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VOLUME 3 NUMBER 148:17• NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010 Art thou walkers of art now?

The Shaman in The Sandbox p. 5 ● Help Paint the town: First Thursday p. 6 by Steve Hunter

by Cindy Dauer

Bump events calendar p. 8


voice

SYMPOSIUM symposium VOLUME 3 NUMBER 148:17, NOVERMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

VOIC E

Opi n i on s a n d Editor ia ls , b e t h e y ours or yours , t h i s i s wh e re th e y be.

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Dirtstir

V ERDIC T

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We ’ l l b e t h e judge. You be th e jur y...you tr us t us r ig h t?

East meets West

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J o u r n a l i st s c a l l th e m f e a ture s; we say it's th e word.

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Dave Storrs First Thursday

B U MP

I t ’s t h e c alendar of al l t h i n g s A l b a ny, Cor v a l lis , L e b a n on , a nd P h iloma th .

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LITERATI

Am a t e u r p ro se, poetr y and fi c t i on st i l l h a s a h om e.

Detective Siempre

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Cro s s wo rd

Editorial

Editors Courtney Clenney, Stanley Tollett Staff Writers Courtney Clenney, Noah Stroup, Stanley Tollett Bump Editor Courtney Clenney Contributors Cindy Dauer, Dirtstir, Josh Goller, Steve Hunter, Joel Rea

Art

Art Director Freddy Ruiz Layout Editor Courtney Clenney Cover Photo Cindy Dauer See artifacts and altars when you visit “El Dia de los Muertos – Day of the Dead Celebration” at the Corvallis Arts Center. Check out the reception as part of Corvallis’ First Thursday event on November 4. Make your own offering or watch a dramatic puppet show.

Advertising

Account Executive Noah Stroup

Business

Publisher Noah Stroup The Alchemist Weekly is published by: CorvAlcheMedia LLC PO Box 1591 Corvallis, OR 97339 Alchemist Mission

As a publication, our goal is to facilitate greater understanding and appreciation for the diverse social and cultural groups found in the area. In doing so, we hope to create a greater sense of community between Oregon State University and Corvallis, between Albany and Corvallis, and between Philomath, Lebanon and Corvallis-Albany. The Alchemist recognizes the various interests of these groups and is dedicated to being as fluid as the community it serves. The Alchemist is available to you for free. Please limit yourself to one copy. If your picture is in it, you are welcome to take enough copies for your family. Subject to availability, back issues can be purchased by mail for $5. Send your request with specific issue date to PO Box 1591, Corvallis, OR 97339 and include a check or money

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NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

Last week's puzzle solutions

order payable to The Alchemist.

The time has come again for all patriotic American citizens to exercise their greatest constitutional right. The one that makes the United States a representative democracy, meaning that the people we elect represent us. They are doing us a favor taking the time out of their lives to go to state and national capitals and speak and vote for us, because we’re back on our farms and factories and offices and we can’t be there, so they’ll take care of the whole deciding part of our government in our stead. Checking in and making sure that they’re saying and doing the things that we want, and you know... representing us. The idea, long ago, was that because we were the land of the people, by the people and for the people, that the people, meaning you and I, should decide what goes on in this land of ours. But how to do that with any organization? We can’t all get into a giant stadium and stand up or down on issues and policies, things would grind to a halt. So we “elect” a much smaller group of people to go off and say what we want said and let the others know how things are going way out here. Then they all get together and tell each other how the people they represent feel about the laws and bills and such. Then they all sit around and vote and everyone goes home and reports the results. Pretty smart huh? Ah, the good ole’ days. Today, it’s slightly different than that. What Dwight Eisenhower once referred to as the military-industrial complex, has evolved into a militaryhealth care-justice system-insurancealcohol-tobacoo-pharmaceutical-industrial-congressional complex. And the grist for this mega-mill? Well it’s us, the people. Every November, there is always talk of change. But I’m not sure that change is always good. Perhaps if change is always an appealing campaign slogan, that is indicative of the absolutely horrid state of our country, state, county, city etc. If we are always hungry for change, then things must be pretty crappy during the previous administration or tenure in office. Which, I wouldn’t be hard-pressed to agree with. Politicians, in my opinion, are an odd breed. I’ve spoken with many political minded people, as well as those currently in office during various journalistic endeavors. And I always get the feeling that they are either incredibly naive, or they must really be from some other planet. Conversations usually contain a lot of redundancy and repeated, seemingly rehearsed statements. They almost nev-

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er answer anything with great candor or at any length, lest they say something they will end up regretting. Then, recently, I had an interesting conversation with a very intelligent individual that seemed to be an expert on corruption. He was a former gang member, a criminal. He made the very interesting point: that if you have to operate at all in a corrupt system, you must corrupt yourself as well. Otherwise, those that already are corrupt will refuse to work with you, they may even be dangerous to you. To operate in a corrupted environment, all involved must have some form of dirt on them. So, in a sense, it just takes one member of any governmental institution to rot the entire system. Thank God that this year’s lot of candidates are going to “change” things. I can breathe easy because these candidates, from what I’ve seen in their television commercials, genuinely feel compelled to go off and represent OUR interests in a completely altruistic gesture. But then, I see their competitor’s commercials, and they say the other candidates are actually devils and just the sort of people that the former gang member was talking about. Corrupt, money hungry, selfish, horrible creatures AND, with checkered backgrounds and voting records. Maybe I should vote for this lot, the one that’s warning me about all the bad apples, the “real” corrupt ones. I was all set to cast my vote, glad that I found out about the bad politicians in time. Then something horrible happened. I saw another batch of commercials. These were saying that the ones that were calling the other ones corrupt, were in fact themselves the corrupt ones, and they were trying to fool us. Wolves in sheep’s clothing! My God! How devious! I was almost fooled! Maybe I should just vote for the person that isn’t in office, you know... change things. Make them better. Yeah, that’s what I’ll do. Cause things pretty much suck right now. Then I thought, I just have one vote, and there are much brighter people out there than me. They’ll choose wisely. They’ll make sure the right man or woman gets into office and does us all proud. I laid down last night with a smile, feeling blessed to live in a democracy where our informed and educated citizenry, aware of all the facts, have the privilege to elect honest, incorruptible folks to go off and represent our interests while we toil back home to pay their salaries and fund their ideas. -Stanley Tollett think@thealchemistweekly.com

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voice

D I Rstir T Swimming in Money, Snowed Under with Debt A competitive swimmer recently died at an International Swimming Federation event in the United Arab Emirates.  I wrote in the past about the headquarters of big international sports competitions like Federation International Football Association, International Olympic Committee, and International World Games Association being in Switzerland.  Well, FINA is too. The IOC holds the purse strings of numerous international sports federations.  Imagine the social and economic power wielded by a sports oriented corporation that holds patronage over innumerable leagues.  Read the Chapter 22 essay (The Economics of the IOC, by Jean-Loup Chappelet)  in  Handbook on the Economics of Sport by Andreff and Szymanski. It’s available at Google books.  You will be amazed.  Though involved in commerce, the IOC isn’t listed in the Swiss Trade Register.   Apparently their idealistic views preclude the transparency of an annual report. We’re talking billions from broadcast rights, “branding” (Olympic rings on a Coke product), merchandising, etc.. As the IOC is considered “non-profit”, we should consider Vancouver the “antiprofit.” According to theglobeandmail. com, as of a month ago, the City of Vancouver was still out well over $700 million on the backing of the Olympic Village construction ($1 billion).  Other investments have fared just as poorly.  Within weeks after the Winter Games, Vancouver’s $5.7billion investment (your Canadian counterpart’s tax dollars at work) was expecting a financial return of around

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$2 billion in money spent locally.  Mind you  not the fraction  that represents tax revenue (‘recession Olympics’ usfst.com).  Vote! Your ballot is  due today.  Vote.  From local measure to Federal office holder, your vote is important.  Granted, for the most part it is a selection between a big ol’ douche and a turd sandwich (tired of the South Park quip yet?).  Each ballot I receive brings conflict.  Most ballot measures and some candidates are easy picks, but usually I can’t decide which candidate is worth  expressing myself artistically by penciling in the bubble. I’m generally happy with the decisions of my current city council person and will keep the person in that role.  I maintained all but two incumbents.  I cast no vote for all but one candidate running unopposed and chose DIRTSTIR for Mayor.  I didn’t feel well informed about the Measures, and let the names of those who supported or opposed the measures influence my decisions.  I supported all but two measures, but easily found potential for disaster in all measures. This has been the worst election season I can remember.  The economic downturn certainly limited campaign spending, and unfortunately a huge amount was spent on negative campaigning.  If I had refused to vote for anyone employing negative campaign tactics, I would have cast few votes.  This lack of self-promotion, and an overwhelming amount of undermining campaign tactics, demonstrates the genuine lack of substance in our candidates.  -cjT  dirtstirreply@gmail.com

The thoughts, views, and opinions expressed in Voice are of their authors and do not necessarily represent the thoughts, views or opinions of CorvAlcheMedia, LLC.

