2021 The APA Living Today Jan/Feb vol. 3 - issue 1

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IN THE COMMUNITY

What’s Ahead For The FANHS Museum In 2021? Page 4 The Story of Us, Told By Us Page 5 Times Are Tough For Our Kids And Even Scarier For San Joaquin County Foster Kids Pages 6 & 7 The American Dream - What Is Your Legacy Page 8 & 9

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STORY THREADS TRAILBLAZERS

Congresswoman Patsy Mink - An Iconic Trailblazer & Ahead Of The Majority Page 10 & 11 Miami Marlins General Manager Kim Ng First East Asian American To Hold The Position In Major League Baseball History. Page 12 & 13 Racing To The Stars & Above...Jonny Kim. - Navy Seal, Doctor And Now Astronaut! Page 14 & 15

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SWEET & SAVORY

Pop-up Power: @elChinoGrande + Hén-zhì SF + Harmonic Brewing Page 16 & 17 The Modi Apple Chicken With Asparagus And Mashed Potatoes Page 18

& WELLNESS 20 HEALTH Depression And The Covid-19 Pandemic Page 20 Asia Plays The Long Game On Covid Vaccine Rollout Page 21 The Empowered Mindset With A Winning Attitude Page 22 & 23

Happy New Year! T H E A PA LIVIN G TO DAY

& EVENTS 24 NEWS Reinvent Yourself And Embrace The New Year... Virtually! Page 24

26 OPINION Mabalon’s Book Uncovers The Truth About

Stockton’s Reaction To Pearl Harbor, Internment Page 26 Restaurants Have Become Pandemic Scapegoats, Struggling To Survive. Page 27

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Chasons Holiday Features will warm and heat up any appetite. Check out our Family Meal Deal! Kids Eat Free on Tuesdays for to-go orders too for the Holidays.

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Feeling cold inside and out?

Free Kids meal with purchase of each entree. Hot, fresh, steamy gumbo, add soft shell crab to enjoy!

y o j n e and r e d my r a O e t s d n a t rt o o h f r m u o o ec h t n i e. m meal, o h r of you Visit www.chasonscrab.com or call (916) 688-8885 J A N UA R Y / FE BR UA R Y 2021

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5250 Claremont Ave. Ste. 224 Stockton, CA 95207

PHONE

209.993.2607 Layne Imada 916.995.5200 Hau Cam

EMAIL

L_imada@bggwestllc.com haucam@gmail.com

ONLINE

www.isuu.com/theapalivingtoday @apalivingtoday

EDITOR-IN-CHIE F Terri Torres

DIRE CTOR

Layne Imada

SENIOR PA RTNE R Hau Cam

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS & SOURCES APAPA Asian Journal Val Acoba Jessie Bowen Linda Calarmo Hau Cam The Child Abuse Prevention Council Jim Chong Beverly Engkabo Emil Guillermo Joseph Guzy My Kristy Nong Linda Norris NASA and U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affair Tanya Parmelee Terri Torres Dr. Richard Yee, D.O. CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Miami Marlins Hau Cam Jim Chong Tim Ulmer Deadline to submit newsworthy information from nonprofits, charitable organizations, or other sources is the 5th of each month for the following issue. Submitting information does not guarantee it will be featured in print.

Submit information to: L_imada@bggwestllc.com • Attn: Layne Imada The APALT is published bi-monthly by APA Living Today. APALT does not assume responsibility for the authenticity or accuracy of news materials furnished for publication. ©The APA Living Today 2020

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FROM THE DIRECTOR’S DESK: 2020 drew to a close, and we’re sure everyone is ready to close the door on what was described as an insane, crazy year and move forward into a hopeful future. Each new year, everyone has a slew of hopes and dreams: landing the perfect job, finding the perfect mate, having a child, climbing that mountain, taking that dream trip, morphing ourselves into our perfect self-image ... the list goes on and on. And when the bells rang out, we all raised our glasses and masks to wish 2020 a swift goodbye and welcome in 2021 with open arms and hopeful vision. We’ve decided to have a little fun and make a list of what just might happen when 2020 is no more, thanks to Twitter. Here’s what people have come up with: “I’ve cried a lot in this 2020. I hope for 2021 less drama, less pain, easier decision making skills, better mental health and to be surrounded with honest people who give back the same positive energy I put out.” - Pia “I have high hopes for 2021 and one of my big wishes is that I’ll figure out how to mute other people’s Venmo transactions.” Francine “I have such high hopes for 2021, that i’ve already ordered two planners.” - Kristen “3 predictions for 2021. Apple TV will not have a new model. Netflix will see a subscriber drop in the U.S. Online TV streaming service will shut down” - Luke “I hate to be the one to say it, but between this, the 40,000 year-old ice worms, and the mysteriously expanding crack in the moon, it may behoove us to reexamine our hopes for 2021.” - DefNotRyan There are an infinite amount of hopes and dreams we all have for every new year, however, 2021 has a lot of pressure on it already. Our list is all in good fun, and we know there are a lot more hopes, dreams, and predictions that could be added. Whatever your dream is for 2021, here’s to hoping it happens—and in a big way! Layne Imada Director

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Next Issue March/April 2021

The Asian Pacific American Living Today is a bi-monthly newspaper dedicated to providing a comprehensive publication, both in print and online, that seeks to raise awareness of issues of interest to Asians and associated ethnic groups in California and abroad.

Objectives

Strength - To give a voice to the community for sharing and lauding accomplishments and concerns. Unity - Unite readers about the issues facing Asian Pacific Americans. Promote and encourage readers to take an active role in raising awareness in the community and its contributions and concerns. Involved - Ask readers to be involved in the community as an informed member. While we most directly address the concerns of Asian Pacific Americans, our publication is not a racial or ethnic sorting. It is a gathering of all those who wish to gather.

For more info: email us at L_imada@bggwestllc.com or haucam@gmail.com

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Some Past Programs:

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What’s Ahead For The FANHS Museum In 2021? By Terri Torres, FANHS Museum Board Member/Treasurer 2021 will mark the FANHS Museum’s five-year anniversary! While it took almost 20 years to establish the only national Filipino American history museum in the United States, we have been incredibly pleased with how the public has shown their interest in learning about how Filipinos have contributed to the development of this nation.

April 2019: Lois Sahyoun talks about Alaska and growing up as a Mestiza.

Filipinos, once United States Nationals, have contributed or have been involved in almost every major historical event in the US – War of 1812, Civil War, Spanish-American War, The Philippine-American War, WWI, WWII, etc. Filipino Americans were also major contributors to the building of the cannery and agriculture empires on the west coast. Currently, we are one of the largest ethnic groups affected by the pandemic, either as front-line workers or, sadly, as patients. The Filipino American National Historical Society (aka FANHS) organization, headquartered in Seattle, with 38 chapters across the United States, and the FANHS Museum, records it all – to showcase it and to make sure it is not forgotten.

Cindy Fazzi, author, reads from her book “My MacArthur”

June 2020: Emil Guillermo speaks with Mel LaGasca about his family history

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Each month, since the Museum opened, we offered various programs, exhibits, and speakers – presenting knowledge and, most times, first-hand experience about Filipino American history. In 2020, we had to rethink our offerings due to the pandemic. We could no longer welcome visitors to our small Museum. Using technology, we have taken our presentations online. It was a learning experience for us all, but we’ve come a long way in nine months! We created our own

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YouTube channel (FANHS Museum), and every weekend when we ordinarily would be open, our board vice president and Museum director, Emil Guillermo, has begun doing programs showcasing Filipino American history on live pop-up shows on Facebook each weekend. Since we won’t be able to reopen anytime soon, until our county receives the all-clear for indoor museums, our all-volunteer group will continue to tell the Filipino American story to all those interested in our history. Coming up in 2021? We hope to return to our in-house presentations but will continue our online presence. We are developing new exhibits and displays, and are expanding our volunteer base so we can offer additional open hours/days to the public. We’ve been lucky that our volunteers have been so dedicated over the past two decades because of their belief on how important it is to tell the Filipino American story and have a place to do so. And we’ve been lucky to have that place for almost five years now, and hope to have it (and, fingers crossed, a larger space) for 50 more! If you are interested in volunteering at the FANHS Museum, please contact us at (209) 932-9037 and leave a message or email us at fanhsmuseum@aol.com. And please check out our website at fanhsmuseum.com and our Facebook page at fanhsmuseum and watch all our videos on our YouTube channel or on Facebook.

