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Rebels are diamond ready Page 12

The Alumni

Colorado’s Authority for High School Academics, Activities and Athletics News

Volume I Edition V

In this issue ...

Established 2006

Wrestling for mat glory

Athlete of the Month Longmont High School senior Elizabeth Stover Page 11

Tyler Graff of Loveland, top, wrestles Tino Laureles of Rocky Mountain during their 130-pound Class 5A state championship match at the Pepsi Center on Feb. 23. Graff won his fourth consecutive state title, while Ponderosa took home the Class 5A team title. The Alumni/Jessica Vidal

Then and Now Wayne Manzanares

Teacher of the Month Silver Creek High School science teacher and boys basketball coach Bob Banning Page 8

In a career that spans four decades, Wayne Manzanares has seen it all. The former band teacher is now president of the Colorado Bandmasters Association and continues to pave the path for Colorado high school band participants. Read his story inside. Page 9


www.thealumninews.org

April ’08

Contents:

Academics......................................................................... CHSAA............................................................................... The Alumni Top 50........................................................... School of the Month......................................................... Students of the Month..................................................... Teacher of the Month....................................................... Then & Now...................................................................... Athletes of the Month....................................................... Baseball............................................................................ Skiing................................................................................. Wrestling............................................................................ Fitness............................................................................... Activities............................................................................ Swimming.......................................................................... Around the State..............................................................

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 16 17 18 19

From the Publisher

Dear readers, Staff members at The Alumni have attended many of this year’s tournaments and state championships and applaud all of the people involved for their great sportsmanship throughout these activities. Competition evokes many emotions, and we would like to give thanks to school administrators, athletic directors, coaches and teachers who have helped foster the practice of sportsmanship. Above all, we want to thank the student-athlete and student-activity participant, because only you can exhibit sportsmanship and other practices to better yourself not only as a participant but also as an individual. The staff at The Alumni wants to foster sportsmanship, and starting in May, The Alumni will publish tidbits of good sportsmanship practice. Let us know your ideas. Go to www.thealumninews.orgg and click Contact Us to send us your helpful examples of sportsmanship. Thank you,

We Are an Official Sponsor of

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Matthew A. Castilleja CEO/Publisher The Alumni News Agency/The Alumni

The Alumni Staff Publisher Matthew A. Castilleja Vice President of Operations Isaiah P. Castilleja Editor-in-Chief Don Cameron Copy Editor Ryan Russo Web site/Designer Joe Ybarra Staff Writers Kyle Garratt Joanna Gomez Matthew Green Scott Kaniewski Ryan Russo Renee Torres Photographers Summer Maid Jessica Vidal Accounting Margaret Cathey

Advertising Jeremy Bosunga Nick Perea Paul Spruce Distribution Rocky Madrid

Matthew Gurule, the Class 5A 103-pound champion, stands atop the podium next to runner-up Jared Rieck, left, of Coronado and third-place finisher Jeremy Robledo of Brighton. Elias Rosales of Lakewood finished fourth, Junior Romero of Denver East finished fifth and Jeremy Luna of Rocky Mountain finished sixth. The Alumni/Jessica Vidal

Contact Information General: 303-478-2952 Advertising: 720-276-1826 comments@thealumninews.org www.thealumninews.org

Sponsoring/ Advertising Would you like to be a corporate sponsor of The Alumni? Would you like to see your advertisement here? Contact our advertising department at 720-276-1826 or e-mail us for more information and rates at advertising@thealumninews.org. The Alumni is a product of The Alumni News Agency L.L.C. 12000 Zuni St., Ste. 1, Westminster, CO 80234

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Academics

April 2008

Advancing the Colo. cause Colorado sets national pace for success on AP exams BY JOANNAGOMEZ

University of Colorado

A

LMOST19 percent of public school graduates from the class of 2007 achieved an Advanced Placement Exam grade of 3 or higher a quantity that ranked well above the national average of 15.2 percent. The AP exam score is often predictive of college success. Colorado high schools led the nation with the greatest five-year increase in the number of students who achieved a score of 3 or higher. “These results demonstrate that Colorado students can and do perform at a very high level,” said Commissioner Dwight Jones. This represents a vast improvement since the class of 2002 graduated, with Colorado notching the fourthhighest gain in AP exam proficiency in the country. The College Board, the not-forprofit membership association that administers the AP program, released its third annual

Advanced Placement Report to the nation, indicating that students who participate in AP have significantly better college grades and college graduation rates than academically and economically similar students who did not take the demanding course and exams. “Educators, and administrators, deserve tremendous credit for enabling a wider segment of our nation’s youth than ever before to achieve success on an AP exam,” said College Board President Gaston Caperton. “But there is still work to be done in preparing under-represented

Colorado high schools — Peak to Peak is shown here — led the nation with the greatest five-year increase in the number of students who achieved an AP exam score of 3 or higher. The Alumni/Jessica Vidal

tunity. Schools need to start preparing students as early as middle school so they are equipped to take on the challenges of AP courses once they get to high school.” While AP exam success — earning a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam during high school — in Colorado has experiGASTONCAPERTON enced a rate of growth College Board president among both black and Hispanic students, overall participation students to succeed on these in the AP exam has increased challenging courses that open by more than 10 percent in the the door to college and oppor- last year.

Educators, and “ administrators, deserve

tremendous credit for enabling a wider segment of our nation’s youth than ever before to achieve success on an AP exam.”

Your school Your stories Published here

Of the estimated 13,765 Colorado students who graduated from public high schools in 2007, an average of 8,574 students earned a 3 or higher on at least one AP exam. Jo O’Brien, assistant commissioner of standards and results for the Colorado Department of Education, attributed the positive development to the “increased mind-set among school districts and principals to encourage students to tackle the rigors of Advanced Placement classes.” O’Brien also noted the statewide efforts of the College in Colorado campaign, which has encouraged students to set

high expectations. With 75 percent of U.S. high school graduates heading to college, college is becoming more accessible. But high college dropout rates and the fact that about half of college freshmen are taking at least one remedial course show that secondary schools need to do more than just help students gain admission to college. “If we are to succeed in democratizing what really matters — completion of a college degree — the gap between high school graduation standards and freshman college course requirements must be eliminated,” said Caperton.

The Alumni $1,500 Colorado High School Student Journalism Award

Be your school’s correspondent Apply now for 2008-09

Contact The Alumni at 720-276-1826 or e-mail us at comments@thealumninews.org for applications, rules and more information

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CHSAA

GET TO KNOW: Steve Espinoza Last month, The Alumni chatted with newly appointed CHSAA Assistant Commissioner Steve Espinoza. Here are some highlights: PROFILE Name: Steve R. Espinoza Administration: Colorado High School Activities Association Title: Assistant commissioner Education: Montezuma-Cortez class of 1969; Colorado State University, B.S. 1974; University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, master’s 1990 Tenure: Taught for 31 years in El Paso County School District No. 11 Notable organizations: Colorado Athletic Directors Association, National Interscholastic Athletic Administration Association and Colorado High School Activities Association Awards: 2000 CHSAA Distinguished Service Award, 2001 5A Athletic Director of the Year Family: Donnie Vee (wife), Erin Maria (daughter) and Michael (son)

CHSAACALENDAR March 19 •Speech scheduling committee meeting 9 a.m. •Basketball committee meeting 9:30 a.m. March 20 •Budget/property administration committee meeting 9:30 a.m. March 21 •Spring break CHSAA office closed March 30 • Second semester spring sports eligibility lists due March 31-April 25 •Large group musical festivals April 7 •CASSA/CHSAA committee meeting Noon

Steve Espinoza began his tour as CHSAA assistant commissioner on Jan. 16.

Q Q Q Q

What was the motivating factor for joining CHSAA?

A

I thought my expertise was with CHSAA. I love kids, I love sports and I love “extracurricular activities. It’s just something about seeing kids compete at a high level and I really enjoy the aspect of the educational process.”