The Alchemist Weekly welcomes freelance submissions. Send material to submissions@thealchemistweekly.com or snail mail to PO Box 1591, Corvallis, OR 97339. Manuscripts will be returned if you include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

YOUR VOICE: letters@thealchemistweekly.com YOUR SCOOPS: news@thealchemistweekly.com YOUR WORDS: submissions@thealchemistweekly. com CONTACT US: 541.224.6873 editor@thealchemistweekly.com calendar@thealchemistweekly.com ads@thealchemistweekly.com

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verdict

The Alchemist

Ast rologer Blame the stars, not yourself

   ARIES

(March 21 – April 20) It’s football season so learn this valuable lesson from Brett Favre – quit while you’re ahead.

TAURUS

(April 21 – May 21) You are the kind of person who gets suckered into buying useless crap from the Sky Mall magazine and infomercials with Dlist celebrities.

GEMINI

(May 22 – June 21) Your bi-polar nature comes out in the fall – half of you wants to escape to warmer climates and half of you wants to wear sweaters and drink soup. However, no part of you wants to do work.

   CANCER

( June 22 – July 22) In the spirit of thanksgiving, be sure to say thanks to your mailman, 2nd grade teacher, and the Puritans that were starving to death so you now get two days off to stuff yourself with pie.

LEO

( July 23 – August 21) Take some time this month to spend an entire day in bed including sleeping, eating, and working (if you must). Hey, isn’t that what rain’s for?

VIRGO

(August 22 – September 23) It’s time to jump on the next fashion bandwagon – it’s out with ironic hipster and in with prep school duds. Bowties will be big.

   LIBRA

(September 24 – October 23) There have never been any Libras famous for their ability to juggle knives while unicycling. You could be the first!

SCORPIO

(October 24 – November 22) Here’s to the next year of your life, Scorpio! This is your year – whether it’s to be funemployed or make a new frenemy.

SAGITTARIUS

(November 23 – December 22) As the weather gets chillier and you need some extra warmth, it’s a great time to let your personal hygiene go.

   CAPRICORN

(December 23 – January 20) They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but your thousands of photos on Facebook of your ______(self, cat, baby, boyfriend, etc.) are worth absolutely jack.

AQUARIUS

( January 21 – February 19) Rather than using your two vacation days to eat turkey with your family, consider a more pleasant alternative – eating Chinese food alone while watching the Macy’s Day parade on TV.

PISCES

(February 20 – March 20) This month you will become a firm convert to the eugenics movement after spending a cross-country flight with screaming babies.

Award winning documentary highlights local acupuncturists by Josh Goller

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s Eastern medicine increases in popularity, Americans are discovering new alternatives to maintain their health. Acupuncture is now a common form of alternative medicine, emphasizing a connection to the natural world that addresses the root causes of health problems rather than relying on drugs to treat symptoms. In the locally produced documentary East Meets West: Oriental Medicine and the Future of Healthcare in America, the history and efficacy of acupuncture and other Eastern medicinal treatments are detailed in a way meant to educate and enlighten the viewer. This hour-long documentary focuses on the benefits of acupuncture in curing ailments and of herbal treatments for maintaining health. Western medicine excels in diagnostic and emergency care, but often relies on pharmacological treatments for maintenance care. The film argues that in the United States we value the cutting edge, that which is new and groundbreaking. But in Eastern culture, methods that are time-tested receive the most veneration, and healing arts like acupuncture, Qi Gong and herbal care have been practiced for thousands of years. The practitioners interviewed in this film stress how an integrative approach to medicine, one that downplays the need for pills that simply mask symptoms, and focuses on the channeling of the body’s natural energy will provide the most effective means of maintaining

health. Medications often carry negative side effects, while most side effects associated with acupuncture tend to be positive in that they treat other ailments. Director Lynn Walker is passionate about her subject matter, and the film garnered an Honorable Mention at the Los Angeles Reel Film Festival. Many of the America’s most pressing health concerns—diabetes, heart disease, cancer—are to a large degree affected by diet, emotional state, and lifestyle. Eastern medicine focuses on the complete being, not simply the particular affliction, and is oftentimes better equipped to address the sources of ailments. East Meets West: Oriental Medicine and the Future of Healthcare in America will debut on Thursday, November 11th at 7:00 PM at the Troubadour Music Center in downtown Corvallis.

Get noticed, and advertise your business. ads@thealchemistweekly.com 4

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

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The Shaman in The Sandbox Dave Storrs, 5th & B gear up for the brass ring

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little after noon on the day before my deadline, I pull up in front of Dave Storrs’ house in northern south Corvallis. He waves me down at the intersection after I drove half a block in the wrong direction and greets me warmly. He is a tall man with an athletic build, just entering his 60s. He is eager to get started. After shaking hands and exchanging ritualistic greetings, we relocate to the inside of what appears to be his garage. Storrs is a multi-talented percussionist/ musician/composer/recording engiteve unter neer who has been local to the Northwest his whole life, and has called Corvallis home since the early 90s. I’m interviewing him because his jazz group 5th & B are performing at an upcoming benefit concert for The Albany Brass Ring Carousel project (Cloud 9, November 6, 9:00 PM, $8 admission). 5th & B is comprised of local musicians with a history of collaboration that, in the case of Storrs and Keyboardist Dave Leslie, stretches back to 1974. Storrs says the original concept for the concert was to have the musicians visit the carousel itself and perform a set of spontaneous compositions based on their experiences there. While he isn’t sure if this will actually

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contain him. His synapses fire at an alarming pace that I entertain no hopes of keeping up with. Each sentence is a wormhole that my host brazenly dives headfirst into time and again, emerging triumphant in what could be a different universe entirely, and staying just long enough to divine the location of the next jumping off point. As near as I can tell, the only thing that permits him to maintain a constant shape is the gravity inculcated in the walls, ceiling, and floor of the studio itself. Dave warned me on the phone that his studio was a mess, however my own tenure within this shrine to the gods of sound left me with the impression that every single thing was exactly where it needed to be. It’s arranged like an antique shop; each relic wrought with significance and resonating with the echoes of sessions past, present, and future. The space is rife with history. “This room, which has 18 years of history – I mean my daughters have all sent back stuff from all over the place, and all the stuff on the ceiling is part of history – but I would say in the last couple years, the flex that happens in this room is starting to permeate into the recordings. I mean, I’m the drummer, I set the room up, I gotta record in here, but the room (and I think this is the way it’s supposed to be) is imposing its flex on people,” Storrs says. He has been recording his own albums since 1983, and began his own label – Louie Records – in 1996. He uses Louie in con-

He calls his studio The Sandbox, and it's quite apparent that he comes here to play. happen or not, he digs the idea of going to the source for inspiration, “I can remember a time I was playing in a group and the guy finally explained the title of the tune – really explained it – and then we really played the tune! We knew what the e-motion—the energy and motion—was.” Dave Storrs is a flurry of verbiage, a manic collage of ideas, and a willing projective stimulus. We develop a strong rapport within a few breaths, and before long we are trading questions about musical experiences, who the other knows and plays with, what we hear and sense, et cetera. We shift and settle into the context, aligning impressions, and constantly readjusting, as we spontaneously compose what can only loosely be termed an interview. Conversation. Process. Projection. Rumination. Regurgitation. Reabsorption. “Part of my job, is that I’m the container for what’s happening,” he says, while gesturing as if he’s pressing inward on the ends of a two foot spring. “When things are getting out here, it’s my job to make sure to bring it back. It’s tension and release.” I start to wonder who or what could possibly

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junction to release his own work and that of other dedicated artists who strive to make the pulse of the universe audible. He calls his studio The Sandbox, and it’s quite apparent that he comes here to play. True to his nature, he plays, and subsequently endows me with, 7 or so albums he’s recorded in The Sandbox with various groups: 5th & B, The Tone Sharks, SDS Trio, Techno Lodge, and a group he’s particularly ecstatic to talk with me about, Timbral Hut. The tunes fit perfectly in the room, and our punctuated interchanges of silence continue, not so much over as through the music. He elaborates on his role as mentor/shaman to some of the younger musicians he plays with, “One of the things that I’ve tried to pass on as an elder to these guys, is at some point, they have to push back. You essentially have to get rid of ma and pa, and that’s a major thing that we don’t do. We don’t have a shield of autonomy around us,” Storrs says. “As a teacher what I try to do is push, and eventually they push back. Once they push back, there’s something that they create.” Dave’s own father was the architect responsible for St. Mary’s Catholic Church on 25th Street. He recalls watching his father return from work and zoning out with a container in his hand, emotionally disengaged. Dave is anything but. He discloses with enviable candor that his mother ended her own life after a long struggle with depression, when he was 17. His manifesto on the need for autonomy begins to resonate subtly with the deeper harmonics of The Sandbox, where his mother’s spirit is no longer suffering, where he himself is contained. “She would like it here,” he tells me. I trust she would.