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The Story of Us, Told by Us By Linda Claramo, President

The mission of the Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS) Stockton Chapter is to collect, record and share Filipino American history of Stockton and the surrounding area. It is important for us to collect history, as in many cases, we do not have the benefit of written documentation of the events that have shaped our historical and cultural identity. Conducting interviews and the sharing of stories provides an insight and appreciation of our diverse Filipino American community.

Montage created by Chapter member, Beverly Engkabo

In 2021, we will continue to fulfill our mission of gathering and sharing stories. We thank the individuals and families who graciously contributed their photos and experiences with us. If you are interested in sharing you or your families’ story, please contact Elizabeth Claramo, Newsletter Editor at eclaramo@gmail.com. We invite you to join our FANHS Stockton chapter. To learn more or to request an application please contact me at lindaclaramo123@gmail.com

Membership applications can be requested by sending an email to: STOCKTONFANHS@outlook.com

@fanhsstockton • www.fanhsstockton.com

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Montage created by Chapter member, Laurena Cabanero

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Times are tough for our kids and even scarier for San Joaquin County foster kids As the coronavirus lockdown keeps families confined to their homes, financial worries and anxiety about what the future holds can reach critical mass.

foster youth and spend on average 2-3 hours per week with the youth. While some of this time is mentoring, skill and relationship building, the other time is being an advocate for the well-being of the youth in every asset of their lives. CASA is prepared to conduct training “virtually” while we practice social distancing. What better way to spend time at home than training to be a CASA? Our kids need you!! If you are in the position to support your local CASA program, please consider becoming a CASA volunteer today. Help change the story of a child in foster care.

These times are tough for our kids and even scarier for our foster kids. Many of our foster kids are living in less-than-ideal circumstances. Some are not sure what the future holds or where he or she will be living next month or next year. Older foster youth are suffering from lost jobs or, if they were attending college, a lost school year—including no dorm living.

Now, factor this additional stress into homes with families already struggling with circumstances threatening to overwhelm their ability to cope, and you have a home with children who are incredibly vulnerable to abuse and neglect.

In San Joaquin County, nearly 2 children enter foster care a day due to abuse or neglect. Currently, we have 1700 children in our foster care system. Statistics tell us that: • 50% of foster children will not graduate from high school • 1 in 5 foster youth will be homeless after age 18 • Only 50% of foster youth are employed by the age of 24 • 71% of young women who were in foster care will be pregnant by age 21

Studies show that more than 80% of sexual abuse happens in isolation, now imagine you are a child stuck at home with your abuser. Where do you turn? The closing of schools has been a disaster for abused children. Teachers are the primary reporters of suspicious bruises or behavior suggesting child abuse. But now those protective eyes and ears are not on children who may be being seriously hurt at home.

Our community cannot forget about our foster youth. We must help them through this pandemic nightmare which impacts them so disproportionately.

In times of trauma, adults often think about the “what ifs.” Children, on the other hand, continue to live in the moment and thrive on routine. So, focus on the here and now. Avoid anticipatory anxiety. Turn off the news and put down your phone. What kids will remember is what their day-to-day existence was like. It was weird—they were trapped inside, not in school—but we want them to remember board games and walks and tickle fights, not stress and violence.

Even at the height of this pandemic, the CAPC’s Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) program is recruiting volunteers to advocate on behalf of our foster youth. CASA volunteers are matched with a

The CAPC is still serving our children and families. Many of the families that we serve under normal circumstances are in crisis, and the virus sweeping through our community has only exacerbated

For these older foster youth, we add in the stress of CV19 and statistics for them to become homeless, hungry, sick, trafficked, or tempted into crime dramatically increase.

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the level of risk of child abuse and neglect – we cannot turn our backs on this community need! Many of our services are considered “Essential” and we have doubled down on our mission to protect children and strengthen families. April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month, in an effort to raise awareness of resources and coping strategies available to families in need of support we invite you to visit our website @nochildabuse. org. You can find more information on reporting child abuse, mental health during this time of crisis and tools to create structure and some fun for your kiddos. If you are interested in learning more about how you can be the eyes and ears for our foster youth, please visit our website and click CASA.

For more information please contact: The Child Abuse Prevention Council www.nochildabuse.org

If you are in the position to support local nonprofits on the front line…. Please consider supporting our work by supporting our Ducky Derby. You can help us to adopt more ducks than ever before ($5.00 donation). This event is our major fundraiser and we count on these donations to help us continue serving children and families in unique and life-changing ways.

If you think a child is in immediate danger please call 911 If you think a child is being abused call Child Protective Services (CPS) at 209-468-1333

You can adopt a duck online at CAPCDUCKS.com. If you would like to support the CAPC and the families we serve through the Ducky Derby, Duck Sales or donations please contact Shauna Jacob at 209-644-5318, or sbjacob@nochildabuse.org.

If you’re not sure what to do, please call our 24 hour helpline 209-464-4524 or email us info@nochildabuse.org

Speak up for a child in foster care VOLUNTEER

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THE AMERICAN DREAM What Is Your Legacy? By Jim T. Chong the “Wok Star” & Legend Maker

“If your plan is for one year, plant rice. If your plan is for ten years, plant trees. If your plan is for one hundred years, educate children.” - Confucious passion in his beliefs, his determination, strong work ethic, and also the driving force of his vision on what he believed his life was meant to be lived for. One thought I want us to consider and think about… “What do you want to be remembered for?” This may or may not be something you have thought about, but one of the most significant driving forces for our lives as we age is this very question. It is something that allows us to focus our life and live it on purpose...if we choose to.

Jim and Dad (Courtesy of Bruce Robinson Photography)

This article is dedicated to my father, Wing Gwai Chong, who passed away just after Christmas this past year to be with my mother, Hing Yuet Chong. Love you both and miss you!!! Thanks for giving myself and my brother and sisters a great opportunity here in America.

Our life does matter and if we choose to for it to have significance, we can consider not who we can impact today but also how our story can impact the future generation tomorrow. Whether you are able to create something grand like the Yins or simply raise a family and give them opportunity like my father and mother did when they came to America from China, our life will make a difference.

One of the most important aspects of the Chinese community are the traditions that are transferred from generation to generation. As an Asian American of Chinese descent, I have learned to appreciate the struggle and challenges my parents had to go through to live their American Dream and also provide their children with a future.

As many historic events are happening around us, we have many things to consider and time to evaluate what is really important. Consider the impact you can have in deciding to give it forward to the youth and future generation by helping provide them with vision and hope via education through our own life’s experience and opening doors to provide them with opportunity. Or perhaps you would like to give back to those that have fought for our freedom.

As time progresses, major shifts have occurred that have helped advance our quality of life and opportunities we are able to have. One American Asian icon couple are CC and Regina Yin who have maximized their opportunity to better their lives, give their family a better life to live their potential, and also create an organization called APAPA that serves approximately 30K+ members nationwide in helping the Asian community have a voice. Given the opportunity, Mr. Yin, who is also an engineer, was able to go from running one of the most challenging stores in the McDonald chain to owning nearly 30 stores in the franchise. What drove him? His

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The most significant question we can ask during this time if we have chosen to live in America is… “What will you do with YOUR American Dream?”

