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Issue 11 | December 2013


NewsLetter Staff

Letter From the Staff Hello Readers, It feels so amazing to be back writing after a three month hiatus, as I’ve been working on college applications. And it couldn’t be a better time to start up again, since this is our 1 year anniversary AND a Disney-centric issue. Having been a part of the magazine since last March, The Anglerfish has been like an online family to me, and Disney is just one of those things that strengthens our bonds.

Melissa-lynn Heineman - Writer

Issuu - www.issuu.com/theanglerfish Tumblr - theanglerfishmagazine.tumblr.com Twitter - www.twitter.com/anglerfishzine Facebook - www.facebook.com/theanglerfish

Managers & Editors Brandon Dannenhoffer Eric Cole Jason Stack Keren Moros Jordan Kahle David Pantoja Eefje Savelkoul Katherine Taylor

Graphics & Design MaddieValley Mayela Gutierrez Hayley Pike Jackie Files Jessika Raisor Kenza Samlali Vaiki Tress

Writers Marissa Hubelbank Alyssa Nabors Cecily Dreyfuss Sarah Mills Melissa Heineman Lucy Pegg Joie Ling Kaya Mendelsohn Ruth Tirado Pallavi Pillutla Jacob Lambrecht

Social Media/ PR Mert Keceli Tristan Dane Megan Manzano

Founder Editor in Chief Entertainment Editor News Editor Reader Submissions Art Director Sr. Design Lead Sr. Design Lead

Designer/ Illustrator Designer/ Illustrator Illustrator Illustrator Illustrator Illustrator Illustrator

Many of us have grown up with Disney and continue to love it. I was fortunate to have it throughout my childhood, spoiled by my mother’s rich and expansive Disney VHS collection. Having seen ‘Frozen’ the other night and ‘Tangled’ just recently, I’m reminded of why I love Disney. It brings to life the stories we cherish, whether they’re by the Grimms, Hans Christian Anderson, Shakespeare, or any other family name you can pull off a library shelf as expansive as Belle’s in Beast’s castle. Or, in some cases, it introduces you to a new story or a new culture. Watching Disney movies is magical for the animation, the music, and the whimsy and feelings the films inspire. That being said, I do have a series of issues with Disney films, but for everything I dislike about them, there is something I adore. My favorite film is difficult to pinpoint, as there are countless ones (ignoring the Princess genre). Struggling to cut the list down, I can say that the most memorable movies - ones I can watch over and over again - for me include ‘Meet the Robinsons,’ ‘Oliver and Company,’ ‘Peter Pan,’ ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ ‘Wreck it Ralph,’ ‘Atlantis,’ ‘The Fox and the Hound,’ ‘Robin Hood,’ ‘A Goofy Movie,’ ‘The Sword in the Stone,’ and ‘Pinocchio.’ Disney is a large part of my life, and it’s a safe haven. Every morning as I commute to school, I listen to Billy Joel’s “Why Should I Worry?” and my friends and I constantly compare each other to Disney characters. My favorite Disney songs - by far - are “Go the Distance,” “After Today,” “Poor Unfortunate Souls,” “Let it Go,” “Gaston,” “You’ve Got a Friend in Me,” and “I’ll Make a Man Out of You.” I have many opinions on Disney (especially which of the Disney villains are truly evil - answers: The Evil Queen, Cruella de Vil, and Ursula from ‘The Rescuers’), but so do my colleagues. And I’m sure you all do, too. So please enjoy our newest issue of The Anglerfish and join us in our first anniversary, but don’t forget to send us your opinions, loves, and hates in the Disney fandom! Don’t forget to be awesome, Melissa-Lynn Heineman

Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer Writer

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Table of Contents News 03

Thoughts From Places: Disneyworld

05

NFS: Sabrina Cruz

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Disney’s Legacy

10

Working at the Happiest Place on

13

I’d Rather be the Hijinks Ensue Guy

17

Something Old, Something New

19

Princess Leia: Disney Princess?

21

The Princess Phenomenon

23

The Darker Side of Disney

24

Living a Disney Life

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Why “The Lion King”

29

If Disney Princesses Went to My High

31

How Did New Years Happen?

33

The War on Christmas and why it’s BS

35

Cryonics: Why Walt Won’t be Back

37

The Magical World of Copyright Law

39

Art & Literature

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Reader Submissions

Thoughts from Places: It was 7 o’clock in the morning; the sky was still gray and the fog was hanging to the ground when my sister and I left our house. The two hour drive (3 if anyone other than my sister drove) from Jacksonville to Orlando was beginning. The freeway is surrounded by trees and the morning commuters are speeding away. Reaching the outskirts of downtown Orlando was a sigh of relief, we’re almost there. We have the entire trip planned. Two days, 3 parks. The first day was Animal Kingdom & Magic Kingdom. The Second was Epcot & Magic Kingdom. The crowds were already here when we parked but it didn’t bother us because we got to park in Unicorn. My sister and I have gone to Animal Kingdom many many times and every single time had hoped that we would be park in Unicorn. We’ve been in Dinosaur, Giraffe, and even Peacock. The familiar smell of sunscreen fills the air and the families getting strollers and children out of their car surround you. Lining up at the poles in anticipation to ride the tram, the ride on the tram is voiced by the same man and same Spanish speaking lady for as long as I can remember. By Tristan Dane When you first walk into Animal Kingdom, you’ll see a few little animals like birds but once you cross a bridge you really get the feel off the park. The Tree of Life is the center of the park. It’s towering and if you’d like the get up close to it you should go see “It’s Tough to Be a Bug” which typically has no wait time. The best ride in Animal Kingdom is Expedition Everest. It’s the one that I go one every single time I’m in the park and never just once. My sister and I have found that getting fast passes for Expedition Everest and while you waiting go see Finding Nemo the Musical or ride Dinosaur. Finding Nemo the Musical is my sister’s favorite in the entire park. It’s indoors (so air conditioned) and a fantastic show. Get there at least 30 minutes before the show for good seats. Dinosaur, based slightly on the 2000 film.. The ride has a funky smell but the wait in line is narrated by Bill Nye and most of it is inside. Kali River Rapids are very fun especially if you’re

going on a hot Florida day. You will get soaked, completely, so if you don’t want to be in wet clothes – don’t go on this ride. Of course the one that makes Animal Kingdom so special is the Kilimanjaro Safaris. You’ll get to see many animals in quite close range. I saw baby Giraffes, Hippos, Elephants, Lions, and many more. Animal Kingdom has a lot of playground type places and “treks” that are great for restless children but can be a difficult park to do on a hot day. EPCOT or Epot is the worst park for your feet but the best for food. Epcot is split into two parts “Future World” and “The World Showcase” The World Showcase is where you’ll find either a boat ride, a movie, or (and) a restaurant connecting to a country. There are 11 countries and each one has something special to offer. Epcot is really worth going to for food. One of my favorites is The Coral Reef restaurant it’s on the more expensive side of

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places to eat but the view of the aquarium is a wonderful experience. Innoventions, The Three Caballeros, Living with the Land, Mission:Space, Soarin, and The Seas with Nemo and Friends are good rides. Test Track, recently redone, is the big crowd drawer. Its’ the only real “thrill” ride and it is a good ride. The problem is it draws a very long line and shuts down when it rains. Disneyworld is located in Central Florida, in Florida it seems to rain all the time. There never seems to go a week were it doesn’t rain and in the summer a day doesn’t pass without it raining. For the parks most popular ride to shut down when it rains seems to be very poorly planned and causes lines to be even worse because it’s not always open. Epcot isn’t the best attraction wise but it’s worth going at least once to experience the unique World Showcase and you’ll probably have an enjoyable time. Magic Kingdom is my favorite of the four parks, it has the most “thrill” rides and good rides for when it rains. The decorations at Christmas time are stunning, the castle covered in lights and a giant tree on Main Street perfectly puts you in the spirit. Magic Kingdom has the most magical atmosphere. Music is playing in the background and the Cinderella’s Castle is standing in the middle, it’s stunning. You cannot leave the park without walking through it. It has a beautiful tile mosaic of Cinderella’s story. Magic Kingdom is where you’ll find most of the smaller children and the exasperated adults but it’s my favorite park of the four. The park is split into six “lands” Main Street, Adventureland, Frontierland, Liberty Square, Fantasyland, and Tomorrowland. Main Street is where you first come in, lined with shops and has a very early Americana feel. One of my favoritess the Crystal Arts store, filled with beautiful crystal creations and you can typically watch someone work.If it’s raining (which it probably will) the great thing to do is walk through the main street stores because they’re all connected so you’ll stay out of the rain. Adventureland is where you’ll find Jungle Cruise, Pirates of the Caribbean, The Enchanted Tiki Room, and The Magic Carpets of Aladdin. The Jungle Cruise is held in special place in my heart. It’s not one of the best rides but it’s on my must do


Reader Submissions

Disneyworld, Orlando FL list. I prefer to go on once its dark because you’ll have less of a chance of a long line even though you may not see as much. The ride is full of puns and dad jokes but it has a unique charm to it. The closer you are to the “skipper” the funnier the jokes will be. My sister and I once went on the ride five times in a row because there was no line and our fast passes weren’t in use yet. The Enchanted Tiki Room is great if it’s raining! The Magic Carpet Rides of Aladdin is the same ride as Dumbo and Astro Orbiter. Often the line doesn’t feel worth the wait. In Adventureland you’ll also be able to have a delicious Dole Whip. Frontierland and Liberty Square are separate but for the amount of attractions seems like they shouldn’t be. In Frontierland the best rides are Splash Mountain and Big Thunder Mountain Railroad. Splash Moutain is such a staple of Disney and it’s easy to understand why. You can hear people screaming from the drop and can see the water splash when they come down. Liberty Square is where you’ll find the Haunted Mansion which is fantastic. The special effects by now seem dated and I wouldn’t describe it as frightening but it is entertaining. I have found that every time I’ve been on it the ride has stopped

but that may be a product of its old age.