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Help paint the town A guide to Corvallis' newest art-centered event, First Thursday

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earing green and pink polka dot rubber boots, Jane clutches her kneelength grey skirt with one hand and uses the other to hold onto her boyfriend’s sleeve as they dash across the street in drizzling rain. They splash in a few puddles along the indy auer way before ducking into an art gallery on Second Street. Jane’s cheeks flush as the warm gallery air hits her chilly face. She smiles. He takes off his wool beanie, quickly combs his fingers through his hair, then goes to get a sample of white wine. She puts a few hors d’oeuvres on a small red plate and grabs a napkin. They explore the gallery, sipping and tasting their way through the visual feast. They wave to an old professor, check out the new watercolor paintings, and chat with the featured artist be-

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fore they leave. Their next stop: a restaurant on Washington Street where mixed-media photography is on display. It’s the first Thursday of the month, and the couple plans to hit every event planned for the evening. They are dabbling in First Thursday – the latest color added to the palette of the MidWillamette Valley art scene. ********************************** November 4, this monthly event will once again cast together a handful of businesses in downtown Corvallis, soldering a network of local art. Participating venues will stay open later than usual, unveil exhibits, host beer and wine receptions, and bring in local musicians. Modeled after similar events held in Portland, Bend, and other cities around the country, Cloud Davidson – owner of Cloud 9 Bistro and Bar and the Downward Dog

“Ghana Boy” is a woodblock print created by Corvallis artist Anna Wichman. See more of Wichman’s work as part of First Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. November 4 at Corvallis Brewing Supply.

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Pub and Grub, both on First Del Alma Restaurant Dorothy Matthews, Mark Allison, Alex Rudinsky, Street – initiated Corvallis’ Address: 136 S.W. WashBill Shumway first “First Thursday” last June. ington Ave., Suite 102 An exhibit of en plein air Info: 541-753-2222 or He wanted to create a regular delalmarestaurant.com works with pastels, waterevent that mixed art, music, When: 4 to 8 p.m. colors, oils and acrylics. food, and drink.   Artist: Melinda Luksch Mona Lisa’s Custom “How can you go wrong (www.mluksch.com) Framing hosting an event like this?” Luksch’s mixture of phoAddress: 133 S.W. Sectographic elements, oils Davidson asked. ond St. and charcoal on canvas Since then, First Thursday focuses on the raw, Info: 541-230-1998 or (originally First Friday but imperfect layers of the monalisaspictureframing. com changed to Thursday this fall) human condition. Artists: Anna Tewes has seen growth. About ten and Claude Winter downtown Corvallis busi- Art in the Valley Gallery An array of collages by nesses – including a mix of Address: 209 SW Second Tewes and Winter’s handretail shops, restaurants, and St. painted Ukrainian eggs (Pyanki). Also, live banjo galleries – are actively partici- Info: 541 752-0811 music by Dick Martin and pating. Attendance has come When: 5:30 pm to 7:30 wine tasting. pm in a variety of shades, with dif- Artist: Ellen Borowski,   ferent venues finding varying Diversity in Nature Inside Out Garden Videgrees of success from month Elected member of sions Address: 121 N.W. Secto month. While support for N.J.Water Color Society ond St. First Thursday may be slowly and Oregon Watercolor Info: 541-754-6261 or Society. Art ranges from building, members of the local soft florals  to dreamy insideoutgardenvisions. art and business community landscapes. Borowski com say the event could give the has a fondness for flowWhen: 4 to 7 p.m. Artist: Liz Grant DeMid-Valley art scene a coat of ers, trees, landscapes signs (lizgrantdesigns. and seascapes. fresh paint. com) “It certainly has potential,” Majestic Theatre Affordable jewelry work in said Hester Coucke, gallery Address: 115 S.W. Secrecycled vintage pieces, curator and assistant director ond St. brass, sterling, semiprecious stones. of the Arts Center in Corval- Info: 541-758-7827 or   lis. “It’s going to take some www.majestic.org Corvallis Brewing SupWhen: Nov. 1-31 time for people to catch on.” ply Artist name: Dee Yarnell Local artists like Liz Grant The native Oregonian has Address: 119 S.W. Fourth enthusiastically support the produced and commisSt. Info: 541-758-1674 or event. Grant notes that First sioned art work throughwww.lickspigot.com out the Northwest. Thursday could parallel the When: 6 to 8 pm   farmers’ market in terms of Mod Pod Artist: Anna Wichman building community, encour- Address: 115 N.W. SecIn addition to the display aging people to shop locally, ond St. of Wichman’s paintings, CBS will have free samand keeping dollars in Corval- Info: 541-230-1819 or ples of  PLONK wines www.modpoddecor.com lis. and hors d’oeuvres from When: 4 to 7 pm “It seems to have gotten a Artist: Pam Van Londen I’ovino’s Ristorante. slow start,” said Grant, a local (pamvanlonden.com) jeweler. “But I think it could Come see paintings, Upstairs Studios, #1  Address: 340 SW 2nd, many of local landscapes, really take off.” above Corvallis Cyclery with oil on clay board. Whether you are an art conInfo: 541-231-8558 or   noisseur or not, those involved Pegasus Frame Studio pamhough.com with First Thursday say you & Gallery When: 4:30 to 8:30 pm have to recognize the impor- Address: 341 S.W. SecArtist: Pam Hough Come visit in my worktance of celebrating artistic ond St. ing studio and talk to me Info: 541-757-0042 or expression. while I paint. I paint a pegasusartgallery.com “It keeps everybody sane,” When: 4 to 8 p.m. variety of subjects in a said Joel Rea, owner of Cor- Artists: Bruce Tucker, realistic style in oils. vallis Brewing Supply. “Art is a form of communication that gives you insights into the emotions of other “But if we see even a small amount of success people.” like these other events, it would really add to So will the First Thursday become a masthe monthly calendar in Corvallis.” terpiece of an event? Nearly everyone involved agrees; it is going “Corvallis isn’t Portland,” admits Melinda to take some creative planning and blending Luksch, a local artist who will be showing of the right elements to help First Thursday her mixed-media pieces at Del Alma Resin Corvallis develop. For now, the event is taurant on Washington Street this Thursday. like a sketch that could be transformed into

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word something colorful. While Davidson has got the brush primed and loaded, he believes it is up to the community to paint with it. “There is so much more we could do,” Davidson said. “It would be really great if a local organization would take this on.” What is needed is some coordination to organize event listings, update the Web site, recruit artists, and promote First Thursday to the public. While the event may need some work behind the scenes, the art is ready for viewing. This month, be sure not to miss the Dia de los Muertos (the Day of the Dead) exhibit and reception at the Art Center on Madison Street. Highlighting the cultural traditions of Mexico, Day of the Dead is a celebration and remembrance of those we have lost – whether family, friends, inspirational figures, or even pets. In Aztec lore, it is said that we all die three deaths. The first is when your body physically dies. The next is when your body is lowered into the ground, and the final death is when your memory is no longer celebrated. The purpose of Dia de los Muertos is to keep the memories of our loved ones alive; celebrating the bonds we had with them rather than mourning their loss. You can participate in this exhibit by bringing commemorative items to place on the altars, or admire those set there by others. Also enjoy refreshments and a puppet show “En el Recuerdo: Preparacion de la Ofrenda” (In Remembrance: Preparation of the Altar) performed by Chris Neely and Suzanne Campbell.