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CC and Regina Yin

If you are looking for a good cause to contribute to give to, consider one of the following. To help the Youth and Future Generations: Donate to Future Development Youth Center at http://www.FDYC.org founded by Frankie Woods II To help our Veterans: Donate to Music Therapy for Veterans at http://www.MusicTherapyForVeterans.org which was founded by Floyd A Smith of The 5th Dimension.

FDYC Teen Mobile Media Bus

If you would like to connect with the writer, you can reach Jim T. Chong at (916)747-9366 or send an email to JTC.Publicist@gmail.com.

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Congresswoman

Patsy Mink

An Iconic Trailblazer & Ahead of the Majority

Congresswoman & American lawyer U.S. state of Hawaii Patsy Mink (1927 – 2002)

By Layne Imada

In 1959 when Hawaii became a U.S. State, Patsy Mink knew she wanted to run for a position in government. Little did she know, she would become the first woman of color elected to the U.S. House of Representatives and the first Asian-American woman to serve in Congress. In addition to writing bills like Title IX, the Early Childhood Education Act, and the Women’s Educational Equity Act, Mink was the first AsianAmerican to run for U.S. President.

“We have to build things that we want to see accomplished... to make sure that others do not have to suffer the same discrimination.”

She applied to several medical schools after graduating but none of her applications were accepted. Instead, Mink decided to apply to law school and was accepted at the University of Chicago Law School.

A third generation Japanese American from Hawaii, Mink became engaged in political activism from a young age, in part motivated by witnessing the discrimination her father faced as the only Japanese American civil engineer Patsy Matsu Takemoto was born on December 6, working on Maui during the World War II period. 1927 in Paia, Hawaii. One of two children, her In one of her early acts of political activism, Patsy Takemoto Mink father, Suematsu Takemoto was a civil engineer. when she moved to the mainland to attend When she was a junior at Maui High School, the University of Nebraska, Mink organized a she won her first election as class president. coalition of students, community members, She graduated in 1944 as the valedictorian. After graduation, she and businesses to successfully bring an end to the university’s longwent on to attend Wilson College in Pennsylvania and the University standing policy of racially segregating student housing. of Nebraska but transferred after facing racial discrimination. All students of color were not allowed to live in the same dorms as white In 1965, Mink became the first woman of color elected to the U.S. students. In addition, Mink was diagnosed with a thyroid condition Congress where she served from 1965-1977 and again from 1990 that needed surgery. She decided to move to Honolulu to finish until her death in 2002. During her tenure in Congress, Mink gained her schooling at the University of Hawaii with hopes of becoming a reputation as a vocal advocate for women’s rights and civil rights, a doctor. At her new school, she became a member of the varsity and was a leading opponent to the war in Vietnam. Although her debate team, and was elected president of the Pre-Medicine Students outspokenness engendered criticism at times, Mink believed in Club. She graduated in 1948 with majors in zoology and chemistry. standing by her ideals, famously stating: “It is easy enough to vote right and be consistently with the majority. But it is more often more

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Courtesy of Gwendolyn Mink/Patsy Takemoto Mink papers, Library of Congress

important to be ahead of the majority and this means being willing to cut the first furrow in the ground and stand alone for a while if necessary.” One of her greatest legacies is the Title IX Amendment of the Higher Education Act, the breakthrough 1972 U.S. civil rights law which prohibits gender discrimination in any educational program or activity. Mink was one of the bill’s principal authors and the driving force behind its passage; it was later renamed Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in her honor. Filmmaker Kimberlee Bassford, who made the documentary “Patsy Mink: Ahead of the Majority,” describes Mink’s influence as follows: “Mink’s story captures the spirit of a generation of trailblazing women and shows that one person — armed with vision, drive, and perseverance — can make a difference. I never doubted that I would have the opportunity to go to college — even graduate school — and to play sports. Women of my generation take for granted the very things that Patsy Mink fought for.”

U.S. Representative Patsy Mink, a staunch supporter of equal rights, stands on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. (Photo: Courtesy of Kimberlee Bassford/Photo/Dev O’Neill, courtesy of Making Waves Film)

Mink, who also became first Asian American to seek the presidential nomination during the 1972 election, passed away in 2002. Her death occurred one week after the 2002 primary election, too late for her name to be removed from the general election ballot. As a result, Mink was posthumously re-elected to Congress on November 5, 2002.

SOURCES

Patsy Mink is one of the trailblazing women in U.S. politics featured in the excellent book, “Leading the Way: Women In Power” for ages 9 and up at https://www.amightygirl.com/leading-the-way And, for more stories of female trailblazers in all fields including science, the arts, and athletics, visit A Mighty Girl’s “Role Models” section at https://www.amightygirl.com/.../history-biography/biography

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Miami Marlins General Manager

Kim Ng

First East Asian American to hold the position in Major League Baseball history. By Layne Imada

Kim Ng, General Manager, Miami Marlins

“Look, it’s a tribute to the idea that you just have to keep plowing through,” she said. “That’s what this is. It’s like what we tell the players – you can mope and sulk for a few days, but that’s it. You’ve got to come back, and that’s what I’ve been able to do. I’ve been defeated and deflated numerous times, but you keep hoping.” - Kim Ng

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Kim Ng made history after the Miami Marlins announced her as the team’s next general manager — making her the first woman and first East Asian American to hold the position in Major League Baseball history, officials said. “After decades of determination, it is the honor of my career to lead the Miami Marlins as their next General Manager,” Ng said in a statement. “We are building for the long term in South Florida, developing a forward-thinking, collaborative, creative baseball operation made up of incredibly talented and dedicated staff who have, over the last few years, laid a great foundation for success.” This isn’t the first time Ng has broken records in MLB history. When she was hired as assistant general manager of the New York Yankees from 1998 to 2001 at age 29, she was the youngest person and second woman to hold the position at the time. Her recent appointment comes after serving the last nine years as Senior Vice President of Baseball Operations with the league, which made her the highest-ranking Asian American female baseball executive. “We look forward to Kim bringing a wealth of knowledge and championship-level experience to the Miami Marlins,” said Derek Jeter, the CEO of the Marlins. “Her leadership of our baseball operations team will play a major role on our path toward sustained success.” Ng added she does not take her position lightly. “When I got into this business, it seemed unlikely a woman would lead a Major League team, but I am dogged in the pursuit of my goals,” Ng said. “My goal is now to bring Championship baseball to Miami.” “I am both humbled and eager to continue building the winning culture our fans expect and deserve,” she said.

Background Born November 17, 1968, Kim is an American executive in Major League Baseball. She is currently the general manager of the Miami Marlins and the highest-ranking female baseball executive. She is the first woman to serve as general manager of a team in the Big Four leagues in North America and the first person of East Asian descent to serve as general manager of an MLB team.

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In this photo provided by the Miami Marlins, new Miami Marlins general manager Kim Ng poses for a photo at Marlins Park stadium before being introduced during a virtual news conference, Monday, Nov. 16, 2020, in Miami. Ng discussed her climb to become the first female GM in the four major North American professional sports leagues. (Joseph Guzy/Miami Marlins via AP)

A graduate of the University of Chicago, Ng played college softball. She then worked her way up in the front office of several Major League Baseball teams and became a vice president of the league. She was named the Marlins’ general manager in 2020.

other three are Elaine Weddington Steward and Raquel Ferreira of the Boston Red Sox and Jean Afterman of the New York Yankees) ever to hold the position. She joined the Los Angeles Dodgers as vice president and assistant general manager in 2001.