How do you like being an assistant commissioner so far?

A

interesting. There are a lot of behind-the-scenes type of things that “go Itonis—verycoordinating hundreds of volunteers, setting up state championship events, updating score clocks and organizing the workers. People do not see the amount of work and the time spent to do these things.”

How important is the participation of the student-athlete?

A

I am a very strong advocate of the student-athlete. Having ownership in your “school doesn’t mean that you have to participate in athletics — it can be other activities too, such as theater and debate. The more a student can get involved the more success they are going to have in school and beyond.”

What advice do you have for the Colorado high school community?

A

Support your athletes, support your team and support your school. High “school is a time of great learning experiences where kids and coaches learn to

deal with adversity, stress, winning and being the runner-up. That is what makes this time so special.”

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April 8 •Gymnastics draw 11:30 a.m. April 9 •Spring academic team nominations due April 10 •Board of control meeting — Radisson SE 8:30 a.m. April 15 •Vision committee meeting 11:30 a.m. April 16 •Football draw 8:30 a.m.


Top 50

April 2008

Mustangs make their move Ralston Valley soars up the rankings to the No. 2 position with strong performances in basketball, swimming and wrestling. Peak to Peak debuts in the top 25 at No. 8 with stellar effort in the classroom. Rank

Last Month

1

1

School

Comments Cherry Creek

The Bruins took home their fourth consecutive Class 5A state swimming championship last month at the EPIC center in Fort Collins.

RANKINGSCRITERIA

The Knights finished runner-up to the Bruins yet again at the state championships but still had a strong year.

1. Academics 2. Activities 3. Athletics 4. Community service 5. Sportsmanship

Grandview

The Wolves fell out of the top three for the first time this year but had a strong showing at the state wrestling championships placing third in team standings with two first-place finishes.

*Every high school is eligible for the Top 50

5

Broomfield

What a year for the Eagles in boys and girls basketball. Girls took home the Class 4A state title, defeating Silver Creek 50-34.

6

6

Mullen

7

8

Boulder

8

N/A

9

9

Legacy

10

10

Loveland

11

11

Highlands Ranch

2

4

Ralston Valley

3

3

Fairview

4

2

5

Peak to Peak

The Mustangs won their second consecutive Class 4A state swimming championship and the school’s ice hockey team had a great run at state but fell short again in the semifinals, losing to Battle Mountain 2-0.

Girls soccer hopes to match the season it had last year with another state title.

The Panthers finished fourth at the state swimming championships and slowly continue to inch their way up the rankings. The Pumas are required to accumulate 100 hours of community service before graduation. The school scored an EXCELLENT rating on the SAR’s and had four firstplace finishes at the state speech festival. The Lightning finished sixth at the state wrestling championships.

Tyler Graff won his fourth consecutive state wrestling title at 130-pounds and the Indians finished second in team standings behind Ponderosa. The Falcons rolled to their third consecutive Class 5A girls state basketball title, defeating Regis 58-54. The girls basketball team finished with a 19-1 record. The Tigers’ only loss in the regular season was to Faith Christian at home, but they redeemed themselves with a 38-33 win over Faith in the Class 3A state title game.

12

12

Holy Family

13

17

Eads

The Eagles had a strong season in boys and girls basketball. Girls took home the Class 1A state title, defeating Briggsdale 59-37.

14

14

Faith Christian

The Eagles boys basketball team defeated CSCS in the Class 3A state title game 54-42. The girls basketball team finished ahead of Holy Family in the Class 3A Metro League with a league record of 9-0.

15

15

Monarch

16

7

Bear Creek

17

13

Douglas County

18

18

CSCS

19

25

Eaton

20

16

Columbine

On Saturday, May 12, at 8 a.m. at Clement Park, the Rebels will conduct the Run for Remembrance. Proceeds will help fund memorial scholarships and The Heart of Columbine Emergency Fund.

21

23

Berthoud

Girls basketball had a great season but lost to Moffat County 61-38 in the second round of the Class 4A state tournament.

22

22

Cherokee Trail

In 2007, 95 percent of the school’s graduates went to a four-year university or college.

The Bears fall out of the top 10 for the first time this year.

Huskie International Baccalaureate Scholars have received $3.5 million in scholarship funding. Coach Guhl led her Lady Lions to the final four in the Class 3A state basketball tournament. The Reds had a school accountability rating of HIGH. 100 percent of the teachers at Eaton teach in the subject in which they received their degree.

The Cougars have a graduation rate of 91.2 percent and a dropout rate of 1.4 percent.

The Raptors have quitely put together a solid year and break into the top 25 for the first time this year.

23

31

Eaglecrest

24

20

Merino

Student attendance rose from 93.2 percent in 2005-06 to 96.7 percent in 2006-07 with no dropouts.

25

34

Regis Jesuit

The Raiders won the state championship in ice hockey with a 3-2 OT win over Battle Mountain and swimming finished third in Fort Collins at the state championships.

Go online at www.thealumninews.org and tell us why your school should be on the list. Rankings are determined by the staff at The Alumni along with academic information and statistics from the Colorado Department of Education and the help from our partners at the Colorado High School Activities Association (CHSAA) with state records and statistics.

... THE NEXT25 26. Kent Denver 27. Akron 28. Erie 29. Niwot 30. Air Academy 31. Longmont 32. Cheyenne Mountain 33. Lewis-Palmer 34. Ponderosa 35. Centaurus 36. The Vangaurd 37. Alamosa 38. The Classical Academy 39. D’Evelyn 40. James Irwin Charter 41. Pueblo Tech 42. Denver East 43. Chatfield 44. Simla 45. Arapahoe 46. Denver Christian 47. Battle Mountain 48. McClave 49. Flagler 50. Fort Collins

DIDYOUKNOW? Kyle Sand of Arvada West High School (2001-04) holds the all-time winning percentage in wrestling in the state of Colorado with a career record of 125-0 (1.000). For more information, go to www.chsaa.org

THEALUMNI/5


School

April 2008

OF THE

Month

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Peak to Peak pushes to elevate Charter school Pumas prove that character counts

