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November 7th, 2011

the student voice of thunder bay

Volume 48, Issue 8 www.theargus.ca

LU participates in 31st annual Holocaust Education Week BY ERIN COLLINS News Editor

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ov. 1 marked the beginning of the 31st annual Holocaust Education Week, organized by the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. The annual event blends together programs, events, and testimonies to remember the millions who were murdered during the genocide of World War II. The week also strives to raise awareness about atrocities that have since taken place and about attempts for justice. Holocaust Education Week is designated a yearly theme. ‘Accountability’ was selected for 2011 – the year that marks the 50th anniversary of Adolf Eichmann’s trial and the 65th anniversary of the Nuremberg trials. In addition to the study of postWorld War II justice, the event stressed individual and collective accountability to prevent future human rights violations and genocides. Dr. Valerie Hébert, assistant professor of history and interdisciplinary studies at the Orillia campus, presented the lecture Genocide and the Law last Wednesday. She spoke of the evolution of postatrocity justice from the Nuremberg trials, which tried German officials involved in the Holocaust for their war crimes, to the present day. “I am delighted to be part of

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The Holocaust Memorial in South Beach, Florida. this year’s Holocaust Education Week and to have the opportunity to expand the reach of this program to the Orillia and Thunder Bay areas,” expresses Hébert. “I am grateful to the Chaim and Sarah Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and to Lakehead University for supporting this important event. I hope that it will be the first of many.” Hébert’s lecture made refer-

ence to Rwanda’s Gacaca tribunals, a movement toward national reconciliation after 700,000 Tutsi were killed in the 1994 genocide. During the tribunals, witnesses and survivors were provided the opportunity to speak about their horrific experiences in a safe, open environment, and the individuals accused of human rights violations were tried. Dr. Tomaz Jardim from Ryerson

University followed Dr. Hébert, presenting about the Mauthausen trial, an American-led movement to try Mauthausen concentration camp personnel. With an academic focus on the Holocaust, war crime trials, and modern Germany, Jardim has completed extensive research on postwar justice. “The Mauthausen trial [can serve] as a case study to shed light on how the U.S military inves-

tigated, prosecuted and punished Nazi perpetrators at war’s end,” explained Jardim. “The trial remains indicative of the most common, and yet least understood, American approach to war crimes prosecution. This presentation aims to force reflection on the implications of compromising legal standards in order to guarantee that guilty men do not walk free.”

Victim testifies in Calgary torture case BY ERIN COLLINS News Editor

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he victim in a bizarre case of alleged torture, domination, and starvation testified against his former roommate, Dustin Paxton, last Monday. Paxton was charged with aggravated assault, sexual assault, and unlawful confinement after the victim – whose name cannot be mentioned due to a publication ban – was dumped in front of a Regina hospital last April. The victim, who was in critical condition, fell into to a coma and required several reconstructive surgeries. After recovery, he began to remember and recount months of subjection to abuse. Paxton and the victim had met in Winnipeg and had moved to Calgary to pursue a business venture. In his testimony, the victim explained that the abuse started shortly after they moved into their apartment, when Paxton beat him with a steel-toed boot. Afterwards Paxton was reported to have apologized and his roommate, concerned with appearing ‘weak,’ forgave him. With time, however, physical abuse became regular. The roommate recalled Paxton using several

devices to inflict pain, including a dog leash, an extension cord, and a two-by-four. Two consecutive beatings – which destroyed the victim’s eye socket, broke his ribs, and ruptured his bowel – rendered him bedridden. During his testimony, the victim recalled that Paxton refrained from calling an ambulance for more than twenty-four hours while he lay helpless and in pain. “I thought I was going to die I was in so much pain,” he said to the Winnipeg Free Press. The hospital staff were told that the injuries were caused by a pizza oven, and the victim returned to live with Paxton after his release. The victim also testified that Paxton became ‘turned on’ during episodes of torture, and that performing sexual acts was a resort to keeping the beatings at bay. “Personally, I thought it was disgusting. I was in survival mode," he explained to the Winnipeg Free Press. "I would do anything not to get beaten anymore." After the victim’s testimony, Defense Lawyer Jim Lutz asked why the victim, who was not physically constrained, had never left. The victim responded that by the time he had opportunities for escape, the brain injury he had

acquired early on had diminished his ability to think straight. "You've got to understand, I had a serious brain injury, so my thinking was compromised,” he explained to CBC News. Lutz also accused the victim of inventing the scenario, even hinting that the memories of abuse may have been implanted by family members trying to help him piece together the events leading up to his coma. But the aftermath of abuse left behind on the victim’s body cannot be denied. Last September, Lindsay Airhart expressed her shock after visiting her former boyfriend in the hospital. "He was a frail, lifeless body," Airhart testified to the Global Calgary. "He looked like he had been starved. He had burn marks inside of his legs. Every couple of inches there was a cut or a bruise. Some were infected." The victim had dropped to 87 pounds from 245, and was also missing pieces of his lips and tongue. Next week, the court will hear a testimony from Dr. Kris Mohandle, a police and forensic psychologist who has experience working with persons who have been subject to captivity. The trial is ongoing.


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Orillia takes back the night BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

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UK Prime Minister David Cameron declares that nations upholding anti-gay laws will be subject to aid cuts.

Commonwealth threatens to withdraw aid for gay rights violations BY ERIN COLLINS News Editor

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riday marked the kick-off to the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Perth, Australia. Due to the outrage of several members, Prime Minister David Cameron announced that the UK would cut aid to nations upholding anti-gay laws. With the support of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, Cameron advocated that the Commonwealth take a more active role to stop gay rights violations. “Britain is one of the premier aid givers in the world,” Cameron told CBC News. “We want to see coun-

tries that receive our aid adhering to proper human rights.” Ugandan presidential adviser John Nagenda was not happy with Cameron’s decision to withdraw aid. In an interview with BBC News, Nagenda said that his country’s people were “tired of these lectures” and of “being treated like children.” He also accused Cameron of a “bullying mentality.” “This kind of ex-colonial mentality of saying: ‘You do this or I withdraw my aid’ will definitely make people extremely uncomfortable,” explains Nagenda. He adds, “Those who have more should give to those who have less. It’s that simple.” During the meeting, Cameron expressed concerns that gay rights

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violations in Commonwealth countries, particularly in Africa, would continue if actions were not taken. Anti-gay laws still exist in 41 of the 54 member states, and punishments for homosexuals are harsh. Queer UK, an LGBT community and news source, provides an overview of some of the penalties: queers in Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Pakistan, Uganda, Bangladesh, and Guyana can be sentenced to life imprisonment, while those in Malaysia are punished with floggings and as many as 20 years in jail. As well, “homophobic witchhunts” have actively sought out gays for penalty in several of the Commonwealth nations. “Anti-gay laws and witch-hunts contradict the Commonwealth’s commitment to equality, human rights, individual freedom, and non-discrimination,” explains Peter Tatchell, a human rights activist in the UK. Besides upholding basic human rights, Cameron explained that the demand for the repeal of anti-gay laws was largely concerned with the way such laws prevent the initiation of an effective HIV/AIDS endemic response from Commonwealth nations. “About 2.7 million new people become infected with HIV every year, with the virus claiming a further two million lives annually from AIDS,” stated Cameron to the Globe and Mail. “Commonwealth countries are disproportionately burdened with the disease, accounting for some 30% of the global population, but 60% of the world’s HIV/Aids cases.” Malawi’s aid was already reduced last July after two gay men were sentenced to hard labour and 14 years in jail. During the meeting, Cameron suggested that Malawi, Uganda, Nigeria, and Ghana may be among the first to see aid cuts.

n Thursday, Lakehead University’s Orillia campus took part in an international tradition, Take Back the Night. The event, which approximately 300 people attended, took place in downtown Orillia and saw women and children marching from Heritage Place to the Port of Orillia. “Take Back The Night was started in the 70s as a symbolic movement for women to literally take back the night and exercise their right to be safe walking alone at night and to not be sexually assaulted,” explains Leigh Castle, LUSU’s Orillia Events Coordinator who’s been involved with the event for four years. The first Take Back the Night occurred in Philadelphia in October 1975. Following the murder of Susan Alexander Speeth, who was stabbed a block from her home, the people of Philadelphia came together to show that they would not stand for violence. Another Take Back the Night took place at The International Tribunal on Crimes against Women. The Tribunal took place March 4-8 1976 in Brussels, Belgium. Two thousand women representing 40 countries attended the event. “Today the march speaks out against all forms of violence against women. I believe it has also evolved into more than just taking back the night and ‘shattering the silence’: women, survivors, and victims leave these marches empowered and hopefully ready to heal,” commented

I remember feeling this wave of strength—as I walked with my sisters and chanted and yelled and screamed, I actually felt safe. Leigh Castle Orillia Events Coordinator

Castle. “The first time I participated in Take Back the Night in 2008, I remember feeling this wave of strength—as I walked with my sisters and chanted and yelled and screamed, I actually felt safe. It was moving and extremely powerful because to be honest, until that moment, I had [felt] unsafe and had been used to that knot in the pit of my stomach.” Castle was not alone in having a life changing experience at Take Back the Night. “That same night, a young woman shared for the first time that she had been date raped,” explains Castle. “She had thought for years that it wasn’t ‘really rape’ because she was dating the attacker. She spent years feeling that she was abnormal because she felt like a victim. She realized that night that she was a victim and was able to begin the healing process and become a survivor.”

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RANDALL MUNROE


November 7th, 2011

14 fun&games

Sudoku

Crossword

Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (http://www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission.

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The politics of the ‘Drunkorexia’ trend popular zombie apocalypse despite binging health risks

Tufts University prof tests modern political theories Study suggests that the trend of students cutting food to drink more is growing against zombie invasions as the consumption of five drinks in a BY MIKE LAKUSIAK The Cord (Wilfrid Laurier University)

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Last week’s solutions

ACROSS 1 – Two-legged support 6 – Hawaiian greeting 11 – Cutting tool 14 – Exorbitant rate of interest 15 – Echolocation 16 – Trident-shaped letter 17 – The house of a parson 18 – Impassive 19 – B & B 20 – Sharpen 22 – Took on 24 – Not solid or liquid 28 – Cheap restaurant 30 – Free of an obstruction 31 – Funnel-shaped 32 – Of sedate character 33 – Baton 37 – “... ___ the cows come home” 38 – Midway alternative 39 – Bordeaux buddy 40 – Small quantity 43 – Israeli desert 45 – Large wave caused by tidal flow 46 – A wineshop 47 – Rollerblader’s protector 50 – Pert. to the thigh 51 – Leases 52 – Hindu music

53 – Egg head? 54 – Rhino relative 57 – Coup ___ 62 – Goose egg 63 – Moral precept of conduct 64 – That is to say... 65 – Botanist Gray 66 – Bluffer’s ploy 67 – Seashore DOWN 1 – Derelict 2 – This ___ stickup! 3 – Play on words 4 – Hosp. areas 5 – Tree matter that yields a coloring matter 6 – Donkeys 7 – Trent of the Senate 8 – Lennon’s lady 9 – Yes, in Yokohama 10 – Antiquated 11 – Steeple 12 – “Lou Grant” star 13 – Breezy 21 – Embrace 23 – Foot part 24 – Sudden bursts of wind 25 – Caper 26 – Milan’s La ___

27 – Actor Wallach 28 – French market town 29 – Feminine suffix 31 – Large wading bird 33 – Next after the second 34 – Enthusiastic 35 – Last letter of the Greek alphabet 36 – Growing in snow 38 – Gymnast Korbut 41 – Depilatory brand 42 – Bartender 43 – Like Bedouins 44 – Conductor de Waart 46 – Implore 47 – Basic monetary unit of Sweden 48 – One of the Leeward Islands 49 – ___ Gay 50 – Sham 52 – Reformer Jacob 55 – Loss leader? 56 – 21st letter of the Greek alphabet 58 – Comedian Philips 59 – Beverage commonly drunk in England 60 – Small batteries 61 – Big bang cause

ATERLOO (CUP) — The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) in Waterloo hosted a talk that was topical, but nonetheless of the utmost importance on Oct. 26, as Daniel W. Drezner gave the “signature” lecture on zombies, the G20 and international relations. The author of Theories of International Politics and Zombies, Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Medford, MA. His lecture at CIGI was based off of his book, which explores international relations supposing that the dead have begun to walk the earth, hungry for human flesh. “I particularly liked that as we were making the arrangements for this lecture, I was told this was the signature lecture on zombies, the G20 and global governance—because that implied that there had been previous lesser lectures,” Drezner began his talk, which focused on different theories of global politics including realism, liberalism, and neo-conservatism would react and fare were the zombie apocalypse to occur tomorrow. “World politics, as we know it, is really all about trying to find security in an insecure world,” he continued, noting the wrath of earthquakes, tsunamis, and other phenomena that have posed threats to global order. “These are all natural sources of fear, but if you take a look at the cultural zeitgeist, there’s clearly an unnatural fear that’s barely spoken about or just now being spoken about. Of course you know what I’m talking about—I speak, of course, of zombies.” The immediate reaction to an outbreak of zombie activity would be crucial, Drezner detailed, if the timeline of a typical zombie movie is to be considered. “If you take a look at the zombie canon, all the movies out there, they all follow the exact same trope: the undead are introduced in minute one, and by minute ten, everyone is living in a post-apocalyptic wasteland,” Drezner explained, through use of clips from a smattering of films. “This is a very serious problem. Even if there is only a remote possibility of zombies actually being created, the outcome is so horrific that we need to figure out what to do.” While Drezner’s examples of zombies elicited laughter and applause from the audience of around 200 people, he was also careful to include tangible international relations and political theory context for the circumstances attached to this admittedly unlikely situation. “You might remember that about five years ago former [U.S.] vicepresident Richard Cheney argued that if there was even a one per cent chance of al-Qaida launching a terrorist attack on American soil, the U.S. would be obligated to launch any and all available countermeasures to stop that attack from taking place,” he said. “Even if the odds were only one per cent, the outcome was so precipitously bad that it was worth investing a fair amount of energy to stop it.” “I’ll acknowledge that the likelihood of an al-Qaida terrorist attack

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Daniel W. Drezner delivers his lecture on zombies at CIGI. is much larger than the likelihood of zombies actually existing and eating us, but let’s say there’s a 0.001 per cent chance of some freak accident in a government lab triggering something really bad.” After the lecture, Drezner said that he was not particularly familiar with the zombie genre prior to the book and a blog post he wrote that spawned it. He explained his attention was first drawn to the subject through an article penned by Robert Smith, a University of Ottawa math professor. “I read the article and there was no politics in it. It generated a lot of response and I didn’t think I could do anything with it, but then I realized it actually works as a book. It doesn’t work as an article, obviously, but it works as a book,” he explained, noting that his book has shown up on the reading lists for some undergraduate political science courses in the U.S. “Your average 18-year-old—if they’re confronted with a traditional [international relations] text—their eyes might start to glaze over,” he said. “I kind of think of this as a gateway drug, getting them hooked initially and then really getting them on the crack of quality international relations theory.”

BY LEE RICHARDSON CUP Ontario Bureau Chief

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ORONTO (CUP) — More students are saving their calories during the day by cutting back on eating so that they can binge drink at night. The University of Missouri has released the results of a study showing that one in five students choose to drink instead of eat. This growing trend among university and college students, according to the study, has been called “drunkorexia.” Students in the study said that they are saving their money for alcohol and are aiming to get drunk quicker. Binge drinking is prevalent among students. “From our study so far, it’s really hard to find people who don’t engage in binge drinking at all,” said McMaster University psychology professor Suzanne Becker, who is researching the links between histories of binge drinking and cognitive performance. Short-term effects of binge drinking include the slowing down of the involuntary reflexes like breathing and the gag reflex, and declines in reflexes are an indicator of alcohol poisoning. “Generally people are okay with reacting to the expected, but poor

at reacting to the unexpected,” said Becker. “For instance, when someone runs out in front of your car, you’re very poor at dealing with the unanticipated. You might be fine at rolling along on autopilot, but if you have to deal with something unexpected, you’ll be slower, and you might miss things that should grab your attention, but don’t.” As well as a decline in reflexes, there are other short-term symptoms that are seen with excessive alcohol consumption. “Some of the symptoms that go along with alcohol poisoning can be very dangerous,” said Ian Culbert of the Canadian Public Health Association. “You have extreme confusion, the inability to be awakened, vomiting, seizures—so obviously you see some really nasty stuff.” Even the recovery from consumption can be seen to have effects on health. “The alcohol acts as a depressant, so your brain tries to compensate by generating more neural activity, so when you’re withdrawing from the alcohol you can have this rebound excitation that’s actually potentially toxic to the brain,” said Becker. “So alcohol withdrawal may be part of the reason why it hampers your brain particularly badly.” Binge drinking, which is classified

row for men and four drinks in a row for women, is typically seen more in teenagers and university-age adults. That has the potential to cause problems further down the line; the effects of binging seem stronger in young drinkers. “We know that the early developing brain is very vulnerable to alcohol—you get fetal alcohol syndrome when the fetus is exposed. Likewise, the adolescent and teenage brain is very vulnerable especially in the areas still undergoing development,” said Becker. “Early binging could cause long-lasting, permanent brain damage.” Other effects brought on by consistent binge drinking are common of other alcohol abuse disorders. “The wear and tear it has on your body, the breakdown of your social relationships, the inability to maintain professional employment—all those are the trickle down effects of alcoholism,” said Culbert. Culbert adds that the major issue is not the number of drinks that are consumed, but the timeframe of consumption and the way that drinks are processed by the body. “People always try to put a number on it because it makes it okay, but how the alcohol is processed through your body makes all the difference in the world,” said Culbert. “It tends to go back to what is the motivation for drinking in the first place.” That motivation can be anything from emotional triggers, the idea of alcohol as a stress reliever, or in the case of students, the simple aim to get drunk, or the desire to feel like an adult. “I’d like to know how you’d possibly get through to teenagers and what kind of information would it take to make them change their behavior,” said Becker. “Even in the face of really hard evidence that something you’re doing will cause brain damage, does that change their behaviour? Not really. We need massive public education,” she added.