Ng was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, the first of five daughters, to Jin Ng and Virginia Fong. Her father, an American of Chinese descent, was a financial analyst, and her mother, Thailand-born of Chinese descent, was a banker. She attended elementary school in Fresh Meadows, Queens and junior high on Long Island, New York. Her interest in baseball started when she played stickball on the street in Queens and her father taught her about sports. She played tennis and softball at Ridgewood High School in Ridgewood, New Jersey and graduated in 1986. She graduated from the University of Chicago in 1990, where she played softball for four years and was named MVP infielder, and earned a B.A. in public policy.

In 2005, Ng was interviewed for the vacant position of Dodgers general manager. No female had ever been a GM in any major sport. The Dodgers hired Ned Colletti as their GM, who immediately kept Ng on as his assistant. She has interviewed for the general manager position with the Seattle Mariners, San Diego Padres, Anaheim Angels, and San Francisco Giants. On March 8, 2011, Ng announced that she was leaving the Dodgers to take on the position of senior vice president of baseball operations for Major League Baseball, where she would report to former Yankees and Dodgers manager Joe Torre. On November 13, 2020, Ng was hired as general manager of the Miami Marlins. She became the first woman to become a general manager of a men’s team in the history of major North American sports, as well as the first Asian-American general manager in MLB history.

Career Ng began her career as an intern with the Chicago White Sox after graduating from the University of Chicago. She was hired full-time in 1991 and became special projects analyst before being promoted to Assistant Director of Baseball Operations under then-GM Ron Schueler in 1995. In 1995 she became the youngest person, and the first woman, to present a salary arbitration case in the major leagues when she worked for the White Sox, regarding the case of pitcher Alex Fernandez, and won. She then worked in the offices of the American League in 1997, where she was Director of Waivers and Records, approving all transactions.

Ms. Ng entered the game when top positions were often filled by former professional players, almost all of them white. Those positions rarely go to former players anymore, as incresingly teams lean on decisions driven more heavily by data than scouting or on-field experience. Ms. Ng’s hiring resonated throughout an industry that remains heavily male and white. At the beginning of the 2020 season, only four people of color led baseball operations departments: Ken Williams of the Chicago White Sox, Farhan Zaidi of the San Francisco Giants, Al AVila of the Detroit Tigers and the Marlins’ Michael Hill, whom Ms. Ng is replacing.

In March 1998, she was recruited by general manager Brian Cashman to work for the New York Yankees as assistant general manager, becoming the youngest in the major leagues, at age 29, and one of four women (the

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Racing To The Stars & Above...

Jonny Kim

Navy Seal, Doctor, and Now Astronaut! By Layne Imada

Johnny Kim, NASA Astronaut

Being a graduate from Harvard Medical School is hard enough and being a part of the Navy SEALs is even tougher, but an astronaut also? It must not have been enough accomplishments for Jonny Kim. The 35-year-old is now the first KoreanAmerican to become a NASA astronaut. Kim, along with 12 others, graduated from NASA’s Artemis program, allowing the astronauts to be eligible to participate in missions to the International Space Station, to the moon and even Mars. Kim was selected from an initial pool of more than 18,000 applicants.

“My parents were South Korean immigrants who came to America in the early 80s for the hope of a better life for their children.”

Becoming an astronaut Kim wanted to become an astronaut because he “fundamentally believed in the NASA mission of advancing our space frontier all the while developing innovation and new technologies that would benefit all of humankind,” he said in a 2017 interview.

- Jonny Kim

But, for those thinking that these achievements came easy, think again, he said. If he had to give his younger self a piece of advice, he said it would be this: “All things that are worthwhile, are very difficult to obtain.”

Let’s begin with Kim’s family background. It certainly is one that many children of immigrants can relate to. “My parents were South Korean immigrants who came to America in the early 80s for the hope of a better life for their children,” Kim said in a 2017 interview with NASA.

The process of baseline training, followed by advanced training, is like his first career as a SEAL, or even his second career as an medical doctor.

After graduating from high school in Los Angeles, Kim joined the Navy as a Seaman recruit, eventually leading him to earn the elite military status of a Navy SEAL, where he served as a combat medic, sniper, and navigator on more than 100 combat operations across two deployments to the Middle East. He then went on to earn his degree in mathematics at the University of San Diego and a doctorate of medicine at Harvard Medical School. At

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the time of his astronaut candidacy selection in June 2017, Kim was a resident physician at a hospital in Massachusetts.

Every SEAL completes Basic Underwater Demolition School (BUDS) in Coronado, California. It provides a core of common skills, techniques, and terminology. After BUDS, SEALS are assigned to specific teams that may have different specialties, and each SEAL team tailors its training to its upcoming deployments. In a similar manner, every M.D. completes essentially the same curriculum in medical school, then goes onto advanced training, depending on what the assigned specialty

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Photos provided by NASA and U.S. Department of Veterans Affair

is. It works roughly the same way with astronauts. Once they complete the baseline training as astronauts, they proceed to advanced training unique to their specialty or mission.

to the Crew Dragon and CST-100 Starliner craft, which are strictly transfer vehicles intended to get astronauts from earth to the ISS, Orion is optimized to support astronauts for long-duration missions that go beyond low earth orbit. As of now, Orion can support missions of up to 21 days duration, more than enough to get from Earth to the Moon and back. Eventually, NASA hopes to build on the success of a return to the Moon with a mission to Mars.

The future Kim is certainly interested in the progress of NASA’s plan to restore domestic manned spaceflight capabilities. With the retirement of the Space Shuttle in 2011, NASA lost its “in house” capability to send U.S. astronauts into space on its own equipment. As a temporary solution that is now nearing a decade in use, NASA contracted with the Russian space agency Roscosmos to provide launch services for U.S. astronauts to get to the International Space Station (ISS). Recently, a spate of failures on the Russian Soyuz family of rockets have put the ISS at risk of having to operate in unmanned mode with no astronauts on board. NASA wants to avoid that scenario and is actively working on the Commercial Crew Development Program to restore America’s ability to launch astronauts into outer space onboard domestically manufactured space vehicles. The two competing models in the NASA program are the SpaceX Crew Dragon space capsule, and the Boeing CST-100 Starliner crew capsule. Both space vehicles have gone through extensive research, development, and testing, and are nearing certification to carry humans. The initial focus of this program is to get U.S. astronauts to the ISS. If both space vehicles prove capable, the mission sets will probably expand beyond the ISS to other manned space flight missions.

While his life has been nothing short of amazing, what many people notice about him is that he is an extremely humble man. He describes himself as a servant of a greater cause, who never forgets where he came from. Of his decision to join the Navy and become a SEAL, in an interview with the Annals of Emergency Medicine, he said “Going into the Navy was the best decision I ever made in my life because it completely transformed that scared boy who didn’t have any dreams to someone who started to believe in himself.” Even though he is now in what is widely considered, the most elite group of people on the planet, astronauts. All the while, maintaining an air of humility and a focus on his service. At this point, Jonny Kim is on track to be assigned to a longduration space flight that goes beyond low earth orbit as part of the Artemis program, he does not yet have an assigned mission. That means he might be assigned to a manned mission to the moon or a developmental mission that goes beyond low earth orbit, but not all the way to the moon, or a mission to the ISS in low earth orbit.

Jon entered training as part of the Artemis program, through which NASA is actively pursuing a return to the Moon. Manned missions in the Artemis program will use the Orion space capsule. In contrast

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He is considered a real role model and hero. By all accounts, Jonny Kim fits the bill.

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POP-UP : @elChinoGrande + Hén-zhì SF + Harmonic Brewing POWER By Tanya Parmelee

accessible businesses of course. And local places already known for approachable menu pricing.