are part of a K-12 community driven by strong character — a trait so important to the school’s mission that reminders of character are plastered on the school’s walls. School officials also point to the involvement of parents BY RENEETORRES as a vital part of the success. The Alumni “We have parents that get involved,” said Athletic Director Peter Chandler. “I think it is about being in the CHOOLS are evolving. trenches daily and using comCompiling vast amounts of data, being mon sense as administrators, teachers and parents.” accountable More than ever, and focusing on high schools are takdetails have shaped ing a look at the vast the way high school amounts of data at their administrators apdisposal, and they are proach kids today. deciphering how to use Peak to Peak High the information to their School, a Class 3A Kyle Mathews advantage. charter school in “We are data driven Lafayette, has emPeak to Peak High School is an innovative K-12 charter school in Lafayette. The Alumni/Renee Torres today. We know braced the changing to experiment, so let’s find what works and what of the times and has school career. and athletic events. He has out what you are passionate doesn’t,” Mathews benefited from these “By the time they are in implemented a rule to cheer about, and I think we do that said. “For example, methods exponen10th grade, we expect them for your team and not against very well here,” Mathews statistics show that if tially. to lead tours, we expect them your opponent. said. kids are involved in When the Coloto deliver some of our open “As the athletic director, The charter school requires activities and athletics, rado Department of enrollment messages. That I’m not trying to restrain our students to log 100 hours of then they are probably Education released is part of the expectation,” kids to the point where they going to do well the School Account- Peter Chandler are not having fun at academically and ability Reports in games,” Chandler said, probably have December, Peak to “but it is difficult when better self-perception Peak administrators were not spectators and athletes at surprised by the excellent rat- and better relationships the professional level bewith other kids.” ing the school received — in have the way they do and School officials use fact, they were expecting it. it just filters down. It is School: Peak to Peak High School data and new philoso“We have families in the hard for high school kids Location: 800 Merlin Drive, Lafayette phies toward kids when county that from the get-go not to emulate that kind Mascot: Pumas are thinking about where their finding out where they of spectatorship. We just kids are going to go to college excel and what passions want our kids to cheer for Colors: Royal blue, black and white they have. and they are thinking about their team.” Classification: 3A “More is not better how good their kids can posMathews and Chandler now. Colleges know sibly be,” said Peak to Peak want to cater to what moDistrict: Boulder Valley School District RE #2 that, we know that and Principal Kyle Mathews. tivates each student rather League: Metropolitan when I talk to a kid that Only 36 high schools in than having to follow one is going to take three or Colorado received a rating of blueprint. Enrollment: 480 more advanced-placeexcellent, and of those, five “I can remember [ExPrincipal: Kyle Mathews ment classes, I say, were located in the Boulder ecutive Principal] Tony ‘Don’t do it.’ Instead Valley School District. Fontana pushing to have Athletic director: Peter Chandler I ask, ‘What are you “I’m not that surprised by all of our teachers in Rival: Holy Family doing for athletics and the performance of our kids the halls during passing what are you doing for at the school,” Mathews said. periods,” Chandler said. fun?’ Colleges want to “When you create a great “And once our teachers see that kids are good program, kids who are really started to do this, you community service starting heady, really smart and really at fewer things and can show Mathews said. could see a difference in the their freshman year. School more depth in a couple difdriven are probably driven Chandler wants his stukids. It is some of these small administrators want students ferent areas rather than bein more than one particular dents to be accountable for things that you think don’t to take initiative and show ac- their actions while attending a mile wide and an inch area.” have a big impact, but they countability early in their high ing extracurricular activities deep. There is plenty of time The Pumas of Peak to Peak do.”

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Students

April 2008

OF THE

Month

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Zane Harker

Kate Hopkins

Student council VP seizes opportunity

Senior ramps up for Ivy League

BY RENEETORRES The Alumni

S

PROFILE Name: Zane Harker School: Peak to Peak High School Grade: Senior GPA: 4.0 Activities: Student council vice president, concert choir and NHS

OME kids change schools and struggle, while others accept change and thrive in unfamiliar settings. After transferring from a public school to the charter school Peak to Peak, Zane Harker has capitalized on a setting with smaller class sizes and more one-on-one interaction with teachers. “I came [to Peak to Peak] from a bigger public middle school in seventh grade and I didn’t like [public school] as much,” Harker said. “I felt it wasn’t as challenging and it was hard for me to interface with my teachers because I ask questions like, ‘Why is this how it is,’ instead of accepting things the way they are.” Harker explained that his first year was difficult because of the transition between school districts and the change of curriculums, but he soon realized the difference in his progress. “Being here in middle school definitely prepares you for being here in high school. We have a challenging curriculum,” Harker said. “You get the cool community opportunities, too. When I was a freshman, one of my best friends and I got to tutor a fifth-grade math class, and that is easy to do here because all you have to do is walk over to one of the other buildings.” The senior has maintained a 4.0 grade-point average and is the student council vice president. Harker also is a member of the National Honor Society, concert choir and chamber choir and stars as Captain Von Trapp in the school’s production of The Sound of Music. “I have had opportunities to try a lot of things,” he said. “At a public school, you tend to get locked in at doing one thing and that’s it. Whereas here, you can be in track, musicals and speech and debate. People really know you and it is encouraged to take advantage of these opportunities.” After graduation, he plans on attending either Brigham Young University or Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, with a two-year religious mission after his first year in college. “We have three teachers at Peak to Peak who are alumni of Swarthmore and they all are very interesting, multidimensional and diverse people,” Harker said. Swarthmore appeals to Harker because, like Peak to Peak, it offers a challenge in a small setting. “Since we have smaller, more intimate classes, there are opportunities for all kinds of leadership roles,” Harker said, “and you need people to fill all those roles. I think Swarthmore will provide much of the same.”

a public school, you tend to get locked “in Atat doing one thing and that’s it. Whereas here, you can be in track, musicals and speech and debate.”

ZANEHARKER

Peak to Peak High School senior

BY RENEETORRES The Alumni

S

PROFILE Name: Kate Hopkins School: Peak to Peak High School Grade: Senior GPA: 3.97 Activities: Student council president, speech and debate captain and cross-country

OPHOMORE year. Second semester. Math. Every student can remember a class where she should have done better. Kate Hopkins remembers her sophomore math class well because it’s the only class in which the Peak I had to read it a to Peak senior has received a grade lower than an A. couple of times to “It’s one of those things where make sure that is I did poorly on the final,” Hopwhat it said. I called kins said. my mom crying and Since her sophomore year, Hopkins has maintained a 3.97 she didn’t know grade-point average. This fall, whether that was she’ll head to Yale University in yes or no. And then New Haven, Conn., where she I called my dad and plans on studying biomedical engineering or economics. he asked to make Hopkins said it was an incredsure that it wasn’t a ible feeling when she found out mistake.” she had been accepted, especialKATEHOPKINS ly because the acceptance rate On being accepted to Yale for Yale is so low. “I had been checking online all day and finally, during seventh period, I was notified that I had been admitted,” Hopkins recalled. “I had to read it a couple of times to make sure that is what it said. I called my mom crying and she didn’t know whether that was yes or no. And then I called my dad and he asked to make sure that it wasn’t a mistake.” What interested Hopkins about Yale was that unlike most other schools, the professors at Yale, not teaching assistants, teach the undergraduate classes. The senior attributes her success to the curriculum at Peak to Peak. She said the charter school is just big enough to offer advanced-placement classes, but not too big so size classes are overfilled. “I think that if I had gone to a bigger school I probably wouldn’t have been able to be involved as much, which would have limited what I had been able to try,” she said. “I would have been too intimidated to try out for cross-country. Most importantly, I wouldn’t have been offered the advanced-placement classes that have helped me with my college ambitions.” Hopkins competed for the school’s cross-country team that finished runner-up to the Classical Academy at the Class 3A state championships last fall at the El Pomar Sports Complex in Colorado Springs. “I used to ski race outside of school and DIDYOUKNOW? my dad said I should give cross-country a try. I thought it would be good trainOf the 21,101 students ing, and it turns out that I wasn’t bad at who applied for it,” Hopkins said. acceptance at Yale Until Hopkins graduates and moves in 2006-07, on to New Haven, she will continue her only 9 percent duties as president of the school’s stuwere accepted. dent council, a captain of speech and debate, and a member of the National Honor Society.

THEALUMNI/7


Teacher

April 2008

OF THE

Month

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Silver lining, on and off the court showed me “theHesubtleties of

Silver Creek’s Banning excels as teacher, coach and role model

being a great player, the importance of weight room work ethic and the concept of team being family. You feel if you don’t work hard you are letting him down and the program down.”