November 7th, 2011

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A look at former Thunderwolves hockey players as they continue their careers

What’s up at LU

BY MIKE ST. JEAN Layout & Design Editor

BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

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ince CIS hockey returned to Lakehead for the 2001-02 season, Thunder Bay sports fans have been blessed to watch skilled players step on the ice at the Fort William Gardens. While many view Canadian university hockey as a ‘last-stop’ for players to compete in the game before entering the ‘real-world’ job market, a large number of former ‘Wolves have continued their career in the minor leagues or in Europe since graduating from Lakehead. Here is a look at where a handful of former Thunderwolves are playing since they last laced up the skates for the blue, yellow, and white.

Diary brought into light Lakehead University’s Chair of the Department of Languages and Professor of French, Alain Nabarra, has recently transcribed and edited the diary of Fr. du Ranquet, considered one of the most important Canadian missionaries of the nineteenth century.

Upcoming at LU November 9th — There will be a symposium from The Centre for Research on Safe Driving (CRSD). Dr. Juan Lupiáñez will give the lecture The Importance of Considering Vigilance when Interpreting Network Scores from the Attention Network Test. The event begins at 4 pm in ATAC 1007. November 9th — The French Movie night hosted by the Department of Languages will be showing l’Auberge Espagnole at 7:30 in ATAC 2015. November 11th — Remembrance Day. Ceremonies begin in the Agora at 10:50. November 11th — Dr. Scott Hamilton from Lakehead’s Department of Anthropology will present a seminar on Port Arthur Waterfront Archaeology: 19th century capitalism and nation building. The event begins at 12:30 in ATAC 2015. November 11th & 12th — Thunderwolves hockey team faces off against Guelph Gryphons. Both games start at 7:30 pm at Fort William Gardens.

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Where are they now?

News Briefs

This previously unpublished 756 page manuscript covers the years 1853 to 1877. The new volume also publishes the first part of the Journal, 1853-1856, and includes a postface by John O’Meara, Dean of Lakehead’s Faculty of Education. Extensive footnotes and appendices provide the reader with factual information to help comprehend the text and events.

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Pete Belliveau (Coach 2001-2007) HONOU/FLICKR

A guide to the Smartphone world: Part 1, Blackberry BY UKO ABARA

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his is the first of a four part series covering the smartphone options available to buyers, which will explore the Blackberry, iPhone, Android, and Windows phones and will overview the features of each device, giving buyers a clearer idea of their options. In 1999, Waterloo Ontario-based company Research In Motion (RIM) set foot in the business world with the aim to provide a mobile communications solution. Its product, the Blackberry 850, consisted of a monochrome display, 0.5 megabytes of memory, and four megabytes of storage—buyers who couldn’t afford that could spring for a model with half the hardware. Several iterations later, RIM has firmly planted itself in the corporate universe with its devices, while successfully catering to the general population as well. Presently, there

are three model lines: the Curve line is targeted towards the consumer, while the Bold and Torch lines focus on the business world. While the majority of companies now make touch screens, RIM has retained a design with a physical keyboard (except in the Torch 9850/9860), which is one of the main draws of the device. The keyboard has undergone several changes over the years, but has always been user-friendly. Even for someone with larger hands, typing is a breeze—so much so that using spell-check may be a nuisance. The other trademark feature of the RIM product line is the Blackberry Messenger, which is an instant messaging service that allows for snappy direct text, audio, picture, and video messages between two subscribers using any recent Blackberry model. Until recently, RIM was the only phone manufacturer to provide such a service. Phone calls are clear and the

devices tout the strongest antenna signals in the mobile game. Together, these features brought about Blackberries’ affectionate nickname, ‘Crackberries.’ The OS7 operating system that the devices run on is nothing to write home about, but it is functional. The interface is simple and clean, and users never find themselves digging through layers of menus. The Blackberry is arguably the best smartphone for email. Setting up different email accounts is a simple two-step process. Each inbox is clearly organized by date, and message threads are grouped together. The default ‘push’ system that RIM pioneered ensures that email is sent and received instantaneously. The security features embedded in the OS are top of the line and use an encryption system not even RIM can crack. Sent and received data are protected by default, but users can enable protection of any data and

of memory cards inserted into the phone. Users who are serious about privacy should consider Blackberry, though they should keep in mind that no security system is perfect. Customers looking for an immaculate set of applications, however, may want to keep walking. Although I found everything I needed (internet radio, Twitter, and Facebook), hardcore app users will be dissatisfied. Apps also take a long time to install, and depending on users’ abilities and phone specifications, browsing the web may be an unpleasant experience. Finally, recent devices do not have the ability to upgrade past OS7, so customers will be stuck with their operating system. I recommend this phone for buyers who want increased security and efficient messaging and email capabilities. Stay tuned next week when The Argus takes a look at the iPhone.

Long-time Thunderwolves fans will have trouble forgetting former head coach Pete Belliveau. Belliveau, who was named the team’s first coach in 2001, remained behind the bench of Lakehead’s hockey team until he resigned in early 2007. During his tenure with the ‘Wolves, Belliveau helped establish the squad as one of the top teams in the CIS, leading Lakehead to a Queen’s Cup Championship in 2006 as well as a trip to the CIS University Cup finals that same season. Since leaving Lakehead, Belliveau has remained active as a coach in CIS hockey, first taking over as bench boss of the Thunderwolves OUA rival Windsor Lancers in the summer of 2007, and then accepting the same role with Dalhousie, where he is currently in his third season as head coach of the Tigers.

Former ‘Wolves forward Scott Dobben takes a shot at the UOIT Ridgebacks net during a game at the Fort William Gardens in 2010.

Scott Dobben (Forward 2008-2010) Although he was only in Thunder Bay for a short time, centerman Scott Dobben left his mark on Thunderwolves hockey in a way that fans won’t be forgetting anytime soon. Brought in for the 2009 season after bouncing between the AHL, UHL, and ECHL, the Drayton, Ontario native and former Ottawa Senators draft pick provided the ‘Wolves with secondary scoring behind the team’s top line of Dan

Speer, Brock McPherson and Mark Soares. In two seasons with Lakehead, Dobben scored an average of more than one point per game, compiling 54 points in 49 OUA regular season contests. After leaving the Thunderwolves in 2010, Dobben travelled to Germany, where he suited up for ESV Kaufbeuren and served as the team’s assistant captain. The 28 year old forward currently plays for the Cardiff Devils in Great Britain’s Elite Ice Hockey League, where he has put up 6

You’re a winner! The Boston Bruins

BY MIKE ST. JEAN Layout & Design Editor

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e’ve all heard the term Stanley Cup hangovers before. However, a month into the NHL season, it appears as if the Boston Bruins are still drunk. Coming off a campaign in which they were NHL postseason champions for the first time since 1972, expectations were high for the Bruins. As the hockey season carries on, however, fans of the black-and-gold have had more questions than answers for their struggling franchise. Boston finds themselves stuck in dead last in the NHL’s Eastern Conference with a dismal 3-7-0 record – a far cry from a year ago, when they won the Northeast Division title and were among the league’s top teams.

Offense has been a problem for Boston, who finished third in total goals in the East in 2010-11 but is currently ranked near the bottom of the conference. While sophomore sensation Tyler Seguin is scoring at a point-a-game pace and Milan Lucic continues to show why he is considered one of the game’s top power forwards, not much else has gone right offensively for the Bruins. David Krejci, the team’s top center, currently has only one point to his credit, while new additions Benoit Pouliot and Joe Corvo, who were brought in to replace the departed Michael Ryder and Tomas Kaberle, have been disappointing. Thankfully for fans in Beantown, the team’s performance hasn’t been entirely negative. Tim Thomas and Tuukka Rask have provided the squad with

quality goaltending, and while their win-loss record doesn’t reflect that fact, a look at both ‘keepers save percentage and goals against average proves otherwise. Forward Patrice Bergeron has also been turning things around lately, going on a point streak at the end of the month and showing flashes of the offensive skill he displayed during the team’s post-season run. While the season is still in its early stages and the Bruins have ample time to turn things around, Boston is going to have to hit their stride sooner rather than later. Far too many teams have missed the playoffs by a few points, and it would be a shame to have a poor start force the defending Stanley Cup Champions to miss the post-season altogether.

goals and 12 points in 16 games this season.

Kyle Moir- Goaltender (2007-2011)

The ‘Wolves have been blessed with solid goaltending since they entered the CIS, and former Lakehead netminder Kyle Moir was no exception. Moir, a native of Calgary, Alberta, joined the Thunderwolves for the 2007-2008 season after four years with the Western Hockey League’s Swift Current Broncos, where he

FILE PHOTO BY COLE BREILAND

was named the CHL’s Humanitarian of the Year in 2007. Unfortunately for Moir, the LU’s excellence in the crease proved problematic, and he was forced to settle for splitting starts during his tenure in Thunder Bay, first behind ‘Wolves legend Chris Whitley, then with young netminder Alex Dupuis. The former fifth round draft pick of the Nashville Predators currently plays for Eindhoven Kemphanen in the Netherlands, his first international stop since graduating last year.


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Flashbacks

The Argus time machine digs through the archives

Lakehead Special teams key in series split seventh at OUA Cross Country T Championships BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

BY KIP SIGSWORTH

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he Lakehead cross country teams headed to Ottawa last weekend for the 2011 OUA Championships. Hopes were high heading in, but stiff competition made breaking into the top five difficult. Nonetheless, both the women and the men held their own against larger schools. The women’s team placed seventh in a 16-team field while the men placed seventh in a field of 15. Leading the way for the women was fifth-year senior Tess Naroski. Naroski started out conservatively and worked her way up through the field. Her time of 18:57.5 gained her 24th place in the women’s five-kilometer race. Finishing two seconds behind Naroski was fourth-year senior Hilary Qurion, who finished 26th. Qurion, like Naroski, rolled through the field well and was rewarded with her highest OUA place ever. Also acting as scorers for the ‘Wolves were Lisa Alaimo, Danielle Thiel, and Callie Roelfsema. Alaimo placed 35th, while Thiel and Roelfsema finished 46th and 62nd, respectively. Fourth-year Britt Bailey acted as Lakehead’s sole displacer, placing 81st. Guelph Gryphons, the perennial champions, were on top once again. The Gryphons scored an ultra-low 25 points, placing six runners in the top ten. Unfortunately for Guelph, Toronto’s Tamara Jewett stopped them from stealing all the accolades. Jewett won the individual race in a time of 17:33.5, beating out Guelph’s Genevieve Lalonde and Andrea Secaffien. Guelph’s Joanna Brown took the rookie of the year honours with her 15th place finish. On the men’s side, fourth-year senior Alastair Brown was out front for the Thunderwolves. Coming off a disappointing run in Wisconsin, Brown ran well, but ultimately missed OUA All-star honours by a mere 0.3 seconds. Brown placed 16th in a 102-man field and qualified for the national CIS championship. Brown’s time of 32:09.9 was a personal best. Following Brown was rookie Dominique Aulagnon. Aulagnon ran tough and placed 41st. Rounding out the scorers for the ‘Wolves were Dalton Rismay, Travis Roske, and Chris Brown. Dalton placed 52nd, while Roske and Brown placed 56th and 61st, respectively. Antonio Redfern Pucci and Connor Price acted as displacers for the ‘Wolves. Pucci placed 66th, while Price placed 68th. The men’s race did not disappoint, with Guelph beating Windsor by 20 points. The Gryphons went one-two in the individual race, with third-year Andrew Nixon taking the win in 30:51.8 over second-year Ross Proudfoot. The rookie of the year award went to Aaron Hendrikx of Guelph for his sixth place finish. “We had an excellent year,” commented Head Coach Kip Sigsworth. “We were prepared and executed quite well today, but that didn’t end up getting us the placing we were looking for. The athletes are fit and this fitness will help them heading into the indoor track season.”

he Lakehead University Men’s Hockey Team split the weekend series against the Laurier Golden Hawks, winning 3-1 on Friday and losing 3-2 on Saturday. Of Lakehead’s five goals this weekend, four were scored by Lakehead’s special teams. Lakehead’s two quick power play goals by Adam Sergerie and Ryan McDonald 31 seconds apart in Friday’s second period made the difference in the game. The ‘Wolves dominated the second

period, outshooting their opponents 17-2. Sergerie scored another special teams goal in the third period, this one short-handed. Zackory Ray ended Lakehead goaltender Alex Dupuis’ shutout bid with only 1:30 left in the game, leaving a final score of 3-1. The Hawks outshot the ‘Wolves 7-5 in the final period; however, the game was ultimately dominated by Lakehead, who outshot their opponents 35-16 overall. The Thunderwolves’ sevengame winning streak ended Saturday in a hard-fought 3-2 loss to Laurier. Ryan Daniels was out-

standing in the Golden Hawks net, turning away 45 of 47 shots. Lakehead controlled the play for most of the first period, but Laurier scored the only goal in the opening period when Thomas Middup beat LU goaltender Jeff Bosch at the 7:15 mark. Lakehead outshot Laurier 17-10 in the first. The Golden Hawks lead was extended to 2-0 at 8:02 of the second period, thanks to a goal by James Marsden. The ‘Wolves closed the gap to 2-1 at 16:43 on the power play when Trevor Gamache finally scored on Daniels, with Matt Caria and Sergerie assisting. Shots on goal in the

middle frame were 13-9 in favour of LU. Mitch Lebar put Laurier ahead 3-1 midway through the third period, but Lakehead narrowed the Hawks’ lead to 3-2 when Jake Carrick scored from Victor Anilane and Andrew Wilkins at 15:46. The ‘Wolves continued to apply pressure, outshooting the Golden Hawks 17-5 in the final 20 minutes, but Daniels was equal to the task and Laurier held on for the win. Next weekend, Lakehead will be hosting the Guelph Gryphons at the Fort William Gardens. Game time is 7:30.

‘Wolves complete perfect preseason BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

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espite traveling with only 10 players, the Lakehead University Men’s Basketball Team completed a perfect 8-0 preseason by defeating University of Wisconsin-Stout and Hamline University last weekend. The ‘Wolves defeated UWStout 70-67 in a tough battle on Friday. Down 58-52 with six minutes to go, Brendan King, Joe Jones, and Nate Wainwright had big 3-pointers to help LU escape

with the win. Starters Ryan Thomson and Yoosrie Salhia were missing on this trip, as they stayed home with injuries. The ‘Wolves were led in scoring by King, who had 15 points and five rebounds, and by Venzal Russell, who had 15 points. Jones also contributed ten points, shooting 7-10 on free throws, including two FT with five seconds remaining to clinch the game. On Saturday, in a game uncharacteristic of recent Lakehead wins, the ‘Wolves toughed out a

high scoring 98-95 to win over a tough Hamline University. Jones led Lakehead with 23 points and seven rebounds in what the Lakehead coaching staff felt was possibly his best game in the CIS. Russell had a slow start but rallied to score 22 points with nine rebounds and five assists. Greg Carter also had one of his finest games of the young season with 14 points, four assists and three steals. Wainwright also had double figures, with 10 points. Hamline proved effective with their dribble penetration, led by senior Mike Campbell, who

poured in 30 points without taking a 3-pointer shot. “While it was not our best performance on the defensive end, I was proud of how our players dealt with some adversity including some tough calls, foul trouble and playing short-handed because of injuries,” commented head coach Scott Morrison on the win. “We got down 12-0 to start the game but stayed focused and showed some of the intangible qualities necessary to be successful in the OUA.”