Walking from the Haunted Mansion passing Rapunzel’s tower, is a real lovely entrance to Fantasyland. It has recently been added to, at the cost of Toon Town but I like the addition, it also has the most rides per land. It’s A Small World probably one of the most known rides of Fantasyland, the version in Magic Kingdom is sung only in English. Peter Pan’s Flight always has an obscenely long line for the ride as does Winnie the Pooh. Those rides are for younger children but are still nice to experience if you never have. Under the Sea – Journey of the Little Mermaid is beautiful but is very similar to The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, and Nemo’s ride in Epcot. Mickey’s PhilharMagic is a surprisingly pleasant show and great to relax for a couple minutes. Another part of the “New Fantasyland” was the Big Top Circus. The new and improved Dumbo the Flying Elephant ride is great. The wait in line is not as long but you don’t have a choice. The new Dumbo has a playground and you’re given one of those beepers that are typically at restaurants and you wait but what ends up happening is you have a bunch of children running around having a great time and anyone above the age of 10 sitting

on the sidelines waiting. The Barnstormer is a very short rollercoaster, good for kids who may not be ready for a “Mountain” not the replacement of the Matterhorn I was hoping for. The Mad Tea Party is great and usually doesn’t have a long wait time. Tomorrowland, despite its name, feels the most outdated. The Tomorrow Land Speedway doesn’t have car that doesn’t squeak and the cars are slower every time I ride. Astro Orbiter, similar to Dumbo or Aladdin’s Magic Carpets, is one of my favorite rides in Tomorrowland because it’s on top of the People Mover and you get a great view of the park. Any time of day; it’s beautiful. Space Mountain is the staple of Tomorrowland, FAST PASS IT. The line will undoubtedly be on the longer side but it’s indoors but it’s also the ride most people run to in the case of rain. To the left of Space Mountain is The Carousel of Progress which no one seems to be interested in and doesn’t progress pass the 20th century. It’s there, singing the Tomorrowland song but falling on deaf ears. The Tomorrowland Transit Authority PeopleMover or simply The PeopleMover is the simplest ride but great if you just want to put your feet up for a little bit or need some time to kill. It gives you a great tour of Tomorrowland and a small glimpse behind the scenes. Buzz Lightyear’s Space Ranger Spin is a favorite between my sister and I. It’s the best ride to get stuck in and the competition grows stronger every time. I once reached the highest score possible; upsetting my sister greatly. Overall, I wish the park had more rides, and more in common with Disneyland but I have hope that it will continue to be updated and new rides will continue to be added. The first time I went to Disney World I was 13 years old and we were about to move to Jacksonville, the first time I went to Disneyland I was 2 weeks old. Riding the monorail or ferry at 1 in the morning, begging your feet to stop aching, is something that just makes Disney special. Despite some crying kids, the overpriced food, the long lines, and the weather, I’m sure I’ll go back again in the future because it’s an experience and there’s something magical about Disney.

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Reader Submissions

Nerdfighter Spotlight: Sabrina Cruz The Anglerfish sits down with Sabrina Cruz (http://www.youtube. com/user/NerdyAndQuirky) this month for the Nerdfighter Spotlight. Making herself known to all of Nerdfighteria as a Replacement John, this spunky Nerdfighter talks about her high school and YouTube life. By: Joie Ling

The Anglerfish: How were you first introduced to the VlogBrothers and how would you describe your first reaction to them? Sabrina Cruz: I found the vlogbrothers in the suggestions of a charlieissocoollike video. It was one of Hank’s joke videos. I loved the channel immediately, but it did take a while to get accustomed to nerdfighteria and the many injokes. TA: Did you already know John Green from his books or did you start reading his books because of the Vlogbbrothers? SC: I started reading his books because of the Vlogbrothers. TA:How did it feel to be chosen as one of the Not John replacements while John was on paternity leave? SC:I still have trouble believing that actually happened. I had totally forgot I entered nerd factor until I got a tweet congratulating me in the middle of science class. I spent the rest of the day on cloud 9. Though I was pretty scared to make a video for Nerdfighteria since it’s so massive. TA:How did you get started making YouTube videos? SC:It’s pretty funny actually. My first serious video, now deleted, was a submission for the original Nerd Factor. I didn’t win but I got hooked on making videos after that. TA: That’s interesting how your first video that didn’t win eventually

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made it so that you could. Did you ever think that you would get this big to the point of having more than 75,000 subscribers? SC:Gosh no! Actually, my dream goal for 2013 was to reach one thousand subscribers. TA: Your videos cover a wide range of topics, who/what gives you inspiration for you videos? SC: My content is largely inspired by all the amazing youtubers I watch. For example, every time I watch an Olan Rogers or Evan Edinger video, I want to film a story-telling video. My biggest inspirations are Mamrie Hart, Hank and John Green, and Alex Day. TA:You do a lot of collab videos with other YouTubers. How exactly do you make a collab video? SC:It’s a pretty simple process. The person whom I’m collaborating with and I just message each other on twitter and get an idea for a video. Afterwards, we write scripts and get each other to review them. Then we film our parts, do rough edits, and use Google drive or something to send it to each other for the final edit. All in all, it takes 2-4 days. TA:Is it difficult to balance the life of being a full time high school student and the life of a YouTuber? SC:Not particularly. I feel kind of like Hannah Montana leading a


Reader Submissions double life, but the people at my school who do know about my channel find it cool. But sometimes its cumbersome needing to write an essay and a video script in the same night. TA: In the end which one wins, essay or script? SC: Essay. Hands down. Sorry, Youtube. TA:Do you have any idea of what you’re going to do after high school or is it still too early to think about it? SC: I can’t decide if I want to doing something involving maths or film. They’re two really different subjects but I figure I’ll be able to decide when the time comes. At least, I hope so. TA: What part of film interests you? The management side of thing, backstage stuff, or do you wanna be the one that is actually in front of the camera? SC: I love all three. I find planning shots and working with actors is just as fun as being an actor or doing some costume make up. I just really love film. TA: Do you see yourself of becoming a full time YouTuber? SC: I could never really attach myself to the idea of full time Youtuber. It certainly exists but I can’t see myself doing it. I’m not quite sure why.

SC: Kuroshitsuji TA: You have amazing taste. Favorite manga? SC: Thank you, and Oresama Teacher. TA: Favorite TV show? SC: 30 Rock. TA: Favorite movie? SC: The Princess Bride TA: Favorite type of food? SC: Sushi. TA: The real sushi or the American sushi? SC: Real sushi. TA: Alright most difficult one. Favorite brother of the Vlogbrothers? SC: Oh this one is just evil. I’ll say John because we share a love for pizza. TA: (hahaha) Alright I think that concludes this interview. Thank you so much SC: Thank you, it was superdupes coolios.

TA: Do you have any advice you would give to high school students around the world that are going through a tough time whether it be at home or at school? SC: Three things. 1) find someone to talk to, online or IRL, because bottling negative feelings inside is never good. 2) Try to find the silver lining of every situation, no matter how bleak. Practice it enough so you’re naturally optimistic. 3) Watch good comedy shows. TA: Any suggestions on those comedy shows? SC: 30 Rock never fails to make me smile. TA: What’s the best Christmas gift you have ever gotten? SC:My best christmas gift was a new fencing sword. TA: So you fence and make youtube videos, what else do you do for fun? SC: At risk of sounding stereotypical, I like reading and writing. I also love watching movies. I’m currently on a bit of a classics binge. TA: Alright time for a segment I like to call “Your Favorites!”. I’m going to ask you what your favorite blank is and to make it interesting, you can only give one answer. Are you ready? SC: Ok TA: Favorite fandom? SC: Harry Potter TA: Favorite book? SC: Mostly Harmless TA: Favorite author? SC: Douglas Adams. Sorry, John

images provided by Sabrina Cruz

Sabrina Cruz! Did you like what you read? Need more Nerdy & Quirky? I think everyone needs more Nerdy & Quirky! You can find Sabrina at the following: Tumblr - http://awkward-aeries.tumblr.com/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/HorridlyUnfunny Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/NerdyAndQuirky Subblime - http://subblime.com/nerdyandquirky/

TA: Favorite anime?

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Entertainment

Disney’s Legacy A note about the lists before we begin: These lists will not please everyone. When it comes to a global powerhouse such as Disney, there will always be debate about what is the best movie or song Disney has ever created. It is in the veins of man to debate.

She is driven, power-hungry, and utterly mad, and watching her attempt to butcher a group of innocent puppies reminded the world how sinister Disney is willing to go in their tales. This film easily holds up today, due to its memorable characters, ingenious concepts (The Twilight Bark, anyone?) and thrilling pace. 4: ‘The Little Mermaid’: Readers, you are going to see a bunch

by: Eric Cole of Renaissance Period Disney films on this list and for good More importantly than that, everyone has their own favorite for sentimental reasons. All of us who consider ourselves Disney fans grew up on the magic and because of that, all of us are attached to one movie or another. These lists are not made with sentimentality. In creating these lists, I have tried to figure out, truly, what is the best of the best when it comes to Disney. Not the most important, or the most loved, but the best. So, with this hope in mind, I present to you, what I believe, to be the best movie and song Disney has ever created in its illustrious history.

Best Movies 5: ‘101 Dalmatians’: Is it possible that this is the first Disney movie whose success hinged entirely on the strength of it’s villain? Cruella De Vil is such a vile character for all the right reasons.

reason. Yes, there are many classic films in the Disney library, but it was during the Renaissance Period that Disney truly perfected its storytelling craft, and it all began with this film based on Hans Christian Andersen’s fairy tale about a young mermaid who longs to live on land. The music alone would earn this movie a place on the list with songs such as “Under The Sea”, “Part of Your World”, “Kiss The Girl”, and “Poor Unfortunate Souls” becoming iconic classics. However, this film is more than just a one-trick pony combining that music with classic characters such as Sebastian the Crab and Ursula the Sea-Witch, gorgeous animation, and a tale that showcases true love in both the romantic and familial sense. 3: ‘Frozen’: Let the debate begin. Is it too early for this film based on Hans Christian Andersen’s “The Snow Queen” (I am sensing a pattern here) to be on this list? Perhaps. Perhaps this film needs more time before it’s considered a classic, and perhaps I am a prisoner of the moment to include it on this list, but if this is prison, then I am going to get comfortable and stay for a long time. Much in the same way that ‘The Little Mermaid’ ushered in a new Golden Age for Disney, this film symbolizes to the world that Disney is back and ready to reclaim it’s “Kings of Animation” crown from Pixar. The story, while clichéd in dealing with true love, takes this concept in an entirely fresh and new perspective. The characters are flawed, deep, and varied, which only adds to the viewers enjoyment. The animation is utterly breathtaking, particularly the ice effects, and the songs, provided by Broadway alumnus Robert Lopez, are some of the best that Disney has ever produced. This film will certainly stand the test of time. 2: ‘The Lion King’: Has there ever been a Disney film more beloved by the general public? Based on Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’, ‘The Lion King’ is the highest grossing film Disney has ever created and for good reason. The animation is deep and carefully crafted, creating some of the most beautiful scenes Disney has ever created. Try and watch the opening scene of this film without gasping a little as the sun rises over the African plains. The characters are flawed and provide genuinely touching moments. More so, I dare say, the characters in this film are the FUNNIEST characters Disney has ever written (I am looking at you, Timon and Pumbaa, and your luau dance), and, as with all Disney classics, the music is simply incredible, but what else can you expect from a duo such as Elton John and Tim Rice?

