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Karel Mar tens is a Dutch designer and teacher. After training at the school of ar t in Arnhem, he has worked as a freelance graphic designer, specializing in typography. Alongside this, he has always made free (non-commissioned) graphic and three-dimensional work.

His design work ranges widely, from postage stamps, to books, to signs on buildings. All this work is documented and celebrated in the books Karel Mar tens: drukwerk / printed matter and Karel Mar tens: counterprint. Mar tens has taught graphic design since 1977.

His first appointment was at the school of art at Arnhem (until 1994). He was then attached to the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht (1994–9). From 1997 he has been a visiting lecturer in the graphic design department at the School of Art,Yale University. In that year, together with Wigger Bierma, he started a pioneering school of postgraduate education within the ArtEZ, Arnhem – the Werkplaats Typografie – where he still teaches.

- DUTCH DESIGNER AND TEACHER KAREL MARTENS

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KAREL MARTENS


Karel Martens (born 1939) finished as a student at the Arnhem School of Art in 1961. Since then he has worked as a freelance graphic designer, specializing in typography. Alongside this, he has always made free (non-commissioned) graphic and three-dimensional work. As well as designing books and other printed items, he has designed stamps and telephone cards. He has also designed signs and typographic façades for a number of buildings. Karel Martens has taught graphic design since 1977. His first appointment was at the Arnhem School of Art (until 1994). He was then attached to the Jan van Eyck Academie in Maastricht (1994-99). From 1997 he has been a visiting lecturer in the graphic design department at the School of Art, Yale University. In the same year, together with Wigger Bierma, he started the Typography Workshop for postgraduate education within the ArtEZ, Arnhem. Karel Martens with Jaap van Triest and Robin Kinross. The work of Karel Martens occupies an intriguing place in the present European art-and-design landscape. Martens can be placed in the tradition of Dutch modernism – in the line of figures such as Piet Zwart, H.N. Werkman, Willem Sandberg. Yet he maintains some distance from the main developments of our time: from both the practices of routinized modernism and of the facile reactions against this. His work is both personal and experimental. At the same time, it is publicly answerable. Over the now 50 years of his practice, Martens has been prolific as a designer of books. He has also made contributions in a wide range of design commissions, including stamps, coins, signs on buildings. Intimately connected with this design work has been his practice as an artist. This started with geometric and kinetic constructions, and was later developed in work with the very material of paper; more recently he has been making relief prints from found industrial artefacts. Karel Martens has many quotes to To share whit many.

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LA TIPOGRAFIA Claude Garamond

LA TIPOGRAFIA GARAMOND Garamond is the name given to a group of old-style serif typefaces named after the punch-cutter Claude Garamond (c. 1480–1561). Most of the Garamond faces are more closely related to the work of a later punch-cutter, Jean Jannon.

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CLAUDE GARAMOND


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direct relationship between Garamond’s leterforms and contemporary type can be found in the Roman versions of the typefaces Adobe Garamond, Granjon, Sabon, and Stempel Garamond. Garamond’s letterforms convey a sense of fluidity and consistency. Some characteristics in his letters are the small bowl of the a and the small eye of the e. Long extenders and top have a downward slope. Garamond is considered to be among the most legible and readable serif typefaces for use in print (offline) applications.It has also been noted to be one of the most eco-friendly major fonts when it comes to ink usage. Claude Garamond came to prominence in the 1540s, first for a Greek typeface he was commissioned to create for the French king Francis I, to be used in a series of books by Robert Estienne. The French court later adopted Garamond’s Roman types for their printing and the typeface influenced type across France and Western Europe. Garamond probably had seen Venetian old-style types from the printing shops of Aldus Manutius. Garamond based much of his lowercase on the handwriting of Angelo Vergecio, librarian to Francis I. The italics of most contemporary versions are based on the italics of Claude Garamond’s assistant Robert Granjon. When Claude Garamond died in 1561, his punches and matrices were sold to Christophe Plantin, in Antwerp, which enabled the Garamond fonts to be used on many printers. This version became popular in Europe. The only complete set of the original Garamond dies and matrices is at the Plantin-Moretus Museum, in Antwerp, Belgium. Jean Jannon misattribution In the 1621, sixty years after Garamond’s death, the French printer Jean Jannon issued a specimen, old typeface.

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Marian Bantjes was born in 1963 and is a Canadian designer, artist, illustrator, typographer and writer. Bantjes started working in the field of visual communication in 1983 and worked as a book typesetter from 1984–1994.

In 2003 Marian left her firm and “strategic design” behind to embark on the work that she has since become internationally known for. Describing herself as a Graphic Artist, working primarily with custom type and ornament, Bantjes’ highly personal, obsessive and sometimes strange graphic work has brought her international recognition and fame as a world-class visual designer. Bantjes is known for her detailed and lovingly precise vector art, obsessive hand work, patterning and highly ornamental style. Stefan Sagmeister calls Bantjes “one of the most innovative typographers working today,” and Noreen Morioka calls Bantjes “the Doyald Young of her generation.” In 2005 Bantjes was named one of 25 up-and-coming Designer s to Watch (STEP Magazine, Januar y 2005). Bantjes’ clients include Pentagram, Stefan Sagmeister, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bruce Mau Design, Young & Rubicam Chicago, Anni Kuan, Houghton Mifflin, Print Magazine, Wallpaper* , WIRED, The Guardian (UK), The New York Times, among others. She has also worked on design materials for AIGA, TypeCon 2007, and the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada (GDC). Her work has been featured in STEP, étapes (Paris), Azure, Matrix (Quebec) and Eye magazine.

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MARIAN BATNJES


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1 . 2 0 1 2 S K O L E O P P G A V E

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T Y P O G R A P H I C - M A G A Z I N E  

TYPO is a typographic magazine i made in my second year at the Norwgian School of Creative Studies. The task was to make a typographic magaz...

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