowcountry Oyster Festival

FEB 3: Good Catch

Oysterfest, South Carolina Aquarium, 6:30-10pm

MARCH 1 – 5: Charleston Wine + Food Festival

WINTER 2017 | 85


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performing Arts

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STATE

EY KING

5. Theater 99

S. BATTERY

6. Spoleto Festival USA

MURRAY

Headquarters

7. Sottile Theatre 44 George St | 843.953.6340 sottile.cofc.edu

8. College of Charleston Theatre Dept 161 Calhoun St 843.953.6306 theatre.cofc.edu

9. Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun St | 843.724.5212 gaillardcenter.com

86 | thear tmag.com

CHURCH

84 Society St | 843.277.2172 charlestontheater.com 280 Meeting St 843.853.6687 theatre99.com

VENDUE

1

QUEEN QUEEN

HL

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Theatre

14 George St | 843.579.3100 spoletousa.com

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4. Threshold Repertory

N

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200 Meeting St #100 843.901.9343 34west.org

8

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Company

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9 N UN OU HO H ALL CA C

135 Church St 843.577.7183 charlestonstage.com

3. 34 West Theatre

10

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2. Dock Street Theatre/

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20 Queen St | 843.722.4487 footlightplayers.net

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Guide

1. Footlight Players

ER

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MIDTOWN 10. Charleston Music Hall 37 John St | 843.853.2252 charlestonmusichall.com

11. Music Farm 32 Ann St | 843.577.6989 musicfarm.com

12. PURE Theatre 477 King St | 843.723.4444 puretheatre.org

13. Charleston Academy of Music 189 Rutledge Ave 843.805.7794 charlestonmusic.org

14. Jazz Artists of Charleston/ Charleston Jazz Orchestra 93 Spring St | 843.641.0011 jazzartistsofcharleston.org

15. Woolfe Street Playhouse/ Village Rep. 34 Woolfe St | 843.856.1579 woolfestrretplayhouse.com


Concerts, Theatre, Dance, & Performing events JAN 5: Garrison Keillor, Gaillard Center PERFORMING

JAN 11: Remembering Ray: The Legacy of Ray Charles, Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

JAN 12 – 29: Mine, Threshold Repertory THEATRE

JAN 19 – FEB 11: The (Curious Case of the) Watson Intelligence, PURE Theatre THEATRE

JAN 20 – FEB 25: Addicted to Love (Encore), 34 West THEATRE

JAN 20 – FEB 5: Suddenly Last Summer, Footlight Players THEATRE

Conservatory Winter Session, 9 Week Acting and Music Conservatory, Woolfe Street THEATRE

JAN 26 – FEB 4: Sex With Strangers, Village Rep Co, Woolfe Street THEATRE

JAN 27: An Evening With Bernadette Peters, Gaillard Center PERFORMING

JAN 28: Big Band Blast, North Charleston Performing Arts Center MUSIC

JAN 13: Groundhog Day V, Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

JAN 13: André Watts, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Gaillard Center MUSIC

JAN 17 – 18: Shen Yun, Gaillard Center MUSIC & DANCE

JAN 18: Dave Mason, Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

JAN 21: The Manhattan Transfer & Take 6, Charleston Jazz Festival, Gaillard Center

JAN 28: The Shanghai Quartet, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Gaillard Center MUSIC

MUSIC

JAN 21 – 22: James and the Giant Peach, Charleston Stage, Dock Street THEATRE

JAN 23: Pilobolus, Gaillard Center PERFORMING

JAN 23 – MARCH 23: Village Rep Youth

Pilobolus at Gaillard Center

WINTER 2017 | 87


JAN 31: 42nd Street,

FEB 16 – MARCH 12:

Gaillard Center

Uncle Vanya, Threshold

MUSICAL

Repertory THEATRE

FEB 4: Tony Desare Sings

FEB 17: Rufus Wainwright,

Sinatra, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Gaillard Center MUSIC

FEB 8: Al Di Meola,

Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

FEB 17 – MARCH 5: Peter and the Starcatcher, Charleston Stage, Dock Street

Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

THEATRE

FEB 8: Dance Theatre of Harlem, Gaillard Center

FEB 21 – 22: Once, North Charleston Performing Arts Center MUSICAL

DANCE

Joe Bonamassa at Gaillard Center

FEB 24: Joe Bonamassa, Gaillard Center MUSIC

FEB 25: Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

FEB 25: Miranda Lambert, North Charleston Performing Arts Center MUSIC

MARCH 3 – 4: Beethoven’s Pastoral, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Gaillard Center MUSIC