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Entertainment 1: ‘Beauty and the Beast’: I honestly don’t know if you could put another Disney film in this spot. While ‘Snow White’ is the most important Disney film and ‘The Lion King’ is the most loved, it is ‘Beauty and The Beast’ which is simply Disney’s best, and the only Disney animated film to be nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards, you know, back when there was only five nominees, and it was extremely difficult to crack into that group. It is not without spectacular reason either. From the opening notes of “Belle”, the film hooks you with its beautiful pacing that puts a story of love first and foremost. The animation is sweeping and gorgeous, the characters are unique - even among Disney characters with a group of servants transformed into various household objects - the female protagonist is strong, intelligent, and most importantly, INDEPENDENT enough to completely reject the idea of absolutely needing a man in her life, instead choosing to wait until she finds love. In addition, is there a better message Disney has ever crafted than the one in this film? It is not appearance that matters, but it is what is in the heart of someone that really counts.

Best Songs 5: “When You Wish Upon A Star” from ‘Pinocchio’: THE QUINTESSENTIAL DISNEY SONG! Sorry, I just felt like I needed to emphasis that point in case anyone wanted to argue it. Seriously, though, Disney made its reputation off of the back of this song, and who could blame them? The song is simple and relaxing, has a genuinely touching message, and is beautifully sung by Cliff Edwards, the voice of Jiminy Cricket. What more could you ask for? 4: “Under The Sea” from ‘The Little Mermaid’: I don’t think I know one person who hasn’t, at one time or another, turned this song up and boogied down to it. Probably the most fun and catchy song in the Disney catalog, this song also bolsters some of the most wildly imaginative lyrics as well as sparked thousands of imaginations to ponder “What WOULD it be like to live under the sea?”

1: “Beauty and The Beast” from ‘Beauty and The Beast’: Timeless lyrics, simple and yet gorgeous orchestrations, and the beautiful tone of Broadway veteran and Tony Award-winner Angela Lansbury, to me, this is the pinnacle of Disney love songs, and is one that future Disney composers will have difficulty topping. So, there you have it, readers. What did you think of our list? Feel free to drop us a line on our Tumblr (theanglerfishmagazine. tumblr.com) with your thoughts, and debate away, my friends, debate away.

3: “Let It Go” from ‘Frozen’: This song rightfully takes its place alongside “Part of Your World” as the go-to ballad for anyone longing to break out of their world with its raw power and emotion. In addition, “Let It Go” bolsters soaring lyrics, beautiful orchestrations, and an emotional message that threatens to knock you out as the song reaches its thrilling climax. It is one show-stopper that will not be forgotten. 2: “Circle of Life” from ‘The Lion King’: Disney’s greatest opening to a film is in ‘The Lion King’, and it is in large part due to this song. From the first sweeping note sung with intense power by Lebo M to the African chorus that follows to the powerful message of unity that the song spins so well, everything about this song is Disney magic, and it only beckons the audience to stick around for more.

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Illustrated by David Pantoja


Entertainment

Working at the Happiest Place on Earth It seems like a dream job but is working at one of Disney’s iconic theme parks really as magical as it seems? By: Sarah Mills Disney theme parks attract thousands of visitors a day, all intent on making Disney-themed memories that will last a lifetime. We ride the rides, eat the food, take pictures with characters, and buy the commemorative mugs. But how often do we think about the people who make those things happen? The “cast members” mind the stalls, sweep the streets, don the furry costumes, and use that patented two fingered point to tell us where the bathrooms are. How does their experience of Disney magic differ from ours? Disney World is the largest employer in central Florida, and with some 63,000 employees working on the property, Disney World is the largest single-site employer in the U.S. This workforce is also made up of 7,000 to 8,000 interns who take part in Disney’s College Program. Through the program, college students and recent graduates are able to work at Disney’s parks and hotels. There is an extensive application and interview process but once you are accepted, feel free to happy dance to your heart’s content. For the recently graduated Molly, working at Disneyland represented the fulfillment of long-term desire:

“I had always wanted to work for Disney. It was something just always in the back of my mind that one day I’d like to be a princess at Disneyland-a face character. When I was a sophomore in college, I visited Southern California with my mom and it was really solidified that I wanted to try my hand there after graduation.” Working at Disney isn’t just a walk in the (theme) park. It means conforming to the rules for every new employee and intern. These outline everything from the appropriate length and coloring of a girl’s hair, to the banning of visible piercings, tattoos, and even makeup stipulations (“applied in a blended manner and in colors complementary to the skin tone”). There is a great emphasis on an

“all-American” look; a look that hasn’t changed much at all since the days of Walt Disney himself. You may have heard about some of these stringent controls in the popular YouTube videos “Confessions of an ex-Disney Employee” by sWooZie. The animated videos recount the colourful happenings and behind-the-scenes tales of woe he encountered as a greeter at Disney World’s Indiana Jones stunt show and a lifeguard at the Hard Rock Hotel. The immense popularity of these “confessions” videos suggests that the public are dying to know the inside scoop on what seems to be an ideal job. One of the common themes in both sWoozie’s videos and Molly’s experiences relates to Disney’s control over their employee’s emotions. sWooZie describes subliminal Mickey’s and ingrained phrases he would parrot out to park-goers. Molly recounts some of her first impressions of working at Disneyland:

“The company in this process is as manipulative with your emotions as they are in the production of their movies-they know exactly the right emotional buttons to push to make you feel astounding joy at working for the company. I cried during the in-park walkthrough because I was so happy to finally achieve what was pretty much my sole dream for the prior few years.” Clearly, Disney evokes many memories for park visitors, but it also realizes that its employees must do everything to assure those memories are happy ones. A Disney vacation is a prized commodity, after all; a fact Molly and her co-workers were reminded of while working in ticketing and annual passes:

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Entertainment this idea of what we need as traditional American families to give to our children--the costumes, the picture with Mickey, the food--and if parents don’t provide that for their children, they’ve failed. I really saw this reflected in a lot of areas. Parents would be upset that things were expensive, or there was a problem with their ticket or ticket type, or the ride broke down while they were on it, and parents, deep down, felt like they had failed their children.” Pressure is never far away from the lives of Disney employees. Not only is the public and management expecting great things, but the cast members must attempt to maintain a balance between this pressure-fueled work and their mental well-being. sWooZie describes cultivating a feeling that he was “about to quit,” not for any particular reason, but rather due to an accumulation of managerial abuse. Molly parted ways with the company for other commonly-heard complaints against Disney as an employer: a lack of chances for advancement and an unlivable wage:

“I got paid $9/hr and after my internship was over, I no longer had the guarantee of my 32 to 40 hours a week from the program, so I was working 8 to 16 hours a week, max. Usually 8… My desire to work for the company-to be a princess/face character--did not pan out, as I went on two auditions and didn’t make it past the first round for either one. I had to come to grips with the fact that this company that I had so admired and wanted desperately to work for for a long time couldn’t care less about me--I was a number… I couldn’t afford SoCal on 8 hours a week and $9/hr. I realized that I was never going to live up to their princess standards, packed up my car and moved home to South Dakota. I felt really discouraged…”

Illustration by Mayela Gutierrez

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The Anglerfish | Issue 11 Dec 2013


Entertainment Working for Disney, interacting with thousands of people and tens of thousands of dollars a day, I realized just how powerful of a brand it was. This brand, that is such a part of most of our lives, exercises a great deal of influence over all of us. The opportunity to work at a Disney theme park, as either a part or full-time cast member, or a Disney College Program intern, seems to be both a blessing and a curse. When asked if she would recommend working for Disney, Molly responded…

“I’m not one to tell people what to do, ever. If people want to work for Disney, so be it. I needed to do it to fulfill a dream. I would have been very disappointed in myself had I not worked for Disney--it was that important to me. It has been a resume booster, for sure, but if I had it to do over again I would go into it with a different frame of mind.” One thing that permeates people’s experiences as a Disney employee (both past and present) is a fundamental and enduring love for Disney. It takes a great deal of devotion to work for this company, and if you feel strong enough to deal with the pressure, can cope with a very small salary, and can plaster that Disney-brand smile on your face for hours on end, we wish you all the best in the pursuit of your dream to work at “the happiest place on Earth.”

Special thanks to Molly for sharing her experiences with us.

Illustration by Mayela Gutierrez

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Entertainment

I’d Rather Be The Hijinks Ensue Guy - Part Two of An Interview With Joel Watson In our February Issue, Joel Watson, creator of the webcomic Hijinks Ensue, contributed some of the information he posts in his blog, The Experiment. The Experiment chronicles Joel’s transition to fulltime cartoonist, including his most recent decision in September of this year to change from largely fandomthemed comic strips to character-driven story arcs. Joel was able to talk with us again this autumn to talk about the switch, about being a geek dad, and about pursuing creative passions full-time. This is part two of our threepart interview with Joel: By Alyssa Nabors

TA: In your comic, you’ve already addressed how you discuss relationships outside the heterosexual norm with your daughter. When you encounter a complicated conversation like that, is it going to be reflected in your storylines? JW: It depends- maybe, if it’s natural. The reason I started with that was because it was true, and it really struck me as eye-opening, to me as a person and as a parent. Especially in Texas, you hear a lot of this “How am I going to explain to my kids if their teacher is

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married to another woman?” And I’m like… “You say it with those exact words and then they don’t care; And if they do, it’s because you did something wrong, or perhaps they have a legitimate question which you can answer with facts and compassion.” Ours didn’t have any questions. Like I said, you have to teach the bigotry, it doesn’t come naturally to a healthy brain. I feel like I’ve already written some stuff that’ll come up in the comic pretty soon about what we were just talking about, the boys toys versus girls toys. Stuff like that, that usually enrages me, I make a note to remind myself to write about later. Because as I talk about parenting in the comic, and especially parenting from a geek perspective, you can’t ignore the fact that parents are trying to cram their children into these molds. It’s not for me to say what are good hobbies and what are bad hobbies , it’s for her to tell me what she is interested in.