LU volleyball falls to 0-5

WBB falls short in Minot

BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

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he Lakehead University Women’s Volleyball team dropped two matches against the Guelph Gryphons last weekend, losing 3-0 on Friday (25-20, 25-15, 25-17) and 3-0 on Saturday (25-22, 25-17, 22-15). On Friday, the first set was a close battle until 20 points, when a string of unforced errors by Lakehead allowed Guelph to pull away with a 25-20 win. The Gryphons jumped ahead early in set two, taking a four point lead that they maintained through the technical timeout. From there, Guelph kept the pressure on and surged ahead to win 25-15. The third set saw the Gryphons again forge an early lead that they expanded into a comfortable 25-17 win. Lakehead coach Chris Green insisted that the team needs to get details right in order to achieve success. “This young team has got to learn fast to pay attention to details. When they learn that and practice it, they will reap its rewards,” he noted. Lakehead was led by Michelle Cournoyer and Jorie Daymond

with eight points each. Sara Hudson had 21 assists, as Lakehead’s hitting errors outnumbered Guelph’s 25-8. Brooke Lloyd led the Gryphons’ offense with 14 points, followed by Kaitlyn Krizmanich with ten points. Saturday’s fate was no different, as the ‘Wolves dropped three straight sets in a tough, well played match. Brittany MacLeod led the way for LU with 11 points, followed by Daymond with seven. Hudson had 21 assists. Green is confident that his team’s ability is there, but believes they have yet to compose their efforts into a complete match. “Tonight started off the right way,” Green said. “Point for point the girls battled smart and aggressively, following exactly what they designed and accepted as the ‘plan’. When one person in our game at 20-20 misses their assignment, veteran teams will make you pay. “Second set, again, we started following the game plan. You have to execute and have the wherewithal to maintain the plan. Unfortunately these players, rookie and senior, are struggling with that.”

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he Lakehead University Women’s Basketball team headed south of the border last weekend to take on Bemidji State University and Minot State University. The ‘Wolves played hard against Bemidji State on Thursday, but fell short and list the game 97-61 after the Beavers’ offense exploded in the second half. Lakehead’s leading scorer was Carolyn Fragale with 15 points and four assists, while veteran Lindsay Druery battled through continuous double team coverage to finish with ten points and five rebounds. Bemidji’s Kate Warmack had 18 points and nine rebounds, while point guard Shannon Thompson had 14 points, nine helpers, and seven steals. The Beavers’ entire 13-woman roster scored during the blowout, which was their home opener. The LU pulled up their efforts in games two and three, but fell short, losing 69-57 on Friday and 76-74 in OT on Saturday. Druery had a game high 23 points and eight rebounds on

COMPILED BY SEBASTIAN MURDOCH-GIBSON News Writer

Friday. Kelsey Bardsley added 15 points and Ayse Kalkan chipped in ten. MSU was paced by the Boag sisters, as Christina Boag scored a team-high 19 points and pulled down seven rebounds, while Carly Boag added 15 points and five rebounds. Katie Hardy also added 11 points and eight rebounds. Saturday‘s game went to overtime, with the ‘Wolves losing a heartbreaker by two after the extra frame. Lakehead was ahead until Minot State made a push and took the lead with three minutes to go. Lakehead was able to give one final push to tie the game and take it to overtime, but a turnover for Lakehead with 11 seconds left in OT secured a Minot State win. Druery led the way for the ‘Wolves with 23 points and 11 rebounds, while Fragale contributed 20 points, four rebounds, and two assists. “This was the type of game we needed heading into league play,” commented head Coach Jon Kreiner. “We won’t see a team with as big and skilled posts as this team, and, although we need to play better post defense without fouling, we did give ourselves a great chance tonight.”

January 4, 1971 Student Cafeteria

GARY MUSSON/ARGUS

Meet your profs: Dr. Robert Mawhinney BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

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akehead University is home to a high number of diverse programs manned by hundreds of dedicated professors. Chances are you’ll have the opportunity to take many different classes and experience a wide range of subjects during your academic career. To help you become more acquainted with the university’s faculty and numerous opportunities for research and study, the Argus will be featuring one professor a week, their research interests, and the opportunities for students in their field. A graduate from the University of Guelph’s PhD program, Dr. Robert Mawhinney is more than just an everyday theoretical chemist. As well as teaching Organic Chemistry, Dr. Mawhinney instructs Physical Chemistry III, part of the Advanced

Research Methodology course; Modern Chemistry; and an advanced course in Chemical Bonding Theory. On top of that, Dr. Mawhinney is the Coordinator for the Bioinformatics program. Dr. Mawhinney says that his current research is focused on “trying to understand why specific chemistry happens by building theories to explain the observed behaviour and models to predict what will happen when a component is changed.” Having worked for four years as a post-doctoral fellow at Concordia University in Montreal, Dr. Mawhinney has researched a variety of topics. “The two highlights from that time include designing new molecules for use in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing and discovering a new acyclic carbene, which is a molecule where a neutral carbon atom has a lone pair,” Dr. Mawhinney said. LU’s unique close-knit community drew in Dr. Mawhinney.

Do not be afraid of failure; it is one aspect of learning, which brings to mind a famous quotation by Robert Schuller: ‘What would you attempt to do if you knew you would not fail?’ Dr. Robert Mawhinney

“As a person from the Maritimes, I like the feel of a smaller community.

LU offered me the opportunity to advance my career in a familiar environment,” Dr. Mawhinney said. Since his arrival, Dr. Mawhinney’s greatest accomplishment has been the development of a new degree program, the HBSc in Bioinformatics program. “This is a new program where students learn the required skills from several sciences to understand the complexity of living organisms and build models to explain their interactions,” he said. Aspiring Theoretical Chemists have a variety of job opportunities. Pharmaceutical companies and the microelectronics industry look for theoretical chemists to develop new medications. Dr. Mawhinney’s advice to students is simple: “Do not be afraid of failure; it is one aspect of learning, which brings to mind a famous quotation by Robert Schuller: ‘What would you attempt to do if you knew you would not fail?’”

Dear People: Got complaints about the quality of food in the campus cafeteria? Why not operate it yourself? According to Bob Gude, former cafeteria manager, profits in the 1967-68 season were in excess of $17,000, all of which went to versa foods. Why shouldn’t this profit go to a student- organized body? Student labour could be employed on a fullor part-time basis. Then we would have no one to complain to but ourselves. If the AMS is not willing to do this, the SDU is. It has made sufficient studies to determine that student takeover of this cafeteria is economically feasible. What do you think? What do you want? Should students be allowed to run their own cafeteria?

December 1st, 1971 Symann Sez Happiness is changing the oil in a tractor during a snowstorm. Happiness is listening to a blues band play everything well except blues. Happiness is a rope and bucket in the well instead of running water. Happiness is a water fountain in the snow that doesn’t work. Happiness is losing a cold. Happiness is finding your stash intact after a raid by the narcs. Happiness is having change for the cigarette machine. Happiness is having people using that change for the cigarette machine instead of smoking yours. Happiness is clean laundry. Happiness is finding twenty dollars that you thought you lost. Happiness is paycheck at long last. Happiness is girls on your hockey team. Happiness is finding the rubber dispenser in the men’s washroom still works. Happiness is not having to buy any rubbers because you’re sterile. Happiness is finding out that women have a rubber machine in their washroom too. Happiness is trying to explain the retail sales act to a sales girl in a department store.

January 12th, 1972 Kill the Piano Player Kill the piano player is the latest in a series of excellent and uncommon movies presented by the New Dimension Cinema. Directed by Francois Truffuat, it combines pathos with slapstick comedy. The result is a surreal emotional mixup. Truffaut, famous for his 400 Blows, has crammed so many slants on comedy and drama into the movie that the audience is drawn into great concentration in an attempt to absorb this ingenuity. The movie can be seen Thursday January 13, 1972 at 6:30 and 7 pm in the UC Theater.


columns&editorials theargus the student voice of thunder bay

Room UC-2014B Lakehead University 955 Oliver Rd Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 Phone: (807) 766-7251 Fax: (807) 343-8803 E-Mail: editor@theargus.ca DANIEL BACSA Editor-in-Chief daniel@theargus.ca MICHAEL ST. JEAN Layout & Design Editor mike@theargus.ca DEREK WALL Business Manager derek@theargus.ca ERIN COLLINS News Editor erin@theargus.ca

Am I making you uncomfortable? Good, because you’re make me uncomfortable too BY GARY MUSSON “Many religions do not support gay rights, and therefore that should be also considered, as no one wants to make an environment an uncomfortable one to be in.” These are the wise words of a female grade 12 student from the Toronto District School Board. Last month marked the release of the 2011 Ontario Student and Parent Survey report by the Ontario Student Trustees’ Association-l’Association des élèves conseillers et conseillères de l’Ontario (OSTA-AECO), which asks parents and students about the current state of education in Ontario. The survey asked whether permission should be given to students wishing to establish a Gay Straight Alliance in their school. An overwhelming 87.8% of students agreed,

followed by a close 78.8% of parents. To receive more insight, the report included brief comments from students and parents about the questions, such as the one by Ms. TDSB above. Here is my interpretation of this comment: the comfort of a vocal majority takes precedence over the comfort of a marginalized minority. To me, this makes little sense. The acceptance of those falling outside of the heteronormative – queers, gays, lesbians, bisexuals, trans*, and so on – has come a long way, yet many youth may not feel comfortable in their own skin when first coming out, let alone feel comfortable enough to live as an out person in their schools. Often they face harm. A 1999 report says that queer youth are 3.4 times more likely to commit suicide than their hetero-

sexual counterparts. Remember the rash of youth suicides that occurred in late 2010? How about the death of Ottawa’s Jamie Hubley on Oct. 15? Most of these suicides were result of unrepentant bullying. Queer youth are a minority, but one that is slowly growing for every individual brave enough to come out. However, the bullying and suffering they receive as a result of making a majority comfortable is absurd. What about the comfort of the queer youth who have enough on their plate to deal with already? Or, conversely, what about my discomfort with your religious views? Why should I tolerate the formation of religious clubs in schools when they could potentially make me uncomfortable? Acceptance is a two-way street. So to Ms. TDSB: Honey, this is public school. You are going to get a

mash of diverse worldviews, some of which may clash, under one roof. Total comfort in the real world, much less in public school, is an impossibility. You are in the privileged position of taking solace in the fact that you are like the rest of your peers. Those who are not need the most support in order to gain at the very least a sense of acceptance of their own identity. The only thing you can do at this point is to learn to how deal with it. I’m sorry if my queerness makes you uncomfortable, but the fact of the matter is that your discomfort doesn’t excuse the deaths of countless youths that couldn’t find comfort of their own. The full report is available on the OSTA-AECO website, http://www. osta-aeco.org.

tion. It seems silly, I know, because your question seems straightforward. However, it is the modifier “good” that has me in a pickle. What “good music” means to each person is different. I would say in a general sense that I have an eclectic taste in music. I enjoy ska, rock,

country, folk, r&b, and some rap (honestly I think screamo is the only music I don’t enjoy). That being said, in each genre there are good musicians and bad ones. I think there are three components that make music good. The first thing that I believe makes a particular song good is the general sound of the music. The artist must have some ability to play his/ her instruments in order for it to be listenable. The band’s sounds must blend well and must be pleasant to listen to (although, again, what people consider to be pleasant will differ). The singer must have a voice that is unique and that suits the subject of the song. The second factor that I believe makes music good is lyrics. Lyrics should be relatable and should cause emotions in the audience. This could be as simple as laugher at a silly song, or as complex as tears

because it reminds you of some far away memory of your childhood. Of course, in instrumental songs, this can be accomplished through melody lines, which can also be powerful. The final factor that I think makes music good is the shared connection that people have when they listen to music. That moment when you’re at a concert and the singer turns the mic over to the audience for them to sing a few bars is powerful. The fact that good music allows people who don’t know each other to connect amazes me. Good music is about connection, be it between you and a friend, or between you and a thousand strangers. That artist has managed to captivate you and to make you feel something through their music, which is a good feeling. Hope I’ve Helped, Amy

CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor chris@theargus.ca AMANDA MCALPINE Arts & Culture Editor amanda@theargus.ca GARY MUSSON Photo & Graphics Editor gary@theargus.ca SEBASTIAN MURDOCH-GIBSON News Writer sebastian@theargus.ca AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer amy@theargus.ca CAROLINE COX Copy Editor caroline@theargus.ca TYLER COOK Circulation Manager tyler@theargus.ca The Argus is published by the Lakehead University Student Union. Letters may be submitted to via e-mail to editor@theargus.ca or online at www.theargus.ca. Students interested in writing for The Argus should contact an editor. The deadline for submissions is 6pm Thursday of the week prior to publication. The opinions expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of the editors, staff, or the Lakehead University Student Union. The Argus is a member in good standing with the Canadian University Press (CUP). Advertising inquiries should be directed to ads@theargus.ca. Please visit www.theargus.ca/advertising for rate and demographic information. All ads must be submitted by 1pm Friday of the week prior to publication. The Argus is the largest student newspaper in Northern Ontario with a weekly circulation of over 3,000. Founded in 1966, the Argus has covered issues important to students at Lakehead University and in Thunder Bay for nearly half a century.

Dearest Amy, What makes good music good? Yours, Pensive in Praetoria Dear Pensive in Praetoria, I have to admit that I was apprehensive about answering this ques-

From the editor…

Making disingenuous scientific claims is beyond dangerous L ast week, Baroness Susan Greenfield made statements at a conference in England where she claimed that there is evidence that computer games leave children with dementia. Earlier, she had also written about how Facebook and Twitter are creating a generation of self-obsessed people, and that they can rewire children’s brains and shorten their attention span. Greenfield is not someone who can be immediately dismissed, however. She has 30 honourary degrees, is a member of the House of Lords, was awarded the Royal Society’s Michael Faraday Prize, and received the CBE in 2000 for her contribution to the public understanding of science. Yet, despite her considerable credentials, she has said such irresponsible and dangerous things as: “unless we wake up to the damage that the gadget-filled, pharmaceuticallyenhanced 21st century is doing to our brains…” and “we are developing an ever deeper dependence on web-

sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life – and these technologies can alter the way our minds work.” These quotes are dangerous and irresponsible because those who know nothing about Facebook, Twitter, or Second Life (which, by the way, was never something the vast majority of people ever used) will use her statements as a justification for limiting and even dismantling the progress that we have made in technology and the Internet throughout the last decade. If these statements had any measure of truth to them, that would be one thing. Then, we can sit down and have chat about how this is affecting people and what we should do about it. The truth is, there is no evidence to her claims; in fact, there is such little truth to them that prominent scientists can’t help but speak out against her words. For example, two months ago she announced essentially the same thing – that video games harm children. That time, however, instead of saying it causes dementia, she claimed it

is contributing to the rise of autism diagnoses. It wasn’t until Oxford professor of psychology Dr. Dorothy Bishop objected that Greenfield started walking her statements back. “Most cases are diagnosed around the age of two, when not many children are using the Internet. And this rise has been documented over the past 20 years, long before Twitter and Facebook,” Bishop said. But don’t let the facts confuse you – Greenfield just decided to change her claim from games causing autism to causing dementia and told the media that, “it’s not really for [Dorothy Bishop] to comment on how I run my career.” Greenfield is a scientist, and yet instead of focusing on doing the things that scientists do – like performing extensive repeatable studies via utilizing the scientific method – she’s using her professional status and position to make dubious claims about reality. It’s funny for the moment, but there are people who take her seriously. Andrew Wakefield was taken

seriously in 1998 when he published a paper filled with falsified data that claimed the MMR vaccine caused autism. Investigations revealed he had multiple undeclared conflicts of interest, had manipulated evidence, and had broken several ethical codes. His research was eventually retracted in 2004, but the damage was done – millions of people now refuse to give vaccines to their children because of this unbelievable example of scientific misconduct. And this affects all of us. Greenfield owes not only science but society an ethically-executed scientific study. It’s irresponsible and terribly disingenuous for an academic of her magnitude to spout off her personal beliefs and observations as scientific fact, backed by the weight of her office and credentials. That’s not the way real science works, and on a world-scale it’s beyond dangerous. DANIEL BACSA Editor-in-Chief


op-ed

November 7th, 2011

10 arts&culture

Could we cast an Iron Man?

UVic professor’s new book, Inventing Iron Man, gleans from comics and science BY JENNY BOYCHUK The Martlet (University of Victoria)

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ICTORIA (CUP) — Have you ever thought about the possibility of a reallife superhero? Seems impossible, doesn’t it? UVic neuroscience and kinesiology professor Dr. E. Paul Zehr discusses this possibility in his new book, Inventing Iron Man: The Possibility of a Human Machine. Zehr, whose book came out last month, signed copies of Inventing Iron Man at Curious Comics in Victoria, B.C. on Oct. 9. The book examines what the under-layers of an Iron Man suit might look like, and how one could be constructed for real-life purposes such as physical rehabilitation after a stroke or spinal cord injury. So, is this a comic book or a scientific proposal?

“I tried to use a pop culture icon as a medium to explore science,” said Zehr. “Because we live in an age of technology, what can we do to try to amplify biology with technology? That’s sort of the theme with Inventing Iron Man. In particular, an area of amplification is the idea of using the brain to control devices.” Zehr has a philosophy about educating the public, which is to use a common ground. “There’s a lot of science in here, but I’m trying to put it in a way that’s interesting for people,” said Zehr. Although a seemingly unlikely duo, Zehr explained that science and comics compliment each other well. He discovered this thanks to his last book, Becoming Batman. Zehr said that, in some cases,

earlier comics foreshadowed what we have in the real world today. “When I was thinking about brain-machine interface and where we are now, if we go back to early ‘90s comics, there’s some imagery around brain ports and things that actually look a lot like what we have in real brainmachine interface now,” said Zehr. “These same kind of connections actually go into real people now, but were thought and written about in Iron Man comics in 1993.” While the idea of an Iron Man suit is exciting, there would also be many risks. “It leads into all areas of discussion on rehabilitation—there are probably some negative things could happen to your brain if you were connected to a machine,” said Zehr. “When we think of a superhero like Iron Man and of being connected to the suit to use it, we also have to realize it’s connected to us.” Zehr notes that part of the book’s purpose is to make readers realize that Iron Man’s armour is not just an article of clothing. The key to scientific advances is that they often change people’s perspectives. “I think the biggest thing about advances in science is that we get constrained by our paradigms and the normal things we do. This [book] kind of helps break those molds a little bit—it makes you think outside of it all.”