Pam Von Londen’s “Crows on the Beach” and other paintings will be shown at Mod Pod for Corvallis’ First Thursday November 4.

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Another reception you should not miss is planned for Inside Out Garden Visions on Second Street. There Grant will unveil her latest collections of “recycled” jewelry. To create her vintage pieces, she “upcycles” antique and modern materials, combining the old with the new to create one-of-a-kind designs. For winter, she says chunky jewelry is in, but she designs her pieces with the hopes of making timeless adornments that you can flaunt any time of the year. Grant collects many of the materials she uses in her craft from local antique shops and yard sales, reveling in chipped and broken pieces that others may have discarded but that she can restore. Some of her designs feature vintage crystal and glass; others have an “icy” feel for winter, with pearls and silver. “I’ve been obsessed with sparkly things since I was a little kid,” Grant admits. These are just two of the events lined up for November’s First Thursday. Each participating venue runs the event differently, so check the listings in The Alchemist Weekly for times and information. Hit all the spots, or select a few. As the first coat of paint on this event dries, more layers will be added, or the paint will thin and peel. So dip in your brush and make your mark with Corvallis’ First Thursday event. Author’s note: Jane and her boyfriend are conglomerates of First  Thursday  attendees as described by gallery and business owners. These characters were created to illustrate what the events looks like based on real observations.

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tuesday Corvallis

Peacock Bar & Grill Karaoke, 9:00 pm On the Top: DJ Big Cheese 9:00 pm, FREE Sunnyside Up Café Celtic Jam [CELTIC] 7:00 pm, FREE

Valentino’s Pizzeria Jeff Lesmeister [FOLK] 6:30 p.m.

photo by Holland Dorn

Lebanon

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly Peacock Bar & Grill East The Brand [BLUES] 7 pm

Tangent Dixie Creek Saloon

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Battle of the Bands 7 pm

wednesday Albany

Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill Pure Country Night Country Dancing with DJ 9:00pm

Corvallis Bomb’s Away Café Dessert First [ROCK] 7:30 pm, FREE

Peacock Bar & Grill Jonny Dark and the Wondertones [BLUES] 9 pm Sunnyside Up Café Bluegrass Jam [BLUEGRASS] 7:00 pm, FREE

8

thursday

Albany

Calapooia Brewing Rusty Hinges [STRING BAND] 7:30 pm Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill Ladies Night with DJ Unofficial 9:00pm

Corvallis Bomb’s Away Café Accoustic Showcase 7:30 pm, FREE

Calapooia Brewing Co.

Tyler Fortier [AMERICANA] Friday 8 pm

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

THE ALCHEMIST

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06 07

Contributed Photo

Contributed Photo

saturday Albany

Cloud 9, Thursday

Burnt [REGGAE] 9pm Cloud 9 Saint Crow & the Sinners w/Fjork, & Barry Walker & the Tanks [AMERICANA] 10:00 pm Fireworks Melanie Reed [AMERICANA] 8 pm Memorial Union Lounge, OSU Campus Music a la Carte–OSU Chamber Choir and the CHS Concert Choir [CHOIR] 12 pm

Fireworks

05

The Littlest Birds [BLUEGRASS] Sunday 8 pm Cloud 9 Burnt [REGGAE] 9:00 pm Peacock Bar & Grill Karaoke, 9:00 pm, FREE DJ Mike, 9:00 pm, FREE

Lebanon Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly Peacock Bar & Grill East Blues Jam, 7:00 pm

friday Albany

Calapooia Brewing Co. Tyler Fortier [AMERICANA] 8 pm

Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill Dance Party with DJ Unofficial, 9:00 pm

Corvallis The Beanery on 2nd Laurie Markus [ACOUSTIC] 8 pm

Old World Deli The Hilltop Big Band [BIG BAND] 7pm

Bomb’s Away Café

Peacock Bar and Grill Karaoke, 9:00 pm, FREE On the Top: DJ Alex, 9:00 pm, FREE

Mad Planet [ELECTRO-SOUL/ROCK] 9 pm

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Lebanon

sunday Albany

Calapooia Brewing Foxtrot [INDIE JAZZ] 8:00 pm

Calapooia Brewing Blues Jam [BLUES] 4:00 pm

Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill Dance Party with DJ Unofficial 9:00 pm

Corvallis

Corvallis Bomb’s Away Café The Svens [COWBOY SURF] 8:30 pm, FREE Cloud 9 5th & B for the Albany Carousel Fundraiser [ JAZZ FUSION] 9 pm Novak’s Hungarian Restaurant 2306 Heritage Way SE Strings of Time [MELODIC JAZZ] 6:00 pm, FREE

WineStyles Chuck Holst & Gary Rowles [FOLK ROCK] 7-9 pm

Lebanon Lebanon Coffeehouse & Eatery Live Music 6:30pm

Fireworks The Littlest Birds [BLUEGRASS] 8 pm OSU LaSells Stewart Center Austin Auditorium 875 SW 26th St. Steinway Piano Series Martina Filjak [PIANO] 4:00 pm

Lebanon Merlin’s Bar & Grill Blues/Rock Jam 7 pm

08

monday Corvallis

Fireworks Southtown Open Mic Talent Search 8 pm

Merlin’s Bar & Grill Karaoke Nightly

Tangent Dixie Creek Saloon Karaoke 9 pm

November 4th, 2010

119 SW Fourth St.

First Thursday Corvallis Art Walk

Featured Artist Anna Wichman is an artist with a focus in painting and printmaking as well as a student living in Corvallis, Oregon.

Anna Whichman, ganesha 4

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In addition to the display of Wichman’s paintings, CBS will have free samples of PLONK wines and hors d’oeuvres from I’ovino’s Ristorante.

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

9


Albany Public Library 2450 14th Ave. SE Lecture: Dave Fitchett Bhutan, the Land of the Thunder Dragon [LEARN] 6:30 pm

Photo by; Cindy Dauer

Corvallis

The Arts Center 700 SW Madison  Dios de los Muertos [SEE] 12-5 pm Cloud 9 126 SW 1st St. Beer & Blog [TALK] 5 pm Infinite Improvabilities [LAUGH] 9 pm Corvallis Farmers’ Market 2nd & B Street [BUY] 3-6 pm Enoteca Wine Bar Wine Tasting [DRINK] 7:00 pm, $10

The Arts Center

Dios de los Muertos [SEE] Thursday 6 pm

02

tuesday Tuesday Corvallis

The Arts Center 700 SW Madison  Dios de los Muertos [SEE] 12-5 pm Benton County Library 645 NW Monroe Ave. Lecture: Paths to More Renewable Energy [LEARN] 12:10-1 pm City of Corvallis Chintimini Senior Center 2601 NW Tyler Ave Aging Well Lecture Series [LEARN] 1:30 pm Corvallis Elks Lodge 1400 NW 9th St. Beginner Line Dance [DANCE] 7:00 pm Enoteca Wine Bar Girls night out! Knit night [FUN] 7:00 pm

10

Grass Roots Books & Music 227 SW Second St. Reading group: My Abandonment by Peter Rock [READ] 6:30-8 pm Kelley Engineering Center 1003 1148 Kelley Engineering Center Building Your Killer Business Plan Series-Marketing [LEARN] 6-7:30 pm OSU Benton Hall Room 303, OSU Campus Linn-Benton Opera Guild Preview Lecture: Hansel and Gretel by Humberdinck [LISTEN] 8 pm OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE] Artists’ Reception 6:30-8:30 pm OSU LaSells Stewart Center Agricultural Conference Room 875 SW 26th St. 