For instance she played softball for three years, and I hate softball. It was the most boring, hot, time-consuming, disorganized, macabre nightmare I’ve ever been involved in: three years of smalltown Texas softball. But she loved it and I loved watching her love it. That was the only thing I didn’t hate about it, that she enjoyed it and I vicariously participated through her enthusiasm. Then she decided she wanted to do karate and I thought “Thank God because I am so sick of softball”. We told her, one activity at a time, she’s


Entertainment not going to be one of these kids with nine things scheduled four days a week. We run into those kids all the time too, and you know that comes from the parents- no kid wants to be six years old and have a schedule so busy that they don’t have time to be a kid. From the same token I’m not going to tell her sports are dumb, because I think they are. If she ends up being a basketball player, that’s totally up to her. I’m not going to wedge her into what I think is a good way to spend her time; that’s not my decision. I see a lot of that, you know, “girls do this, boys do this, you should not want this, these are things that are odd the table for you without you ever really trying them”. It’s just pointless and petty, and I think it speaks of the parents’ insecurities about their own lives and the choices they’ve made. I want to break any and all cycles of stuff like that- if I don’t do it to her, she won’t do it to another kid, and so on, and hopefully that will make the world a slightly nicer place to live in. TA: I think that’s really great advice for especially geeks that are going to have kids and be baffled when they want to play football. JW: Exactly! Believe me, her wanting to play softball was not my super-proud parent moment, but I did find proud moments in her making her first hit, making her first…

scoring situation, whatever it’s called in softball… making of a base? Whatever it is she did when people cheered, I thought that was great. I was an assistant coach for one year, and I had to stop because as much as I enjoyed being out on the field and watching her do stuff the other parents made it a horrifying experience for me . There was one guy in particular, this sort of bro-dad who had a daughter on the team , and he so clearly didn’t want her- he didn’t want a girl, he didn’t know what to do with one. The way he would encourage her was by saying “Now you’re hitting like a boy!” or “Show me how a boy runs!” Then he sort of devolved into outwardly verbally abusive all the time, just terrible soulcrushing things he would say to her. I realized I need to be in the stands; I need to watch and make sure no one is treating my daughter like that, but I can’t be standing side-by-side with people like this who are ruining generations to come. I tried to counteract some of that, by encouraging her positively, but there is this line you are not supposed to cross. You don’t supercede someone else’s shitty parenting right in front of them. I don’t really believe in that, but I see how enraged it makes people, and how it turns kids’ fun times into parent-yelling times. More than trying to save every kid with a shitty dad, I’m trying to first save mine. As

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Entertainment selfish as that may sound, I don’t want to go to jail for getting into an altercation with a horrible person who’s treating their child like that. Being a parent opens your eyes up to the worst kind of peo-

leave for three or four days, and that’s the trade-off. We’re still in a lot of ways- if you’re comparing time spent in the same place at the same time- we’re still up on pretty much every other traditional

ple, and it makes you pay a lot more attention to how shitty people are being to their kids all the time. So I want to, through the comics, help this. Let’s say there is one person out there who didn’t know how to tell their six year old about gay people. Maybe I helped them with that, maybe I pushed them in the right direction, or maybe not. The reason I want to talk about those things in a humorous way is to remove their severity, drain them of their issue status, and allow people realize that at least somebody out there thinks that their hotbutton issues are just a part of life and not something to get so upset about, and still make them laugh at the same time.

family. I think she gets it now, but she really didn’t like it a couple of years ago. It’s a reality of how to do this job and do it, I don’t want to say “right”, but with vigor. It’s the way to do it proactively and the way to do it to put yourself in the position to have the most good things happen to you. I probably don’t do as many as I did when she was a little, little baby; I probably did 18 my first year, 15 my second, then 12, then 10, and then probably 9- maybe I did 8 in 2012. I’m definitely cutting back a little each year, but it’s still part of my job and a necessity, so I think she gets it.

TA: Does having a kid keep you from doing the comic artist norm, the con circuit and travelling? JW: It doesn’t keep me from doing any of it, but it makes me want to do it less. As of right now, it hasn’t stopped me from going. [My daughter] understands that I don’t have to go work at an office 12 hours a day, 6 days a week, but sometimes I have to

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TA: Most of the stuff in your store, aside from the books and the t-shirts especially, has come from jokes you made in the comics. Are you at all concerned that switching to storylines might decrease the amount of merchandise you’re able to come up with? JW: I hope it does, that’s part of my plan. I got a lot of eye-opening experiences at conventions over the last couple of years, and one of them was that people could walk by and laugh at


Entertainment my shirts, but they were laughing at a joke I made about a thing they have a one-off joke that requires no prior knowledge of my characalready liked. So I was only really getting half the credit, and it didn’t ters or my comic, I’ll do them there. It’s sort of a trade-off because bother me, especially if they sold well, but it wasn’t doing anything the art is simpler and there’s no color, but it’s really just the words for me as a creator. And most of my merchandise at conventions that are funny. I’m just giving a vehicle to the words. I have two that was more popular than my comics. I’ve made a conscious decision I’m working on now that are extremely specifically about Breaking to move away from that and not to make jokes geared toward a Bad, because I thought of these jokes and I think are funny. The certain fandom as much. I hope to build up the culture around my 30% of my audience that watches Breaking Bad will like them and own work and then make merchandise based on those things. The the rest will shrug with confusion, but because it’s not the main middle ground of that, like you said the jokes come from my com- comic, I think it won’t as much damage as it has in the past. I get ics, a lot of the shirts are illustrations that were directly from the to have my cake and eat it too; I can make the jokes I want to make comics. I think I’ll be mining my comics more for the jokes that are that are too specific for a larger audience, but you can easily ignore more universal, or at least universal to geeks. So that it’s not “you them if I’m making strips you like about characters that you like. don’t get this shirt if you don’t It was sort of David’s fault for watch Doctor Who”, I’d rather the whole thing. We’ve talked “As I talk about parenting in make merchandise and slogans about it a lot over the past couand t-shirts that are more uniple months, he’s been, in a lot the comic, and parenting versally relatable to the kinds of of ways, coaching me as to how from a geek perspective, you geeks and nerds that would also I could transition- what elelike my comic. That’ll be a difments of my life to bring in, and can’t ignore the fact that parents ferent audience probably, but what to leave out, and where are trying to cram their children I’m okay with that. I don’t want there was gold to be mined in to be the Doctor Who t-shirt this story I was trying to come into these molds. It’s not for me to guy at conventions anymore, I’d up with. I think to begin, the say what are good hobbies and rather be the Hijinks Ensue guy. only way I would go back and I know that that’s going to be do a one-off strip within the what are bad hobbies , it’s for [my a long and probably extremely main Hijinks Ensue canon is if daughter] to tell me what she difficult transition, but I think I’ll it didn’t break the canon and is interested in.” be more happier with my work if I didn’t have an idea for the two years from now if I start next comic. Which hopefully that today. wouldn’t happen. I hope to, much like David, eventually be working ahead; whereas I am drawTA: Do you see the format of the comic for the immediate future ing Thursday’s strip right now, and Thursday is mostly over. Then being story arc and then a couple of fandom strips every now and I have to do Friday’s, because I’m trying so hard to update more then- sort of like Shortpacked but with less Batman? than I used to and more regularly. If I ever get ahead, you can’t break that and then talk about something that happened last night. JW: Shortpacked doesn’t even have that much Batman these I’ll do that with the Lo-Fis, but I don’t think I will do that in the comdays, he’s really fallen off the deep end. It’s funny that you men- ics unless it fits. I did so much out-of-universe stuff. There’s ways to tioned Shortpacked, it’s created by one of my best friends, David do that: you can show Robocop doing something ,and in the last Willis. If there’s any one person responsible for all of this, it was panel reveal that the characters have been talking about Robocop. him. Number one, when he created his second comic Dumbing of It’s going to get harder and harder to do specific stuff and current Age three years ago, it was because he and I had a conversation stuff if and when I start working ahead. I’m just kind of waiting to about, you know, “we’re not getting any younger and eventually see what happens, I’m not there yet. I’m not going to be able to buy all these toys and be so engrossed in these fandoms”. I thought “oh, I have a kid- I’m not going to have You can read Joel’s comic here (http://hijinksensue.com/), time to go to movies that much or have time to watch a bunch of read about The Experiment here (http://hijinksensue.com/experitv shows… crap, where does that leave us?”Whereas I went home ment/), read the lastest Lo-FiJinks here and follow Joel on Facebook and continued pondering that, he went home and drew fifty comic (https://www.facebook.com/hijinksensue), Tumblr (http://hijinkstrips and started a new comic that would allow him to tell charac- sensue.tumblr.com/), or Twitter (https://twitter.com/hijinksensue). ter based stories that were not dependent on a fandom. I was just Comics are featured courtesy of Joel Watson. three years behind the curve on really understanding what that meant. David doesn’t even have kids yet, so I was really behind in Check back next month for the final part of our Interview with thinking that I was going to be able to keep going at the same pace, Joel Watson! making my version of Batman jokes, when I was moving further away both in age and relevance from the audience that would be into that sort of thing. I do not want to be fifty years old making jokes about things I don’t really understand. I would rather start now, moving to an area where I do feel relevant. I still love pop culture and geeky stuff, and I still love making jokes about it. One of the reasons I’m still doing the Lo-Fi comic strips in addition to Images provided by Joel Watson via Tumblr & hijinksensue.com the Hijinks Ensue strips is to get out and exorcise those demons. If I

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Entertainment

Something Old, Something New This time around for ‘Something Old, Something New,’ we have two sisterly tales of distance, journeys of female strength, and questioning the world we are born into. Enjoy! By Marissa Early-Hubelbank

Something Old

The Color Purple was written by Alice Walker in 1982, and it depicts the lives of black women living in rural Georgia during the 1930’s. It’s an epistolary novel, narrated in the form of two sisters’ letters as they grow older. One is a child wife; the other is a missionary in Africa. There’s so much that could be said about this amazing

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piece of literature, but it would take up an entire article (and the length of several others). However, something that was particularly fantastic about this novel was its refusal to skirt around the ugly. This book does what we as a society at times fail to do, in that it considers the violence which black people – particularly women – experience(d) within our own community. It

The Anglerfish | Issue 11 Dec 2013

addresses the flaws of believing civil rights and feminism only entail the subjugation of ethnic people by white people, or of women by men. The more complex fact of these issues is that a community which experiences violence from the outside is equally capable of exacting violence within itself. The Color Purple, to put it very shortly, is about finding unity, love, and spirituality in the

midst of isolation and violence. Alice Walker brings forth character types which are often made invisible by mainstream literature, and this book is beautifully written. It’s perfect for those who wish to gain more insight on the complexity of America’s past (and present).


Entertainment

Something Old, Something New Something New

Smoke is Ellen Hopkins’s latest YA, and (in classic Hopkins fashion) is told via poetry. This novel features characters she wrote about back in 2006 with her novel Burned. (Note: This is a review of the second book in the stories. All spoilers for the first are isolated in the next paragraph!) In Burned, Pattyn Von Stratten is on the run. Her father, abusive and drunk, is dead at her hand; Ethan, the love of her life, is long gone. She is headed for the East Coast, and with little money and zero connections, she is utterly lost. Back at home, Jackie Von Stratten must rebuild the life that her father’s

violence blew to pieces. She is the recipient of much blame, even though she isn’t accountable for the actions that caused it. At the story’s beginning, neither of these sisters know what the future has in store; both are plagued by violence at the hands of the those they once trusted. They search hope for in what the future has in store. This book is bread and butter for those who

can totally get into the immersion that this free-flowing first-person narrative offers. It takes on a very fresh sense of immediacy with its present tense narration (while Burned was written in the past tense). The introduction of Jackie’s narration to the storyline is great, and fleshes out their world even more fully than the first book.

There’s all that, including the fact that Hopkins has seven more years (and eight more books) of writing experience between Burned and this sequel. (The improvement is noticeable and exciting, if perhaps you didn’t enjoy Burned as much as her more recent books.) Smoke is an awesome read, with or without the prequel (providing plenty of context and independent plot to do without). One would expect nothing less from this bestselling YA author.