Life, liberty and the pursuit of the American Nightmare Reality shows reveal how much the American Dream has decayed BY CONNOR CAMPBELL The Xaverian Weekly (St. Francis Xavier University)

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NTIGONISH (CUP) —I find it best to watch television at night and alone. Then there are no distractions, no glare from the picture window that takes up most of the wall in my living room, nothing to do but become absorbed in some serious cultural criticism. Throughout my adult life, I’ve found that every time I turn on the television, I'm bombarded with yet another new reality show. See what happens when the last drop of fame has slipped from B-listers’ hands. See what happens when we place you (or your wife, your daughter, your son or whoever) in ridiculous situations. See what happens when ... well, when you are tired of our Game Show Gimmicks and Fear Factor Fads and would rather watch the picture window. Of all these hyper-reality shows, these airbrushed, spray-tanned pseudo-life dramas, there is one which speaks more to our time than all the rest: Storage Wars. According to A&E, the show is preoccupied with "follow[ing] teams of bidders looking to score it big in the high-stakes world of storage auctions." We watch as four “teams” travel to different storage lockers in Southern California (once as far as Las Vegas, but that’s a can of worms I won't open up here) and attempt to out-bid their rivals on “units” that have gone unpaid for at least three months. We watch, breathless, as they dig through mortgaged treasures. One character describes the

experience as a type of high. He is addicted to the feeling. We watch this. We watch as strangers dig through other strangers’ battered lifetimes in hopes of finding some sort of hidden treasure. But why? There has been a recent explosion of shows hell-bent on turning the recession of 2008 into some sort of game — Pawn Stars, Auction Hunters and Storage Hunters, to name a few. These highlight just how far the American Dream has fallen. An anonymous failure helps — with the last bounced check — to provide a better life for a lucky prospector. And the people on these shows are just that: prospectors. They are panning for gold in a stark, urbanized landscape where all that matters is hanging on to your money for longer than your neighbour. Redemption comes in the form of an antique desk or stereo equipment. The American Dream is no longer a sweet one, for one person’s achievement is now dependent on another's failure. Is that what was meant by “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?” I suppose it’s true, what Robinson Jeffers said: “One always knew that cultures decay.” The American ideal of one man versus the environment, from cowboys to pioneers, from Lewis and Clark to Neil Armstrong, is dead. It has been replaced by a free-for-all where nothing is sacred and empathy is for the weak; where relationships are failing and belief has been replaced with manipulation. Schadenfreude is a wonderful thing, I suppose, but for me, it’s time to put away my guilty pleasure and turn back to that beautiful picture window.

MSG/FLICKR

Can’t always get fresh at Tim Hortons BY LAURA BEESTON The Link (Concordia University)

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ONTREAL (CUP) — In late September, Riley Duckworth and her partner Patricia Pattenden exchanged an embrace outside a Blenheim, ON Tim Hortons window and were promptly asked to leave the premises. The person who was “uncomfortably distracted” by their kissing — which, it should be noted, was done in the presence of Duckworth’s parents — was Eric Revie, a Pentecostal assistant pastor at the Glad Tidings Community Church. Revie told Canadian queer magazine Xtra that the women were “being disgusting … tongues locked … grabbing genitals,” while the women denied anything lewd went down in front of their folks. They told the CBC the incident was a manifestation of the “rampant homophobia” that occurs in Blenheim and that the queer community was “feeling the chill.” Upon Revie’s complaint, a Tim Hortons manager asked the couple and Duckworth’s parents to leave, saying that the coffee chain was a “family friendly” establishment. Despite the irony of the situation — that the girls were frequenting the coffee shop with their family — they left and told their story. An “Occupy Timmies” sprung up on

Facebook, resulting in the staging of a “kiss-in” against the coffee-brewing corporation. This isn’t the first time Tim Hortons has felt the heat for questionable queer politicking. In 2009, the corporation came under fire for nearly providing 250 cups of free coffee for a “Marriage and Family Day,” in Rhode Island, which was organized by an anti-gay National Organization for Marriage group. Many Canadians weren’t happy with it. For many, kicking out the Ontarian lesbians confirmed that Tim Hortons — and, by extension, the very cultural fabric and values of this nation (if we are to believe Timmy commercials, anyways) — is “no homo.” On Oct. 24, nearly a month after the original incident, the company apologized, and the reverend has since said he didn’t know the orientation of the couple. So hold the Timbit: you’re telling me an incident was perhaps blown out of proportion because a member of the church was being judgmental? Shocking. What’s interesting about this story, however, is that when some of the LGBT community of Blenheim— which is said to have only three or four “out” members, but many allies — rallied behind the women and created an “Occupy Timmies” sit-in, the local Chatham-Kent LGBT com-

munity group said that, while they supported the women, they weren’t interested in attending. A man who only would go by “Randy” came out in full force, however, holding a sign that read: “It’s not gay, it’s not straight, it’s GET A ROOM.” Despite the national press coverage and the homophobic heat this particular story generated, the incident in question may actually have nothing at all to do with the sexual orientation of the women. Perhaps this is why Pride Chatham-Kent gracefully bowed out of the spotlight and Randy may have actually got it right: this has everything to do with a Pentecostal brother being a prude. It also says something about the unspoken rules of public displays of affection. Keeping lesbian love — or love in general, if we are to believe the Reverend didn’t know the girls were girls — behind closed doors seems to be what this issue boils down to. In what spaces, in 2011, is it acceptable to show affection with your partner? Does PDA warrant banishment from a fast-food chain? What are the rules of public affection? Does it depend on whether or not there’s a Holy Man in the building? How much tongue, or how little, necessitates denial of a double-double?

The women hope their story will start a necessary conversation about homophobia in Blenheim. Still, until we know more than this “he said,

she said,” a dangerous precedent has been set: the only French acceptable in Tim Hortons is a French Vanilla. You’ve been warned, Canadians.


arts&culture

theargus|www.theargus.ca

Trying to beat the clock, Timberlake makes it In Time

New owners bring classic approach Wine,

conversation, and song

Bay Meats Butcher Shop provides Thunder Bay with high end meat BY DEREK WALL Business Manager

W

hile the current owners of Bay Meats Butcher Shop may be new to the scene, their shop is nearing its fiftieth birthday. Cindy Salo and Bruce Krupp decided to take up the store last February – a deviation from their normal employments as private tax contractors and employed auditors for Revenue Canada. The two are graduates from Lakehead’s Business program. Salo and Krupp were looking to invest in a company in the Bay Street district. They wanted a business dealing with food and wild game because Krupp is an avid hunter. When the old butcher shop became available, Salo and Krupp added new touches, while also maintaining a classic approach to the meat store. Salo stresses that it’s important that everything be local. For that reason, all beef and chicken are raised in Canada. The store sells only AAA-graded beef, and proudly carries organic chicken and turkey products from St. Jacobs, Ontario. Obtaining Canadian pork, according to Salo, provides more of a challenge, but the company does what it can to ensure quality. The butcher shop offers a unique service to hunters, allowing them to rent the store’s equipment and staff to butcher wild game caught locally. This year, the shop has processed more than 100 moose and countless deer.

Jim Cuddy hits the stage for fourth year in a row BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

T

DEREK WALL/ARGUS

So many moose were hanging in the shop’s cooler that a refrigerator serviceman once received a panicked phone call from the shop explaining that their fridge urgently needed reinforcing supports in order to prevent it from collapse. Bay Meats’ commitment to selling quality meat is environmentally friendly. Currently, factory farming and the meat industry are wreaking havoc on the environment, animals,

and humans. Sustainably-raised meat sold in smaller volumes betters both the product’s quality and its nutritional value. Salo states proudly Bay Meats sells “high-end meat,” and that they “have a very good product.” The shop offers deals to students. They have put together a student special consisting of a dish of pasta and homemade meatballs, a twopound meatloaf, eight chicken

sausages, two sirloin steaks, eight smokies, and two pounds of bacon for $89. However, Salo warns about the sharp learning curve when it comes time to apply the lessons learned in accounting, pricing, and tax consulting courses to real life, saying that opening a business can be fraught with challenges for which academia cannot fully prepare students.

The Nature of Snowblink BY JILL CROCKFORD

S

PRESS PHOTO

nowblink: a white luminosity on the underside of clouds, caused by the reflection of light from a snowy surface. It is a name fitting for a duo that seems to reflect the beauty and simplicity of nature through their lyrics. Originally from California, the duo consisting of Daniela Gesundheit and husband Dan Goldman has since relocated to Toronto. The change in landscape resonates in their music, as there is a notable shift from an earthy and organic warm-weathered band to one that is increasingly creating sounds that reflect a city-alert vibe. “We are using more synthesized sounds in the band since the move, perhaps in part because of the more urban environment,” Gesundheit says. “The midi patch that we use most is called ‘Calm Beach,’ though, so that kind of puts nature back into the mix.” No matter how much the flat urban setting of Toronto may seep into their music, nature imagery remains prominent in their melodies. Gesundheit continues to exude nature, evident as she proudly strums her guitar adorned with deer antlers. “I am trying to encourage a deep and thoughtful listening to music, of course, but to all sounds and beings in our environment,” Gesundheit said. And Snowblink does just that. As soothing vocals fill the air, you can almost hear the ebb and flow of the

arts&culture 9

ocean tides, feel the warmth of the sun on your skin, and smell the sweet aroma of cedar trees. “Wild environments are essential to my understanding of the world. When I am in cities for too long, I start to lose my ability to solve problems and to communicate in ways that are satisfying. After even a short time in a wild environment, I come away with orderly, inspired thoughts and calm buoyant feelings. I bring the imagery from nature into my songs as a sort of homage to what I gain from being in its presence.” Snowblink’s debut album, Long Live, is an eclectic mix of 15 natureinfused songs. While the album is firmly grounded in the popular folk genre, evidence of gospel, indie pop, and country are also interwoven throughout. Gesundheit describes her musical style as “Dolly Parton meets Enya” and “experimental folk.” Musical artists such as Timber Timbre, Brian Eno, The Lim Family, Owen Pallett, and Lole Y Manuel serve as her inspiration. Snowblink is set to play at Apollo in Thunder Bay on November 11 at 9pm. An open book, Snowblink is known for inviting a sea of other performers to add embellishments to their whimsical tracks as they travel from city to city. With soft melodies reminiscent of lullabies, and Gesundheit’s angelic soprano vocals, Snowblink’s performance demands an intimate listen.

he kickoff for A Wine Affair, Thunder Bay’s wine tasting and auction, featured singer/ songwriter Jim Cuddy and a glass of Sant Margherita Pinot Grigio 2010 – an unstoppable combination. Cuddy’s show – his fourth annual appearance at the Thunder Bay Community Auditorium – was a unique and intimate experience for those who manage to purchase tickets before they sold out. The audience sits on the stage with Cuddy and enjoys wines he’s picked specially for the evening. They also have the opportunity to ask Cuddy questions. Cuddy played a solid two hours of acoustic music, accompanied by fiddler Anne Lindsey and guitarist Colin Cripps. Opening the show with “Watch Yourself Go Down,” a song from his latest album, Skyscraper Soul, Cuddy explained the song was about “a guy who makes it to the city trying to make it big and it doesn’t work out that well.” The crowd was roaring throughout Cuddy’s explanation, and cheering throughout his song. Cuddy jokingly explained his strategy, saying, “what makes a show like this so successful is that you learn to ally yourself with wine, because people don't remember the show. Did he play that song last year? I don't remember; it's a new show each time.” Playing a selection of songs from his three solo albums, as well as favourites by Blue Rodeo, Cuddy proved that he is capable of the telling the stories behind his songs. Cleverly paring two songs, “Everyone Watched the Wedding” and “Married Again,” Cuddy told about a fairytale wedding, as well as about a wedding that needed reevaluating. “I found [Prince] Will a very appealing character. He could be a lay-about like his brother, but he is accepting the mantle and becoming king. As I watched [the royal wedding], I found it very moving. The flipside of that is about a couple... they go to Vegas to get a divorce. They celebrate the divorce and have some alcohol and get to that point where a bad decision becomes a good one and they get married again.” The show was punctuated with face melting fiddle solos from Lindsey and great lead guitar lines from Cripps that brought the audience to their feet. Keeping the intimate and acoustic feel of the concert alive, the first song of the encore, “Wash Me Down,” was performed with no amplification. Its performance caused a hush to fall over the audience that was broken by the final number, a rockin’ version of Blue Rodeo’s “Trust Yourself.” In the end Jim Cuddy and (let’s face it) a bottle of Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio 2010 provided a night I know I’ll be repeating next year.

Spending your time wisely

BY SIMON WORLEY

T

aking place in the not so distant future, when time is literally money, In Time plays out as an allegory to today’s “rich control the poor” society. The idea is simple: humans are genetically modified to have a timer begin to count down after their 25th birthday. They only have one year on their clock and once this time is up, so is their life. Justin Timberlake plays Will Salas, a do-gooder who lives one day at a time and must work to keep his clock running. It seems like he is destined for a life of hard labor and a menial existence until he crosses paths with a mysterious stranger. Before he knows it, he is given a century and sets off to see how others live. At this point, the movie finds its legs and starts exploring the fragility of the system by which control is maintained. By chance or by choice, In Time couldn’t be released at a better moment. This is Hollywood’s science fiction answer to occupy Wall Street: the 99% fighting against the money hungry 1%. The film plays out a Robin Hood

theme as Will and his reluctant recruit Sylvia (Amanda Seyfried) steal time from the rich and add years to the lives of the poor. However important the movie’s message might be, at times I felt like I was getting hit over the head with it rather than being allowed to work the message out for myself. Andrew Niccol did a good job getting the most out of his actors and ensured that the message was obvious and that the science fiction was interesting. Niccol is known for penning unique, high concept scripts for films like Gattaca and The Truman Show. Conceptually, In Time didn’t disappoint. The film did disappoint, surprisingly, in its pun-heavy script. I found myself laughing out loud as characters made statements like “time waits for no man” and “time heals all wounds” with absolutely straight faces. At times, the dialogue was cringeworthy, and it continually brought me out of the movie and into the theater – a shame in a movie with a strong concept. Every possible play on the word “time” was overused.

SCREEN CAPTURE

In Time is a high concept movie that is marred by a weak script and a heavy-handed message. If Niccol had

allowed me to think for myself, I may have had some time for his movie. I left the cinema with a new appre-

ciation for the value of time, only to realize I’d just spent two hours of it that I’ll never get back.

buying a cup of coffee; you’re being part of an experience.” Espresso and local Boreal Forest Teas are also available, so there is no need to put the kettle on. Aside from the 100% organic fair trade coffee, the menu has a great selection of handcrafted sandwiches forged by manager Kerry Crooks. I recommend the garlic induced Killer Tomato with basil cream cheese, but the bestseller is the Toasted Turkey with arugula pesto. Locally-sourced ingredients are a nice touch, and even my cinnamon dusted Americano with cream came in a locally fired mug. “Being local’s important, but delicious quality is the focus,” says Hamilton. The teak Thai furniture and colorful Nepalese art create a unique atmosphere that is foreign yet famil-

iar. Free wifi and great music follow suit: the friendly staff encourages musicians to come kick it at the open mic nights Wednesday from 8-11. It’s hard not to slip off your shoes when it’s this easy to settle in. Hamilton sees the Bay Street district as a community, and he speaks highly of his competition. “You’ve got to think of other people as yourself and make the decision to go together. After all, we all share the same stomachs; we share the same pockets,” Hamilton said. The Bean Fiend is a rockin’ lunch spot, and with the possible addition of a shisha bar in the warmer months, hookah’n resist? Come bask in the whistling whisper of espressos and the tingling touch of swirling spoons. The Bean Fiend is sure to carve a culture for the conscientious craver.

Espresso yourself

The Bean Fiend makes it easy to sip into something more comfortable

KEVIN CHEVAL

BY KEVIN CHAVAL

O

wner Brian Hamilton was sipping wine with a friend when he decided to combine west coast coffee culture with a quality sandwich bar and “bring out a cultural revolution.”