Early morning. The rare occasion my phone is not on silent, a family calendar reminder goes off. LunchBox Pop-up SF Pickup Today. Doot-doot, do-doot, doot-doot. Like clockwork. Big Sis’ Power Ranger alert. She a texts pickup request. Pfft. Phone back on silent mode.

elChinoGrande #2: LunchBox — Pickup at Lafayette Kitchen

elChinoGrande #1: BrunchBox — Outdoor dining at Hunters Point Brewery, San Francisco Pre-purple tier. Next to the parking lot courtyard, sits Chef Proprietor Christopher Yang and wife, Hén-zhì CEO Marcelle Yang’s outdoor kitchen. They describe their pop-up as inspired by the street food night culture of Taiwan, “travels of Asia & Hawaii, memories of childhood, and importance of community.” The only Black Owned Brewery in San Franciso is home to the Speakeasy Ales & Lagers brand. Back at the table, Pink Ranger & sidekick dive into their sweets. Apple Fizzes. Strawberry Milk Ice on a stick. Milk Tea French Toast, or Boba Toast as Chef Little Bro calls it. For hot food…Scallion Pancake Hand Roll. Pink Ranger raves over the Lou Rou Fan Lunchbox’s five-spice braised pork belly. Little Bro’s Da B-Fast Burger dream combo — hamburger, fried egg, hash brown patty and bacon! Car ride home. Hurricane Pink Ranger, snores softly with Chex Mix furikake bits stuck to her face.

Hén-zhì’s New Year’s Eve Family Meal Kit to the rescue. Another SOS from Pink Ranger. Campus Housing is punting students back home for online finals. We move her into the big Family House until we can eventually move the rest of the family in for winter break. To Grandpa’s delight, the Family Meal Kit sits on the counter, waiting to be reheated. He not-so-stealthily devours the Chashao Pork Belly Ssam until I yell at him. With 8 family members across 3 generations, we switch to tasting menu format. Winter Citrus Salad. Bone-in, Shoyu Braised Shortrib. Garlic Noodles with lap cheong. Pork Belly. Roast Kabocha & Mushroom. The shortrib bones & juice become the next day’s soup base. The jars of 8 Treasures Dessert are secretly eaten.

The humble, Hén-zhì dynamic duo. Marcelle has held the GM role of several top 100 restaurants (including Michelin-starred Omakase). Chris was celebrated as 2018 Rising Chef of the Year by San Francisco Magazine. Hén-zhì’s own Pop-up has been hailed among the The Best Bay Area Pop-ups of 2019 by San Franciso Chronicle. They obviously know how to test what’s working.

Quarantine winter break to remember, indeed. The kids were able to experience heritage through food and stories from their elders. We deliver Pink Ranger to campus for January Term. After Welcome Back Saliva Testing clearance, she waves and disappears into her dorm. I reach for my phone to turn off silent mode.

On the flipside, the establishments that are out-of-sight and outof-price, have become out-of-mind. Even the historic beasts seen as the go-to for lunch, loyally visited on important family events are forgotten. Surviving and possibly thriving? The creative and

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Pink Ranger’s 18th. The rice cooker serenades me as I prep her team’s batches of Spam Musubi. Mid-day supper, elChinoGrande’s LunchBox Chef Chris holds the NYE Meal Kit Menu pre-order. New items include the Island Style Rainbow Poke Bowl and Kiawe Smoked Roasted Winter Squash. Apple Fizz to go (Little Bro hides it) and Black Sesame Soy Milk. As a surprise, Chef Chris tucks in tubs of Hurricane Chex Mix for Birthday Girl and pals!

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The Hén-zhì NYE Meal Kit

Chef Chris drops off the New Year’s Eve Meal Kit The plated NYE meal Reheating the NYE Meal Kit

Lou Rou Fan Lunchbox

FEATURED VENDOR INFO Hén-zhì + elChinoGrande

Taiwanese-inspired pop-up concepts, private chef services, and catering from husband and wife team, CEO Marcelle & Chef Proprietor Christopher Yang. elChinoGrande for LunchBox, BrunchBox, Brunch&Brew days. Hén-zhì@Home for dinner meal kits. The couple will be hibernating for winter. Subscribe to their mailing list. Follow on Instagram for up-to-the-minute news. Make sure to experience their vibrant fabulousness when they re-emerge in February. @henzisf @el_chino_grande henzhisf.com

Island Style Rainbow Poke Bowl

Hunters Point Brewery

The Bay Area’s only Black Owned Brewery located in the historic Hunters Point neighborhood. Home to Speakeasy Ales & Lagers. On-tap when allowed, otherwise crowler-to-go. An avid supporter of their food friends, make sure to visit one of their newly launched Food Market days! @HuntersPointBrewery Check out their offerings on untappd.com 1195 Evans Ave, San Francisco

Chef Little Bro’s scarfs down his Da B-Fast Burger

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The Modi Apple Chicken with Asparagus and Mashed Potatoes By Kristy Nong @foodienong

Modi Apples are the perfet compliment to your favorite recipes! With the perfect sweetness and crunch, what dish would you prepare with the Modi Apple? Check out @foodienong featured dish, the Modi Apple chicken with asparagus and mashed potatoes. Yum! Make it with Modi Apples! The Modi is a new apple variety that is crunchy and perfectly sweet with a beautiful red hue. The flesh of the Modi Apple is yellow, firm, crisp, and juicy. They are packed to order and of the utmost best quality. Grown in the heart of the Northern California Delta Region, this apple is grown for Californians! They’re available now at your local Food 4 Less and Rancho San Miguel Supermarkets.

The Modi Apple chicken with asparagus and mashed potatoes by @foodienong

Modi Apple Growers Derrell Kelso, Olivia Kelso, and Bob Freeman.

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TAIKO & KOBE

Sushi Natomas • Folsom • Carmichael

Visit Kobe Sushi in Natomas, Taiko Sushi in Folsom and Carmichael to pick up delicious takeaway feature items. Enjoy our Dinner Specials and Sushi Boats in the comfort of home.

Order our volcano and house special rolls for an amazing and flavorful sushi experience.

ORDER & PICKUP!

Golden crispy sesame chicken bento boxes are made to order, in house, for each order. Taste the difference with our house made sauce a Wave Kid Bronston’s favorite.

www.taikosushi.com www.kobebarandgrill.com VO LU M E 03 . N O 1

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Depression and the COVID-19 Pandemic By Richard Yee, D.O.

As the Holidays are passing, I hope that all of you are well. Unfortunately, many suffer from sadness and depression. It can affect all of us at some point in our lives but it affects us with different degrees. It also affects people at any age - young and old. Each person deals with depression in various ways; we all have different coping mechanisms. Some of the symptoms of depression are as follows: loss of interest in pleasurable activities, increased/decreased sleep patterns, increase/decrease in appetite, thoughts of suicide, agitation, irritability, loss of motivation and concentration to name a few. With the COVID-19 pandemic disrupting our lives, we should try to look out of each other. We should be mindful of our family members, our friends, our coworkers, our classmates, our neighbors, etc. Be willing to reach out and see how people are doing. If you find yourself, dealing with depression and anxiety, reach out to someone for help. There are trained professionals available who can help, such as a psychiatrist or mental health therapists. You are not alone. As adults, we need to take care of ourselves. We need to get enough sleep. We need to eat as healthy as we can; this includes eating nutritious foods such as fruits and vegetables. We need to exercise. We also need interaction with others. This is going to depend on your comfort level but it is easily doable while maintaining distance and being masked. With the winter and snow upon us, our ski resorts are open now. They have been taking much precautions to make skiing safe for their guests. Outdoor activities such as golfing and tennis are also options, while maintaining distance, can be a help with one’s mental and physical state of being. Our children have also been more vulnerable during these times. They too need to get their sleep, eat healthy, and exercise. They also have had minimal contact with friends oftentimes. They turn

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to video games and the internet for a way to have some sort of social interaction. Try to organize safe ways for your children to interact with their friends. Also, do things as a family by getting them outdoors for a walk, run, bike ride, or hike. As the winter and spring passes, I am hopeful that our 2021 summer will be a better one than that of 2020. With the COVID-19 vaccine being initiated at this time, I hope that we will be back to doing the things we enjoy doing with one another. Again, if you are experiencing severe depression, please reach out to someone. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255 (TALK) Or call: 911. Stay safe! Dr. Richard Yee, D.O. Family Medicine – Sutter Health, Lodi, CA

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Asia plays the long game on Covid vaccine rollout Original Source: Financial Times. Reporting by Robin Harding in Tokyo, Song Jung-a in Seoul, Christian Shepherd in Beijing, Jamie Smyth in Sydney, Stefania Palma in Singapore and John Reed in Bangkok Asia has led the world in controlling the spread of Covid-19, but that very success has set the region behind the US and Europe in the race to vaccinate against the disease.