This book is bread and butter for those who can totally get into the immersion that this free-flowing firstperson narrative offers.

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Disney Princess?

Princess Leia Organa:

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On October 31st 2012 it was announced that Disney was buying Lucasfilm the company behind the Star Wars films and franchise - from its owner and creator George Lucas for $4.05 billion. But with the beloved characters of a galaxy far far away now in the hands of Disney, I explore whether we can ever say that Leia Organa is really a Disney princess. by Lucy Pegg

With her blaster gun at her side and her no-nonsense approach to romance, Leia isn’t exactly what we expect when we think of a Disney princess. Though characters like Merida from ‘Brave’ may be bucking the trend, the impression most people still have is of the traditional Cinderella or Sleeping Beauty, both of whom sit around looking pretty and wait for their Prince Charming to arrive. Perhaps, though, she actually has more in common with possible counterparts than it might first seem ...

Iconic Outfit: One of the defining features of a Disney princess, in my opinion, is the outfit. Not only does it usually suggest something about their story or character, but it’s what will be emblazoned upon every backpack, toothbrush and pencil case, and it’s what millions of seven-year-old girls will dress up as. Princess Leia has already beaten Disney to it on this point, having been merchandised within an inch of her life by George Lucas and company. Plus, she’s a Comic Con cosplay favourite, meaning her style is definitely appreciated, even if the slave girl outfit might be a bit too adult for Disney’s purposes. Weapons: A vote in the ‘no’ category for Leia’s acceptance as a Disney princess would definitely have to be her use of guns. Whilst there are weapons in the animated Disney films, they tend to be archaic and slightly fantastical, like the bow and arrow, rather than having the “real” danger of a gun attached to them. Disney films are, after all, intended for children and so I think this point might mean she is deemed unsuitable as a role model for kids by some people.

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Animal Bonding: Whilst Snow White may have a flock of tiny birds at her command, would she manage to make friends with the Ewoks (otherwise known as the most adorable creatures ever conceived by a human mind)? In ‘Return of the Jedi’, Leia’s friendship with her furry friends ultimately helps to save the day, though with slightly more violence than the average Disney film. Personal Choice: Surely if anyone gets to decide if Leia should be a Disney Princess, it should be the woman in question herself, shouldn’t it? And as seen when she first introduces herself to Darth Vader, Leia is reluctant to use the ‘princess’ label, instead identifying herself as ‘a member of the Imperial Senate’. Perhaps it’s because the position would bring with it airs and graces she doesn’t want or simply that she isn’t keen on bureaucracy, but it seems clear that she values her position as a politician and rebel above any kind of royal status. Ultimately it’s probably unlikely that Leia will ever officially be confirmed as part of the princess posse, but as fans we can decide if we want to include her there in our heads. Personally, I have mixed feelings; not being much of a Disney fan, I kind of prefer to see her as an important character in her own right, whilst at the same time I acknowledge that by being included, she can help to improve a group of characters who are not always the best role models for young girls.


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Princess Leia Organa, Disney Style! Big head, childlike Giant Eyes Very Slender Neck Very Demure shoulders Medium-size perky boobs Soft but defined waist What are Hips? Legs connect to waist Long Legs Tiny-tiny feet!

G N I SS

Total score 07/10 Please forgive us Carriwwe Fisher!

PA

by Katherine Taylor

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Entertainment

The Princess Phenomenon Illustration by Jacquelyn Files

Girl’s toys and boy’s toys. Wasn’t there a GIF set that went around a while back where even the smallest of girls was shown to know that such a division is just silly? And yet the unstoppable machine that is Disney adds heroine after tiara-ed heroine to its lineup of extraordinarily marketable princess characters, and they are purchased in overwhelming numbers for almost exclusively young girls. What impact is this having on other toy-selling giants, and more importantly, on the kids? By Alyssa Nabors

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The Princess Phenomenon In her acclaimed 2011 best-seller Cinderella Ate My Daughter, Peggy Orenstein made this observation about today’s girlie-girl culture: It was confusing: images of girls’ successes abounded — they were flooding the playing field, excelling in school, outnumbering boys in college. At the same time, the push to make their appearance the epicenter of their identities did not seem to have abated one whit … I had read stacks of books devoted to girls’ adolescence, but where was I to turn to understand the new culture of little girls, from toddler to “tween,” to help decipher the potential impact — if any — of the images and ideas they were absorbing about who they should be, what they should buy, what made them girls? Did playing Cinderella shield them from early sexualization or prime them for it? Was walking around town dressed as Jasmine harmless fun, or did it instill an unhealthy fixation on appearance? Was there a direct line from Prince Charming to Twilight’s Edward Cullen to distorted expectations of intimate relationships? Orenstein’s book delves far past the inception of Disney princesses to the American Girls, child beauty pageants, and innumerable other pop culture influences that touch on young girls’ lives daily, in both fiction and true life. However, the emergence of the Disney Princess line of toys, costumes, and other products has had an undeniable impact on how products are marketed to young girls. In the late 1990s, Andy Mooney, the then-recently appointed chairman of Disney Consumer Products, was inspired by

the homemade princess costumes young girls wore at a Disney On Ice show to create the Disney Princess line. Originally consisting of Snow White, Aurora, Cinderella, Ariel, Belle, and Jasmine, the princess products became instantly successful, and the company has continued to add characters to the lineup as new movies are released. The incredible amount of profit reaped from every toothbrush, sippy cup, and nightgown with a princess plastered on it certainly inspired other toy manufacturers; now you can’t enter a toy store without knowing instantly where the “girl toys” are located; it is the only part of the store that’s entirely pink. We can argue all day long about whether any Disney princess is a good role model for a child or not, but the fact remains that they are a huge portion of the cultural influence contributing to the increasingly heavily gendered toy selection. Last Christmas, 13-year-old McKenna Pope successfully campaigned for a non-pink version of the Easy Bake Oven to appeal more successfully to boys, but during the same holiday season, Lego released their Lego Friends product line, little more than pastel dollhouse kits in the same vein as Polly Pocket. That’s not to say that such play is harmful; on the contrary, playing “house” and other imaginative pretending is crucial for a child’s socialization and development. The problem is the divide that’s created by the message sent by businesses trying to sell a product. The commercials continue to show girls playing with baby dolls and Barbie dolls and yet another incarnation of a doll in a mind-bogglingly restricted color palette. This will cause more girls to understand that the way to assert their identity (of which gender is usually the first

concrete and crucial part) is by conforming to what they understand is a normal display of gender roles. Engineering toys created specifically for girls like GoldiBlox and Roominate have caught flak for keeping close to the official “girl” colors, for attempting to appeal to girls on the same grounds as Lego Friends sets, albeit with higher goals. But the truth is that they are trying to make headway into repairing some of the damage the marketing exposure has done. Even the child of the strongest advocates for gender equality and doing whatever you want regardless of what anyone else thinks — like Orenstein’s daughter Daisy — will be influenced by the impressions of their peers, and if the toy that’s meant to encourage them to create and explore looks just a little bit more like what a “girl’s toy” is supposed to look like, maybe it’s more likely to catch on. The inspiration movies like the Disney princess films provide to a child’s imagination is undeniable and invaluable to their development. The desire to want to be proud of your appearance or to enjoy that aisle full of pink because you love pink shouldn’t be looked down on. Telling our children that they can be whatever they want and truly meaning it is going to be hard. If that means I, a huge geek who often forgets to brush her hair, much less apply mascara, will someday have to accept that my daughter wants to be a cheerleader and a mathlete … I’ll live. It’s okay to be both. It’s okay to be neither. The princesses are just fairy tales, but letting them oversaturate the culture of little girls sets us up for two-dimensional grownups, regardless of whether they embrace or reject the tiara.

We can argue all day long about whether any Disney princess is a good role model for a child or not, but the fact remains that they are a huge portion of the cultural influence contributing to the increasingly heavily gendered toy selection.

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Entertainment

The Darker Side of Disney The shiny happy branding of Disney films and products couldn’t possibly be as bright as it is without casting a few shadows. While most of the urban legends surrounding the parks, company, and movies are false, some are based in truth and all are incredibly creepy! By Alyssa Nabors Ghosts There are many tales of haunted rides and ghost sightings in the various parks. Not to cast aspersions on the existence of an afterlife, but there isn’t much proof of these spirits’ existences. However, it is true that people have died on rides. According to Snopes, between 1964 and 1983, six teenage boys died while disabling safety features on various rides, including one who was attempting to sneak into Disneyland by climbing over the Monorail. One “cast member” died while operating the America Sings ride (a revamped version of the Carousel of Progress), and her ghost is said to haunt Tomorrowland. The strangest of all ghost stories would be those borne of the constant attempts to scatter cremated human remains in the various parks. Many people have actually been caught by park staff sprinkling the ashes of their loved ones on rides, especially the Haunted Mansion and Pirates of the Caribbean. So while you may not see a ghost visiting any of the Disney theme parks, you may or may not be breathing in another Disney fan … literally.

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Secret Places While there’s no bonus park hidden underneath the Magic Kingdom, underground tunnels allow cast members to move throughout the park without being seen by guests. Additionally, Walt did have an apartment over the Disneyland Fire Department on Main Street, which is now used as a staging area for one of the final shows of the day, and while there was not originally a secret room in Cinderella’s castle, special guests can stay in a suite at the top of the castle. There’s also a very exclusive “speakeasy” bar in the New Orleans area in Disneyland.

Animation We’ve all heard of the phallic-shaped palace on the VHS cover for The Little Mermaid, the cloud dust that spells out “SEX” in The Lion King, and the topless woman that’s rumored to briefly appear in a scene from The Rescuers. Are they really there? Disney animators are just as likely to leave easter eggs as Pixar animators, and there are screenshots to “prove” most of the legends. However, there’s never been concrete proof that any of these claims are true. This might be a legend you have to check for yourself!

Illustration by Vaiki Tress


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Living a Disney Life For over 75 years and through 53 animated films, Disney has created an animation juggernaut that has and will continue to stand the test of time. What is it about Disney films that has captivated audiences throughout the years though? By: Eric Cole and Melissa-Lynn Heineman MH: Even sitting on my bed, I look around my room and see traces of one of the biggest parts of my childhood: Disney. I see my deluxe copy of ‘The Nightmare Before Christmas’ on the top shelf of the bookshelf near my door, my copies of the books ‘Alice and Wonderland’ and ‘Peter Pan’ on another bookshelf, my humongous Cheshire Cat plush on the floor in front of me, and even my copy of Meg Cabot’s ‘Avalon High’ book, which was turned into a made-for-TV Disney film. My room, as a teenage girl going on adult, exudes my nostalgia, from the actual objects to the color, a blueish-green that reminds me of Neverland’s waters and Wonderland’s sky. As a girl growing up with Disney, Disney was as much

a part of me as the ‘Harry Potter’ experience, if not more. As I grow older, I feel more unattached to those movies, but whenever I see that Mulan is on TV while I channel surf, I feel a need to turn it on. I smile thinking of times when I dressed as Jasmine and Cinderella, and I relish all references to the culture of Disney, enjoying all little salutes to different films in ‘Once Upon a Time.’ Disney, for me, is a universal concept unto itself. Especially as a girl, it created a model as to how girls should act and what they should seek. It taught me compassion, became a long collection of animated crushes, and provided comparisons of real life to fantasy. It was inescapable, and today, I still don’t wish to be released from the fandom’s grasp.