The Bean Fiend has quickly adapted to Thunder Bay’s needs. Hamilton’s passion for quality coffee has created an “inviting space for a conscious palate.” Seeing the way the corporate coffee market was creating long lines and unremarkable experiences, Hamilton admits, “If this is the

way the world is going, I want to do the opposite. We do this because we believe in it.” The moment you walk in the door, the earthy space seems to unfold in your favour. The bold aromas of dark roasted brews are a kind reminder that, as Hamilton says, “you’re not


arts&culture

theargus|www.theargus.ca

Trying to beat the clock, Timberlake makes it In Time

New owners bring classic approach Wine,

conversation, and song

Bay Meats Butcher Shop provides Thunder Bay with high end meat BY DEREK WALL Business Manager

W

hile the current owners of Bay Meats Butcher Shop may be new to the scene, their shop is nearing its fiftieth birthday. Cindy Salo and Bruce Krupp decided to take up the store last February – a deviation from their normal employments as private tax contractors and employed auditors for Revenue Canada. The two are graduates from Lakehead’s Business program. Salo and Krupp were looking to invest in a company in the Bay Street district. They wanted a business dealing with food and wild game because Krupp is an avid hunter. When the old butcher shop became available, Salo and Krupp added new touches, while also maintaining a classic approach to the meat store. Salo stresses that it’s important that everything be local. For that reason, all beef and chicken are raised in Canada. The store sells only AAA-graded beef, and proudly carries organic chicken and turkey products from St. Jacobs, Ontario. Obtaining Canadian pork, according to Salo, provides more of a challenge, but the company does what it can to ensure quality. The butcher shop offers a unique service to hunters, allowing them to rent the store’s equipment and staff to butcher wild game caught locally. This year, the shop has processed more than 100 moose and countless deer.

Jim Cuddy hits the stage for fourth year in a row BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

T

DEREK WALL/ARGUS

So many moose were hanging in the shop’s cooler that a refrigerator serviceman once received a panicked phone call from the shop explaining that their fridge urgently needed reinforcing supports in order to prevent it from collapse. Bay Meats’ commitment to selling quality meat is environmentally friendly. Currently, factory farming and the meat industry are wreaking havoc on the environment, animals,

and humans. Sustainably-raised meat sold in smaller volumes betters both the product’s quality and its nutritional value. Salo states proudly Bay Meats sells “high-end meat,” and that they “have a very good product.” The shop offers deals to students. They have put together a student special consisting of a dish of pasta and homemade meatballs, a twopound meatloaf, eight chicken

sausages, two sirloin steaks, eight smokies, and two pounds of bacon for $89. However, Salo warns about the sharp learning curve when it comes time to apply the lessons learned in accounting, pricing, and tax consulting courses to real life, saying that opening a business can be fraught with challenges for which academia cannot fully prepare students.

The Nature of Snowblink BY JILL CROCKFORD

S

PRESS PHOTO

nowblink: a white luminosity on the underside of clouds, caused by the reflection of light from a snowy surface. It is a name fitting for a duo that seems to reflect the beauty and simplicity of nature through their lyrics. Originally from California, the duo consisting of Daniela Gesundheit and husband Dan Goldman has since relocated to Toronto. The change in landscape resonates in their music, as there is a notable shift from an earthy and organic warm-weathered band to one that is increasingly creating sounds that reflect a city-alert vibe. “We are using more synthesized sounds in the band since the move, perhaps in part because of the more urban environment,” Gesundheit says. “The midi patch that we use most is called ‘Calm Beach,’ though, so that kind of puts nature back into the mix.” No matter how much the flat urban setting of Toronto may seep into their music, nature imagery remains prominent in their melodies. Gesundheit continues to exude nature, evident as she proudly strums her guitar adorned with deer antlers. “I am trying to encourage a deep and thoughtful listening to music, of course, but to all sounds and beings in our environment,” Gesundheit said. And Snowblink does just that. As soothing vocals fill the air, you can almost hear the ebb and flow of the

arts&culture 9

ocean tides, feel the warmth of the sun on your skin, and smell the sweet aroma of cedar trees. “Wild environments are essential to my understanding of the world. When I am in cities for too long, I start to lose my ability to solve problems and to communicate in ways that are satisfying. After even a short time in a wild environment, I come away with orderly, inspired thoughts and calm buoyant feelings. I bring the imagery from nature into my songs as a sort of homage to what I gain from being in its presence.” Snowblink’s debut album, Long Live, is an eclectic mix of 15 natureinfused songs. While the album is firmly grounded in the popular folk genre, evidence of gospel, indie pop, and country are also interwoven throughout. Gesundheit describes her musical style as “Dolly Parton meets Enya” and “experimental folk.” Musical artists such as Timber Timbre, Brian Eno, The Lim Family, Owen Pallett, and Lole Y Manuel serve as her inspiration. Snowblink is set to play at Apollo in Thunder Bay on November 11 at 9pm. An open book, Snowblink is known for inviting a sea of other performers to add embellishments to their whimsical tracks as they travel from city to city. With soft melodies reminiscent of lullabies, and Gesundheit’s angelic soprano vocals, Snowblink’s performance demands an intimate listen.

he kickoff for A Wine Affair, Thunder Bay’s wine tasting and auction, featured singer/ songwriter Jim Cuddy and a glass of Sant Margherita Pinot Grigio 2010 – an unstoppable combination. Cuddy’s show – his fourth annual appearance at the Thunder Bay Community Auditorium – was a unique and intimate experience for those who manage to purchase tickets before they sold out. The audience sits on the stage with Cuddy and enjoys wines he’s picked specially for the evening. They also have the opportunity to ask Cuddy questions. Cuddy played a solid two hours of acoustic music, accompanied by fiddler Anne Lindsey and guitarist Colin Cripps. Opening the show with “Watch Yourself Go Down,” a song from his latest album, Skyscraper Soul, Cuddy explained the song was about “a guy who makes it to the city trying to make it big and it doesn’t work out that well.” The crowd was roaring throughout Cuddy’s explanation, and cheering throughout his song. Cuddy jokingly explained his strategy, saying, “what makes a show like this so successful is that you learn to ally yourself with wine, because people don't remember the show. Did he play that song last year? I don't remember; it's a new show each time.” Playing a selection of songs from his three solo albums, as well as favourites by Blue Rodeo, Cuddy proved that he is capable of the telling the stories behind his songs. Cleverly paring two songs, “Everyone Watched the Wedding” and “Married Again,” Cuddy told about a fairytale wedding, as well as about a wedding that needed reevaluating. “I found [Prince] Will a very appealing character. He could be a lay-about like his brother, but he is accepting the mantle and becoming king. As I watched [the royal wedding], I found it very moving. The flipside of that is about a couple... they go to Vegas to get a divorce. They celebrate the divorce and have some alcohol and get to that point where a bad decision becomes a good one and they get married again.” The show was punctuated with face melting fiddle solos from Lindsey and great lead guitar lines from Cripps that brought the audience to their feet. Keeping the intimate and acoustic feel of the concert alive, the first song of the encore, “Wash Me Down,” was performed with no amplification. Its performance caused a hush to fall over the audience that was broken by the final number, a rockin’ version of Blue Rodeo’s “Trust Yourself.” In the end Jim Cuddy and (let’s face it) a bottle of Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio 2010 provided a night I know I’ll be repeating next year.

Spending your time wisely

BY SIMON WORLEY

T

aking place in the not so distant future, when time is literally money, In Time plays out as an allegory to today’s “rich control the poor” society. The idea is simple: humans are genetically modified to have a timer begin to count down after their 25th birthday. They only have one year on their clock and once this time is up, so is their life. Justin Timberlake plays Will Salas, a do-gooder who lives one day at a time and must work to keep his clock running. It seems like he is destined for a life of hard labor and a menial existence until he crosses paths with a mysterious stranger. Before he knows it, he is given a century and sets off to see how others live. At this point, the movie finds its legs and starts exploring the fragility of the system by which control is maintained. By chance or by choice, In Time couldn’t be released at a better moment. This is Hollywood’s science fiction answer to occupy Wall Street: the 99% fighting against the money hungry 1%. The film plays out a Robin Hood

theme as Will and his reluctant recruit Sylvia (Amanda Seyfried) steal time from the rich and add years to the lives of the poor. However important the movie’s message might be, at times I felt like I was getting hit over the head with it rather than being allowed to work the message out for myself. Andrew Niccol did a good job getting the most out of his actors and ensured that the message was obvious and that the science fiction was interesting. Niccol is known for penning unique, high concept scripts for films like Gattaca and The Truman Show. Conceptually, In Time didn’t disappoint. The film did disappoint, surprisingly, in its pun-heavy script. I found myself laughing out loud as characters made statements like “time waits for no man” and “time heals all wounds” with absolutely straight faces. At times, the dialogue was cringeworthy, and it continually brought me out of the movie and into the theater – a shame in a movie with a strong concept. Every possible play on the word “time” was overused.

SCREEN CAPTURE

In Time is a high concept movie that is marred by a weak script and a heavy-handed message. If Niccol had

allowed me to think for myself, I may have had some time for his movie. I left the cinema with a new appre-

ciation for the value of time, only to realize I’d just spent two hours of it that I’ll never get back.

buying a cup of coffee; you’re being part of an experience.” Espresso and local Boreal Forest Teas are also available, so there is no need to put the kettle on. Aside from the 100% organic fair trade coffee, the menu has a great selection of handcrafted sandwiches forged by manager Kerry Crooks. I recommend the garlic induced Killer Tomato with basil cream cheese, but the bestseller is the Toasted Turkey with arugula pesto. Locally-sourced ingredients are a nice touch, and even my cinnamon dusted Americano with cream came in a locally fired mug. “Being local’s important, but delicious quality is the focus,” says Hamilton. The teak Thai furniture and colorful Nepalese art create a unique atmosphere that is foreign yet famil-

iar. Free wifi and great music follow suit: the friendly staff encourages musicians to come kick it at the open mic nights Wednesday from 8-11. It’s hard not to slip off your shoes when it’s this easy to settle in. Hamilton sees the Bay Street district as a community, and he speaks highly of his competition. “You’ve got to think of other people as yourself and make the decision to go together. After all, we all share the same stomachs; we share the same pockets,” Hamilton said. The Bean Fiend is a rockin’ lunch spot, and with the possible addition of a shisha bar in the warmer months, hookah’n resist? Come bask in the whistling whisper of espressos and the tingling touch of swirling spoons. The Bean Fiend is sure to carve a culture for the conscientious craver.

Espresso yourself

The Bean Fiend makes it easy to sip into something more comfortable

KEVIN CHEVAL

BY KEVIN CHAVAL

O

wner Brian Hamilton was sipping wine with a friend when he decided to combine west coast coffee culture with a quality sandwich bar and “bring out a cultural revolution.”

The Bean Fiend has quickly adapted to Thunder Bay’s needs. Hamilton’s passion for quality coffee has created an “inviting space for a conscious palate.” Seeing the way the corporate coffee market was creating long lines and unremarkable experiences, Hamilton admits, “If this is the

way the world is going, I want to do the opposite. We do this because we believe in it.” The moment you walk in the door, the earthy space seems to unfold in your favour. The bold aromas of dark roasted brews are a kind reminder that, as Hamilton says, “you’re not


op-ed

November 7th, 2011

10 arts&culture

Could we cast an Iron Man?

UVic professor’s new book, Inventing Iron Man, gleans from comics and science BY JENNY BOYCHUK The Martlet (University of Victoria)

V

ICTORIA (CUP) — Have you ever thought about the possibility of a reallife superhero? Seems impossible, doesn’t it? UVic neuroscience and kinesiology professor Dr. E. Paul Zehr discusses this possibility in his new book, Inventing Iron Man: The Possibility of a Human Machine. Zehr, whose book came out last month, signed copies of Inventing Iron Man at Curious Comics in Victoria, B.C. on Oct. 9. The book examines what the under-layers of an Iron Man suit might look like, and how one could be constructed for real-life purposes such as physical rehabilitation after a stroke or spinal cord injury. So, is this a comic book or a scientific proposal?

“I tried to use a pop culture icon as a medium to explore science,” said Zehr. “Because we live in an age of technology, what can we do to try to amplify biology with technology? That’s sort of the theme with Inventing Iron Man. In particular, an area of amplification is the idea of using the brain to control devices.” Zehr has a philosophy about educating the public, which is to use a common ground. “There’s a lot of science in here, but I’m trying to put it in a way that’s interesting for people,” said Zehr. Although a seemingly unlikely duo, Zehr explained that science and comics compliment each other well. He discovered this thanks to his last book, Becoming Batman. Zehr said that, in some cases,

earlier comics foreshadowed what we have in the real world today. “When I was thinking about brain-machine interface and where we are now, if we go back to early ‘90s comics, there’s some imagery around brain ports and things that actually look a lot like what we have in real brainmachine interface now,” said Zehr. “These same kind of connections actually go into real people now, but were thought and written about in Iron Man comics in 1993.” While the idea of an Iron Man suit is exciting, there would also be many risks. “It leads into all areas of discussion on rehabilitation—there are probably some negative things could happen to your brain if you were connected to a machine,” said Zehr. “When we think of a superhero like Iron Man and of being connected to the suit to use it, we also have to realize it’s connected to us.” Zehr notes that part of the book’s purpose is to make readers realize that Iron Man’s armour is not just an article of clothing. The key to scientific advances is that they often change people’s perspectives. “I think the biggest thing about advances in science is that we get constrained by our paradigms and the normal things we do. This [book] kind of helps break those molds a little bit—it makes you think outside of it all.”

Life, liberty and the pursuit of the American Nightmare Reality shows reveal how much the American Dream has decayed BY CONNOR CAMPBELL The Xaverian Weekly (St. Francis Xavier University)

A

NTIGONISH (CUP) —I find it best to watch television at night and alone. Then there are no distractions, no glare from the picture window that takes up most of the wall in my living room, nothing to do but become absorbed in some serious cultural criticism. Throughout my adult life, I’ve found that every time I turn on the television, I'm bombarded with yet another new reality show. See what happens when the last drop of fame has slipped from B-listers’ hands. See what happens when we place you (or your wife, your daughter, your son or whoever) in ridiculous situations. See what happens when ... well, when you are tired of our Game Show Gimmicks and Fear Factor Fads and would rather watch the picture window. Of all these hyper-reality shows, these airbrushed, spray-tanned pseudo-life dramas, there is one which speaks more to our time than all the rest: Storage Wars. According to A&E, the show is preoccupied with "follow[ing] teams of bidders looking to score it big in the high-stakes world of storage auctions." We watch as four “teams” travel to different storage lockers in Southern California (once as far as Las Vegas, but that’s a can of worms I won't open up here) and attempt to out-bid their rivals on “units” that have gone unpaid for at least three months. We watch, breathless, as they dig through mortgaged treasures. One character describes the

experience as a type of high. He is addicted to the feeling. We watch this. We watch as strangers dig through other strangers’ battered lifetimes in hopes of finding some sort of hidden treasure. But why? There has been a recent explosion of shows hell-bent on turning the recession of 2008 into some sort of game — Pawn Stars, Auction Hunters and Storage Hunters, to name a few. These highlight just how far the American Dream has fallen. An anonymous failure helps — with the last bounced check — to provide a better life for a lucky prospector. And the people on these shows are just that: prospectors. They are panning for gold in a stark, urbanized landscape where all that matters is hanging on to your money for longer than your neighbour. Redemption comes in the form of an antique desk or stereo equipment. The American Dream is no longer a sweet one, for one person’s achievement is now dependent on another's failure. Is that what was meant by “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness?” I suppose it’s true, what Robinson Jeffers said: “One always knew that cultures decay.” The American ideal of one man versus the environment, from cowboys to pioneers, from Lewis and Clark to Neil Armstrong, is dead. It has been replaced by a free-for-all where nothing is sacred and empathy is for the weak; where relationships are failing and belief has been replaced with manipulation. Schadenfreude is a wonderful thing, I suppose, but for me, it’s time to put away my guilty pleasure and turn back to that beautiful picture window.

MSG/FLICKR

Can’t always get fresh at Tim Hortons BY LAURA BEESTON The Link (Concordia University)

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ONTREAL (CUP) — In late September, Riley Duckworth and her partner Patricia Pattenden exchanged an embrace outside a Blenheim, ON Tim Hortons window and were promptly asked to leave the premises. The person who was “uncomfortably distracted” by their kissing — which, it should be noted, was done in the presence of Duckworth’s parents — was Eric Revie, a Pentecostal assistant pastor at the Glad Tidings Community Church. Revie told Canadian queer magazine Xtra that the women were “being disgusting … tongues locked … grabbing genitals,” while the women denied anything lewd went down in front of their folks. They told the CBC the incident was a manifestation of the “rampant homophobia” that occurs in Blenheim and that the queer community was “feeling the chill.” Upon Revie’s complaint, a Tim Hortons manager asked the couple and Duckworth’s parents to leave, saying that the coffee chain was a “family friendly” establishment. Despite the irony of the situation — that the girls were frequenting the coffee shop with their family — they left and told their story. An “Occupy Timmies” sprung up on

Facebook, resulting in the staging of a “kiss-in” against the coffee-brewing corporation. This isn’t the first time Tim Hortons has felt the heat for questionable queer politicking. In 2009, the corporation came under fire for nearly providing 250 cups of free coffee for a “Marriage and Family Day,” in Rhode Island, which was organized by an anti-gay National Organization for Marriage group. Many Canadians weren’t happy with it. For many, kicking out the Ontarian lesbians confirmed that Tim Hortons — and, by extension, the very cultural fabric and values of this nation (if we are to believe Timmy commercials, anyways) — is “no homo.” On Oct. 24, nearly a month after the original incident, the company apologized, and the reverend has since said he didn’t know the orientation of the couple. So hold the Timbit: you’re telling me an incident was perhaps blown out of proportion because a member of the church was being judgmental? Shocking. What’s interesting about this story, however, is that when some of the LGBT community of Blenheim— which is said to have only three or four “out” members, but many allies — rallied behind the women and created an “Occupy Timmies” sit-in, the local Chatham-Kent LGBT com-

munity group said that, while they supported the women, they weren’t interested in attending. A man who only would go by “Randy” came out in full force, however, holding a sign that read: “It’s not gay, it’s not straight, it’s GET A ROOM.” Despite the national press coverage and the homophobic heat this particular story generated, the incident in question may actually have nothing at all to do with the sexual orientation of the women. Perhaps this is why Pride Chatham-Kent gracefully bowed out of the spotlight and Randy may have actually got it right: this has everything to do with a Pentecostal brother being a prude. It also says something about the unspoken rules of public displays of affection. Keeping lesbian love — or love in general, if we are to believe the Reverend didn’t know the girls were girls — behind closed doors seems to be what this issue boils down to. In what spaces, in 2011, is it acceptable to show affection with your partner? Does PDA warrant banishment from a fast-food chain? What are the rules of public affection? Does it depend on whether or not there’s a Holy Man in the building? How much tongue, or how little, necessitates denial of a double-double?