MARCH 3 – 19: Love, Sex and the IRS, Footlight Players THEATRE

MARCH 5: Valerie June,

Beauty and the Beast at North Charleston Performing Arts Center

FEB 11: Beauty and The Beast, North Charleston Performing Arts Center BALLET

FEB 13: Lang Lang, Gaillard Center MUSIC

FEB 14: Under the Streetlamp, Gaillard Center PERFORMING

FEB 23: Taj Express, Gaillard Center PERFORMING

FEB 23 – MARCH 4: The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, Village Rep Co, Woolfe Street THEATRE

FEB 24: Women & The Rolling Stones: A Tribute to The Stones, Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

88 | thear tmag.com

Charleston Music Hall MUSIC

MARCH 9 – APRIL 1: Our Mother’s Brief Affair, PURE Theatre THEATRE

MARCH 10: Madeleine Peyroux and Rickie Lee Jones, Gaillard Center MUSIC


MARCH 10: Norah Jones, North Charleston Performing Arts Center MUSIC

MARCH 10 – 19: The Father, Village Rep Co, Woolfe Street THEATRE

MARCH 11: Celtic Woman, Gaillard Center MUSIC

MARCH 12: Amos Lee, North Charleston Performing Arts Center MUSIC

Original Live Theater in the heart of Charleston

MARCH 14 – 15: Rodgers

www.34west.org

+ Hammerstein’s Cinderella, North Charleston Performing Arts Center MUSICAL

MARCH 16 – 17: St. Paul

200 MEETING ST

MARCH 17 – 18: A Sea

& The Broken Bones,

Symphony, Charleston Symphony Orchestra,

Charleston Music Hall

Gaillard Center MUSIC

MARCH 25 – 26: Sleeping Beauty, Gaillard Center BALLET

MUSIC

MARCH 17: Chicago,

MARCH 17 – APRIL 2:

North Charleston Performing Arts Center

The Miracle Worker, Charleston Stage, Dock

MUSIC

Street THEATRE

MARCH 30 – APRIL 15: Dogfight, Village Rep Co, Woolfe Street THEATRE

Keep up with the latest arts events at theartmag.com/events

WINTER 2017 | 89


DOWNTOWN boutiques & ShoPping

1. Dulles Designs 89 Church St | 843.805.7166 dullesdesigns.com

Guide

2. Utopia 27 Broad Street 843.853.9510 utopiacharleston.com

3. The-Commons

UN

HO

L CA

54 Broad St, 646.408.3447 the-commons.us

30

16

4. Maris Dehart

E

KI NG

CONCORD

RG

O GE

HI

.P ST

15 14 13

32 Vendue Rg | 843.974.5712

5. Ellington 24 State St | 843.722.7999

6. Kathleen Rivers Interior Design 38 Queen St | 843.723.5744 kathleenrivers.com

LIP

12

7. Curiosity Vintage 56 Queen St | 843.647.7763 curiosityvintage.myshopify.com

11

LOGAN

8 9

4

VENDUE

7 6 5

QUEEN

CONCORD

10

3

183 King St | 843.327.8304 ibumovement.com

9. RTW Charleston 186 King St | 843.577.9748 rtwcharleston.com

10. Lily 2

1

8. Ibu

196 King St | 843.577.7633 lilycharleston.com

11. Peyton William Jewelry 241 King St | 843.724.7061 peytonwilliam.com

KING

CHURCH

12. Worthwhile 268 King St | 843.723.4418 shopworthshile.com

13. Croghan’s Jewel Box 308 King St | 843.723.3594 croghansjewelbox.com

14. Anne’s S. BATTERY

MURRA Y 90 | thear tmag.com

312 King St | 843.577.3262 annesdowntown.com


26

52

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OP

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CO

29 E

LIN

US MB

LU

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28 .P ST

E

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25

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26

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27

I N T E R S TA T E

23

MI CO

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22

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21

20 19 18 17

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1. Hampton Clothing 314 King St | 843.724.6373