BY RYANRUSSO The Alumni

H

AVE you ever had a teacher who brought the competitive nature of the basketball court to your biology classroom? Since 1981, students who have attended the many classes taught by Bob Banning in the St. Vrain Valley School District have excelled in an environment that brings the intensity of an overtime basketball game to an honors science class cat dissection. Banning, Silver Creek High School’s head boys basketball coach, is also the head of the school’s science department. “The fact that I wear the label as head basketball coach I see as an allure for some students — that you don’t have to be the best basketball player in the school for me to care about your future as a student and as a human being,” Banning said. The evolution of Banning began at Aurora-Hinkley High School, where he excelled at track and basketball. He went on to Colorado State University, running track for the Rams. Banning realized quickly that if he was to be competitive in college, he would have to increase his distance from the half-mile to the mile. “I knew after the first two weeks of practice that if I wanted to do this, I would really have to love to do it,” Banning said. “Those guys are just animals, especially at that level.” When his interest in track dwindled, Banning remembers interrupting a high school basketball practice behind his apartment. “I had jumped the fence from where I was living and asked the head coach if I

8/THEALUMNI

MATTMERRIOTT

Former player and assistant

Silver Creek science teacher Bob Banning tutors students David Pond (center) and Daniel Brunelle (right). Banning is also the school’s head boys basketball coach. The Alumni/Jessica Vidal

PROFILE...................................................................Bob Banning School: Silver Creek High School Title: Biology teacher and head boys basketball coach Mentors: His parents, Angie (wife), Lindsay and Kendall (two kids), Bob Caviness and Frosty Castilleja Did you know? Banning led Niwot High School to the 1992-93 boys basketball championship could help out,” Banning said. “I loved basketball so much that I would go to school during the day and then go to practice at Poudre High School at night.” Poudre head coach Edd Telez asked Banning what he was majoring in at Colorado State. Banning replied, “Forestry.” Telez said, “You’re a teacher.” Banning went to Telez’s classroom, where Telez introduced him to a science teacher who gave him the opportunity to teach a lesson. “After that I changed my major,” Banning said. He began his teaching career at Niwot High School, where he taught from 198197. At Niwot, Banning coached tennis and track and

won a state championship in basketball in 1992-93. After 17 years at Niwot, the tenacious teacher and coach needed a change of venue. “Although Niwot was a great school, with great students and great teachers, I knew if I had stayed there, that is where I would have ended up,” Banning said. Banning accepted a teaching position at Skyline High School and coached girls basketball. It was a coaching position very unfamiliar to Banning. “I thought if I was a true teacher I would need to give coaching girls a shot too,” Banning said. As a testament to Banning’s coaching skill, his girls team won league his last year there and after he left, they won

state the following year. In 2001-02, intrigued by the opportunity to join a startup school, Banning headed to Silver Creek, where he remains today. “I feel like a dinosaur,” Banning said. Being in the building is a big advantage. I’m not sure if it equates to wins and losses on the floor, but it does equate to wins and losses in life. I think it is so important that students see you as an educator and a teacher first.” Matt Merriott, a former basketball player under Banning, said Banning is so successful because he makes everyone accountable. “He showed me the subtleties of being a great player, the importance of weight room work ethic and

the concept of team being family,” Merriott said. “You feel if you don’t work hard you are letting him down and the program down.” Silver Creek Athletic Director Phil Borchelt credits Banning with helping give the school identity once the basketball program started to have success. “Bob’s basketball program is the first to break out of mediocrity and set the bar high for our school,” Borchelt said. “As a teacher he is very tough but very fair, and he requires his kids to work a lot. But they always end up enjoying his classes.” Behind the coach, the teacher and the man, Banning said his wife, Angie, and his two kids, Lindsay and Kendall, are his biggest accomplishments. “My family has made me who I am today,” Banning said. Whether in the classroom or on the court, Banning said you never know whose life you are going to touch. “I was at Disney World having dinner,” he said. “And when dinner was over, the waitress came over and said, ‘Your tab has been picked up,’ and I asked by who, and she said, ‘A former student of yours. They just want to say thank you.’ And till this day I have no idea who had bought my dinner for me.”


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Then & Now

Colorado’s music man Manzanares brings state’s marching bands to the biggest stages BY KYLEGARRATT The Alumni

D

O you ever watch the halftime show of a football game and wonder how all the members work together? Maybe you wonder how The Ohio State University spells the word “Ohio” with moving people or how University of Tennessee students form a large “T.” For the past 30-plus years, displays such as these have been achieved by high school marching bands through the help of Wayne Manzanares, chairman of marching affairs for the Colorado Bandmasters Association. Manzanares coordinates all the marching contests in Colorado, including the state championship. He was headed toward this position almost his entire life. “I told my dad when I was in fourth grade that I wanted to be a band director and he didn’t believe me,” Manzanares says. “He said, ‘Oh yeah, here’s a fourth-grader just talking.’ ” But Manzanares’ father bought him a trumpet, one of about 20 instruments he plays. Manzanares claims to play six instruments well. He’s played drums and bass guitar in bands and has recently taken up the mandolin. During his sophomore year at Centennial High School, he was taking music more seriously than most. “About halfway through high school, I realized that if I was going to be a band director and I was going to get prepared for college, I could not go to that high school. They had a very small band program,” Manzanares says. So he enrolled at the private Holy Cross Abbey School in Canon City for his final two years of high school. He went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in band and choral studies and a master’s in music theory from Adams State in Alamosa. Manzanares says his college education taught him to play his main instrument, the trumpet, very well, all the other marching band instru-

Then: Wayne Manzanares started working with high school bands in 1971. You’re teaching jazz band, ments well and some music a big-time program and young you’re teaching concert band, band director like me, I might theory, none of which prehave bombed out.” pared him entirely for his first you’re teaching marching band, you’re the director of job as band director of DougHalfway through his 12the orchestra for the musical. las County High School. year tenure at Douglas Coun“I was ty, Manzanares really was nervous, heading really young, the largest band but I in Cololearned with the WAYNEMANZANARES rado high schools. kids. Chairman of marching affairs for the Colorado Bandmasters Association It was The band Then there’s the band boosthe took over had 39 mema weak band and a weak ing organization, the financial bers, and when he left it had band director, but we grew side where you’re fundraisup together and got to be 280, or about a third of the ing and all of those hats that school’s student body. The a pretty good-sized band,”

I told my dad when I was in fourth grade “ that I wanted to be a band director and he

didn’t believe me. He said, ‘Oh yeah, here’s a fourth-grader just talking.’ ”

Now: Manzanares has helped boost recruiting, judging and fundraising. Manzanares says. “It really defined what I was at a later date because I learned so much. There’s so much to know as a band director.

you wear that you don’t learn anything about in school. Because the program was so young, it was good for me to learn with them. If it had been

average high school band makes up about 8 percent of the student body, according to Manzanares. The culmination of this tenure was when

Douglas County was invited to perform in front of 1.6 million people at the Tournament of Roses Parade in 1981. After transforming the Douglas County program, Manzanares went on to Ponderosa High School, where he won six state championships in eight years. It took 20 years of 14-hour days for Manzanares to build a program out of nothing, create a dynasty, influence hundreds of kids and lose plenty of his hearing before he called it quits to take over as band director at Castle Rock Elementary School, in favor of shorter days and less-damaged eardrums. He also took a position as the assistant entertainment director for the Denver Broncos, planning halftime shows using high school and college marching bands as well as booking acts to perform the national anthem. In 1991, he started his duties as chairman of the Colorado Bandmasters Association, serving as the self-described founding father of unifying and better funding marching bands around the state. He retired from Castle Rock in 2001. “What I like most is paying back the organization for the opportunity that I had when I was a high school band director,” Manzanares says. “I went to state championships and when I went there, the events were very well-organized and I was a recipient of that organization. Somebody did that job for me and now it’s my turn to provide the same thing.” When Manzanares started working with high school bands in 1971, there was no uniform manner of judging competitions and several private organizations ran competitions. Now there is one way to judge competitions, the state championships are held at Invesco Field at Mile High and revenue for marching band events is up 600 percent since Manzanares joined the Bandmasters Association. “Standing in front of a band and conducting a concert is an empowerment that you can’t believe,” Manzanares says. “When you’re on stage, you don’t worry about what’s wrong, you just worry about what’s right.”