Illustration by Hayley Pike

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Entertainment EC: I am very much in the boat you are, Melissa, and I absolutely agree with the universality that Disney has created for itself. It is indeed inescapable. It doesn’t matter who you are, your profession, your hobbies, or your personality; ask anyone a question about Disney and they will immediately jump into their childhood and provide you an answer. Disney is in everyone’s soul. It is how we learned and were entertained as children, and it is a constant in all of us because of it. This trait is exactly how I would describe myself. I am not a Disney collector as you are, nor do I own much Disney merchandise besides the actual films that I love. However, my experiences with Disney have brought me emotional and spiritual changes. Disney is still very much a part of my moral fiber. I believe in true love and the power of good over evil because of Disney. My enjoyment of animation is on a deeper level such as how a choice in color can add emotional depth to a scene. I love musical theater and songs with emotional depth to them because of the power that Disney had over me as a child. In short, much of who I am today is in large part thanks to Disney, and I think that is a statement that a lot of Disney fans would apply to themselves. We are, perhaps, the most nostalgic fandom because of the influence that Disney has had over our lives and the ideals that Disney has helped shape for us. MH: There’s honestly no better way to describe the legacy Disney has created for itself and all who cherish it. But I find it interesting how you discuss that you found your love for Disney through its overall themes and the seemingly generalized aspects of the films. It actually begs a question, as a girl. For girls overall, we find our love for the films as they are our models for a specific desired lifestyle. I know a lot of guys who love the classic nature of the films and the style. But as a guy, what made them memorable as a child, especially as during the earlier periods, before the 2000’s, many of the “remembered” films were princess flicks? EC: Well, let me answer your question with a question: Are you sure that Disney movies are just princess flicks? See, to a general audience, it is easy to make that assumption because they see a female protagonist - who happens to be of royalty or is seeking royalty - they see the female attempting to find true love or needing a prince to rescue them and, generally, people will leave it at

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that. However, Disney fans know there is so much more to a Disney princess movie than that. Take, for example, a movie such as ‘Sleeping Beauty’, one of the first Disney princess films. Yes, you have Aurora, who falls under the spell of Maleficent and needs Prince Philip to kiss her in order to save her. However, I think the real appeal of the film, and why it is universal not just for girls but for boys as well, is that Disney does an excellent job of portraying more than just true love in a story, but also, in the case of ‘Sleeping Beauty’, jealousy, vengeance, humor, adventure, danger, and so forth. Disney knows that in order to be successful, they need to be more than just a company for girls, and they make sure to be cognisant of that with every film they make. It also doesn’t hurt that the movie ends with a giant dragon shooting fire, and Philip trying to cut it down with his sword, you know?

Are you sure that Disney movies are just princess flicks? MH: Okay, fair enough. Though I wouldn’t say that Disney films are merely “princess flicks,” more so that in the 90’s, the company focused on that theme. And it worked, especially as a young girl, to gain my attention, seeing as it created a huge market with many spin-offs and toys. I remember re-renting the same ‘Aladdin’ television series VHSes from Hollywood Video when I was little, and obsessively loving princessthemed birthday parties. It wasn’t until I was in middle school that I became a bit of a cynic, criticizing that distinct brand and branching off the focuses solely on non-princess films, not praising them again (with the exception of ‘Mulan’) until ‘The Princess and the Frog’ came out. I think that especially as a girl, I focused much more on the love story aspect of the films and began to feel cheated by Disney setting unrealistic goals for girls when it came to love, wishes, dreaming and goal. As a boy, without focusing on the “princess aspect,” it seemed like you got more out of those “princess flicks,” ironically. EC: I think that is a fair statement to make. As a boy, I didn’t have to contend with high expectations set by Disney princesses, and


Entertainment the princes were, for the most part, so under developed during the early years, that they didn’t really matter. However, I would contend that once Disney started to get its act together and write male princes with actual character development, starting with Prince Eric in ‘The Little Mermaid’, some boys, not all, could have faced some of the same social pressures from Disney as girls did. Sure, The Beast and Aladdin were as nervous and awkward around girls as us boys are in real life, but they were also brave, charming, extremely good-looking, and they always were able to get the girl in the end. This is something that a fair number of us guys have trouble doing. However, for both boys and girls, I think Disney does enough to counteract these social pressures by offering other substantive items in their films, beginning with their villains. Here is a group of individuals who don’t give two shakes about society and all the pressures that come with it. These individuals set out on their own paths and live life their way. Now, yes, they do take it too far oftentimes, which is why they are considered evil, but I think Disney does a good job of portraying these people with enough shades of grey that there are still some moral lessons that one can learn even from someone who wants to rule the world. MH: Villains are always a saving grace for me in Disney films, even in ones that I already love. Almost always, they are likeable, either as comic relief or for relatability. And even when you think they’re entirely awful, you can find a new point of view through someone else’s take on them (A thank you to Starkid’s ‘Twisted’). Villains often represent something unique; they are real people with specific desires (no matter how dastardly) that they strive for. They don’t wish on stars or wait for a fairy godmother to wave a wand and hand them a chance. Whether they have henchman, coerced victims, or they take matters into their own hands, they actually attempt to reach their goals without waiting for “someday.” This is an entirely avoidable theme in non-princess films. Take, for example, ‘The Emperor’s New Groove.’ Sure it had royalty, even one who had long hair and earrings, but the movie wasn’t focused on what Kuzco wanted. It was more so focused on how what he wanted, along with his attitude and greed, and how all this affected others. Through Pacha he learns compassion, and we still get an awesome baddie,

Yzma, who has greed for the throne and uses mad science and an idiotic but loveable lacky to attempt to achieve it. EC: I utterly agree that the non-princess Disney films are more diverse in their themes and are, oftentimes, more creative in their problems and solutions than the princess stories. I mean, it is through the non-princess films that Disney was able to create such gems as ‘The Fox and The Hound’, a touching story about friendship, ‘The Rescuers’, a film depicting the world of mice and how they help humans, ‘Oliver and Company’, a unique twist on the classic Dickens story, and ‘Lilo and Stitch’, which is on an entirely other planet of unique. It is through these tales that Disney was able to touch on themes outside of love, such as compassion for our neighbors, or expressed their views on other forms of love besides romantic, such as friendship and familial love. However, to be fair to Disney, it is through doing these non-princess films that they have learned how to make their princess movies more diverse in nature. For example, the character of Belle in ‘Beauty and The Beast’ is not one who I believe we would have seen from Disney prior to their experimental phase during the 80s. Belle is a princess and she does find her prince in the end, but she is not actively looking for him throughout the film. Belle is independent. She is an intellectual and would rather spend time reading than hunting down a man, even though she is ostracized from her village for it. Then, we look at ‘Frozen’, Disney’s latest addition to its library. ‘Frozen’ is indeed a princess movie, and yes, there is a character in the film who actively seeks love from a prince, but the way the film handles the prince character is an entirely new spin on the genre. In addition, the film does touch on the adage that true love will conquer all, but it is the way that love wins that is entirely new. It seems to me as if Disney understands the frustrations that people have had with their films over the years and have attempted to try and relieve some of those pains, and their films have been all the better for it. MH: Seeing as I can retort with Belle not being a proper model, as she has Stockholm Syndrome towards the middle of the film, I’ll just civilly bite my tongue at this point. Overall, we can agree that Disney offers specifics lessons and models for all walks of life, imprinting something memorable

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Entertainment If you were a child growing up in the 90’s, I think it is a safe assumption to make that your entertainment and moral learning was done through PBS and Disney. on all of its viewers. For me, I wish I had Tiana growing up, but was happy to live with a colorful assortment of villains as well as classics like ‘Peter Pan,’ ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ and animal-based stories like ‘Oliver and Company,’ ‘The Great Mouse Detective,’ and ‘The Fox and the Hound,’ not to mention countless other films that don’t fit either of these two categories. They’ve culturally impacted me, and I have grown because of them. They taught me lessons on how to be a more humane person, in addition to developing kindness and bravery, while providing a counterexample through the antagonists and forces of society. They also give us an easy way to relate to others, as so many cherish Disney, and they easily connect us with an exclaim of “All my feels!” or “Let’s get down to business … to defeat … the Huns!” Disney was an important part of my childhood, whether be it adding to my ability to criticize things, regardless of my initial and continuing connection to them, or teaching me valuable lessons that I will always hold onto. EC: If you were a child growing up in the 90’s, I think it is a safe assumption to make that your entertainment and moral learning was done through PBS and Disney. Disney has helped and will continue to help children all over the world learn valuable moral lessons that they can use in their own lives, as it helped us, too. And if, years from now, my kids and I are driving down the highway belting out “Hakuna Matata” to passing motorists, I know who I will be thanking. Disney, no matter their faults, will always be there for children and adults alike, and that is not at all a bad legacy to leave behind.

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Illustrations by Hayley Pike


Entertainment

Why ‘The Lion King’ is the Best Disney Animated Film (A list) by Palls Pillutla

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Simba: The ultimate symbol of bravery. And he’s cute. So that’s a bonus.

“He lives, in you.”: The best quote on loss of a loved one.

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Timon and Pumba: Both the funniest and the most fun pair of pals.

The soundtrack: Just phenomenal. They really put the audience in the mood the directors intend. Perfect selection of songs to listen to in the shower.

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It’s not just a princess story. It’s about animals and pride and bravery and honor. Way better than being kissed by a prince to get out of REM cycles.

Mufasa’s death. Even in a cartoon movie this is one of the most powerful scenes depicting a fallen hero.

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4

Matthew Broderick: We all love Ferris, and he gave us Simba, too.

“Danger? Ha! I laugh in the face of danger. Ha-ha-ha!” My personal favorite. Gotta love the little cubs.

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2

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The 3D remastered version. Never has a 17 year old had so much fun in her life. I even wore the kiddie Simba version of the 3D glasses.

Zazu’s loyalty. Loyalty is the important lesson you can teach a child!