“We had better secure the volume [of jabs] in advance, but begin vaccinations [only] after monitoring any possible side effects from inoculations abroad for two to three months,” said Mr Park.

In countries with limited coronavirus outbreaks, regulators have been happy to let westerners act as guinea pigs for quickly approved jabs, while in others, the low level of Covid-19 cases means that locally developed vaccines have struggled to complete clinical trials.

Australia and Vietnam are in a similar position, with only a handful of Covid-19 cases a day. Regulators said they were happy to wait for more safety data.

Asia’s vaccine caution contrasts with fervent enthusiasm in the US and Europe, where coronavirus infection is raging and authorities have made it a point of pride to grant approvals quickly. The differing approaches raise the prospect of a world where some nations are vaccinated and others are not, which could affect the speed of economic recovery and hinder international travel. In countries such as South Korea, Vietnam and Australia, controlled outbreaks make vaccination a choice rather than a necessity. “We are coping with Covid-19 relatively well so we don’t have to begin vaccination in a hurry when the risks have not been verified yet,” said Park Neung-hoo, South Korean health minister. Seoul has signed deals for 20m doses each from AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Moderna, plus another 4m doses from Johnson & Johnson. Although inoculations could start in the first half of next year, South Korean health experts said widespread vaccinations were unlikely until next autumn, because the country has to go through its own safety checks.

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Instead, Chinese developers brokered deals to carry out trials in more than a dozen host countries — including Brazil, Indonesia, Pakistan and Russia — often in exchange for promises of early access to vaccines once they were ready. The delays mean that Chinese vaccines have not yet reached the threshold for regulatory approval. Last week, the United Arab Emirates moved closer to approving a vaccine developed by Sinopharm after interim analysis showed 86 per cent efficacy against infection, a breakthrough for the largest Chinese coronavirus vaccine manufacturer.

“Frankly, the work done in the UK will give Australia and the world very important data, very important lessons, both on the rollout and the efficacy of this particular vaccine, but vaccines more generally,” said Greg Hunt, Australia’s health minister.

Jerome Kim, director-general of the International Vaccine Institute, a Seoul-based multilateral organisation, said the UAE announcement was encouraging but raised questions about the underlying data.

Canberra has signed deals for four separate vaccines, including the Pfizer/ BioNTech jab, with enough doses to cover its population thrice over. But Mr Hunt said vaccinations would only begin in March if the national regulator deemed them safe and effective.

“It’s going to be really important for [Chinese vaccine developers] to make data public,” he said.

Even if they wanted to start inoculations sooner, countries cannot do so until they have a supply of vaccines. One paradox of Asia’s success in controlling the pandemic has been that not enough people have fallen ill to prove that local vaccines work.

Beijing-based Sinovac has also begun exporting its vaccines and delivered 1.2m doses to Indonesia last week, with another 1.8m expected in January.

In Japan and South Korea, vaccine candidates have yet to start phase 3 trials and are unlikely to be ready before 2022. Chinese vaccines were among the first to enter clinical trials but fell behind over the summer as they entered the final stage of testing. Large-scale phase 3 trials require the jabs to be administered in a population where the virus is still spreading, so China’s early effort to eradicate the virus within its borders made trials of sufficient scale near impossible.

Indonesia falls into a separate category of poorer but highly populous Asian countries, which also includes India and the Philippines, where Covid-19 is prevalent. There, the challenge is to procure a vaccine and distribute it. Indonesia has secured 155.5m doses of Covid-19 vaccines: 125.5m from Sinovac and 30m from US company Novavax. Jakarta is in talks to procure an additional 116m doses from Pfizer, AstraZeneca and the World Health Organization’s Covax programme.

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Indonesian state-owned pharmaceutical company Bio Farma is conducting phase 3 clinical trials on the Sinovac jab in the city of Bandung. Bio Farma said it would submit an interim report on the clinical trials to authorities in January. Apart from obtaining a sufficient supply of vaccine doses, Indonesia will also face significant distribution hurdles. The country spills across thousands of islands with often poor transport and infrastructure beyond urban centres. “The government thinks the vaccine is the quick solution,” said Pandu Riono, epidemiology professor at the University of Indonesia. “But the vaccine itself doesn’t work if you don’t successfully deliver it to the people, and [that is] a complex job.” Vaccinating just half of Indonesia’s population might take three to four years, he added. Mr Pandu said Indonesia’s temperature-controlled supply chains were “not perfect” even in more developed provinces, and might struggle to accommodate the vaccines’ various temperature requirements. Winning Indonesians’ trust to take Covid-19 vaccines could provide an additional challenge, Mr Pandu added, after the government’s poor job at containing the disease. While Asian countries have moved slowly on vaccines, they may find their citizens demanding inoculations so as to make a full return to travel and normal life.

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The Empowered Mindset with a Winning Attitude

By Grand Master Jessie Bowen, Martial Artist / Corporate Speaker / Business and Life Coach To be able to achieve success and internal peace especially in today’s “New Normal”, it is of utmost importance to have the right foundation in place. In my training programs, I try to ensure that everyone has explicit knowledge of the words’ definition in my subject. The keywords for this subject are mindset and attitude. Mindset means the current set of someone’s attitudes. I failed at first with most of the things I’ve done in my life or when I was in a position I struggled with; however, each situation and circumstance I’ve experienced made me stronger.

“Attitude is a settled way to think or feel about someone or something that is reflected in the actions of a person. Life itself is your instructor, and you are in a state of constant learning...”

- Martial Arts You will change your life when you change your mentality by your thoughts. It would help if you changed your attitude towards life to be a winner rather than live a life of mediocrity. Successful individuals all have a winning mentality that moves them forward every day in all walks of life. You are not born with the mentality of winning. I have learned to use that information to teach and train fortune 500 companies to motivate their teams for their empowerment breakthrough. Breakthroughs are key to truly achieve success. What breakthroughs are you searching for? Everyone is affected by major issues that happen in the world. The coronavirus pandemic has influenced everyone, but they have sought new possibilities and become the new rising leaders instead of their struggles. These people have embraced a new mentality. Throughout your life, it is something you cultivate and need to continue to nurture. There is a real winning mentality for a small percentage of the population because it takes time and effort.

legend Bruce Lee

all, you have to figure out where you are right now. Secondly, you need to find out where you want to go, and the third thing you need is to get directions on how to get there. As an example, the purpose of our mobile phone or car navigation systems is to give us guidance and provide us with navigation. This is a lesson for us since as humans, you have to know where you are and then discover the direction and destination of where you want to be. Most people do not do this and tend to take advice from people that have not achieved what they want to achieve. If you want to be successful in life, then the best way to do it is to model someone that has experienced the same or similar success that you are striving for.