5. Filigree 47 John St | 843.722.6189 filigreecharleston.com

2. Artist & Craftsman Supply 6. Mitchell Hill 143 Calhoun St 843.579.0077 artistcraftsman.com

MIDTOWN 3. Beckett Boutique 409 King St beckettboutique.com

4. Blue Bicycle Books 420 King St | 843.722.2666 bluebicyclebooks.com

438 King St | 843.564.0034 mitchellhillinc.com

7. Seeking Indigo 445 King St | 843.725.0217 seekingindigo.com

8. ONE Boutique 478 King St | 843.259.8066 onelovedesign.com

9. Distil Union 525 King St | 843.321.4068 distilunion.com

10. Candy Shop Vintage 9 Cannon St | 843.737.4289 candyshopvintage.com

11. Mac & Murphy 74 ½ Cannon St 843.576.4394 macandmurphy.com

12. Indigo and Cotton 79 Cannon St | 843.728.2980 indigoandcotton.com

13. Lula Kate 2nd Floor, 82 Spring St 843.805.7193 lulakate.com

14. Open Door Shop 78 Line St | 843.872.6469 opendoorshop.com

15. Fritz Porter 701 E Bay St #106 843.207.4804 fritzporter.com WINTER 2017 | 91


MOUNT PLEASANT // DANIEL ISLAND . DR G IN ND LA . ER DR RIV D AN ISL

EL NI DA

DANIEL ISLAND ARTISTS & GALLERIES

1

1

The Islander Laura Alberts Vespa Pizzaria

Family Circle Tennis Center Peace, Love, Hip Hop

BOUTIQUES & WEARABLE ARTISTS 1

White on Daniel Island

MOUNT PLEASANT ARTISTS & GALLERIES

3 4 5 6 7

Beads and Brushstrokes Havens Fine Framing The Artist’s Loft School Wine and Design Tidewater Editions

FOOD & WINE

4 Amalfi ’s Italian Restaurant 5 The Granary 5 Carter’s Kitchen 6 Grind and Squeeze 7 Collective Coffee Co. 8 Langdon’s 9 Charleston’s Café 10 Five Loaves Café 11 Graze 12 Bacco 13 Metto Coffee & Tea 14 Boulevard Diner

2 1

EN SEV

DANIEL ISLAND

PERFORMING ARTS

1 2

2

3

Jonathan Green Studios

FOOD & WINE

1 2 3

1

15 16 17 18 19 20 20 20 21 22 23 23 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

Coleman Public House Vickery’s Bar & Grill Water’s Edge Tavern And Table Geechie Seafood Basil Thai Bottles Beverage Store Vintage Coffee & Cafe Red Drum Gastropub The Americano Southerly Restaurant and Patio Southern Seasons The Pickled Palate Pages Okra Grill Mustard Seed Old Village Posthouse Village Bakery The Wreck of the Richard & Charlene Crave Kitchen & Cocktails Mosaic Sweetgrass Café See Wee

PERFORMING ARTS

3

Charleston Ballet Theatre

RM FA

1


CITY GUIDE

35

. DR MS

34

MOUNT PLEASANT

I N T E R S TA T E

526

1 RD. LONG POINT

4 35 3

3

32 33

14

9

15 16

RA N G E RI FL E

5

17

I N T E R S TAT E

17

4

20 2 23

28

526

27

COLEMAN BLVD.

2 24 22 18 21 1 19 31 29 2 30

2

703

CREATIVE BUSINESSES 1 2

Creative Spark Center for the Arts Out of Hand

BOUTIQUES & WEARABLE ARTISTS 2 3 4 5

517

10 3

HOUSTON-NORTHCUTT BLVD

6

. RD

5 11 3

4

8

7

RD .

AN M W BO

5 6

12 13

7

. RD RY FER S I TH MA

DESIGN & DECOR

1 2 3 4

Elizabeth Stuart Design GDC Home Celadon Bella Décor

Henry & Eva Cavortress dee ruel Gwynns of Mt. Pleasant WINTER 2017 | 93


CITY GUIDE NORTH CHARLESTON 3

4

5

1 3 12 2 1 2

2

I N T E R S TA T E

26

6

642

7 I N T E R S TA T E

526 7

61

9

8 7

WEST ASHLEY

171

4 5 11

3

10 17

17

2 12

4 13 151 1 14 16


WEST ASHLEY // NORTH CHARLESTON WEST ASHLEY

NORTH CHARLESTON

ARTISTS & GALLERIES

FOOD & WINE

1 1 1 2 3 4

1 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 5 6 7

Chart Outdoor Initiative & Gallery Fazal Gallery Jericho Advisors Frametastic Fabulon Center for Art & Education Fire & Earth Fine Pottery