THEALUMNI/9


Athlete

April 2008

OF THE

Month

Sponsored by

Wingman

Grout rebounds from title-match loss Northglenn junior finds motivation for 2009 BY KYLEGARRATT The Alumni

I

T was right there, seemingly for the taking. Phillip Grout, the defending 112pound state champion and a junior at Northglenn High School, headed into overtime of the state title match at the Pepsi Center against an opponent he thought he could beat. When the mats cleared there was no title defense as Grandview High School’s Eric Wilson claimed this year’s crown after a 2-0 victory over Grout. Grout was the second state champ Wilson defeated in the tournament after pinning Jeremy Schmitt of Rocky Mountain High School, the 2005-06 champ, in the semifinals. The loss was tough to take for Grout, who had been ranked as 5A’s top 112-pounder for the entire season. “I couldn’t believe it because going into the match I thought that I could control [Wilson],” Grout said. “It was just disbelief after I lost.” Grout, Schmitt and Wilson were ranked in the top three of their weight class for much of the year, so the depth and difficulty of this group was no secret. “You always get nervous for a kid that knocks off a returning state champion in a semifinal match,” Brian Hufford, Northglenn head coach, said of Wilson. “A lot of times in the state tournament, not necessarily the best wrestler wins state, it’s who had the best tournament.

PROFILE Name: Phillip Grout School: Northglenn High School Grade: Junior GPA: 3.30 Sports: Baseball and wrestling Years lettered: Three Date of birth: Jan. 8, 1991

best characteristic. I told him after the match I was more proud of him then than when he won the state title because he handles losing with such maturity. It’s really neat to see as a coach.” Next year, if Grout duplicates his win total from this year he will own the record for most victories in a career for a Colorado wrestler, set this year by Tyler Graff of Loveland with 162. “I’ll be surprised if he doesn’t come back and go undefeated as a senior,” Hufford said. “I think he has a chip on his shoulder right now.” Grout still feels what his most recent loss left on his shoulder and it just might end up costing his future competition. “It’s still getting at me today,” Grout said. “It will motivate me a lot in the next season for sure.” Grout’s motivation will take a pit stop in Virginia for a national tournament this month. He took fifth place at the event last year and hopes to place in the top three this year. The sting of the state title loss might linger a little longer, but little else from the contest will. “I think he just had an off match. I think he just needs to work hard, continue to grow as a wrestler,” Hufford said. “You can’t change BRIANHUFFORD everything you’ve been doing, which Northglenn head coach has brought him a ton of success, over the loss of one match.” Only 13 Colorado high school before capturing the title last year. wrestlers have won more matches in He broke his own school record for a season than Grout did this year, but victories in a season of 40 after going there’s something more impressive 44-2 this year and set the school about Grout than all those wins. record for career victories with 120 “What I like about Phillip is every after only three seasons. Even with time his character shows, it’s always these lofty standards, Hufford didn’t a good thing,” Hufford said. “He react with disappointment when Grout deals with things really well and takes failed to bring home a second straight them in stride. I guess that’s why state title. he’s successful. Everything he does “My ultimate reaction was concern is because of that attitude where he’s for Phillip,” Hufford said. “He always going to find a way to get around impresses me with the way he handles it and doesn’t make excuses for defeat. I think that’s probably his himself.”

My ultimate reaction was concern for Phillip. “ He always impresses me with the way he handles defeat. I think that is his best characteristic.”

“I think you could ask eight coaches if their kid’s the best wrestler and I hope that each coach has that confidence in their kid. I’ve worked with Phillip for three years and he’s an incredible athlete. I’d be lying if I didn’t say I thought he was the best wrestler in the state in that weight. Certainly every coach thinks his kid’s the best and I hope that the top eight kids in the state think that.” Grout provided plenty in the way of expectations after taking third place in the state tournament as a freshman

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Athlete

April 2008

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Elizabeth Stover: Shooting for lucky 13

Pole vaulter has clear goal for 2008, and beyond

PROFILE Name: Elizabeth Stover School: Longmont High School Grade: Senior GPA: 4.0 Sport: Track and field Years lettered: Four Date of birth: Oct. 2, 1990

BY JOANNAGOMEZ University of Colorado

F

OR the past four years, Elizabeth Stover has managed to routinely place among the top pole vaulters in the state. Stover, who set Class 4A state records last season as a Longmont High School junior, has more on her high school to-do list before taking her talents to Purdue. “It was surreal when I first found out I broke a state record. I was the underdog coming out. It definitely took a couple weeks for it to sink in that I broke a state record,” Stover said. A year ago, Stover eclipsed 12 feet for a record-breaking win in the pole vault in the Re-1J championship, making her a two-time defending 4A state champion and giving her a ranking of No. 24 in the nation. Stover knows that the journey to winning and breaking state records could not have been accomplished without her coach, Warren Franz. “It’s great having a coach that I can learn so much from and who believes in me enough to keep pushing and motivating me to get to the next level,” Stover said. “This year Elizabeth is taking on a little bit of a different role,” Franz said. “She took a leadership role last year as a junior, but this year as a senior she really needs to step up and help the younger athletes so that there will be a pole-vault legacy after she is gone. We have some good female pole vaulters coming up the ranks, and Elizabeth is a good mentor to look up to.” “I think it’s really just a great thing for girl pole vaulters in Colorado to be breaking records, because pole vaulting for women is still a pretty new sport, so it’s pretty cool to be one of the top girl pole vaulters in the nation,” Stover added. “Me and some of the others have started a legacy and I want to leave having taught the younger girls. I want them to have as many resources as possible so they can go on and create their own legacy”

DIDYOUKNOW? Longmont High School students scored a 3 or higher on 60 percent of their Advanced Placement tests.

It was surreal when I first found out I broke a “ state record. I was the underdog coming out. It

definitely took a couple of weeks for it to sink in that I broke a state record.” ELIZABETHSTOVER

Longmont pole vaulter When Stover began her high school track and field career in 2004, she knew little about pole vaulting. “Track I had casually done in middle school and they didn’t have pole vaulting, so I just did jumping and hurdles and stuff,” she said. “As a freshman, I had a friend who was a gymnast and she pole vaulted, so she kind of talked me into it, and now I love it.” Stover has signed a letter of intent to compete in pole vault at Purdue

University next year, and she hopes to compete in the 2012 Olympic Games. “I really just thought that Purdue was the best decision for me,” Stover said. “I love their engineering program and the pole-vaulting program is really strong too. I think it fits me good and I am really excited for the future and the goals that I want to accomplish.” It’s been a fun experience, and one of hard work. “I’ve had to work and train really hard to get to this point,”

Stover said. “It can be time consuming and doing drills is never easy, but it’s fun and I enjoy doing it because I know it’s making me improve and making me better each time I do it.” “Elizabeth is a hard worker, and in the end it pays off, because she is constantly taking it to the next level,” Franz said. Stover is one of the best prep vaulters in the country and is favored to win the 4A title again. Her next goal is to break the 13-foot mark. “I just want to get out there and get to where I was last year. And hopefully get there quicker than I did the year before,” Stover said. “So I hope to be jumping at 13 feet again and then at the end of the season see how much higher I can get. I can’t wait to get out there and do my personal best. I think that is all anyone can ask for.”

Would you like to be a correspondent for your school? You could win $1,500 Contact us at comments@thealumninews.org for details

THEALUMNI/11


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Baseball

Rebels rarin’ for diamond dominance while hitting .493. In the infield with Cunningham is shortstop Jeff Cicchinelli, who hit .449 last year BY SCOTTKANIEWSKI and scored 33 runs. “He does The Alumni everything for us,” Columbine coach Chuck Gillman said. “We call him little Ty Cobb.” WO years removed Cicchinelli is excited about from a state championship, the Columbine the season. “I like our pitching this year,” he said. “We High School baseball don’t have one dominant team may be on its way back pitcher. We have five strong for another one. guys. All will win us some Last year, the Rebels games.” reached the semifinals, comThe experience of the team ing up one game short of a also has Cicchinelli excited. return to the title game. This season, the Rebels return sev- “Our whole infield is back,” Cicchinelli said. “We’re all en starting seniors, including seniors. We have two of our their entire infield. three outfielders back. It’s going to help us a lot.” Those seniors saw their season come to an end last year at the hands of Wheat Ridge. The Farmers defeated the Rebels 8-5 in the elimination game. “It’s a big hurt losing [Gillman],” Cicchinelli BRETTWEIBEL said. “Besides Rebels second baseman that, we’re pretty strong.” Cicchinelli’s That experience and leader- double-play partner, second baseman Brett Weibel, was as ship could lead to a deep run excited as Cicchinelli. in the state playoffs. Colum“Two years ago, we had a bine was slated to kick off its season March 6 at Northglenn lot of seniors when we won state,” Weibel High School. said. “It’s a lot of Columbine, which plays in fun. I know the the Jeffco League in Class potential of this 5A, will be without fourteam, and we can year catcher C.J. Gillman. do as well as that Gillman, who graduated last season.” spring, hit .390 and drove in With such a 27 runs last season, second strong program, most on the team. RBI leader and first baseman Curtis Cun- the Rebels get good work ningham is back for his senior throughout the season, buildseason. Cunningham drove in ing for playoffs. “Being a top team in the 35 runs and belted 10 homers

Senior-laden Columbine packs an offensive punch

T

Two years ago, “ we had a lot of

seniors when we won state. It’s a lot of fun. I know the potential of this team, and we can do as well as that season.”