My 7 Steps for forming a Winning Attitude are as follows: 1. Choose the Right Mindset 2. Craft A Positive Self-Image 3. Don’t Dwell on Failures 4. Increase Your Commitment 5. Practice Gratitude Daily 6. Surround Yourself With Winners 7. Never Give Up You will be doing things you never have experienced on your path to building a winning attitude. For your performance, consider these as stepping stones. Each time you step forward, to make good progress, you pat yourself on the back with a few stones. Remember...Success is not given, it is a gift that should be defined and planned for.

Most people want a simple life but still lament on how things are not the way they want them to be. If you feel you’re lost in life, first of

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Reinvent Yourself and Embrace the New Year ...Virtually!

Are You VirtuaLY Ready? By Jim T. Chong and Linda Norris

One of the best joys I have is watching people overcome barriers in order to better themselves and also others around them. One exceptional example is a business person I had been introduced to this past year. She was in the entertainment arena and with all the shut downs of live events, needed to begin the process of re-inventing herself and adapting to the “New Reality” and “New Normal Economy”. I wanted to have her share her story as it is one that is all to common during these “Pandemic Times”. Her story is now one of excitement and anticipation instead of fear during these times where it is paramount to be able to transform quickly and learn new skills. Here, Linda shares about her decision to learn how to maneuver and adapt. As she shares her story, keep in mind that her experience could be much different if she hadn’t decided to learn and apply new skills necessary for the new way of doing things. I look forward to working with her on our new upcoming show “Sip and Inspire with Jimmy & Linda”.

Linda Norris online with friends

My name is Linda Norris, business owner of Top Talent Today Entertainment and known as the “entertainment expert!” My passion has always propelled in the Performing Arts industry… performing as a featured dancer with Lionel Ritchie in the 1986 Olympics to Co-hosting TV shows, Motivational speaking and entertaining “around the world” as a Headliner and Cruise Director! Since 2000, I have been operating a successful Entertainment and Events business based in the Sacramento area … servicing throughout Northern California. Fulfillment for me is really achieved when I can get entertainers work and coach them to perfect their individual talents! When the Covid Crisis hit us all, my business took a brutal fall …like so many others. I brood for a bit, picked myself back up and chose to reinvent Myself and My Business Branding. I was so comfortable producing LIVE events and as an Entertainer, this was key to connect with the audience! With all the lockdowns, I had to make the choice either to ride it out til whenever… or GO VIRTUAL! This arena was unfamiliar to me and the thought of making the shift from Live to Virtual was beyond frightful. But, whenever I get afraid, I have learned to face Fear by taking Action with Faith! I knew it was time to team up with a Virtual “Guru” someone who had the skills and patience to teach me. His name is Jim T. Chong. He not only taught me about the virtual world, but he educated me on the “real” necessity of it for my business not only to survive, but to thrive… Big Thank You Jim. My 2021 Message Challenge: “Virtualize your Visions and Dreams and make them Victorious!”

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Linda Norris Founder of Top Talent Today Entertainment http://www.TopTalentToday.com To learn more about how you can thrive in today’s “New Normal Economy”, you can reach Jim T. Chong at (916)747-9366 or jtc.publicist@gmail.com.

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Emil Guillermo: Mabalon’s Book Uncovers The Truth About Stockton’s Reaction To Pearl Harbor, Internment By Emil Guillermo, FANHS Museum Director Here’s one good reason to learn history. If you missed a lesson the first time you were exposed to it, when it hits you a second time, history has the impact of breaking news. Such is the case as I talked about Pearl Harbor Day in my virtual FANHS Museum popup videos. (You can see them on the FANHS Museum Facebook page, and on our YouTube Channel). For Asian Americans, you might think you know the history of Pearl Harbor pretty well. In 1941, the surprise bomb attack in Hawaii brought the U.S. into World War II. By Dec. 8, President Roosevelt delivered a national address and declared war on Japan. By Dec.13, west coast cities from Stockton to Seattle organized boycotts against Japanese American businesses. By February, Japanese Americans on the west coast were incarcerated. I had never stopped to wonder what the Asian American reaction, specifically the Filipino American reaction, was to either the bombing at Pearl Harbor or the subsequent internment order of Japanese Americans. I just assumed we had the same perspective as we do now–that it was all a horrible setback to Japanese Americans and Asian Americans, in general, and that we were all in solidarity. But that’s my 21st century view of “us” back then in 1941. In fact, there was no “Asian America” back then. All our communities under that generic umbrella were all struggling, one Asian ethnic group at a time, from racist policies against Asians starting with the Chinese Exclusion Act. From a white perspective, it was a de facto “divide and conquer” situation. There was no solidarity among Asians. After Pearl Harbor, there was only solidarity against both the Japanese and Japanese Americans.

Young Filipino scholar’s book The fervor grew within the Filipino American

community ten hours after the initial attack. The Japanese went on to attack the Philippines and laid the groundwork for a full-fledged occupation of Manila and the islands, complete with a Filipino puppet government.

least two Japanese had been murdered mysteriously since the war began. Asian American historian Nelson Nagai also confirmed to Mabalon that several Japanese residents were killed by Filipinos after Pearl Harbor, but no one was ever arrested.

For the 40,000 Filipinos who had come to the U.S. since the early 1900s, primarily as American nationals, whose side would you be on?

It takes diversity to tell the untold story

It made Pearl Harbor a bonding moment for Filipinos and Chinese with whites.

We’ve long known about the “infamy” of Pearl Harbor from a xenophobic U.S. perspective. We blister at the “N” word now. But we’ve forgotten how liberally we tossed around the ugly “J” word — “Jap.”

“Once seen as half-human, inferior savages, Chinese and Filipinas/os were suddenly America’s allies, while the Stockton Japanese community immediately found itself the target of racist attacks from their Asian neighbors as well as whites,” wrote the late Dawn Bohulano Mabalon, a Stanford-trained Ph.D, from Stockton, Calif. At the time of her death, she was a tenured professor of history at San Francisco State University and considered to be a promising young Filipino American scholar in American history.

It was used to show passionate patriotism and a hatred for Japan.

Her book “Little Manila Is in the Heart,” talked about how Pearl Harbor changed the racial pecking order quickly. “Once the favored racial minorities of white elites in the Delta, ethnic Japanese found themselves under racial attack and intense scrutiny in Stockton through the winter and spring of 1941-1942.”

But most Filipino and Chinese in California were all too happy to join in the white chorus, shamelessly using the “J” word to enflame the hate and jingoism of the day.

More surprising are the oral histories captured by Mabalon. Camila Carido said Filipinos were prepared to arm themselves against the Japanese American community. Carido also said that she and many Filipinos were for the internment of Japanese Americans. “Oh, lotsa Filipinos were armed, ready to kill the Japanese,” Carido told Mabalon. “Lucky thing the Japanese were sent out to the camps, otherwise there would have been lotsa Japanese just fall out and died, and nobody knows? They had bad feeling against them, especially with all the killing in the Philippines. Lotsa Japanese here [in Stockton] they just disappear! Good thing that President Roosevelt had that idea to bring the Japanese, even if you are an American citizen, to the camp. Otherwise, there were lotsa people killed.” The Stockton Daily Record reported on February 20, 1941, a day after the internment announcement, at

It was simply racist, but also a kind of selfxenophobia when used by Asians in America. Some Filipinos did help Japanese Americans who were forced to abandon their farms. Prior to the war, a few Filipinos intermarried into Japanese American families. Many left the state in an attempt to escape the backlash.

Infamy? Turns out there was enough of it from all perspectives, creating those shameful moments in a self-centered world when diversity values were nonexistent. It takes young diverse scholars like the late Bohulano Mabalon to find it and make sure all the stories are uncovered. Now we have to make sure we all read and understand the truth of our history, especially if we want to know the shameful truth. See my discussion of Mabalon’s book and Pearl Harbor and what it meant to Filipino Americans in Stockton on our FANHS Museum popups, archived on Facebook@fanhsmuseum/live and on our YouTube Channel.