The women hope their story will start a necessary conversation about homophobia in Blenheim. Still, until we know more than this “he said,

she said,” a dangerous precedent has been set: the only French acceptable in Tim Hortons is a French Vanilla. You’ve been warned, Canadians.


columns&editorials theargus the student voice of thunder bay

Room UC-2014B Lakehead University 955 Oliver Rd Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 5E1 Phone: (807) 766-7251 Fax: (807) 343-8803 E-Mail: editor@theargus.ca DANIEL BACSA Editor-in-Chief daniel@theargus.ca MICHAEL ST. JEAN Layout & Design Editor mike@theargus.ca DEREK WALL Business Manager derek@theargus.ca ERIN COLLINS News Editor erin@theargus.ca

Am I making you uncomfortable? Good, because you’re make me uncomfortable too BY GARY MUSSON “Many religions do not support gay rights, and therefore that should be also considered, as no one wants to make an environment an uncomfortable one to be in.” These are the wise words of a female grade 12 student from the Toronto District School Board. Last month marked the release of the 2011 Ontario Student and Parent Survey report by the Ontario Student Trustees’ Association-l’Association des élèves conseillers et conseillères de l’Ontario (OSTA-AECO), which asks parents and students about the current state of education in Ontario. The survey asked whether permission should be given to students wishing to establish a Gay Straight Alliance in their school. An overwhelming 87.8% of students agreed,

followed by a close 78.8% of parents. To receive more insight, the report included brief comments from students and parents about the questions, such as the one by Ms. TDSB above. Here is my interpretation of this comment: the comfort of a vocal majority takes precedence over the comfort of a marginalized minority. To me, this makes little sense. The acceptance of those falling outside of the heteronormative – queers, gays, lesbians, bisexuals, trans*, and so on – has come a long way, yet many youth may not feel comfortable in their own skin when first coming out, let alone feel comfortable enough to live as an out person in their schools. Often they face harm. A 1999 report says that queer youth are 3.4 times more likely to commit suicide than their hetero-

sexual counterparts. Remember the rash of youth suicides that occurred in late 2010? How about the death of Ottawa’s Jamie Hubley on Oct. 15? Most of these suicides were result of unrepentant bullying. Queer youth are a minority, but one that is slowly growing for every individual brave enough to come out. However, the bullying and suffering they receive as a result of making a majority comfortable is absurd. What about the comfort of the queer youth who have enough on their plate to deal with already? Or, conversely, what about my discomfort with your religious views? Why should I tolerate the formation of religious clubs in schools when they could potentially make me uncomfortable? Acceptance is a two-way street. So to Ms. TDSB: Honey, this is public school. You are going to get a

mash of diverse worldviews, some of which may clash, under one roof. Total comfort in the real world, much less in public school, is an impossibility. You are in the privileged position of taking solace in the fact that you are like the rest of your peers. Those who are not need the most support in order to gain at the very least a sense of acceptance of their own identity. The only thing you can do at this point is to learn to how deal with it. I’m sorry if my queerness makes you uncomfortable, but the fact of the matter is that your discomfort doesn’t excuse the deaths of countless youths that couldn’t find comfort of their own. The full report is available on the OSTA-AECO website, http://www. osta-aeco.org.

tion. It seems silly, I know, because your question seems straightforward. However, it is the modifier “good” that has me in a pickle. What “good music” means to each person is different. I would say in a general sense that I have an eclectic taste in music. I enjoy ska, rock,

country, folk, r&b, and some rap (honestly I think screamo is the only music I don’t enjoy). That being said, in each genre there are good musicians and bad ones. I think there are three components that make music good. The first thing that I believe makes a particular song good is the general sound of the music. The artist must have some ability to play his/ her instruments in order for it to be listenable. The band’s sounds must blend well and must be pleasant to listen to (although, again, what people consider to be pleasant will differ). The singer must have a voice that is unique and that suits the subject of the song. The second factor that I believe makes music good is lyrics. Lyrics should be relatable and should cause emotions in the audience. This could be as simple as laugher at a silly song, or as complex as tears

because it reminds you of some far away memory of your childhood. Of course, in instrumental songs, this can be accomplished through melody lines, which can also be powerful. The final factor that I think makes music good is the shared connection that people have when they listen to music. That moment when you’re at a concert and the singer turns the mic over to the audience for them to sing a few bars is powerful. The fact that good music allows people who don’t know each other to connect amazes me. Good music is about connection, be it between you and a friend, or between you and a thousand strangers. That artist has managed to captivate you and to make you feel something through their music, which is a good feeling. Hope I’ve Helped, Amy

CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor chris@theargus.ca AMANDA MCALPINE Arts & Culture Editor amanda@theargus.ca GARY MUSSON Photo & Graphics Editor gary@theargus.ca SEBASTIAN MURDOCH-GIBSON News Writer sebastian@theargus.ca AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer amy@theargus.ca CAROLINE COX Copy Editor caroline@theargus.ca TYLER COOK Circulation Manager tyler@theargus.ca The Argus is published by the Lakehead University Student Union. Letters may be submitted to via e-mail to editor@theargus.ca or online at www.theargus.ca. Students interested in writing for The Argus should contact an editor. The deadline for submissions is 6pm Thursday of the week prior to publication. The opinions expressed in this paper are not necessarily those of the editors, staff, or the Lakehead University Student Union. The Argus is a member in good standing with the Canadian University Press (CUP). Advertising inquiries should be directed to ads@theargus.ca. Please visit www.theargus.ca/advertising for rate and demographic information. All ads must be submitted by 1pm Friday of the week prior to publication. The Argus is the largest student newspaper in Northern Ontario with a weekly circulation of over 3,000. Founded in 1966, the Argus has covered issues important to students at Lakehead University and in Thunder Bay for nearly half a century.

Dearest Amy, What makes good music good? Yours, Pensive in Praetoria Dear Pensive in Praetoria, I have to admit that I was apprehensive about answering this ques-

From the editor…

Making disingenuous scientific claims is beyond dangerous L ast week, Baroness Susan Greenfield made statements at a conference in England where she claimed that there is evidence that computer games leave children with dementia. Earlier, she had also written about how Facebook and Twitter are creating a generation of self-obsessed people, and that they can rewire children’s brains and shorten their attention span. Greenfield is not someone who can be immediately dismissed, however. She has 30 honourary degrees, is a member of the House of Lords, was awarded the Royal Society’s Michael Faraday Prize, and received the CBE in 2000 for her contribution to the public understanding of science. Yet, despite her considerable credentials, she has said such irresponsible and dangerous things as: “unless we wake up to the damage that the gadget-filled, pharmaceuticallyenhanced 21st century is doing to our brains…” and “we are developing an ever deeper dependence on web-

sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and Second Life – and these technologies can alter the way our minds work.” These quotes are dangerous and irresponsible because those who know nothing about Facebook, Twitter, or Second Life (which, by the way, was never something the vast majority of people ever used) will use her statements as a justification for limiting and even dismantling the progress that we have made in technology and the Internet throughout the last decade. If these statements had any measure of truth to them, that would be one thing. Then, we can sit down and have chat about how this is affecting people and what we should do about it. The truth is, there is no evidence to her claims; in fact, there is such little truth to them that prominent scientists can’t help but speak out against her words. For example, two months ago she announced essentially the same thing – that video games harm children. That time, however, instead of saying it causes dementia, she claimed it

is contributing to the rise of autism diagnoses. It wasn’t until Oxford professor of psychology Dr. Dorothy Bishop objected that Greenfield started walking her statements back. “Most cases are diagnosed around the age of two, when not many children are using the Internet. And this rise has been documented over the past 20 years, long before Twitter and Facebook,” Bishop said. But don’t let the facts confuse you – Greenfield just decided to change her claim from games causing autism to causing dementia and told the media that, “it’s not really for [Dorothy Bishop] to comment on how I run my career.” Greenfield is a scientist, and yet instead of focusing on doing the things that scientists do – like performing extensive repeatable studies via utilizing the scientific method – she’s using her professional status and position to make dubious claims about reality. It’s funny for the moment, but there are people who take her seriously. Andrew Wakefield was taken

seriously in 1998 when he published a paper filled with falsified data that claimed the MMR vaccine caused autism. Investigations revealed he had multiple undeclared conflicts of interest, had manipulated evidence, and had broken several ethical codes. His research was eventually retracted in 2004, but the damage was done – millions of people now refuse to give vaccines to their children because of this unbelievable example of scientific misconduct. And this affects all of us. Greenfield owes not only science but society an ethically-executed scientific study. It’s irresponsible and terribly disingenuous for an academic of her magnitude to spout off her personal beliefs and observations as scientific fact, backed by the weight of her office and credentials. That’s not the way real science works, and on a world-scale it’s beyond dangerous. DANIEL BACSA Editor-in-Chief


sports

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news 5

Flashbacks

The Argus time machine digs through the archives

Lakehead Special teams key in series split seventh at OUA Cross Country T Championships BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

BY KIP SIGSWORTH

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he Lakehead cross country teams headed to Ottawa last weekend for the 2011 OUA Championships. Hopes were high heading in, but stiff competition made breaking into the top five difficult. Nonetheless, both the women and the men held their own against larger schools. The women’s team placed seventh in a 16-team field while the men placed seventh in a field of 15. Leading the way for the women was fifth-year senior Tess Naroski. Naroski started out conservatively and worked her way up through the field. Her time of 18:57.5 gained her 24th place in the women’s five-kilometer race. Finishing two seconds behind Naroski was fourth-year senior Hilary Qurion, who finished 26th. Qurion, like Naroski, rolled through the field well and was rewarded with her highest OUA place ever. Also acting as scorers for the ‘Wolves were Lisa Alaimo, Danielle Thiel, and Callie Roelfsema. Alaimo placed 35th, while Thiel and Roelfsema finished 46th and 62nd, respectively. Fourth-year Britt Bailey acted as Lakehead’s sole displacer, placing 81st. Guelph Gryphons, the perennial champions, were on top once again. The Gryphons scored an ultra-low 25 points, placing six runners in the top ten. Unfortunately for Guelph, Toronto’s Tamara Jewett stopped them from stealing all the accolades. Jewett won the individual race in a time of 17:33.5, beating out Guelph’s Genevieve Lalonde and Andrea Secaffien. Guelph’s Joanna Brown took the rookie of the year honours with her 15th place finish. On the men’s side, fourth-year senior Alastair Brown was out front for the Thunderwolves. Coming off a disappointing run in Wisconsin, Brown ran well, but ultimately missed OUA All-star honours by a mere 0.3 seconds. Brown placed 16th in a 102-man field and qualified for the national CIS championship. Brown’s time of 32:09.9 was a personal best. Following Brown was rookie Dominique Aulagnon. Aulagnon ran tough and placed 41st. Rounding out the scorers for the ‘Wolves were Dalton Rismay, Travis Roske, and Chris Brown. Dalton placed 52nd, while Roske and Brown placed 56th and 61st, respectively. Antonio Redfern Pucci and Connor Price acted as displacers for the ‘Wolves. Pucci placed 66th, while Price placed 68th. The men’s race did not disappoint, with Guelph beating Windsor by 20 points. The Gryphons went one-two in the individual race, with third-year Andrew Nixon taking the win in 30:51.8 over second-year Ross Proudfoot. The rookie of the year award went to Aaron Hendrikx of Guelph for his sixth place finish. “We had an excellent year,” commented Head Coach Kip Sigsworth. “We were prepared and executed quite well today, but that didn’t end up getting us the placing we were looking for. The athletes are fit and this fitness will help them heading into the indoor track season.”

he Lakehead University Men’s Hockey Team split the weekend series against the Laurier Golden Hawks, winning 3-1 on Friday and losing 3-2 on Saturday. Of Lakehead’s five goals this weekend, four were scored by Lakehead’s special teams. Lakehead’s two quick power play goals by Adam Sergerie and Ryan McDonald 31 seconds apart in Friday’s second period made the difference in the game. The ‘Wolves dominated the second

period, outshooting their opponents 17-2. Sergerie scored another special teams goal in the third period, this one short-handed. Zackory Ray ended Lakehead goaltender Alex Dupuis’ shutout bid with only 1:30 left in the game, leaving a final score of 3-1. The Hawks outshot the ‘Wolves 7-5 in the final period; however, the game was ultimately dominated by Lakehead, who outshot their opponents 35-16 overall. The Thunderwolves’ sevengame winning streak ended Saturday in a hard-fought 3-2 loss to Laurier. Ryan Daniels was out-

standing in the Golden Hawks net, turning away 45 of 47 shots. Lakehead controlled the play for most of the first period, but Laurier scored the only goal in the opening period when Thomas Middup beat LU goaltender Jeff Bosch at the 7:15 mark. Lakehead outshot Laurier 17-10 in the first. The Golden Hawks lead was extended to 2-0 at 8:02 of the second period, thanks to a goal by James Marsden. The ‘Wolves closed the gap to 2-1 at 16:43 on the power play when Trevor Gamache finally scored on Daniels, with Matt Caria and Sergerie assisting. Shots on goal in the

middle frame were 13-9 in favour of LU. Mitch Lebar put Laurier ahead 3-1 midway through the third period, but Lakehead narrowed the Hawks’ lead to 3-2 when Jake Carrick scored from Victor Anilane and Andrew Wilkins at 15:46. The ‘Wolves continued to apply pressure, outshooting the Golden Hawks 17-5 in the final 20 minutes, but Daniels was equal to the task and Laurier held on for the win. Next weekend, Lakehead will be hosting the Guelph Gryphons at the Fort William Gardens. Game time is 7:30.

‘Wolves complete perfect preseason BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

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espite traveling with only 10 players, the Lakehead University Men’s Basketball Team completed a perfect 8-0 preseason by defeating University of Wisconsin-Stout and Hamline University last weekend. The ‘Wolves defeated UWStout 70-67 in a tough battle on Friday. Down 58-52 with six minutes to go, Brendan King, Joe Jones, and Nate Wainwright had big 3-pointers to help LU escape

with the win. Starters Ryan Thomson and Yoosrie Salhia were missing on this trip, as they stayed home with injuries. The ‘Wolves were led in scoring by King, who had 15 points and five rebounds, and by Venzal Russell, who had 15 points. Jones also contributed ten points, shooting 7-10 on free throws, including two FT with five seconds remaining to clinch the game. On Saturday, in a game uncharacteristic of recent Lakehead wins, the ‘Wolves toughed out a

high scoring 98-95 to win over a tough Hamline University. Jones led Lakehead with 23 points and seven rebounds in what the Lakehead coaching staff felt was possibly his best game in the CIS. Russell had a slow start but rallied to score 22 points with nine rebounds and five assists. Greg Carter also had one of his finest games of the young season with 14 points, four assists and three steals. Wainwright also had double figures, with 10 points. Hamline proved effective with their dribble penetration, led by senior Mike Campbell, who

poured in 30 points without taking a 3-pointer shot. “While it was not our best performance on the defensive end, I was proud of how our players dealt with some adversity including some tough calls, foul trouble and playing short-handed because of injuries,” commented head coach Scott Morrison on the win. “We got down 12-0 to start the game but stayed focused and showed some of the intangible qualities necessary to be successful in the OUA.”

LU volleyball falls to 0-5

WBB falls short in Minot

BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

BY CHRIS KOWLESSAR Sports Editor

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he Lakehead University Women’s Volleyball team dropped two matches against the Guelph Gryphons last weekend, losing 3-0 on Friday (25-20, 25-15, 25-17) and 3-0 on Saturday (25-22, 25-17, 22-15). On Friday, the first set was a close battle until 20 points, when a string of unforced errors by Lakehead allowed Guelph to pull away with a 25-20 win. The Gryphons jumped ahead early in set two, taking a four point lead that they maintained through the technical timeout. From there, Guelph kept the pressure on and surged ahead to win 25-15. The third set saw the Gryphons again forge an early lead that they expanded into a comfortable 25-17 win. Lakehead coach Chris Green insisted that the team needs to get details right in order to achieve success. “This young team has got to learn fast to pay attention to details. When they learn that and practice it, they will reap its rewards,” he noted. Lakehead was led by Michelle Cournoyer and Jorie Daymond

with eight points each. Sara Hudson had 21 assists, as Lakehead’s hitting errors outnumbered Guelph’s 25-8. Brooke Lloyd led the Gryphons’ offense with 14 points, followed by Kaitlyn Krizmanich with ten points. Saturday’s fate was no different, as the ‘Wolves dropped three straight sets in a tough, well played match. Brittany MacLeod led the way for LU with 11 points, followed by Daymond with seven. Hudson had 21 assists. Green is confident that his team’s ability is there, but believes they have yet to compose their efforts into a complete match. “Tonight started off the right way,” Green said. “Point for point the girls battled smart and aggressively, following exactly what they designed and accepted as the ‘plan’. When one person in our game at 20-20 misses their assignment, veteran teams will make you pay. “Second set, again, we started following the game plan. You have to execute and have the wherewithal to maintain the plan. Unfortunately these players, rookie and senior, are struggling with that.”