After just missing the title game last season, the Rebels return seven starting seniors, including their entire infield. The Alumni photos/Jessica Vidal

state, we get everyone’s A game,” Weibel said. “It prepares us for playoffs and the state tournament competition. As long as we play our game and take care of business, we’ll win a lot games this year.” Weibel admittedly struggled at the plate last season, but is optimistic for 2008. “I have a lot higher expectations and confidence,” Weibel said. “I was a little overwhelmed last season starting, pushing too much. I feel like I fit in better at the plate.” Not only are the seniors familiar with each other on the field, but also Weibel said the team is a close-knit bunch. He and Cicchinelli have played together for 12 years, going back to Little League. They’re also best friends. Third baseman/right fielder Morgan Blatnik agreed with

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Experience and cohesiveness might help the Rebels forget their 8-5 loss to Wheat Ridge in last season’s state tournament. Weibel. “We’re all friends,” Blatnik said. “We hang out a lot.” Blatnik said the team’s strength is at the plate. “Our offense is going to be great,” Blatnik said. “We have a lot of great hitters. Our offense will really stand out.” Last season, Blatnik hit .286. For the most part, he’ll play right field, except when Kyler Brady, the everyday third baseman, takes the

mound. The players said the toughest competition will come from defending champion Rocky Mountain and league opponent Dakota Ridge. Blatnik said the team has the ability to match that championship team of two years ago. “I think we have the potential,” Blatnik said. “It’ll be a hard road. This team has got the potential and great work ethic.”


April 2008

Skiing

CHSAA State Skiing Championships — Feb. 21-22 — Steamboat Springs, Colo.

Summit takes two team titles Chris Woods finishes as state’s top-ranked skier

O

N Feb. 21-22 in Steamboat Springs, high school skiers competed in the CHSAA state skiing championships. The Summit High School Tigers took home titles in the boys and girls competitions. After the state championships, the nordic 2007-08 allstate teams were released. Chris Woods of Vail Mountain High School finished the season as the state’s top-ranked skier and was followed by Tyler Reinking (Summit), Sean Woods (Vail Mountain) Whit Parker (Aspen) and Tony Ryerson (Vail Mountain).

Staff report

Boys Team Results

Girls Team Results FreeStyle

Total Points

159

159

643

165

154

160 624

146

154

162

156

618

Vail Mountain

127

154

127

158

566

5

Nederland

115

129 113.5

128 485.5

451

6

Battle Mountain

170

71

174

33

438

7

Lake County

70

140

63

135 408

104

104 395

8

Evergreen

135

65

115.5

67 382.5

154

0

146 300

9

Middle Park

88

128

32

127

375

0

122

37

134

293

10

Eagle Valley

114

67

115

69

365

Vail Christian

47

77

36

78

238

11

Colo. Rocky Mtn.

78

61

78

63

280

12

Clear Creek

33

29

64

28

154

12

Clear Creek

73

61

74

65

273

13

Platte Canyon

70

0

66

0

136

13

Vail Christian

28

95

0

104 227

14

Ridgeview

0

31

0

59

90

14

Platte Canyon

27

0

85

15

Colo. Rocky Mtn.

43

0

41

0

84

Giant Slalom Classic Slalom

FreeStyle

Total Points

Giant Slalom Classic Slalom

Place

High School

160 650

1

Summit

163

162

139

176

616

2

Aspen

145

144

156

141

603

3

Steamboat Spgs.

137

165

140

149

591

4

Nederland

147

118

150

119

534

6

Evergreen

158

68

154

71

7

Battle Mountain

130

78

143

87

8

Eagle Valley

72

115

9

Lake County

0

10

Middle Park

11

Place

High School

1

Summit

170

155

165

2

Vail Mountain

133

168

3

Steamboat Spgs.

162

4

Aspen

5

0

448

112

THEALUMNI/13


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Wrestling

Forever a champion CHSAA State Wrestling Championships — Feb. 21-23 — Pepsi Center, Denver

Photos by Jessica Vidal

2008CHAMPIONS

Class 2A results

undefeated “in Going high school is

awesome. And me as a freshman coming out and taking that away from somebody feels great doing it.” NICKADAMS

2A 112-pound champion, On taking an undefeated season from Justin Lacovetto of Soroco in a 3-1 decision

•Team/individual champions 146.00 1. Grand Valley 113.00 2. Paonia 105.00 3. Wiggins 103-pound champion David Garcia, Rocky Ford 112-pound champion Nick Adams, Discovery Canyon 119-pound champion Chad Stroh, Holyoke 125-pound champion Chris Gebauer, Akron 130-pound champion Ty Sickels, Nucla 135-pound champion Colten Huskey, Dove Creek 140-pound champion Hugh Hardman, Norwood 145-pound champion Justin Smith, Paonia

I wrestled my “heart out. This win makes it so much better, especially against our rival La Junta.”

JOSHJAIME

Class 3A 103-pound champion Josh Jaime of Lamar savors his win.

That is what I had been working for for 10 to 11 “years, and that kid beat me at regionals, so that is

3A 103-pound champion, On his 4-2 decision over Kurtis Romero of La Junta

what made it all the sweeter.”

JORDANLARSEN

3A 152-pound champion, On defeating Mike Smith of Pagosa Springs by a 3-1 decision in OT

152-pound champion Tyler Miles, Grand Valley 160-pound champion Cody Miles, Grand Valley 171-pound champion Devon Brown, Paonia 189-pound champion Mike Satterly, Burlington 215-pound champion Stryker Lane, Norwood 285-pound champion Bryan Crespin, John Mall

Class 3A results

•Team/individual champions 186.50 1. Roosevelt 125.00 2. Centauri 116.50 3. Florence 103-pound champion Josh Jaime, Lamar 112-pound champion Pablo Mascrenas, Mountain Vista 119-pound champion Jake Eitzen, Estes Park

I knew it was “going to be

125-pound champion Ethan Martinez, St. Mary’s 130-pound champion Dan Frank, Roosevelt

tough. All of those kids are really good.”

135-pound champion Nate Halpin, Florence 140-pound champion Matt Addington, Florence

JESSIEMEIS

4A 103-pound champion, On the competition at the state tournament

145-pound champion Mitchell Polkowske, Centauri 152-pound champion Jordan Larsen, Bayfield 160-pound champion Zach Diaz, Yuma 171-pound champion Nathan Heuer, Roosevelt 189-pound champion David Clark, Platte Valley

Jessie Meis of Alamosa, top, battles Jerry Huff of Broomfield at the Pepsi Center on Feb. 23. Meis won the Class 4A 103-pound title by a 10-0 decision.