Emil Guillermo, an award-winning journalist and commentator, is vice president and museum director of the FANHS Museum in Stockton. During the pandemic he welcomes people to the museum on his virtual popups, Saturday and Sunday from 11:45 a.m. Check us out on Facebook at @fanhsmuseum

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STRENGTH | UNITY | INVOLVED

OP-ED

THE APA LIVING TODAY

Restaurants have become pandemic scapegoats, struggling to survive. By Layne Imada

How did we get here? Restaurants are being treated as scapegoats — quick to be blamed for a spike in COVID-19 cases, without evidence. The most recent Los Angeles County outdoor dining shutdown, which went into effect Nov. 25, seemed like it was just another in a series of government restrictions that make zero scientific sense. When L.A. County Superior Court Judge James Chalfant ordered Los Angeles County public health officials to present scientific evidence, justifying the outdoor dining ban, many dining establishments experienced a minor moment of relief and thought, “Could this be progress?” It felt like a potential step forward. Chalfant was speaking for many in the industry when he said, “You have to do a risk-benefit analysis for public health. You don’t just talk about the risk of spreading disease. You have to talk about the benefit of keeping restaurants open.” Then, the industry was dealt another setback when Gov. Gavin Newsom issued far-reaching statewide restrictions that included requiring restaurants to return to takeout service only for at least three weeks. I realize these are extraordinary times that require extraordinary measures, but, looking out through restaurant windows, it just feels like the industry is being unfairly targeted. Evidence shows the latest spike in COVID cases, specifically in Los Angeles County, is a direct result of indoor gatherings. Closing outdoor dining will likely drive people to gather privately indoors, which is potentially far more dangerous than eating outdoors at restaurants that take COVID-19 precautions and social distancing extremely seriously. Many restaurants haven’t offered indoor seating since March, except for a couple of weeks in early summer when pandemic restrictions were eased. The restaurant industry is already held to higher health standards than most, demonstrating

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success in adhering to constantly evolving COVID-19 health and safety protocols. With a full-service patio, and no indoor dining, restaurants were back to averaging about 50% of their usual sales and 75% of normal staffing for this time of the year (minus the usual holiday parties and catering). Now, with the latest elimination of outdoor seating, revenue has fallen to about 15 to 25% of the norm, causing furloughs for employees. The outdoor heaters and additional weatherproof coverings restaurants purchased to continue operating outdoors in cool weather, now just sit or in storage units. Thousands of restaurant workers across the state are losing their livelihoods and going from food-insecure to food-terrified. The rest will have their salaries cut roughly in half as their hours are pared back. Realize this, when a restaurant closes, a domino effect occurs that affects farmers, liquor reps, delivery drivers, linen companies and so many others. Restaurants have already had to cut back or eliminate cleaning crews, dishwashers, busboys, line cooks, hosts, service staff and managers.

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As an industry, restaurants regularly pay it forward by contributing to philanthropic causes. Giving back is how they define successes. However, if we are going to save an industry that has tried to pivot, while taking one for the greater good, then they are going to need help. I want to believe that federal and state assistance is moments away, that something as wellconstructed as the federal Restaurants Act — which passed in the House in October — will become law and save the hospitality industry with a $120-billion revitalization fund that would give small and independent restaurants grants so we can make our payroll, pay our bills and keep the doors open. So, what’s the plan for survival? It changes almost daily. Cross your fingers that the restaurant or any industry that is hurting, can make it through the next few weeks of uncertainty, with the hope of reopening and obtaining significant financial aid. I’m hoping for a industry wide hail mary.

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a care

THE APA LIVING TODAY

How We Can Support Small Businesses Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS) Stockton Chapter Scholarship Program Academic Year 2020 - 2021 The FANHS Stockton Chapter is proud to announce it will award five $500.00 scholarships to graduating high school students to help finance their education. Applicants must be an upcoming 2021 graduate from a high school in San Joaquin County with a 2.5 GPA or above. The applicant must also plan to enroll in a college, university, business, vocational or trade school in the fall following graduation. Eligibility criteria and application form may be downloaded from: http://fanhsstockton.com/ or by email request to: StocktonFanhs@outlook.com. Application and required attachments must be postmarked by: February 12, 2021. If you have any questions, please call Gloria Nomura at (209) 483-8930 or Lois Sahyoun at (209) 481-0772.

STRENGTH | UNITY | INVOLVED

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

10 ways to help support a part of the economy that has already been particularly hard hit by the impacts of coronavirus — small businesses.

1. Purchase apparel from your favorite ecommerce site.

As already mentioned, apparel is a vertical that, in general, has seen a significant drop in traffic and sales. If you’re feeling the need for a little retail therapy, your purchases online — especially from small businesses — would go a long way toward supporting the economy.

2. Sign up for a subscription service.

Subscription services have been on the rise for several years now, and they’re a great way to support small businesses. Subscription boxes like FabFitFun or Causebox, for example, often include products from small businesses or artisans who don’t yet have broad brand awareness, and these opportunities for visibility can be priceless for them.

3. Gather your WFH supplies from an ecommerce store.

With so many people suddenly working from home, the need for desks, chairs, and office accessories has increased. Support a smaller retailer by finding an online shop focused on furniture or accessories to set up your office for perfect productivity.

4. Gift cards.

Consumers’ needs have certainly changed over the past several weeks, but you can still support the businesses you love — even if you don’t need a new pair of pants or piece of luggage right now. Purchasing gift cards or gift certificates will show them your support and keep cash flow coming in during closures.

5. Get a move on.

With gyms shuttered, people aren’t just working from home — they’re working out from home as well. You can buy at-home equipment from an online business, or support a local gym that’s offering classes online to bridge the gap until they’re able to open again.

6. Redecorate your home.

How many of you have discovered just how uncomfortable your couch is these past few weeks? (I, for one, am raising my hand.) There are plenty of smaller, online retailers that sell unique, high-quality furniture. And if you just want to refresh your decor, you can find that too!

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NEWS & EVENTS

7. Order in.

Many restaurants and bars, largely closed for dine-in service, have pivoted their model to include delivery. Picking a night or two (or more, no judgment) to order in will help support workers in the service industry.

FRANKLIN COMMUNITY LIBRARY

8. Entertain the kids.

If you’re looking for new ways to entertain your kids while they’re stuck inside, check for specialty stores for toys, games, learning tools, and more.

For more information please contact: The Child Abuse Prevention Council www.nochildabuse.org If you think a child is in immediate danger please call 911 If you think a child is being abused call Child Protective Services (CPS) at 209-468-1333 If you’re not sure what to do, please call our 24 hour helpline 209-464-4524 or email us info@nochildabuse.org

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9. Treat yourself.

There is a lot going on right now. It’s normal to feel stressed. It’s okay to be exhausted. Don’t forget that this isn’t a race — it’s a marathon. You need to take some time out for yourself. Purchase all your self-care treats from a small business, and help relieve some of their stress, too.

10. Spread the word.

When you find an online small or local business that provides great products and service, share that with your networks on social media. Word of mouth is a great way to drive traffic to online stores, and the business owners will appreciate the extra amplification. In this time of uncertainty, it makes sense to pull back on discretionary spending, but if you need something, choosing a small business to support does make a difference — to the community and the economy.

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- ELK GROVE -

@apalivingtoday issuu.com/theapalivingtoday Would you like to submit your event and be featured in the next The APA Living Today Events Calendar? Email us at: L_imada@bggwestllc.com

Next Issue March/April 2021

The opinions expressed by contributing writers and sources are their own and do not reflect the opinions of the newspaper’s owners, editor or staff.

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