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he Lakehead University Women’s Basketball team headed south of the border last weekend to take on Bemidji State University and Minot State University. The ‘Wolves played hard against Bemidji State on Thursday, but fell short and list the game 97-61 after the Beavers’ offense exploded in the second half. Lakehead’s leading scorer was Carolyn Fragale with 15 points and four assists, while veteran Lindsay Druery battled through continuous double team coverage to finish with ten points and five rebounds. Bemidji’s Kate Warmack had 18 points and nine rebounds, while point guard Shannon Thompson had 14 points, nine helpers, and seven steals. The Beavers’ entire 13-woman roster scored during the blowout, which was their home opener. The LU pulled up their efforts in games two and three, but fell short, losing 69-57 on Friday and 76-74 in OT on Saturday. Druery had a game high 23 points and eight rebounds on

COMPILED BY SEBASTIAN MURDOCH-GIBSON News Writer

Friday. Kelsey Bardsley added 15 points and Ayse Kalkan chipped in ten. MSU was paced by the Boag sisters, as Christina Boag scored a team-high 19 points and pulled down seven rebounds, while Carly Boag added 15 points and five rebounds. Katie Hardy also added 11 points and eight rebounds. Saturday‘s game went to overtime, with the ‘Wolves losing a heartbreaker by two after the extra frame. Lakehead was ahead until Minot State made a push and took the lead with three minutes to go. Lakehead was able to give one final push to tie the game and take it to overtime, but a turnover for Lakehead with 11 seconds left in OT secured a Minot State win. Druery led the way for the ‘Wolves with 23 points and 11 rebounds, while Fragale contributed 20 points, four rebounds, and two assists. “This was the type of game we needed heading into league play,” commented head Coach Jon Kreiner. “We won’t see a team with as big and skilled posts as this team, and, although we need to play better post defense without fouling, we did give ourselves a great chance tonight.”

January 4, 1971 Student Cafeteria

GARY MUSSON/ARGUS

Meet your profs: Dr. Robert Mawhinney BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

L

akehead University is home to a high number of diverse programs manned by hundreds of dedicated professors. Chances are you’ll have the opportunity to take many different classes and experience a wide range of subjects during your academic career. To help you become more acquainted with the university’s faculty and numerous opportunities for research and study, the Argus will be featuring one professor a week, their research interests, and the opportunities for students in their field. A graduate from the University of Guelph’s PhD program, Dr. Robert Mawhinney is more than just an everyday theoretical chemist. As well as teaching Organic Chemistry, Dr. Mawhinney instructs Physical Chemistry III, part of the Advanced

Research Methodology course; Modern Chemistry; and an advanced course in Chemical Bonding Theory. On top of that, Dr. Mawhinney is the Coordinator for the Bioinformatics program. Dr. Mawhinney says that his current research is focused on “trying to understand why specific chemistry happens by building theories to explain the observed behaviour and models to predict what will happen when a component is changed.” Having worked for four years as a post-doctoral fellow at Concordia University in Montreal, Dr. Mawhinney has researched a variety of topics. “The two highlights from that time include designing new molecules for use in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Quantum Computing and discovering a new acyclic carbene, which is a molecule where a neutral carbon atom has a lone pair,” Dr. Mawhinney said. LU’s unique close-knit community drew in Dr. Mawhinney.

Do not be afraid of failure; it is one aspect of learning, which brings to mind a famous quotation by Robert Schuller: ‘What would you attempt to do if you knew you would not fail?’ Dr. Robert Mawhinney

“As a person from the Maritimes, I like the feel of a smaller community.

LU offered me the opportunity to advance my career in a familiar environment,” Dr. Mawhinney said. Since his arrival, Dr. Mawhinney’s greatest accomplishment has been the development of a new degree program, the HBSc in Bioinformatics program. “This is a new program where students learn the required skills from several sciences to understand the complexity of living organisms and build models to explain their interactions,” he said. Aspiring Theoretical Chemists have a variety of job opportunities. Pharmaceutical companies and the microelectronics industry look for theoretical chemists to develop new medications. Dr. Mawhinney’s advice to students is simple: “Do not be afraid of failure; it is one aspect of learning, which brings to mind a famous quotation by Robert Schuller: ‘What would you attempt to do if you knew you would not fail?’”

Dear People: Got complaints about the quality of food in the campus cafeteria? Why not operate it yourself? According to Bob Gude, former cafeteria manager, profits in the 1967-68 season were in excess of $17,000, all of which went to versa foods. Why shouldn’t this profit go to a student- organized body? Student labour could be employed on a fullor part-time basis. Then we would have no one to complain to but ourselves. If the AMS is not willing to do this, the SDU is. It has made sufficient studies to determine that student takeover of this cafeteria is economically feasible. What do you think? What do you want? Should students be allowed to run their own cafeteria?

December 1st, 1971 Symann Sez Happiness is changing the oil in a tractor during a snowstorm. Happiness is listening to a blues band play everything well except blues. Happiness is a rope and bucket in the well instead of running water. Happiness is a water fountain in the snow that doesn’t work. Happiness is losing a cold. Happiness is finding your stash intact after a raid by the narcs. Happiness is having change for the cigarette machine. Happiness is having people using that change for the cigarette machine instead of smoking yours. Happiness is clean laundry. Happiness is finding twenty dollars that you thought you lost. Happiness is paycheck at long last. Happiness is girls on your hockey team. Happiness is finding the rubber dispenser in the men’s washroom still works. Happiness is not having to buy any rubbers because you’re sterile. Happiness is finding out that women have a rubber machine in their washroom too. Happiness is trying to explain the retail sales act to a sales girl in a department store.

January 12th, 1972 Kill the Piano Player Kill the piano player is the latest in a series of excellent and uncommon movies presented by the New Dimension Cinema. Directed by Francois Truffuat, it combines pathos with slapstick comedy. The result is a surreal emotional mixup. Truffaut, famous for his 400 Blows, has crammed so many slants on comedy and drama into the movie that the audience is drawn into great concentration in an attempt to absorb this ingenuity. The movie can be seen Thursday January 13, 1972 at 6:30 and 7 pm in the UC Theater.


November 7th, 2011

4 news

A look at former Thunderwolves hockey players as they continue their careers

What’s up at LU

BY MIKE ST. JEAN Layout & Design Editor

BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

S

ince CIS hockey returned to Lakehead for the 2001-02 season, Thunder Bay sports fans have been blessed to watch skilled players step on the ice at the Fort William Gardens. While many view Canadian university hockey as a ‘last-stop’ for players to compete in the game before entering the ‘real-world’ job market, a large number of former ‘Wolves have continued their career in the minor leagues or in Europe since graduating from Lakehead. Here is a look at where a handful of former Thunderwolves are playing since they last laced up the skates for the blue, yellow, and white.

Diary brought into light Lakehead University’s Chair of the Department of Languages and Professor of French, Alain Nabarra, has recently transcribed and edited the diary of Fr. du Ranquet, considered one of the most important Canadian missionaries of the nineteenth century.

Upcoming at LU November 9th — There will be a symposium from The Centre for Research on Safe Driving (CRSD). Dr. Juan Lupiáñez will give the lecture The Importance of Considering Vigilance when Interpreting Network Scores from the Attention Network Test. The event begins at 4 pm in ATAC 1007. November 9th — The French Movie night hosted by the Department of Languages will be showing l’Auberge Espagnole at 7:30 in ATAC 2015. November 11th — Remembrance Day. Ceremonies begin in the Agora at 10:50. November 11th — Dr. Scott Hamilton from Lakehead’s Department of Anthropology will present a seminar on Port Arthur Waterfront Archaeology: 19th century capitalism and nation building. The event begins at 12:30 in ATAC 2015. November 11th & 12th — Thunderwolves hockey team faces off against Guelph Gryphons. Both games start at 7:30 pm at Fort William Gardens.

sports 13

Where are they now?

News Briefs

This previously unpublished 756 page manuscript covers the years 1853 to 1877. The new volume also publishes the first part of the Journal, 1853-1856, and includes a postface by John O’Meara, Dean of Lakehead’s Faculty of Education. Extensive footnotes and appendices provide the reader with factual information to help comprehend the text and events.

theargus|www.theargus.ca

Pete Belliveau (Coach 2001-2007) HONOU/FLICKR

A guide to the Smartphone world: Part 1, Blackberry BY UKO ABARA

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his is the first of a four part series covering the smartphone options available to buyers, which will explore the Blackberry, iPhone, Android, and Windows phones and will overview the features of each device, giving buyers a clearer idea of their options. In 1999, Waterloo Ontario-based company Research In Motion (RIM) set foot in the business world with the aim to provide a mobile communications solution. Its product, the Blackberry 850, consisted of a monochrome display, 0.5 megabytes of memory, and four megabytes of storage—buyers who couldn’t afford that could spring for a model with half the hardware. Several iterations later, RIM has firmly planted itself in the corporate universe with its devices, while successfully catering to the general population as well. Presently, there

are three model lines: the Curve line is targeted towards the consumer, while the Bold and Torch lines focus on the business world. While the majority of companies now make touch screens, RIM has retained a design with a physical keyboard (except in the Torch 9850/9860), which is one of the main draws of the device. The keyboard has undergone several changes over the years, but has always been user-friendly. Even for someone with larger hands, typing is a breeze—so much so that using spell-check may be a nuisance. The other trademark feature of the RIM product line is the Blackberry Messenger, which is an instant messaging service that allows for snappy direct text, audio, picture, and video messages between two subscribers using any recent Blackberry model. Until recently, RIM was the only phone manufacturer to provide such a service. Phone calls are clear and the

devices tout the strongest antenna signals in the mobile game. Together, these features brought about Blackberries’ affectionate nickname, ‘Crackberries.’ The OS7 operating system that the devices run on is nothing to write home about, but it is functional. The interface is simple and clean, and users never find themselves digging through layers of menus. The Blackberry is arguably the best smartphone for email. Setting up different email accounts is a simple two-step process. Each inbox is clearly organized by date, and message threads are grouped together. The default ‘push’ system that RIM pioneered ensures that email is sent and received instantaneously. The security features embedded in the OS are top of the line and use an encryption system not even RIM can crack. Sent and received data are protected by default, but users can enable protection of any data and

of memory cards inserted into the phone. Users who are serious about privacy should consider Blackberry, though they should keep in mind that no security system is perfect. Customers looking for an immaculate set of applications, however, may want to keep walking. Although I found everything I needed (internet radio, Twitter, and Facebook), hardcore app users will be dissatisfied. Apps also take a long time to install, and depending on users’ abilities and phone specifications, browsing the web may be an unpleasant experience. Finally, recent devices do not have the ability to upgrade past OS7, so customers will be stuck with their operating system. I recommend this phone for buyers who want increased security and efficient messaging and email capabilities. Stay tuned next week when The Argus takes a look at the iPhone.

Long-time Thunderwolves fans will have trouble forgetting former head coach Pete Belliveau. Belliveau, who was named the team’s first coach in 2001, remained behind the bench of Lakehead’s hockey team until he resigned in early 2007. During his tenure with the ‘Wolves, Belliveau helped establish the squad as one of the top teams in the CIS, leading Lakehead to a Queen’s Cup Championship in 2006 as well as a trip to the CIS University Cup finals that same season. Since leaving Lakehead, Belliveau has remained active as a coach in CIS hockey, first taking over as bench boss of the Thunderwolves OUA rival Windsor Lancers in the summer of 2007, and then accepting the same role with Dalhousie, where he is currently in his third season as head coach of the Tigers.

Former ‘Wolves forward Scott Dobben takes a shot at the UOIT Ridgebacks net during a game at the Fort William Gardens in 2010.

Scott Dobben (Forward 2008-2010) Although he was only in Thunder Bay for a short time, centerman Scott Dobben left his mark on Thunderwolves hockey in a way that fans won’t be forgetting anytime soon. Brought in for the 2009 season after bouncing between the AHL, UHL, and ECHL, the Drayton, Ontario native and former Ottawa Senators draft pick provided the ‘Wolves with secondary scoring behind the team’s top line of Dan

Speer, Brock McPherson and Mark Soares. In two seasons with Lakehead, Dobben scored an average of more than one point per game, compiling 54 points in 49 OUA regular season contests. After leaving the Thunderwolves in 2010, Dobben travelled to Germany, where he suited up for ESV Kaufbeuren and served as the team’s assistant captain. The 28 year old forward currently plays for the Cardiff Devils in Great Britain’s Elite Ice Hockey League, where he has put up 6

You’re a winner! The Boston Bruins

BY MIKE ST. JEAN Layout & Design Editor

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e’ve all heard the term Stanley Cup hangovers before. However, a month into the NHL season, it appears as if the Boston Bruins are still drunk. Coming off a campaign in which they were NHL postseason champions for the first time since 1972, expectations were high for the Bruins. As the hockey season carries on, however, fans of the black-and-gold have had more questions than answers for their struggling franchise. Boston finds themselves stuck in dead last in the NHL’s Eastern Conference with a dismal 3-7-0 record – a far cry from a year ago, when they won the Northeast Division title and were among the league’s top teams.

Offense has been a problem for Boston, who finished third in total goals in the East in 2010-11 but is currently ranked near the bottom of the conference. While sophomore sensation Tyler Seguin is scoring at a point-a-game pace and Milan Lucic continues to show why he is considered one of the game’s top power forwards, not much else has gone right offensively for the Bruins. David Krejci, the team’s top center, currently has only one point to his credit, while new additions Benoit Pouliot and Joe Corvo, who were brought in to replace the departed Michael Ryder and Tomas Kaberle, have been disappointing. Thankfully for fans in Beantown, the team’s performance hasn’t been entirely negative. Tim Thomas and Tuukka Rask have provided the squad with

quality goaltending, and while their win-loss record doesn’t reflect that fact, a look at both ‘keepers save percentage and goals against average proves otherwise. Forward Patrice Bergeron has also been turning things around lately, going on a point streak at the end of the month and showing flashes of the offensive skill he displayed during the team’s post-season run. While the season is still in its early stages and the Bruins have ample time to turn things around, Boston is going to have to hit their stride sooner rather than later. Far too many teams have missed the playoffs by a few points, and it would be a shame to have a poor start force the defending Stanley Cup Champions to miss the post-season altogether.

goals and 12 points in 16 games this season.

Kyle Moir- Goaltender (2007-2011)

The ‘Wolves have been blessed with solid goaltending since they entered the CIS, and former Lakehead netminder Kyle Moir was no exception. Moir, a native of Calgary, Alberta, joined the Thunderwolves for the 2007-2008 season after four years with the Western Hockey League’s Swift Current Broncos, where he

FILE PHOTO BY COLE BREILAND

was named the CHL’s Humanitarian of the Year in 2007. Unfortunately for Moir, the LU’s excellence in the crease proved problematic, and he was forced to settle for splitting starts during his tenure in Thunder Bay, first behind ‘Wolves legend Chris Whitley, then with young netminder Alex Dupuis. The former fifth round draft pick of the Nashville Predators currently plays for Eindhoven Kemphanen in the Netherlands, his first international stop since graduating last year.


November 7th, 2011

14 fun&games

Sudoku

Crossword

Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com (http://www.bestcrosswords.com). Used with permission.