Natural History Discovery Days [LEARN] 9:00 am-8:15 pm OSU Women’s Building Room 112 Salsa Dancing [DANCE] 8:00 pm WineStyles, 2333 NW Kings Blvd Tuesday Trivia League [THINK] 6:00 pm; $10 per team

Lebanon

Cascade Performing Arts Center 800 Harrison St. Beginner Adult Ballet Classes [DANCE] 7:30-8:30 pm, $5

03

wednesday Wednesday Albany  Albany Eagles Lodge 127 Broadalbin St Albany Senior Dance [DANCE] 1:30-3:30 pm, $3

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

Memorial Union Building Journey Room 2501 SW Jefferson Street MUPC Diversity Speaker Series: Dr. Warren Washington [LISTEN] 10:30am-12:30pm

Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Corvallis 2945 NW Circle Blvd. Reception: Elsie Ross, Through the Years [LEARN] 1:30-3:30 pm

04

thursday Thursday Albany Albany Eagles Lodge 127 Broadalbin St Line, Couples, & Open Dance [DANCE] 1:30-3:30 pm, $3

Albany Public Library 2450 14th Ave. SE Book Discussion Group [READ] Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese 7 pm Un-Wrapping Downtown Downtown Albany 5 pm

OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE] OSU LaSells Stewart Center Construction & Engineering Hall 875 SW 26th St Presentation: How do you stop 100,000 computer frauds a day? [LEARN] 12-1:20 pm WineStyles 2333 NW Kings Blvd Wine Club Release Tasting [DRINK] 5:30-7:30 pm, $5

Lebanon

Lebanon Farmers Market Grant & Main St [BUY] 3pm – 7pm

05 friday

Corvallis

Friday Albany

Old World Deli 341 SW Second St. Belly Dance [DANCE] 8 pm

The Arts Center 700 SW Madison  Dios de los Muertos [SEE] 12-5 pm Day of the Dead program, 6-8pm

OSU LaSells Stewart Center Austin Auditorium Warren Miller’s Wintervention [WATCH] 8 pm

Corvallis High School Main Stage Theater 1400 NW Buchanan Ave. Sweet Charity [SEE] 7 pm, $8-$10

OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE]

Enoteca Wine Bar Chocolate Truffle Happy Hour FREE Truffles [EAT] 6:00pm

Oregon Language Center 237 Third Ave. SW Lecture: Vince Zettler, “Impressions of Contemporary India: Part II” [LISTEN] 7 pm

OSU LaSells Stewart Center Construction & Engineering Hall 875 SW 26th St. Food for Thought lecture Series - Forest Science [LEARN] 6:00 pm Peter Gysegem’s Studio Argentine Tango Classes [DANCE] 7:15 pm, $5

THE ALCHEMIST

Fireworks Restaurant & Catering 1115 SE Third St. Dine for the Arts [FUNDRAISER] 5 pm First Alternative Co-Op North 2855 NW Grant Ave. Beer Tasting [DRINK] 5-7 pm

IOOF Hall 738 SE 5th Ave Timber Twirlers: “Red, White & Blue Dance” [DANCE] 7:30-10 pm

Un-Wrapping Downtown Downtown Albany 8 pm

Corvallis

The Arts Center 700 SW Madison  Dios de los Muertos [SEE] 12-5 pm Bertsch/Allied Moving & Storage Warehouse 155 SE Lilly Ave. Furniture Share Benefit Sale [BUY] 9am-4pm

First Thursday Art Walk 4-8 pm

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Corvallis High School Main Stage Theater 1400 NW Buchanan Ave. Sweet Charity [SEE] 7 pm, $8-$10

Corvallis The Arts Center 700 SW Madison  Dios de los Muertos [SEE] 12-5 pm

Corvallis Senior Center 2601 N.W. Taylor Ave Friday Night Dancers [DANCE] 7:00 pm, $4

Bertsch/Allied Moving & Storage Warehouse 155 SE Lilly Ave. Furniture Share Benefit Sale [BUY] 9am-4pm

First Alternative Co-Op South 1007 S.E. 3rd St. Wine Tasting [DRINK] 5-7 pm OSU Campus, Benton Hall Room 202 OSU Music Master Class: Christine Meadows [SING] 5 pm OSU Campus, Benton Hall Room 203 and 303 Choral Composer’s Symposium: Joan Szymko [LEARN] 6:30-8:30 pm OSU Campus, Gilfillan Auditorium 2601 SW Orchard Ave. Autumn Gem: A Documentary on Modern China’s First Feminist [SEE] 7pm, FREE OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE] WineStyles 2333 NW Kings Blvd. First Friday Pinots 5pm-8pm, $8-$12 Lebanon The River Center (old WalMart building) 3000 S. Santiam Hwy. The River Center Holiday Craft and Gift Fair [BUY] 10 am-5:30 pm, Bring a nonperishable food item for extra ticket

06

saturday Saturday Albany 

Albany Saturday Farmers’ Market 4th & Ellsworth [BUY] 9 am – 1 pm  

Corvallis Dance Center 1935 NW Circle Blvd. Swing Dance Lessons 4 - 5 p.m.; 5 - 6 p.m.; and 6 - 7 pm $8 walkin/$30 series Intermediate. Corvallis Farmers’ Market First & Jackson St. [BUY] 9am-1pm First Congregational Church, Gatton Hall 4515 SW Hills Rd.  Corvallis Folkore Society Contra Dance - ThreeFingered Jack with Ron BellRoemer [DANCE] 7:30 Instruction, 8 pm Dance Muddy Creek Maze [FUN] 27001 Llewellyn Road 11am – 5pm OSU Campus, Benton Hall Room 203 and 303 Choral Composer’s Symposium: Joan Szymko [LEARN] 6:30 - 8:30 OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE]

Lebanon

Lebanon Coffeehouse & Eatery 661 Main Street Saturday Breakfast & Brunch (Mimosa’s) [EAT] 9 am – 2 pm Saturday Afternoon Free Movie [SEE] 2pm – 4pm The River Center (old WalMart building) 3000 S. Santiam Hwy. The River Center Holiday Craft and Gift Fair [BUY] 9am-4:30pm Bring a non-perishable food item for extra ticket Santiam Place Event Hall 139 Main St., Lebanon Crafters Market & HomeBased Business Expo 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

07 08 honey let's go out sunday

monday

Sunday Albany

Monday Corvallis

Albany Public Library 161 Washington Ave. Sunday Cinema [SEE] Toy Story 3 2 pm

 Corvallis

Corvallis Boys and Girls Club 1112 NW Circle Blvd.   Swing Dance Class [DANCE] 7-9 pm Muddy Creek Maze [FUN] 27001 Llewellyn Road 11am – 5pm OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE]

OSU LaSells Stewart Center Giustina Gallery 875 SW 26th St   Call & Response: The Conversation Continues Exhibit [SEE]

Lebanon

Starlite Sports Bar 638 Main St. Willamette Poker Tour [GAME] 7 pm v To be considered for a

calendar listings, notice of events must be received in writing by noon on Tuesday, two weeks before publication. Send to our Bump Editor. Photographs should be clearly labeled and will be returned if accompanied by a self addressed, stamped envelope.

oppoetunity It's a NEW thing, it's a COOL thing We are seeking speakers: performance poets, spoken word artists, undefined vagrants of verbiage, anyone, in fact, that takes words scribbled on pages or arranged in digital bits and puts them out into the air for others to hear. We are looking for these people to begin something new here, in Corvallis. This new thing does not yet have a name or a shape or a place; it is simply an idea, a wish, something absent, but desired. As with any desire, the gap between whim and reality is simply action: standing as opposed to sitting, speaking rather than silence, and so speakers are what we need. It is our intention to begin by meeting, sharing our work, and building a community, a collective, a scene, however you prefer to call a group of people with a common interest, a common goal. No resumes or writing samples are necessary; the only experience needed to do what we’re interested in is the life you’ve lived up to this point and a desire to speak and hear others speak. Respect, of course, is mandatory; no one here is better than, we all possess everything necessary to be great performers, from birth. Our ultimate goal is to start a local spoken word show, beginning with open mic nights to allow new folks to get used to performance and building towards whatever the group wishes; showcases featuring touring spoken word artists, poetry slams, and other spoken word events around Corvallis. If you’d like to be a part of this new group, or just get some more info about us, simply contact us by email at speakcorvallis@gmail.com. Include a little info about yourself, your writing, a good contact method, and what you’d like to get from this new creative outlet, as well as any questions you have about us. We’re all listening; all you have to do is speak up. -Jimbo Ivy