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Entertainment

If the Disney Princesses I’m actually surprised they haven’t made this idea into a movie yet. There have been countless high school novels and films with varying twists, but none have been about Disney Princesses! Well, I suppose it will be my honor to tell this story…

Illustration by Vaiki Tress

by Palls Pillutla

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Every day I wake up, brush my teeth, eat some nondescript breakfast, and drive to school. And every day, I park in my assigned parking spot next to Sleeping Beauty’s. Half the time she doesn’t make it into the spot before she passes out on the wheel – literally, on it. Luckily for us all, Sleep’s car - poofed up by her fairy godmothers (“Pink!” “No, blue!” “No, pink!”) - senses when she’s asleep and shuts itself off. Unluckily for me, this often happens in places that make it impossible for me to park. Today, I honk six times before she wakes with a start and pulls into her spot properly. I’m late for my first class now, so I’m forced to jog. On my way, I trip and get entirely tangled in Rapunzel’s hair. I’ll never make it to class at this rate. “I am SO sorry,” she cries, trying to scoop up her hair and free me. “It’s fine,” I mumble, “But I’m stuck.” “Where’s your class? Let me just take you there. Hold on to my hair and I’ll run wherever you need to be.” I roll my eyes. Princesses, I think. “I have English. With you. I sit behind you.” “You do?! I’m so sorry I never noticed. The hair, you know how it is. Come on then, let’s go!” We make it just in time for our teacher to take attendance, and I’m finally untangled by the time the bell rings, signaling the end of class. Next, I have Chemistry, and today is a lab day. This excites me because my lab partner is intelligent, funny, and Snow White. When I was first paired up with her, I groaned, dreading having to work with a princess. But she turned out to know more about molecules and bonding than I did, and she always brought apples – the safe kind – to share after lab. Snow is already ready to begin when I get to the lab room and she waves enthusiastically when I enter. We spend the majority of the lab period completing the


Entertainment

actual lab, but Snow moves so quickly that we finish much before the period ends. While we wait for the bell to ring, I complain to her about Rapunzel and Sleeping Beauty. “It’s unbelievable to me that Sleep even has a license,” she says to me. “It’s unbelievable to me that she qualifies as a normally functioning human being!” I say and we both laugh. The bell rings and we say goodbye, and I’m in a much better mood as I walk to my Art class. It’s a beginner’s class, the kind you have to take to graduate, but certain individuals in my class take it way too seriously, namely Jasmine and Mulan. They are the two most obnoxious, competitive people I have ever come across – and my brother is a ‘lax bro’. It’s fine though, because we’re allowed to listen to music with headphones in class so I put mine on the highest volume and block them out. What’s not fine is every now and then they have art fights - like food fights but with art supplies instead of cafeteria food. Last week, Mulan threw two paint brushes, which Jasmine swiftly ducked; I was, of course the unlucky target, as I sit behind Jasmine. It’s finally lunch time, and I sit with Snow and Ariel. The Little Mermaid is alright. She doesn’t talk too much, but she’s nice when she does. Every now and then, she sings quietly and it’s oddly relaxing. I guess she finally gets to be part of our world. Today, Jasmine sits with us, too. She acknowledges me with a nod and I half-smile at her. Ariel hates Jasmine. No one is sure of the reason, but these princesses never seem to need one. I just do my best to stay out of their way, yet here I am, eating lunch with three of them. I guess that’s what I get for going to Disney High. I should have gone to boarding school when I had the chance!

Illustration by Vaiki Tress

Went to My High School

Issue 11 Dec 2013 | The Anglerfish

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News

ow Did New Years appen? The holiday of New Year’s is a strange holiday; at least it is to me. How did we come to create this holiday in the middle of a season -- a holiday of fireworks, plastic glasses, copious amounts of alcohol, and a Honeymooner’s Marathon? I decided to look into this, and share what I found. Written & Illustrated By Katherine Taylor Like many things in our culture, we use things from the Romans. New Year’s isn’t much different. In ancient Rome, the month of January was named for Janus the god of gates, doors, and beginnings. So it would make sense that New Year’s is celebrated at the beginning of January. However, January is in the middle of winter. Many other cultures prior to Rome or alongside it, would consider a New Year beginning at the beginning or end of winter. Whether around the Winter Solstice (Dec 21 to 22) or at the Spring Equinox (March 21 to 22). They also didn’t follow the same calendar as the Romans. They followed a lunar calendar. Romans invented their own calendar, and it’s taken over a majority of the world ever since. Was New Year’s a big deal in Rome? Not for a while. That was until the rise of Rome’s PR master, Julius Caesar. He was deified (declared a god) on January 1 in 42 B.C.E. The man slaughtered hundreds of thousands of Gauls, helped overthrow the Roman Republic (or what was left of it) and was declared a god after his death. (Go figure -- bad boy worship goes back centuries.) So every year, Rome would celebrate the deifying of Julius Caesar. So over the last 2,000 years, it’s turned into thousands of people crowding into Times Square to watch a ball drop? We’re missing a few steps here. January 1 was celebrated for a long while. Some 500 years or so later, Europe recognized it as the beginning of the year. However, the Church felt there was too much pagan behaviors involved. For instance all the way through the 7th century, the people of Flanders and the Netherlands would exchange gifts amongst friends and family. Saint Eligius (patron saint of specialized workers and party

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poopers) warned them to “not make vetulas [old lady statues], little deer at night or exchange New Year’s gifts or to supply superfluous drinks.” The superfluous drinks are a reference to the Yule traditions of celebrating the dead and you know … fun. The Church, after declaring anything pagan was bad (like fun), moved New Year’s to March 25th to line up with Easter, which apparently, didn’t change dates back in the day. Weirdly, January 1 did have a celebratory purpose in the medieval church: to celebrate Jesus’ circumcision. A practice that is does not have any part of Christianity. (I find this weird because the church was very anti-Semitic at this time. To this day, the Anglican and Lutheran churches still have the Feast of the Circumcision of Christ; Anglican and Lutheran churches have a bris for a Jew who was born and died almost two thousand years ago. I don’t know either.) So when does January 1 take back its right as New Year’s? The Gregorian calendar! That’s right, the calendar we use today was created by Pope Gregory, a pope who promoted art and science, actively sent Jesuits to England, expanded the Catholic Church into Southeast Asia, was so OCD that the new calendar involved the solar calendar basis of the Julian calendar and leap years. This calendar was released in 1582. Many protestant countries did not accept or start using this new calendar until 1752. A whole one hundred and seventy years later! (Side note, when Great Britain switched over, it lost two days! The people went to bed on Sept 1, 1752, and woke up on Sept 13, 1752. That’s one hell of a nap!) It took many countries, specifically Eastern European countries, even longer to adopt the Gregorian calendar.


News

(The last was Greece in 1923 after World War I, only 90 years ago. That is seriously mind blowing!) There are countries today that do have other calendars, but to do business and interact with the rest of the world, they generally use the Gregorian calendar. An example is Israel which uses another calendar mostly for religious purposes. So where do the fireworks, Baby New Year, and the giant ball in Time Square comes in? Things that seemingly to have nothing in common with one another. Firstly, let’s take a look at fireworks. Fireworks date back to the 7th century in China. It was a precursor to gunpowder, but far less dangerous, unless you are a drunkard in your backyard on the Fourth of July. Fireworks were originally a great way for the imperial family to show off their power in through the 9th to 11th centuries. Eventually, fireworks would make its way across the world. Arab traders got their hands on the formula around the 13th century. From there, “Chinese Flowers” would spread, but slowly. Europe didn’t really latch onto the popularity until the mid-17th century. Ambassadors from Peter the Great of Russia to Jesuit missionaries were mesmerized and taken aback by the fireworks displays in the 17th and 18th century. Fireworks for New Year’s Eve are used all over the world. Some of the most spectacular displays belong to London, Sydney, Disney World, and Hong Kong. It, in a sense echoes the power and flash of each country or company. The ball dropping in New York City, though accompanied with fireworks, has been a staple in New York since 1907. Designed by Artkraft Strauss, it was organized by Adolph Ochs, owner of the New York Times. Prior to the ball dropping, Ochs had used fireworks on the top of his new Times building dating back to 1903. From Fireworks to the ball dropping? Ochs wanted something bigger to overshadow the Trinity Church celebration. He turned to the chief electrician of the building, Walter F. Painer who suggested a “time ball” (an obsolete time signaling device from the 1830s) after seeing

the Western Union building nearby use one. Strauss constructed an electrically lit ball for the celebration. It weighed 700 pounds, had 100 incandescent light bulbs, and was about 5 feet in diameter. As time went on, the ball kept getting bigger. The current light as of 2009, is technically an icosahedral geodesic sphere (fancy for boxy-ish ball). It is 11,875 pounds, 12 feet in diameter, and covered in 32,256 LED lamps. Because of its massive size, they just leave it up there all year and it’s visible from Rockefeller Center and the Empire State building! (I’ve seen it myself.) To this day, many villages and cities give the title Baby New Year to the first child born in the New Year. These, like many things we celebrate have a pagan origin. In ancient Greece, around the year 600 B.C.E., where New Year was considered the first day of spring, a baby was paraded around cities to represent Dionysus, the god of wine and fertility. This is the earliest confirmed celebration of this type; however, it is believed that Babylon and Egypt had similar celebrations. The symbolism of Baby New Year in our world today represents the birth of the New Year, who would grow into an old man by the end of the year. He looks a bit like Father Time. The icon of Baby New Year has turned from a godly child (Dionysus or Jesus) to a baby in a diaper, a top hat, and a sash displaying the year. One of the more interesting or fun traditions of New Year’s is the kiss. This may link all the way back to the festival of Saturnalia which involved a lot of debauchery. In Germany and England, it became a tradition to kiss the first person you meet after the “bell ringing” of the New Year. This stems from the masked balls usually held in Europe during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Today, it’s more of an excuse to grab someone you love and proceed to indulge in some tactical face licking. Starting the year off right. Ladies. What else can I say. New Year’s Eve is just another hodgepodge holiday that we love to get drunk and light fireworks for!

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News

The War on Christmas! And Why It’s Bullshit!

In recent years, Fox News and many other conservative outlets have been screaming about “The War on Christmas” and the damn dirty atheists who are trying to take “The Christ” out of Christmas. From where I am sitting, the Christmas we celebrate today in the U.S. is not a religious holiday but a secular and economic boost extravaganza! Why do I make this outrageous claim? Well for one, Christmas was banned in several parts of the country for many years. It wasn’t even considered a national holiday until 1870, which is what I feel marks it as an official secular holiday. Written & Illustrated by Katherine Taylor Just a few short weeks ago, the gigantic Christmas tree (which has pagan origins) was lit in Rockefeller Center in New York City. It wasn’t until the tree was lit that a song mentioning Jesus was sung. All the other songs involved winter traditions like sleigh rides, chestnuts, and Santa Claus. Sure, many Christians don’t really care, but there is a small but vocal group that claims this is a travesty! They cry out every time a town decides to remove a nativity scene with a “Happy Holidays!” sign. They rage every time “Merry Christmas” is replaced with “Happy Holidays.”