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news 3

The politics of the ‘Drunkorexia’ trend popular zombie apocalypse despite binging health risks

Tufts University prof tests modern political theories Study suggests that the trend of students cutting food to drink more is growing against zombie invasions as the consumption of five drinks in a BY MIKE LAKUSIAK The Cord (Wilfrid Laurier University)

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Last week’s solutions

ACROSS 1 – Two-legged support 6 – Hawaiian greeting 11 – Cutting tool 14 – Exorbitant rate of interest 15 – Echolocation 16 – Trident-shaped letter 17 – The house of a parson 18 – Impassive 19 – B & B 20 – Sharpen 22 – Took on 24 – Not solid or liquid 28 – Cheap restaurant 30 – Free of an obstruction 31 – Funnel-shaped 32 – Of sedate character 33 – Baton 37 – “... ___ the cows come home” 38 – Midway alternative 39 – Bordeaux buddy 40 – Small quantity 43 – Israeli desert 45 – Large wave caused by tidal flow 46 – A wineshop 47 – Rollerblader’s protector 50 – Pert. to the thigh 51 – Leases 52 – Hindu music

53 – Egg head? 54 – Rhino relative 57 – Coup ___ 62 – Goose egg 63 – Moral precept of conduct 64 – That is to say... 65 – Botanist Gray 66 – Bluffer’s ploy 67 – Seashore DOWN 1 – Derelict 2 – This ___ stickup! 3 – Play on words 4 – Hosp. areas 5 – Tree matter that yields a coloring matter 6 – Donkeys 7 – Trent of the Senate 8 – Lennon’s lady 9 – Yes, in Yokohama 10 – Antiquated 11 – Steeple 12 – “Lou Grant” star 13 – Breezy 21 – Embrace 23 – Foot part 24 – Sudden bursts of wind 25 – Caper 26 – Milan’s La ___

27 – Actor Wallach 28 – French market town 29 – Feminine suffix 31 – Large wading bird 33 – Next after the second 34 – Enthusiastic 35 – Last letter of the Greek alphabet 36 – Growing in snow 38 – Gymnast Korbut 41 – Depilatory brand 42 – Bartender 43 – Like Bedouins 44 – Conductor de Waart 46 – Implore 47 – Basic monetary unit of Sweden 48 – One of the Leeward Islands 49 – ___ Gay 50 – Sham 52 – Reformer Jacob 55 – Loss leader? 56 – 21st letter of the Greek alphabet 58 – Comedian Philips 59 – Beverage commonly drunk in England 60 – Small batteries 61 – Big bang cause

ATERLOO (CUP) — The Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI) in Waterloo hosted a talk that was topical, but nonetheless of the utmost importance on Oct. 26, as Daniel W. Drezner gave the “signature” lecture on zombies, the G20 and international relations. The author of Theories of International Politics and Zombies, Drezner is a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Medford, MA. His lecture at CIGI was based off of his book, which explores international relations supposing that the dead have begun to walk the earth, hungry for human flesh. “I particularly liked that as we were making the arrangements for this lecture, I was told this was the signature lecture on zombies, the G20 and global governance—because that implied that there had been previous lesser lectures,” Drezner began his talk, which focused on different theories of global politics including realism, liberalism, and neo-conservatism would react and fare were the zombie apocalypse to occur tomorrow. “World politics, as we know it, is really all about trying to find security in an insecure world,” he continued, noting the wrath of earthquakes, tsunamis, and other phenomena that have posed threats to global order. “These are all natural sources of fear, but if you take a look at the cultural zeitgeist, there’s clearly an unnatural fear that’s barely spoken about or just now being spoken about. Of course you know what I’m talking about—I speak, of course, of zombies.” The immediate reaction to an outbreak of zombie activity would be crucial, Drezner detailed, if the timeline of a typical zombie movie is to be considered. “If you take a look at the zombie canon, all the movies out there, they all follow the exact same trope: the undead are introduced in minute one, and by minute ten, everyone is living in a post-apocalyptic wasteland,” Drezner explained, through use of clips from a smattering of films. “This is a very serious problem. Even if there is only a remote possibility of zombies actually being created, the outcome is so horrific that we need to figure out what to do.” While Drezner’s examples of zombies elicited laughter and applause from the audience of around 200 people, he was also careful to include tangible international relations and political theory context for the circumstances attached to this admittedly unlikely situation. “You might remember that about five years ago former [U.S.] vicepresident Richard Cheney argued that if there was even a one per cent chance of al-Qaida launching a terrorist attack on American soil, the U.S. would be obligated to launch any and all available countermeasures to stop that attack from taking place,” he said. “Even if the odds were only one per cent, the outcome was so precipitously bad that it was worth investing a fair amount of energy to stop it.” “I’ll acknowledge that the likelihood of an al-Qaida terrorist attack

DAT’/FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS NICK LACHANCE/THE CORD

Daniel W. Drezner delivers his lecture on zombies at CIGI. is much larger than the likelihood of zombies actually existing and eating us, but let’s say there’s a 0.001 per cent chance of some freak accident in a government lab triggering something really bad.” After the lecture, Drezner said that he was not particularly familiar with the zombie genre prior to the book and a blog post he wrote that spawned it. He explained his attention was first drawn to the subject through an article penned by Robert Smith, a University of Ottawa math professor. “I read the article and there was no politics in it. It generated a lot of response and I didn’t think I could do anything with it, but then I realized it actually works as a book. It doesn’t work as an article, obviously, but it works as a book,” he explained, noting that his book has shown up on the reading lists for some undergraduate political science courses in the U.S. “Your average 18-year-old—if they’re confronted with a traditional [international relations] text—their eyes might start to glaze over,” he said. “I kind of think of this as a gateway drug, getting them hooked initially and then really getting them on the crack of quality international relations theory.”

BY LEE RICHARDSON CUP Ontario Bureau Chief

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ORONTO (CUP) — More students are saving their calories during the day by cutting back on eating so that they can binge drink at night. The University of Missouri has released the results of a study showing that one in five students choose to drink instead of eat. This growing trend among university and college students, according to the study, has been called “drunkorexia.” Students in the study said that they are saving their money for alcohol and are aiming to get drunk quicker. Binge drinking is prevalent among students. “From our study so far, it’s really hard to find people who don’t engage in binge drinking at all,” said McMaster University psychology professor Suzanne Becker, who is researching the links between histories of binge drinking and cognitive performance. Short-term effects of binge drinking include the slowing down of the involuntary reflexes like breathing and the gag reflex, and declines in reflexes are an indicator of alcohol poisoning. “Generally people are okay with reacting to the expected, but poor

at reacting to the unexpected,” said Becker. “For instance, when someone runs out in front of your car, you’re very poor at dealing with the unanticipated. You might be fine at rolling along on autopilot, but if you have to deal with something unexpected, you’ll be slower, and you might miss things that should grab your attention, but don’t.” As well as a decline in reflexes, there are other short-term symptoms that are seen with excessive alcohol consumption. “Some of the symptoms that go along with alcohol poisoning can be very dangerous,” said Ian Culbert of the Canadian Public Health Association. “You have extreme confusion, the inability to be awakened, vomiting, seizures—so obviously you see some really nasty stuff.” Even the recovery from consumption can be seen to have effects on health. “The alcohol acts as a depressant, so your brain tries to compensate by generating more neural activity, so when you’re withdrawing from the alcohol you can have this rebound excitation that’s actually potentially toxic to the brain,” said Becker. “So alcohol withdrawal may be part of the reason why it hampers your brain particularly badly.” Binge drinking, which is classified

row for men and four drinks in a row for women, is typically seen more in teenagers and university-age adults. That has the potential to cause problems further down the line; the effects of binging seem stronger in young drinkers. “We know that the early developing brain is very vulnerable to alcohol—you get fetal alcohol syndrome when the fetus is exposed. Likewise, the adolescent and teenage brain is very vulnerable especially in the areas still undergoing development,” said Becker. “Early binging could cause long-lasting, permanent brain damage.” Other effects brought on by consistent binge drinking are common of other alcohol abuse disorders. “The wear and tear it has on your body, the breakdown of your social relationships, the inability to maintain professional employment—all those are the trickle down effects of alcoholism,” said Culbert. Culbert adds that the major issue is not the number of drinks that are consumed, but the timeframe of consumption and the way that drinks are processed by the body. “People always try to put a number on it because it makes it okay, but how the alcohol is processed through your body makes all the difference in the world,” said Culbert. “It tends to go back to what is the motivation for drinking in the first place.” That motivation can be anything from emotional triggers, the idea of alcohol as a stress reliever, or in the case of students, the simple aim to get drunk, or the desire to feel like an adult. “I’d like to know how you’d possibly get through to teenagers and what kind of information would it take to make them change their behavior,” said Becker. “Even in the face of really hard evidence that something you’re doing will cause brain damage, does that change their behaviour? Not really. We need massive public education,” she added.


news

Orillia takes back the night BY AMY SZYBALSKI Staff Writer

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FLICKR

UK Prime Minister David Cameron declares that nations upholding anti-gay laws will be subject to aid cuts.

Commonwealth threatens to withdraw aid for gay rights violations BY ERIN COLLINS News Editor

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riday marked the kick-off to the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Perth, Australia. Due to the outrage of several members, Prime Minister David Cameron announced that the UK would cut aid to nations upholding anti-gay laws. With the support of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper and Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard, Cameron advocated that the Commonwealth take a more active role to stop gay rights violations. “Britain is one of the premier aid givers in the world,” Cameron told CBC News. “We want to see coun-

tries that receive our aid adhering to proper human rights.” Ugandan presidential adviser John Nagenda was not happy with Cameron’s decision to withdraw aid. In an interview with BBC News, Nagenda said that his country’s people were “tired of these lectures” and of “being treated like children.” He also accused Cameron of a “bullying mentality.” “This kind of ex-colonial mentality of saying: ‘You do this or I withdraw my aid’ will definitely make people extremely uncomfortable,” explains Nagenda. He adds, “Those who have more should give to those who have less. It’s that simple.” During the meeting, Cameron expressed concerns that gay rights

comics

violations in Commonwealth countries, particularly in Africa, would continue if actions were not taken. Anti-gay laws still exist in 41 of the 54 member states, and punishments for homosexuals are harsh. Queer UK, an LGBT community and news source, provides an overview of some of the penalties: queers in Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Pakistan, Uganda, Bangladesh, and Guyana can be sentenced to life imprisonment, while those in Malaysia are punished with floggings and as many as 20 years in jail. As well, “homophobic witchhunts” have actively sought out gays for penalty in several of the Commonwealth nations. “Anti-gay laws and witch-hunts contradict the Commonwealth’s commitment to equality, human rights, individual freedom, and non-discrimination,” explains Peter Tatchell, a human rights activist in the UK. Besides upholding basic human rights, Cameron explained that the demand for the repeal of anti-gay laws was largely concerned with the way such laws prevent the initiation of an effective HIV/AIDS endemic response from Commonwealth nations. “About 2.7 million new people become infected with HIV every year, with the virus claiming a further two million lives annually from AIDS,” stated Cameron to the Globe and Mail. “Commonwealth countries are disproportionately burdened with the disease, accounting for some 30% of the global population, but 60% of the world’s HIV/Aids cases.” Malawi’s aid was already reduced last July after two gay men were sentenced to hard labour and 14 years in jail. During the meeting, Cameron suggested that Malawi, Uganda, Nigeria, and Ghana may be among the first to see aid cuts.

n Thursday, Lakehead University’s Orillia campus took part in an international tradition, Take Back the Night. The event, which approximately 300 people attended, took place in downtown Orillia and saw women and children marching from Heritage Place to the Port of Orillia. “Take Back The Night was started in the 70s as a symbolic movement for women to literally take back the night and exercise their right to be safe walking alone at night and to not be sexually assaulted,” explains Leigh Castle, LUSU’s Orillia Events Coordinator who’s been involved with the event for four years. The first Take Back the Night occurred in Philadelphia in October 1975. Following the murder of Susan Alexander Speeth, who was stabbed a block from her home, the people of Philadelphia came together to show that they would not stand for violence. Another Take Back the Night took place at The International Tribunal on Crimes against Women. The Tribunal took place March 4-8 1976 in Brussels, Belgium. Two thousand women representing 40 countries attended the event. “Today the march speaks out against all forms of violence against women. I believe it has also evolved into more than just taking back the night and ‘shattering the silence’: women, survivors, and victims leave these marches empowered and hopefully ready to heal,” commented

I remember feeling this wave of strength—as I walked with my sisters and chanted and yelled and screamed, I actually felt safe. Leigh Castle Orillia Events Coordinator

Castle. “The first time I participated in Take Back the Night in 2008, I remember feeling this wave of strength—as I walked with my sisters and chanted and yelled and screamed, I actually felt safe. It was moving and extremely powerful because to be honest, until that moment, I had [felt] unsafe and had been used to that knot in the pit of my stomach.” Castle was not alone in having a life changing experience at Take Back the Night. “That same night, a young woman shared for the first time that she had been date raped,” explains Castle. “She had thought for years that it wasn’t ‘really rape’ because she was dating the attacker. She spent years feeling that she was abnormal because she felt like a victim. She realized that night that she was a victim and was able to begin the healing process and become a survivor.”

XKCD

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RANDALL MUNROE


theargus

NEWS Orillia Takes Back the Night NEWS Commonwealth gender equality ARTS Movie Review: In Time NEWS Comparing smartphones

November 7th, 2011

the student voice of thunder bay

Volume 48, Issue 8 www.theargus.ca

LU participates in 31st annual Holocaust Education Week BY ERIN COLLINS News Editor

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ov. 1 marked the beginning of the 31st annual Holocaust Education Week, organized by the Sarah and Chaim Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre. The annual event blends together programs, events, and testimonies to remember the millions who were murdered during the genocide of World War II. The week also strives to raise awareness about atrocities that have since taken place and about attempts for justice. Holocaust Education Week is designated a yearly theme. ‘Accountability’ was selected for 2011 – the year that marks the 50th anniversary of Adolf Eichmann’s trial and the 65th anniversary of the Nuremberg trials. In addition to the study of postWorld War II justice, the event stressed individual and collective accountability to prevent future human rights violations and genocides. Dr. Valerie Hébert, assistant professor of history and interdisciplinary studies at the Orillia campus, presented the lecture Genocide and the Law last Wednesday. She spoke of the evolution of postatrocity justice from the Nuremberg trials, which tried German officials involved in the Holocaust for their war crimes, to the present day. “I am delighted to be part of

MILAN BOERS/FLICKR

The Holocaust Memorial in South Beach, Florida. this year’s Holocaust Education Week and to have the opportunity to expand the reach of this program to the Orillia and Thunder Bay areas,” expresses Hébert. “I am grateful to the Chaim and Sarah Neuberger Holocaust Education Centre and to Lakehead University for supporting this important event. I hope that it will be the first of many.” Hébert’s lecture made refer-

ence to Rwanda’s Gacaca tribunals, a movement toward national reconciliation after 700,000 Tutsi were killed in the 1994 genocide. During the tribunals, witnesses and survivors were provided the opportunity to speak about their horrific experiences in a safe, open environment, and the individuals accused of human rights violations were tried. Dr. Tomaz Jardim from Ryerson

University followed Dr. Hébert, presenting about the Mauthausen trial, an American-led movement to try Mauthausen concentration camp personnel. With an academic focus on the Holocaust, war crime trials, and modern Germany, Jardim has completed extensive research on postwar justice. “The Mauthausen trial [can serve] as a case study to shed light on how the U.S military inves-

tigated, prosecuted and punished Nazi perpetrators at war’s end,” explained Jardim. “The trial remains indicative of the most common, and yet least understood, American approach to war crimes prosecution. This presentation aims to force reflection on the implications of compromising legal standards in order to guarantee that guilty men do not walk free.”

Victim testifies in Calgary torture case BY ERIN COLLINS News Editor

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he victim in a bizarre case of alleged torture, domination, and starvation testified against his former roommate, Dustin Paxton, last Monday. Paxton was charged with aggravated assault, sexual assault, and unlawful confinement after the victim – whose name cannot be mentioned due to a publication ban – was dumped in front of a Regina hospital last April. The victim, who was in critical condition, fell into to a coma and required several reconstructive surgeries. After recovery, he began to remember and recount months of subjection to abuse. Paxton and the victim had met in Winnipeg and had moved to Calgary to pursue a business venture. In his testimony, the victim explained that the abuse started shortly after they moved into their apartment, when Paxton beat him with a steel-toed boot. Afterwards Paxton was reported to have apologized and his roommate, concerned with appearing ‘weak,’ forgave him. With time, however, physical abuse became regular. The roommate recalled Paxton using several

devices to inflict pain, including a dog leash, an extension cord, and a two-by-four. Two consecutive beatings – which destroyed the victim’s eye socket, broke his ribs, and ruptured his bowel – rendered him bedridden. During his testimony, the victim recalled that Paxton refrained from calling an ambulance for more than twenty-four hours while he lay helpless and in pain. “I thought I was going to die I was in so much pain,” he said to the Winnipeg Free Press. The hospital staff were told that the injuries were caused by a pizza oven, and the victim returned to live with Paxton after his release. The victim also testified that Paxton became ‘turned on’ during episodes of torture, and that performing sexual acts was a resort to keeping the beatings at bay. “Personally, I thought it was disgusting. I was in survival mode," he explained to the Winnipeg Free Press. "I would do anything not to get beaten anymore." After the victim’s testimony, Defense Lawyer Jim Lutz asked why the victim, who was not physically constrained, had never left. The victim responded that by the time he had opportunities for escape, the brain injury he had

acquired early on had diminished his ability to think straight. "You've got to understand, I had a serious brain injury, so my thinking was compromised,” he explained to CBC News. Lutz also accused the victim of inventing the scenario, even hinting that the memories of abuse may have been implanted by family members trying to help him piece together the events leading up to his coma. But the aftermath of abuse left behind on the victim’s body cannot be denied. Last September, Lindsay Airhart expressed her shock after visiting her former boyfriend in the hospital. "He was a frail, lifeless body," Airhart testified to the Global Calgary. "He looked like he had been starved. He had burn marks inside of his legs. Every couple of inches there was a cut or a bruise. Some were infected." The victim had dropped to 87 pounds from 245, and was also missing pieces of his lips and tongue. Next week, the court will hear a testimony from Dr. Kris Mohandle, a police and forensic psychologist who has experience working with persons who have been subject to captivity. The trial is ongoing.


Volume 48 Issue 8