FOOD & WINE 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 15 16 17

Ms. Rose’s Fine Food & Cocktails Charleston Burger Company Fiery Ron’s Home Team BBQ Early Bird Diner The Glass Onion Triangle Char & Bar Avondale Wine & Cheese Al Di La Pearlz Oyster Bar Three Little Birds Cafe Boxcar Betty’s

PERFORMING ARTS 4 5

Charleston Symphony Orchestra Robert Ivey Ballet

Accent on Wine Fratello’s Lotus Vietnamese Cuisine Stems and Skins EVO Pizzeria & Craft Bakery The Orange Spot Cafe The BBQ Joint Basico Mixson Market Stiped Pig Distillery Holy City Brewing

PERFORMING ARTS 1 1 1 2 3

North Charleston Artist Guild South of Broadway Theatre Company The Sparrow The Mill North Charleston Performing Arts Center

DESIGN & DECOR Urban Electric Co 1 1 Kistler 1 Avrett 2 Celadon Warehouse CREATIVE BUSINESSES Ink Meets Paper 2 Finklestein’s Center 2

Explore our online creative business directory for more information! theartmag.com/directory

WINTER 2017 | 95


BARRIER ISLANDS Isle of Palms / Sullivan’s Island / Folly Beach / James Island / Johns Island / Kiawah Island

1

10

12

11

9 13

JOHNS ISLAND

JAMES ISLAND

8

17

15

18

171

14 7

700

FOLLY BEACH 16

20

KIAWAH ISLAND 3

11

1

96 | thear tmag.com

2

19


517

ISLE OF PALMS

ISLAND GUIDE 1

2

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND

703

3 5

KIAWAH & SEABROOK ARTISTS & GALLERIES 1 Andell Inn Gallery 2 Wells Gallery

2

Judy Elias

FOOD & WINE 19 Jasmine Porch 19 Ocean Room at Sanctuary 20 The Atlantic Room BOUTIQUES & WEARABLE ARTISTS

1

Peyton William Jewelry

DESIGN & DECOR

1

GDC Home

4

6

3

JOHNS ISLAND ARTISTS & GALLERIES 3 Todd & Huff Art Center FOOD & WINE 17 Fat Hen 18 Wild Olive

JAMES ISLAND FOOD & WINE 7 Bohemian Bull 9 Salty Waters Rawbar and Grill 10 Zia Taqueria 10 Crust Wood Fired Pizza 11 Muddy Waters Coffee Bar 12 The Lot 13 Sweetwater Cafe 14 The Screen Door 15 Stereo 8

FOLLY BEACH FOOD & WINE 16 Taco Boy 16 Lost Dog Cafe 16 The ‘Witch Doctor 16 Rita’s Seaside Grille

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND & ISLE OF PALMS ARTISTS & GALLERIES 1 Sandpiper Gallery FOOD & WINE 1 Coda Del Pesce 2 Boathouse at Breach Inlet 3 Poe’s Tavern 4 High Thyme 5 Home Team BBQ 6 The Obstinate Daughter

CREATIVE BUSINESSES 1 The Terrace Theater

WINTER 2017 | 97


SAR A PIT TMAN , ACRYLIC ON LONG HORN

KNOT LOU NG E CHAIR

B E T T Y FOY BOT TS , “ LE APS AN D BOU N DS” 55 X 55, MIXED M EDIA ON BIRCH PAN EL

B E T T Y F OY B OT T S | S E W E 2 0 1 7 FEB R UA RY 17

TH

- 1 9 T H | O P E N I N G R E C E P T I O N S AT U R D AY 1 8 T H

438 KING STREET Charleston, SC 29403 843. 564.0034 98 | thear tmag.com

s h o p m i tc h e l l h i l l . c o m m i tc h e l l h i l l i n c . c o m @ m i tc h e l l h i l l c h a r l e s to n


Art Mag D IG IT AL YOUR CONNECTION TO THE ARTS Keep up with events, artist profiles, and special features anytime – Read Art Mag on your digital devices. THEARTMAG.COM


Bear Hands 10”x10” oil on panel Robert Lange

N O W O N D I S P L AY T H R O U G H M A R C H 2 0 1 7 19 VENDUE RANGE

|

CHARLESTON, SC

|

843.577.7970

|

THEVENDUE.COM


Art Mag: Winter 2017, The Wild Life Issue