215-pound champion Scott Redden, Gunnison 285-pound champion Austin Kinnison, Highland

14/THEALUMNI


Wrestling

April 2008

CHSAA State Wrestling Championships — Feb. 21-23 — Pepsi Center, Denver

View from the mat: photos by Jessica Vidal 2008CHAMPIONS Class 4A results

I have had several matches where I had to come back and win in the last ten seconds. So I know the match is never over.” JOSHKREIMIER

5A 119-pound champion, On coming back to win against Chris Wessel of Legacy

•Team/individual champions 161.50 1. Northridge 151.00 2. Fort Morgan 114.00 3. Alamosa 103-pound champion Jesse Meis, Alamosa 112-pound champion Gabe Gomez, Broomfield 119-pound champion Travis Himmelman, Conifer 125-pound champion Dale Shull, Fort Lupton 130-pound champion Nick Ludwig, Berthoud 135-pound champion Saul Guerrero, Fort Lupton

Class 5A 119-pound champion Josh Kreimier of Loveland, left, squares up against Chris Wessel of Legacy during their championship match.

140-pound champion Easton Ramirez, Northridge 145-pound champion Justin Gonzales, Northridge 152-pound champion Matt Chavez, Fort Morgan

I was thinking “about how shiny

160-pound champion Johnny Ortega, Thompson Valley 171-pound champion Cody Yohn, Alamosa

that medal looked when I was warming up.”

189-pound champion Tony Chavarria, Pueblo West 215-pound champion Joe Hochanadel, Fort Morgan

DALESHULL

4A 125-pound champion, On what he was thinking as his match was winding down

285-pound champion Tim Saucedo, Northridge

Class 5A results

•Team/individual champions 1. Ponderosa 160.00 2. Loveland 128.00 3. Grandview 89.00

Travis Himmelman of Conifer, top, controls Vinnie Sanchez of Pueblo West in their Class 4A 119-pound title match. Himmelman defeated Sanchez by decision 3-0.

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103-pound champion Matthew Gurule, Central G.J. 112-pound champion Eric Wilson, Grandview 119-pound champion Josh Kreimier, Loveland 125-pound champion Dominic Valenzuela, Centaurus 130-pound champion Tyler Graff, Loveland 135-pound champion Nick Jones, Pomona 140-pound champion Jake Snider, Ponderosa 145-pound champion Daniel Kelly, Ponderosa 152-pound champion Denzel Washington, Regis 160-pound champion Garrett Lanham, Centaurus 171-pound champion Casey Norgard, Rocky Mountain 189-pound champion Luke Vandenburg, Loveland 215-pound champion Robert Tucker, Grand Junction 285-pound champion Cody Gilmore, Grandview

THEALUMNI/15


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Fitness

Kara Ashcraft — 24 Hour Fitness — Trainer of the Month

WORKOUT:TOTALBODYBLAST 1

Name: Kara Ashcraft Fitness center: 24 Hour Fitness (Thornton Express) Certifications: ACSM, APEX and certificate in emergency medical services Activities: Soccer and running College: B.A. physiology, University of Colorado Nutrition tips: Don’t completely deprive yourself of your weaknesses, indulge in MODERATION! Training tips: Keep all motions slow & controlled and strengthen your core it is the root of all movement. You’ll see twice the benefits.

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Squat thrust, biceps curl, shoulder press Start with moderate weight (two dumbbells), holding both dumbbells, place on ground, kick legs back into squat thrust; kick legs back in toward hands (1). Stand and bring weights up to a biceps curl (2), rotate hands outward and press up into shoulder press (3). • Repeat 12 times

4

5 Kara Ashcraft pictured

Backward lunge with lean Hold two dumbbells and step backward into lunge (4). Hinging at the hips with back straight, bend forward, placing weight onto ground. Return to upright position and step forward onto both feet. • Repeat 12 times Jump rope • 2 minutes Push up (with feet on raised platform and body at decline) Bend elbows into push up and return to start position (5). • Repeat 10 times

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Activities

April 2008

Party safe, party sober on prom night MADD drives home a powerful message JOANNAGOMEZ University of Colorado

P

ROM is a night most teens live for. Unfortunately, it is also a night some teens die

for. Etta Stewart lost her son Ryan on the night of his senior prom. “I can just remember him leaving home that day, and me stopping on the corner and waving goodbye. And that was it. I was never going to see him again. Not alive.” Ryan Stewart was killed in a car accident involving alcohol. As a result, Etta, along with thousands of others, have become active members of Mothers Against Drunk Driving. From its humble beginning

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25 years ago, MADD has evolved into one of the most supported nonprofit organizations in America, with chapters throughout the United States, including Colorado. As part of its ongoing effort to scorn drunk driving and prevent underage drinking, the MADD chapter in Colorado holds pre-prom presentations that educate teens on safe party planning and the dam-

age that can be caused by underage drinking and driving on prom night. Smoky Hill, Green Mountain and Thunder Ridge are a few of the Colorado high schools that will participate in MADD’s pre-prom program this year. “We want to get the message across to teens that drinking and driving can ruin someone’s life,” said Tiffany

Hanson, the youth program specialist at MADD. “They really need to place the person they love the most in the victims’ shoes. Drunk driving doesn’t end with impact, it ends with someone’s mother or brother living without their daughter or father.” So with all the excitement and picture taking on prom night, what can parents do to keep their children safe? “Know who your kid’s friends are, know who their [friends’] parents are, know where they are going to be, and communicate,” Hanson said. Plan safe transportation, and although limousines are expensive, they are one of the best ways to get teens home safely. “Encourage your child to attend school-sponsored programs like a prom breakfast where there will be no alcohol,” Hanson added.

MADD’s Youth and Action program is another option for teens to learn more about drinking and driving and get involved with the community. “We try to get teens involved as much as possible. We even have ride-along in which teens can go with law enforcement to see things first hand and gain knowledge of the consequences,” Hanson said. MADD’s Think.Prom also sponsors a video scraping contest during prom season for high school students. Keeping in mind the theme “Party Safe. Party Sober,” high school students are encouraged to submit a short video that encourages their peers to think about their choices with lifesaving messages. MADD’s goals for the video contest are to not only show off talented teen work, but also to promote a fun, safe prom without alcohol. “I wish he could have come home that Saturday

morning and told me all about it. But it didn’t happen,” Etta Stewart said. “I never got to hear about his night.” Every prom night must to come to an end, but the weeks and years following should be filled with happy memories. Every teen deserves to live to tell the tale.

We want to “ get the message

across to teens that drinking and driving can ruin someone’s life. ... Drunk driving doesn’t end with impact, it ends with someone’s mother or brother living without their daughter or father.” TIFFANYHANSON

Youth program specialist at MADD

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Office space available for lease Special features • Open 7 days a week • 100% commissions • Title and lender representatives • Multiple conference rooms • Monthly marketing meetings • Wireless Internet • Direct phone lines • Continuing education classes The Arabian Horse Center 12000 Zuni St. Ste. 1 Westminster, CO 80234 303-252-7700

$250,000 Huge master with 3 bed/2 bath 1896 sq. ft. Call Bob Truax at 303-548-8508 Erie

$284,900 Ranch w/ large basement 3 bed/3 bath 2276 sq. ft. Call Bob Truax at 303-548-8508 Thornton

$331,199 Great views priced to sell with 4 bed/3 bath 3600 sq. ft. Call Bob Truax at 303-548-8508 Westminster

$450,000 Spectacular tahoe model with 3 bed/3 bath 2743 sq. ft. Call Trish Truax at 303-726-4537 Arvada