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THE ALCHEMIST

Albany

Albany Civic Theater, 111 First Ave. SW 541.928.4603 Alleyoop Lounge, 901 Pacific Blvd 541.941.0977 Bogey’s Bar & Grill, 129 W 1st Ave. 541.929.8900 Calapooia Brewing, 140 Hill St. NE 541.928.1931 Cappie’s Brewhouse, 211 1st Ave W 541.926.1710 Cascade Grill, 110 Opal St. NW 541.926.3388 Chasers Bar & Grill, 435 SE 2nd Ave 541928.9634 Dixie Creek Saloon, 32994 Hwy 99E, Tangent, OR 541.926.2767 Favorite Mistake Sports Bar, 5420 Pacific Blvd. 541.903.0034 Front Street Bar, 2300 Northeast Front Ave. 541.926.2739 GameTime SportsBar & Grill, 2211 Waverly Dr. SE 541.981.2376 Humpty’s Dump Bar & Grill, 916 Old Salem Rd NE 541.926.3111 JPv’s Restaurant and Lounge, 220 2nd Ave. 541.926.5546 Lariat Lounge, 901 Pacific Blvd SE 541.928.2606 Linger Longer Tavern, 145 SW Main St. 541.926.2174 Lucky Larrys Lounge, 1296 S Commercial Way SE 541.928.3654 Riley’s Billiards Bar and Grill, 124 Broadalbin St SW 541.926.2838 Wilhelm’s Spirits & Eatery, 1520 Pacific Blvd SE 541.926.7001

Corvallis

Aqua Seafood Restaurant & Bar, 151 NW Monroe Ave. 541.752.0262 The Beanery on 2nd, 500 SW 2nd St 541.753.7442 Big River Restaurant & Bar, 101 NW Jackson Ave. 541.757.0694 Block 15, 300 SW Jefferson Ave. 541.758.2077 Bombs Away Café, 2527 NW Monroe Ave. 541.757.7221 China Delight Restaurant, 325 NW 2nd St. 541.753.3753 Clodfelter’s, 1501 NW Monroe Ave. 541.758.4452 Cloud 9, 126 SW 1st St. 541.753.9900 Crowbar, 214 SW 2nd St. 541.753.7373 Darrell’s Restaurant and Lounge, 2200 NW 9th St. 541.752.6364 Downward Dog, 130 SW 1st St. 541.753.9900 Enoteca Wine Bar, 136 SW Washington Ave. 541.758.9095 Fireworks Restaurant and Bar, 1115 SE 3rd 541.754.6958 Flat Tail Pub, 202 SW 1st St. 541.758.2219 Greenberry Store & Tavern, 29974 HWY 99W 541.752.3796 Harrison Bar & Grill, 550 NW Harrison Blvd. 541.754.1017 Impulse, 1425 NW Monroe Ave. 541.230.1114 La Bamba Mix Night Club, 126 SW 4th St. 541.207.3593 Loca Luna, 136 SW Washington Ave, Ste. 102 541.753.2222 Luc, 134 SW 4th St. 541.753.4171 Murphy’s Tavern, 2740 SW 3rd St. 541.738. 7600 Papa’s Pizza, 1030 S.W. Third St. 541.757.2727 Peacock Bar & Grill, 125 SW 2nd St. 541.754.8522 Squirrel’s, 100 SW 2nd St. 541.753.8057 Sunnyside Up Café, 116 NW 3rd St 541.758.3353 Suds & Suds, 1045 NW Kings Blvd. 541.758.5200 Troubadour, 521 SW 2nd St. 541.752.7720 Tyee Wine Cellars, 26335 Greenberry Rd. 541.753.8754 Wanted Saloon, 140 NW 3rd St. WineStyles, 2333 N.W. Kings Blvd. 541.738.9463

Lebanon

Artisian’s Well Lounge, 2250 South Main Rd. 541.451.3900 Cornerstone Café & Pub, 180 S 5th St. 541.847.6262 Duffy’s Irish Pub, 679 South Main St. 541.259.2906 Fire Pit Lounge, 2230 South Santiam Hwy 541.451.2010 GameTime Sports Bar and Grill, 3130 South Santiam Hwy 541.570.1537 Merlin’s Bar and Grill 541.258.6205 Peacock Bar & Grill East, 76 E. Sherman St. 541.451.2027 Sports Shack and Deli, 1250 Grant St. 541.259.0800

Philomath

High 5 Sports Bar & Grill, 1644 Main St.-541.929.7529 Meet’n Place Tavern, 1150 Mian St. 541.929.3130 Wine Vault, 1301 Main St. 541.929.8496 Wing Sing Restaurant & Lounge, 658 Main St. 541.929.6255

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

11


literati

dream; Bored Laughter

Part I

Chronicles of Detective Siempre by T. Clarence

¨A nineteen hand.¨ Detective Candy Siempre´s eyes scanned Regina´s cards on the table, then looked up to her. ¨You missed knobs for one,¨ he said halfheartedly as his hand slowly moved towards his peg. ¨Oh,¨ Regina´s own hand shot out and grabbed Candy´s. The detective froze, surprised. ¨What are you doing?¨ his client asked. ¨You missed your point, so I´m taking it,¨ he explained. Neither withdrew their hands from the board. ¨My grandfather taught me to never let someone steal my points,¨ Regina said. ¨Well my grandpa taught me not to miss any, and to gain by others mistakes,¨ Candy countered. ¨We´re in my dream,¨ Regina said flatly. ¨Fine,¨ he let go. Regina smiled faintly as she moved her back peg one slot ahead of her lead, ¨What´s knobs supposed to be, anyway? It´s called ´his heels.´¨

¨That´s how my grandpa called it, so that´s how I call it, no matter whose dream I´m in,¨ Candy spoke harshly. A game of cards had seemed to them both like a fine way to perk up a dream, but they were at least half an hour in before they´d gone halfway, and now over an hour later they were still going. ¨My grandfather told me-¨ Regina began. ¨You paid me to figure out why your dreams have been so boring,¨ C´s eyes flicked up from his cards to meet Regina´s, ¨You can´t pay me enough to sit here and argue about our grandfathers.¨ ¨But-¨ ¨Fifteen two, fifteen four,¨ C flopped his cards down, ¨There is no more.¨ Regina eyed his hand carefully as Candy pegged to within easy distance of winning. He flipped over his crib and after a second, sighed. ¨A pair for two, that´ll do.¨ With the detective one point in the lead and two points from going out, the game continued on. Regina shuffled as Candy

stared gloomily at his glass of water, then hers. Nothing else was on the table. ¨If I win, I´m tossing you from a trolley,¨ she said. The long game had taken boredom into painful tediousness, and they´d started to irritate each other more and more. Then the threats had begun. The detective glanced up and past Regina to a window where barren fields now lulled past, as if seen from a slowly moving train. ¨If I win,¨ he said as she began to deal, ¨I´m tossing you from a balcony. It´ll be exciting.¨ He knew already what would appear in the window behind him and didn´t bother to turn for a look. ¨Four,¨ he lead with a spade after handing his two discards over to Regina. She smiled, ¨Eight for two.¨ Regina reached to move her peg as Candy dropped another card on the table, ¨Twelve for six. Game.¨ ¨Epic fail,¨ Regina said with wonder in her voice. The detective stood and stretched, ¨You

know, I think I will try the trolley.¨ ¨Tap! Tap!¨ and the detective sighed again as he tried the window. It wouldn´t open. ¨I´m out,¨ he pinched his arm. After blinking a few times, Candy unhurriedly leaned across the desk to shake Regina´s arm until she woke. ¨Epic fail,¨ she mumbled again. ¨As boring as you said, and I could effect no change to your dream as I warned,¨ Candy contested. ¨Another two people came in about exceedingly boring dreams while you were out,¨ the detective´s secretary, Susan, poked her head in at the sound of voices, ¨That´s eight in the last four days. I don´t know if I can take the pained look on their faces many more times.¨ Candy´s brow furrowed in concentration, ¨That one was definitely boring. I didn´t see any sign of what´s causing it though.¨ ¨I can´t believe I lost,¨ Regina said so suddenly that both Candy and Susan jumped.     He looked to her and shrugged, ¨It was your dream.¨