Now, as for replacing “Merry Christmas” with “Happy Holidays” that’s just being culturally sensitive. My thoughts on this are simple, I couldn’t care less as to what holiday sign is put up on the windows. If someone takes the time to say “Merry Christmas,” “Happy Hanukkah,” “Happy Kwanzaa, Winter Solstice, Festivus,” or whatever you celebrate, I feel special. You took the time out of your busy hunting -- I mean shopping -- schedule to wish me a good holiday. I will gladly do the same to you, even if our holidays don’t match. I’m not offended, and you shouldn’t be either.

But let’s look at the numbers for a moment. As of 2012, the population of America is 313.9 million. Overall, 81% of Americans identify as some denomination of Christian. That is 254.2 million people. That leaves 19% or 59.6 million left over for the 2% of Jews, 0.4% Muslim, 13% agnostic/atheist, and 5% other. Interestingly, though 81% of Americans are Christian, 93% of ALL Americans celebrate the modern-day secular Christmas. That means of the 19% non-Christians, 12% of them still celebrate Santa, chestnuts, and Christmas trees. To me, this doesn’t seem like Christmas is at any kind of risk. To quote John Stewart of The Daily Show who said it best, “Time Square looks like Santa’s balls exploded!”

Now as for Jesus and the Christian variation of Christmas, if that’s your thing, go for it. Have that tacky light-up nativity in your front yard, put up those neon crosses, and sing those songs. Don’t get mad if your neighbor chooses to do something different. If your town decides to do something different, don’t get bent out of shape. You have to keep in mind that our nation does not have an official religion. So just remember, if someone wishes you a happy holiday, don’t take it as a slight. They are trying to be nice, and you should do the same. That’s the Christmas spirit!

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News

Cryonics: Pop culture has taken hold of the idea of freezing a human to revive them at a later date, both as a way to preserve a fatally ill patient until a cure can be found or as a way to get around aging effects of space travel. However, this idea is being used by real scientists on real human bodies (although the bodies must be dead for the process to be performed legally) for people who simply want to be revived in the future, Philip-J-Fry style… and some suspect Disney did the same. By Alyssa Nabors One of the most popular myths associated with the wonderful world of Disney is the story that Walt’s frozen body (or his dismembered head as some say) is sitting in cold storage somewhere deep beneath Disney World. This is completely false, though it was fed for a time by the lack of information regarding Walt’s burial arrangements. The fact is, while cryonics (often mistakenly called cryogenics) may have some positive medical applications, complete freezing and reviving of a human being is just not a plausible reality. At this time, when a deceased person is preserved through cryonics, the water in their body is replaced by a chemical solution called a cryoprotectant. The body is put through a process called vitrification, the core concept behind suspended animation: deep cooling without freezing. The body is then stored head down in a container cooled by liquid nitrogen (head down so that if there’s a leak in the container, your brain will still be safe!). No human has yet been successfully revived from cryonic storage, though it has been used successfully for some animal organs and human embryos. The biggest problem is that, even with the cryoprotectant solution, freezing bursts cell walls. To bring a frozen body back to consciousness, the damage these burst cells make on the human brain must be repaired. The nanotechnology that would make such repairs possible does not yet exist, but, hypothetically, the preservation process keeps the subjects viable until such technology has been perfected. Another question that has not been answered is whether a human will come out of suspended animation with the same personality; as with cases like Phineas Gage, we continue to discover that the human brain responds in unexpected ways to the damage it manages to survive. ww

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News

Why Walt Won’t Be Back!

Despite the unanswered questions, many people opt for cryonic preservation after their deaths, especially those suffering from diseases for which we do not have effective treatments. The premise is that when the technology has been perfected for reviving cryonic patients, a cure for the disease will also have been found. Because vitrification can only be performed when the subject has been legally declared dead, cryonic preservation has been compared to mummification in that it is largely considered a comfort to people with a fear of death rather than an actual medical benefit. And as for Walt, he was cremated at Forest Lawn Cemetery two days after his death in 1966, so even if someday in the future cryonics patients begin to be revived, Walt definitely won’t be one of them.

Phineas Gage In the 1800s, Phineas Gage, an American railroad construction foreman, was involved in an industrial accident and a large iron rod driven completely through his head, effectively destroying his left frontal lobe. While he survived the injury and lived another twelve years, his family and friends reported a complete change in his personality. This was one of the first cases to support the theory of cerebral localization (the idea that different parts of the brain are responsible for different functions). This case is still cited in neurology and psychology curricula today, and Hank Green even released a song about Phineas Gage on his 2011 album: Ellen Hardcastle.

illustrated by Kat Taylor

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News

The magical world

In about five years, the time that the Copyright Term Extension Act that added to keep Superman, Gone with the Wind, and Mickey Mouse out of the public domain will run out. You can bet that Disney won’t be the only company lobbying for another extension, but it’s likely they’ll be a prominent player again. What would it hurt if they got their way? By Alyssa Nabors You might have heard of an incident back in 1989 when some Florida day care centers were threatened with legal action if they did not remove murals featuring Disney cartoon characters. Why did the Disney company make such a fuss? The same reason online companies like Redbubble and Society6 are picky about what kinds of fanart they allow artists to sell; it has to do with agreements made with companies that make the toys and games featuring Disney characters, as well as trademark law and indications of professional affiliation. In order to continue operating as they do, the company carefully guards its intellectual property, which largely consists of deciding who can use the images of their characters and how. The reason copyright and other intellectual property laws exist is ostensibly “to promote the progress of science and useful arts” as stated in the Constitution. By providing protection to the work of inventors and creators, the government hopes to foster creativity and positive economic growth. However, the Constitution also stipulates that these protections cannot last indefinitely. This has become especially complicated as media companies such as Disney are dependent on the exclusivity of their rights to their works. If the Copyright Extension Act and its predecessor in the late 1970s had not been passed, works in the public domain would include every artwork, piece of music, film, and written work created before the mid-1980s. Why shouldn’t Intellectual Property rights be as permanent as rights to physical property? One argument the supporters of the 1998 Extension Act gave was that if the exclusive right to the creation was guaranteed, creators would be more likely to participate

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in the new digital forms of creation and preservation of earlier works. New York Times contributor Mark Helprin wrote in 2007 that there is no difference between physical and intellectual property and that because the Constitution does not propose a specific limit, Congress should extend copyright “as far as it can throw.” Helprin argued that the entrance of works into the public domain does nothing except to increase the publishing companies’ profits. With such provisions as the Fair Use doctrine and the Fairness in Music Licensing Act, it would seem that the extension of copyright would merely protect the creator without stifling the creativity or range of other artists, writers, etc. However, opponents of the Extension Act argued that the protection was designed more for corporations, like Disney, than it was for any individual. Last year, Techdirt blogger Mike Masnick argued that the extension keeps the entertainment companies from having to compete with themselves, in a way. If everything from before the 1980s was freely available, as hypothesized previously, Masnick postulates that the public consumption of new releases would not be as avid. As it currently stands, looking at Masnick’s analysis of “New Books From [the] Amazon Warehouse By Decade” you can see a tremendous gap between works in the public domain


of copyright law

News

We live in an age where not all of the ways we now share our creations are fully protected by the laws as they stand, and we must be aware of the consequences to ourselves and not complacently let large companies with bigger financial stakes make the decisions for us, regardless of who they are or what they do. (pre-1920) and works of the current decade compared with works in the intervening decades. According to Masnick, this gap “doesn’t just represent competitive works, but also raw material and inspiration for all kinds of amazing new works -- which are effectively killed off,” indicating a direct conflict with the intent of copyright, which is to foster creativity and innovation. Thomas Jefferson himself said ideas are “like the air in which we breathe, move and have our physical being, incapable of confinement or exclusive appropriation” -- hence, the Constitutional requirement that copyright not be infinite in length. Masnick also points out the irony that many of Disney’s most successful works were derivative of works in the public domain, including Fantasia, in which all of the music was public domain except the Rite of Spring. What the expiration of copyright really means for Disney is not that you and I will be able to make our own Mickey Mouse cartoons -- that will still be prevented by their non-expiring trademark (which they have on all their works). Without copyright, you can bet they’d be fighting to keep their trademarks as strong as possible. What would really happen is that the creations would be freely distributable, the way you can get free copies of Alice in Wonderland and

Pride and Prejudice on Project Gutenberg. Other entities would also be able to release or screen Disney’s works without having to pay Disney any fee. Is the corporation really the one benefitting most from the extension of copyright law? Do the benefits to the individual creator outweigh whatever damage it may be doing to the creators of the future -- or even the future of the work itself? I encourage all readers to pay close attention over the next few years to all developments concerning Fair Use, the merit of the public domain, and Intellectual Property laws. We live in an age where not all of the ways we now share our creations are fully protected by the laws as they stand, and we must be aware of the consequences to ourselves and not complacently let large companies with bigger financial stakes make the decisions for us, regardless of who they are or what they do. A fun fact to close: At this time, the United States is actually fairly average in terms of copyright length compared to other countries; while the U.S. length is currently the lifetime of the creator plus 70 years, the longest copyright length can currently be found in Mexico, where, effective since 2003, it lasts the lifetime of the creator plus 100 years.

Issue 11 Dec 2013 | The Anglerfish

38


Art & Literature

By Eefje Savelkoul What if The Nightmare Before Christmas and The Muppet Christmas Carol suddenly took place in the same universe? Well we would get Santa Jack Skellington trying to cheer up Muppet Tiny Tim with a possible terribly scary present!

39

The Anglerfish | Issue 11 Dec 2013


Art & Literature By David Pantoja Santa.

By Jacquelyn Files Sunshine.

Submit your art or writing to us at theanglerfishmagazine@gmail.com! It doesn’t have to be Nerdfighter related, share what you want to share.

By Kat Taylor Fishcakes.

Have you submitted something and it’s not in The Anglerfish? Don’t worry, we’re probably just saving it for a future issue.

Issue 11 Dec 2013 | The Anglerfish

40


Art & Literature By Jacquelyn Files Raindrops.

By Kat Taylor

A portrait of Voz.

By Kat Taylor

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The Anglerfish | Issue 11 Dec 2013


Art & Literature

By Kat Taylor Hogwarts.

Fight for the Good Things Crushing blows to the soul cripple the bones unable to run to fight to be free from this suffering chained in place exit nowhere to be seen deaf to the light cry because no one can hear you now lay there broken wallow in sadness and loneliness feel the betrayal the tears as they stream down your face

then Get Up

pull yourself up

gone are the days of being tucked into bed gone are the days of being protected from monsters under the bed

the good things in life are not a Right they are a Privilege for those willing to fight to step away to be strong

Accept the hurt and being burned and turn away for those secret, shared moments are not worth the cost of your soul

to be the phoenix shining above all that has caused pain

days are limited take the helping hand and be prepared

sunlight is coming for those that allow it to rise above the horizon

By Joie Ling

Issue 11 Dec 2013 | The Anglerfish

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The Anglerfish Magazine Issue #11 - December 2013  

In our ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY ISSUE, The Anglerfish tackles The Wonderful World of Disney. Inside you will find articles about working for Mic...

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