THEALUMNI/17


www.thealumninews.org

Swimming

4A/5A State Swimming Championships — Feb. 14-16 — EPIC Center, Fort Collins

STATESWIMMING

4A championship results

5A championship results

Team standings Individual/medley: 200 medley relay, Rock 302 1. Ralston Valley Canyon, (1:48.30); 200 269.5 2. Rock Canyon freestyle, Caroline Shea, 161 3. Thompson Valley SR, Mullen (1:54.10); 159 4. Estes Park 115.5 200 individual med5. Mullen 115 6. La Junta ley, Katie Johnson, JR, 102 7. Windsor Ralston Valley (2:06.31); 95 8. Broomfield 94 9. Montrose 50 freestyle, Kelsey L. 86 10. D’ Evelyn Conci, SR, Moffat County (24.48); 1 meter diving, Jamie D. Bristol, SR, Mountain View (440.05); 100 butterfly, Taylor K. Curado, JR, Rock Canyon (57.18); 100 freestyle, Kenzie L. Hewson, SR, Estes Park (53.05); 500 freestyle, Shannon Garlie, SR, Fossil Ridge (5:05.26); 200 freestyle relay, Estes Park (1:39.79); 100 backstroke, Kirsten M. Milberg, JR, Rock Canyon (58.56); 100 breaststroke, Lauren E. Hewson, SR, Estes Park (1:06.06); 400 freestyle relay: Rock Canyon (3:35.62)

Team standings

Individual/medley: 200 medley relay, Boulder 302 1. Cherry Creek (1:48.92); 200 freestyle, 269.5 2. Fairview Jackie H. Cromer, JR, 161 3. Regis Jesuit 159 Lewis Palmer (1:53.16); 4. Boulder 115.5 200 individual medley 5. Mountain Vista 115 6. Arapahoe Caroline Piehl, FR, Smoky 102 7. Rampart 95 Hill (2:07.16); 50 free8. Grandview 94 9. Chatfield style: Tricia Nelson, SO, 86 10. Fort Collins Ft. Collins (24.17) and Shelley C. Perkins, JR, Chatfield (24.17); 1 meter diving, Elizabeth Yovich, SR, Chaparral (479.10); 100 butterfly, Lauren Rigg, SO, Fairview (57.50); 100 freestyle, Jenna L. Gregoire, SO, Rampart (52.03); 500 freestyle, Loren Brandon, JR, Cherry Creek (5:01.63); 200 freestyle relay, Cherry Creek (1:38.55); 100 backstroke, Breann Fuller, SR, Brighton (57.17); 100 breaststroke, Christine Wixed, SO, Cherry Creek (1:06.49); 400 freestyle relay, Cherry Creek (3:32.60)

COMING NEXTISSUE School of the Month •Erie High School Coach of the Month •Jim Danley, Eaton Speech •State championships Teacher of the Month •Brian Kenney, Longmont Tennis •Broomfield Girls Soccer •Mullen The Alumni Top 50 •Who’s in, who’s out

Salon Odyssey Cindy Knight - Boies Stylist/Nail Tech 303-564-9533

Jeanette Nunez 720-935-2811

Renee Applehans Stylist 303-564-5659

Lynn Nimrod Independent Cosmetologist 303-725-7844

Salon 303-252-9619

pro kicking academy coaching

training

recruiting

COACH MATT THOMPSON — 303-910-9416 — WWW.PROKICKANDPUNT.COM

18/THEALUMNI

12045 Pecos St. Westminster, CO 80234


April 2008

Around the State Mustangs make choosing a college easier with new Web site

R

ALSTON VALLEY has integrated a helpful Web site for its counseling services. Featured under the counseling department Web site, students and parents can find scholarship applications, NCAA Eligibility Center information, college applications and more tools to assist students and parents in the college selection process… Windsor will receive additional funding after the citizens of Windsor and Weld County voted in favor of bonds to help keep their educational facilities upto-date… Fort Morgan’s The Close Up for New Americans Club participated in its third annual Soldier Support Coin Collection. Using only change, the club raised money to send soldiers serving overseas care packages for Valentine’s Day… Thompson Valley will be turning more focus to the Problem Solving & Critical Thinking program, with teachers implementing complex problems that re-

quire dissection, causes and effects, consideration of options and an eventual solution. This system of problem solving was implemented to help students better problem solve for whatever career path they chose… Skyline, through generous donations from Longmont businesses, hired a professional grant writer to help with its STEM/V-P Arts proposal. The STEM/V-P program will teach students skills for today’s modern technology using state-of-theart equipment and software… Poudre’s Poudre Pals in accepting applications for membership. Poudre Pals pairs juniors and seniors at Poudre High School with elementary school students. With one-on-one interaction, Poudre students mentor the elementary school students on school, life and other issues. They also mentor the students on making wise life choices as they grow older. Poudre students can receive credit for their service in the Poudre

Students from Legacy practice for their fashion show. Log on to www.thealumninews.org to get the full story. Pals Program… Horizon had the most improved 2006-07 CSAP/ACT scores in the Adams 12 Five-Star School District. Horizon is allowing students to utilize testGEAR online software that provides students an opportunity to raise ACT test scores through aligned content, practice exams and personalized study sessions formulated through a brief diagnostic. The software allows students to access their personal tutorials 24/7. The tutorials focuses on students’ weaknesses and help improve

test-taking abilities… Rocky Mountain had 11 students selected to participate in the Colorado All-State Orchestra at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Rocky Mountain’s Model United Nations delegates participated in the Regional High School Model United Nations International tournament in Salt Lake City. The delegates received the prestigious Best Delegation Award for Security Council/Counter-Terrorism Committee…During remodeling construction at Wheat Ridge,

the school’s “WR” monument was destroyed. As a senior gift, the current senior class is looking for financial assistance for rebuilding the monument. If interested in helping out, contact math teacher Mike Schmidt at 303982-7782 or send donations to Wheat Ridge High School, Attention: Mike Schmidt, 9505 W. 32nd. Avenue, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033. Make checks out to Wheat Ridge High School, and in the memo section write “Senior Class Gift.”

Mention this advertisement and receive a FREE Appraisal! (Offer only valid with closing)

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Call us today for a free design consultation, and let us help you create your own outdoor sanctuary! 303-794-3866 Chad Shrum www.ceconcrete.com cuttingedgeconcrete@hotmail.com 2045 W. Union Ave., #C Englewood, CO 80110 THEALUMNI/19


The Aragon Group

is a proud sponsor of

The Alumni

www.ColoradoHomeExplorer.com Featured Listings From left; Ben Vialpando, Paul Aragon, Renee Torres

Contact Paul’s Team at 303-525-8915

Property of the Month

$117,900 Nice corner lot home with 3 bedrooms 840 sq. ft. Call Luba Bykova at 720-217-4456 Aurora

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If you would like to see your property featured here contact us at 1-877-791-1239 $212,000 Best price in Signal Creek 3 beds/2 baths 1,640 sq. ft. Call Paul Aragon at 303-525-8915 Thornton

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$269,900 Pride of ownership with 3 bed/3 bath 2228sq. ft. Call Luba Bykova at 720-217-4456 Henderson

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$354,500 Great location for home with 3 bed/2 bath 1727 sq. ft. Call Paul Aragon at 303-525-8915 University Place

$539,000 Gorgeous executive home 4 bed/4 bath 3264 sq. ft. Call Luba Bykova at 720-217-4456 Lafayette

$760,000 Beautiful custom home with 4 bed/4 bath 4259 sq. ft. Call Luba Bykova at 720-217-4456 Westminster

$769,000 Luxurious new build 5 bed/4 bath 4660 sq. ft. Call Luba Bykova at 720-217-4456 Lakewood

$899,000 HUGE price reduction! 5 bed/6 bath 5671 sq. ft. Call Luba Bykova at 720-217-4456 Arvada

Corporate Sponsor of

The Alumni The Mortgage Network has been serving the greater Denver metro area since 1985!

Loan Programs: FHA/VA Approved Conventional Down Payment Assistance Senior Loan Officer Erik Aragon

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Call Today 303-301-7221

“Proud Supporter of Colorado High Schools”

Good luck on the CSAP’s!

The Alumni Volume 1 Issue V April 2008  

The Alumni is Colorado's Authority for High School Academics, Activities and Athletics News.

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