Where in the world is T. Clarence? 12

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

THE ALCHEMIST

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literati literati

My Heroes are Teachers at the bottom of the world by: Jocelyn Preston I know a teacher, who teaches at the Jail, Her students are victims of cultural hells. Lock downs protect her from bodily harm, She never judges her students, or treats them with scorn. She gives them her heart felt attentions each day And holds them to more than they think they can be. Pain is redundant and sorrows are much, These kids long neglected use excuses for a crutch They exist; never thrive at the bottom of the world Where sub cultures of crime use their talents for spoil... Aimlessly searching for anything they can get... Their defenses so thick, that a smile is a threat. And anger is flowing from rivers of regret The depth of this wrong has been lost in a maze Of politic lies that keeps casting them away To out of sight quarters that keeps them at bay... Managed by laws that condemn children to crimes… Caught in the snare of poverty’s grind...   The cure for their hurt is lost to a fear Of those who have more but refuse to care Cries of oppression from hunger and coldness of heart, Born of elitists, from Wall Street and sons… Where greed justifies the crimes of the rich Applauded and praised … It’s a sickening itch in an un-conscious craze… “We The People”, not owning our collective pain Of cultures deep wounds where the privileged elite Spend millions on weddings above poverties streets Where the greedy are envied, applauded and praised Extending their handshake into the adoring maze… Kept outside the gates of the privileged excess… Never minding they feed on unmet needs of the poor Justified by the rich, with thinly veiled contempt They distance themselves from unmet need Masked beneath well defended phrase…   Opportunity they say can be won If you’re willing to practice the ways of deception And take candy from babies, uneducated.., Entitlement is the reward for a lack of conscience …  If only you are willing to kick crap out of your neighbors... It’s the sub cultures that pay this alarming bill… Where  they use ignorance to exploit their

advantage with skill By the suffering of others left behind…     My hero’s are not the Elite who flaunt advantaged perceptions… My admiration does not fall to Royalty’s deceptions… I’m not impressed with how much or how many That marbles of acquisition can bring My hero’s are teachers who toil from great heart Whose works nurture and mine the depth of kid’s hearts Who labor in love to guide kids long abandoned Lost in want in a world of plenty   My hero’s are modest And full of compassion Who step up to affect impossible odds With disciplined caring that inculcates love Intentions of reaching, just one at a time... The kids at the jail Who have been abandoned to hate Need teachers who resonate deeply in mind...   The kids who are lost in poverty’s maze... Are not lost for one minute in capable hands... When one person cares and they know it is real It reaches the core of that God Forsaken drill… The delinquent begins to climb out of that hell Just because they can... when understanding is met That it isn’t their fault; it’s the system that’s wrong But how will they know if fear keeps them down... ? If no one steps up to meet their need From the cupboards of plenty locked behind greed… Like slaves in a slave ship shackled in chains… Denied humanity, sentenced to pain Poverty is profitable, for the elite’s constant gain… Where love hides in non-profit, nursed with distain…   Shame on the culture who fails even one kid With lack of attention to unmet need Support for teachers is sadly missing Entertainments distractions consumed by the masses Trumps education so society crashes… The ‘haves get more and the have not less than’... While corporate greed hides behind the WALL This wrong is blatant but never mind... We’ll just make a movie or talk out of mind That makes heroes for justice, martyrs and saints That kills incentive for fear of complaint Choose your battles carefully they say, Or you’ll end up in the very same way…

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So go ahead, deny it… Poke fun at the facts But nothing is going to keep this wave back The anger is growing as it does in all Time When revolt to avarice meets the fires of mind… We can vote for charisma, ignore our pain... Or we can get real and make a united stand  And join with teachers and parents  Who still give a damn...   Nelson Mandela challenged the odds Against ignorance that keeps people down He modeled compassion and firm resolve And set an example for change in our world He led from the back, he led from the front Committed to principals of unselfish LOVE   Challenge he faced in first changing himself… Not choosing to hate but to understand… Why Self-interests in privilege and entitled minds leave “We the People” at risk and disowned… He never gave up, no matter the cost His shinning light shines outward from inside his heart…   Let us too, practice compassion, where love is an action Say NO to lies and rewarding deceptions… Implement impartial laws… We need to practice, Accountability and  “Justice for ALL”…  Think Globally, Act Locally

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NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

13


O ' P I N Ipints NG

Flat Tail Brewery- Not Your Runof-the-mill pond- Beaver Slap!

Writers Wanted

submissions@ thealchemistweekly.com

14

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

It’s 8:00 am on a cool, foggy and very saturated autumn morning and I’m pressed against the hot liquor tank at the Flat Tail Brewery trying to warm my old bones. The radiant heat coming off the stainless steel feels great and I’m melancholic as I look out through old warehouse windows at Gum Maples blazing brilliantly on a canvas of white fog slash painted above the Willamette. Today, I am here as a guest brewer for batch #4 of Ol’ Lickspigot Barley Wine. As my thoughts meander over the history of this beer I feel the spirits of brewers past coming alive in the blood coursing through my veins. It’s a sensation every brewer gets with this age-old tradition dating back over 7,000 known years. But this story is not about me or about Ol’ Lickspigot. It’s about Dave Marliave, head brewer at the Flat Tail Brewery. During the day’s brew session I asked Dave if he was going to spend the rest of his life brewing at the F.T. and his response was a bit scary. “I don’t know what else I would do.” See, the spirits of past brewers run especially thick through Dave’s veins and from a brewer’s perspective he has it pretty good. The F.T. is a hands on brewery with no computer buttons to push and nothing automated about the place at all...Manual Brewer. Dave is responsible for every aspect of the beer production and if he gets sick or decides not to come to work, then there’s no beer. Dave’s beer is a big aspect of the adjoining Flat Tail eatery as he also has a growing patron list that finds salvation in a pint o’ foam on the restaurant side of the facility just one window pane away. The Flat Tail brewery is a place where the blood and sweat of the day’s work translates into craft beer. I, myself, don’t know why Dave would want to go anywhere else. “Lil’ Dave”, as I like to refer to him, stems back close to the day he first walked into Corvallis Brewing Supply inquiring about homebrewing and walking out the door with a shiny new starter kit. Shortly after he brewed his first batch he came in with questions, “Joel, where can I get a brewing job!”... well, so maybe it was more like a demand and less like a question. At the time, we only had one other brewery in town, so I sent him down to talk to Dave Wills of Oregon Trail. Thus, “Lil’ Dave” the brewer was born. At Oregon Trail Brewery, he quickly scaled the ladder to head brewer as he took on all aspects of the job from brewing, to keg sales, to ordering. Oh, yes, have I forgot to mention that this intro brewer was not yet 21 years of age?

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Searching more from the occupation, he moved from “The Trail” over to a start up brewery in McMinneville called Fire Mountain. So you say that you’ve never heard of that brewery? Well, let’s just say there were some pretty good reasons for Lil’ Dave to jump ship and the prospect of a new brewery got him salivating enough to set his brewing boots deep into the mud of Corvallis. Flat Tail’s standards are pretty typical of Pacific Northwest breweries: stout, kolsch, pale, IPA, wheat, porter and an amber. So you noticed the lack of names? Lil’ Dave is searching for a lasting identity of which I equate to a bit like naming a new pet weeks after bringing it home so that it might discover/expose its own name. The seasonals Lil’ Dave has already crafted are much more identifiable: “Nice Melons” is a collaboration brew with Nate Tilley of Agrarian Ales and Red Hat Melons. “A Brew Named Sue” is an honorable beer crafted on the anniversary of Johnny Cash’s death. His pumpkin beer is an absolute dreamy elixir and one of the best squash ales I’ve yet to try. Lil’ Dave has some tricks up his sleeve that he’ll release when the beers tell him it’s time (that’s kind of a brewer’s thing) such as his Berliner Weise style barrel-aged that is blended with two different bacteria and one yeast strain. At the end of my brew session, Ol’ Lickspigot #4 is tucked away into a fermenter with a nice bed of yeast and I’m squirming down into the man hole of the boil kettle to dig out the spent hops and to scrub the kettle. Lil’ Dave is laughing his ass off as I’ve finally squinted my way into the cavity. Jokingly I quip, “Yep, I sure love brewin’! I love brewin’ beer so much I’m gonna switch my major to fermentation science!” Lil’ Dave smugly pulls back on this verbal tug-of-war with a, “yep, ‘cause girls love beer and they love brewers!” As I dig out another bucket full of wet, soggy hops I pull back on the rope between us “That’s right!” ‘cause brewin’ beer is so damn cool.” Flat Tail is currently the newest and fourth brewery in Corvallis located down along the water front on the corner of 1st and Madison. They are open 11 am to 11 pm daily with a full restaurant serving typical pub food with slight twists and certainly better than average standings. You can find Lil’ Dave here most of the time either physically or by his spirit found within every fresh pint of his beer. -Joel Rea (Corvallis Brewing Supply owner) joel@lickspigot.com

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CRO S SWORD

Moving Around

Inkwell Crosswords by Ben Tausig

Across 1. Brady and Brees, e.g. 4. “___ Griffin’s Crosswords” 8. Without a compass, say 14. Shrovetide day: Abbr. 15. Mine: Fr. 16. Halloween yard props 17. “___ tree falls in the forest ...” 18. Removing stems and seeds? 20. Clinton group in the 1970s 22. Subj. of “The Nader Report” 23. They may be sordid 24. Huge reference: Abbr. 26. Ohio city where Clark Gable lived 28. Steam whistle? 33. Gift bearers of Christmas lore 34. Contend 35. Wears a fake mustache, perhaps 38. “Take On Me” band playing their final shows this December 39. Object of some drives 40. Yank’s currency: Abbr. 41. Japanese dramatic form 42. They may be hung, legally 44. Hindu honorific 45. Bible book after Daniel 46. Vegas? 49. Title in the name of some crappy margarita joints 50. Words of confession 51. Bee-related 54. Rapper with nine Grammy nominations (and no awards) 56. Subject of many a 59-Down photo 60. Cruel blogger’s device for disciplining employees? 63. Subject of many a 59-Down photo 64. Wary of curses? 65. “Livin’ la Vida ___” 66. Brand in some peanut butter bomb cakes 67. What a flirter might give a flirtee 68. White’s genre 69. The mandible is part of it Down 1. Certain swab 2. Muscular 3. Linebacker Junior who debuted in 1990 and still hasn’t retired 4. Like some ball attendees 5. Ammonia inhalant carrier 6. An emcee may ask a crowd to raise it 7. Expensive for being used, perhaps 8. Pundit Coulter

SUDOKU

Tofu Ingredients: Firm tofu of choice Dry Corn Cornstarch Garnish: teaspoon of chopped chives 9. Facility with cages and howling 10. Johnny Cash’s daughter 11. Suffix for believers 12. Poetry units 13. Food Network measures: Abbr. 19. Reactions to spiders 21. Sheets used in sushi 25. Gets started without hesitation 27. “Il barbiere di Siviglia” composer 28. Key for the theme song to “Ghostbusters”: Abbr. 29. Where Obama was born 30. Lab gels 31. Cancel 32. Tony Micelli portrayer on “Who’s the Boss?” 36. Nu metal band whose name is written with a backwards “R” 37. Atlantic food fish 39. “___ now!” (“Seinfeld” exclamation) 40. Geller who claims to be telepathic 43. “I guess everyone wins today!” 44. Keeps going and going, as a city 45. Red Muppet 47. Extremely basic game 48. Tabloid flame 51. Thing entered in a PDA, say 52. Yellow bear since 1926 53. Capri, e.g. 55. “Damn it, fly!” 57. Big trip to Saudi Arabia 58. Region with heavy monsoons 59. Apt to be viewed with a finger on the ESC key, say 61. Marriage announcement word 62. Area for acute treatment, for short

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Thank you to

audiophilia, The Flailing Inhalers, pseudoboss, & Sar Shalom your efforts raised $192 for Project H.E.R.

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www.sudoku-puzzles.net

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Lelan Norquist has served as an Executive Chef for Riverbend Resort, as well as an owner of California Grill. He has been in the restaurant industry in various capacities for 25 years, and his cooking career began at a military cook school in Virginia. eats@thealchemistweekly.com

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Tofu instructions: Using a firm tofu of your choice, cut into small triangles approximately 1 inch long on each side and about ½ inch thick.

4-5 pieces of tofu per plate makes a great appetizer.

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Ginger sauce Instructions: Mix ingredients into saucepan on medium heat and let simmer for 30 minutes. Drain mixture through cheesecloth to get out the pieces of ginger root. Refrigerate sauce until cooled.

Roll tofu pieces in dry corn cornstarch until covered on all sides. Gently place pieces into deep fryer until golden brown. Pour chilled ginger sauce into shallow bowl. You will want the sauce to be about a ¼ inch deep. Place triangle tofu pieces into the sauce at top with a teaspoon of finely chopped chives for garnish.

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Ginger Ingredients: • 2 cups of sherry wine • 1.5 cups of soy sauce • ½ cup brown sugar • ½ cup orange juice • 1 tablespoon fresh chopped ginger root

Difficulty: Medium

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Key Largo Prawns

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THE ALCHEMIST

NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8, 2010

15


A L C H y AWARDS

2 0 1 0 NOMINATION

BALLOT

Thank you for taking the time to help us identify those worthy of being on the official Alchy Award Ballot for 2010. Mail your analog ballot to PO BOX 1591, Corvallis, OR 97339. Go to www.thealchemistweekly.com for the digital version. All entries must be submitted by Friday, November 26th.

DRANK IT BREWERY:

MICROBREW (What/Where):

DOMESTIC:

BEER NAME (What/Where):

WINERY:

RED WINE (What/Where):

WHITE WINE (What/Where):

COCKTAIL (What/Where):

MOCKTAIL (What/Where):

COFFEE DRINK (What/Where):

SANDWICH (What/Where):

APPETIZER (What/Where):

SIDE DISH (What/Where):

DESSERT (Wha/ Where):

QUICK FOOD:

MUSIC VENUE:

FLOWERS:

BAKERY:

NON-PROFIT:

FURNITURE:

HEARD IT

GROCERIES:

BAND:

PLACE TO TAKE YOUR KIDS:

ELECTRIC BAND:

SPIRITUAL OUTLET:

ACOUSTIC BAND:

TO BRAINSTORM:

ELECTRIC GUITARIST:

TO GET PICKED UP:

ACOUSTIC GUITARIST:

TO PICK SOMEONE UP:

BARTENDER:

BREAKFAST (What/Where):

PIZZA (What/Where):

BEST THING ABOUT OSU STUDENTS:

DENTIST: HOME DECOR: DOCTOR:

FICTION WRITER:

NON-FICTION WRITER: WOMEN’S CLOTHING:

BASSIST:

FOR A FIRST DATE:

WORST THING ABOUT OSU STUDENTS:

BEST USE OF CITY MONEY in 2010:

KEYBOARDIST:

TO MAKE OUT:

DRUMMER:

TO BREAK UP:

VOCALIST:

TO HIDE DURING THE SCHOOL YEAR:

WORST USE OF CITY MONEY in 2010:

POET: NEW CLOTHING: HAIR STYLIST: USED CLOTHING:

VEGETARIAN (What/Where):

LOCAL CELEBRITY:

BEST THING TO HAPPEN TO THE VALLEY in 2010:

WORST THING TO HAPPEN TO THE VALLEY in 2010:

SHOES: BAKED GOOD (What/Where):

SUSHI (What/Where):

MASSEUSE: SPA:

SONGWRITER:

PAINTER (ANALOG):

TO PROCRASTINATE: MUSIC ALBUMS:

TURNTABLIST:

TOP NEWS STORY in 2010 (Story/journalist):

PAINTER (DIGITAL):

TO STUDY:

BEST INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM in 2010 (Story/journalist):

MUSIC INSTRUMENTS:

ATE THERE PACIFIC/ASIAN:

HORNIST:

WAS THERE ART GALLERY:

LIQUOR BAR: AMERICAN:

CREATIVE OUTLET:

WATERING HOLE: CHINESE:

FESTIVAL:

COFFEE SHOP:

BURGER (What/Where):

BEST/WORST

MEN’S CLOTHING:

WINE BAR:

ENTREE (What/Where):

CHEF: HARDWARE:

MEXICAN:

ATE IT

WAITRESS/WAITER:

HAIR SALON: HOT DOG (What/Where):

MENTOR:

BARISTA:

DRANK THERE BEER BAR:

KNOW THEM

MEDITERRANEAN:

SUSHI:

FREE WI-FI:

HIKING TRAIL:

THAI:

LOCAL PARK:

VEGETARIAN:

MOVIE THEATRE:

BOUGHT IT THERE ANITQUES:

AUTO SERVICE:

NEW AUTO:

USED AUTO:

BIKES:

BOOKS:

COFFEE ROASTER:

VISUAL ARTIST: NEW BUSINESS in 2010:

BEST THING ABOUT MY TOWN:

PHOTOGRAPHER: PET STORE: POTTER /SCULPTOR: TANNING SALON: PERFORMANCE ARTIST: TATTOOS/PIERCINGS: SHOP ANIMAL: WAY TO SPEND $10: SHOP OWNER: BEER:

WORST THING ABOUT MY TOWN:

BEST VALUE FOR YOUR $:

WORST VALUE FOR YOUR $:

MOST POSITIVE ACTION BY A CITY COUNCIL in 2010:

TEACHER: LIQUOR: PROFESSOR: WINE:

MOST NEGATIVE ACTION BY A CITY COUNCIL in 2010:


The Alchemist Weekly