Page 1

Official

Publication

&

of

M

the

Australasian

A

Corrosion

T

E

R

Association

I

A

•

www.corrosion.com.au

L

S

Vol 36 No 4, August 2011 ISSN 1326-1932

Inside this Issue: Cathodic Protection Technical Group Report University Profile: Charles Darwin University Project Profile: Management of Tasmanian Bridges Project Profile: Rust Never Sleeps: Recoating of Aboveground Bulk Water Pipes in Brisbane Technical Note: Next Generation Metallic Coatings Research Paper: Corrosion and the Role of Blistering at the Coating/Substrate Interface Research Paper: Continual Remote Monitoring for Verification of AC Mitigation

1


Accurate as of 20/7/2011 ACA takes this opportunity to acknowledge the following Gold Members for their ongoing support:

&

M

A

T

E

R

I

A

L

S

ISSN 1326-1932 Published by the Australasian Corrosion Association Inc. ABN: 66 214 557 257 Publications Director Mohammad Ali – GHD, MAli@ghd.com.au Editor Brian Cherry – Monash University, Brian.Cherry@monash.edu Associate Editors Research: Bruce Hinton – Monash University, bruce.hinton@monash.edu Professional Practice: Willie Mandeno – Opus International Consultants, willie.mandeno@opus.co.nz News: Ian Booth – Australasian Corrosion Association, ibooth@corrosion.com.au Reviewers Andy Atrens – University of Queensland Nick Birbilis – Monash University Lex Edmond – Monash University Harvey Flitt – Queensland University of Technology Maria Forsyth – Monash University Rob Francis – Aurecon Australia Warren Green – Vinsi Partners Doug John – Curtin University of Technology Graeme Kelly – Corrotec Services Nick Laycock – STOS Grant McAdam – Defence Science and Technology Organisation David Nicholas – Nicholas Corrosion John Robinson – Mount Townsend Solutions Paul Schweinsburg – Queensland University of Technology Raman Singh – Monash University Graham Sussex – Sussex Material Solutions Tony Trueman – Defence Science and Technology Organisation Geoffrey Will – Queensland University of Technology David Young – University of New South Wales Advertising Sales Wesley Fawaz - wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Subscription Print Version: ISSN 1326-1932 Subscription rates to non members: Within Australia: A$72.60, incl GST, single copies A$16.50, incl GST Outside Australia: A$77, excl GST posted airmail, single copies A$22 incl GST On-Line Version: ISSN 1446-6848 Subscription rates to non members: A$22 incl GST The views expressed in Corrosion & Materials are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the ACA. Publication of advertisements does not imply endorsement by the ACA. Copyright of all published materials is retained by the ACA but it may be quoted with due reference. Australasian Corrosion Association Inc PO Box 112, Kerrimuir Vic 3129, Australia Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Email: aca@corrosion.com.au Internet: www.corrosion.com.au President: Ian MacLeod Chief Executive Officer: Ian Booth Operations Chairman: John Grapiglia Finance Director: Paul Vince Senior Vice President: Peter Dove Junior Vice President: Allan Sterling Immediate Past President: Roman Dankiw Technical Director: Graham Sussex Education Director: Geoffrey Will Membership Director: Fred Salome Communications Director: Bryan Pike Publications Director: Mohammad Ali Newcastle Representative: Matthew Dafter New Zealand Representative: John Duncan Branches & Divisions Auckland Division: Sean Ryder 64 9 261 1400 61 0 418 854 902 Newcastle: Karen Swain 61 0 404 646 272 New South Wales: Denis Jean-Baptiste 61 7 3821 0202 Queensland: Cathy Sterling 61 8 8267 4744 South Australia: Alex Shepherd 61 0 418 120 550 Tasmania: Grant Weatherburn 64 27 671 2278 Taranaki Division: Ron Berry 64 4 473 3124 Wellington Division: Alistair MacKenzie 61 0 408 413 811 Western Australia: Gary Bennett 61 3 9885 5305 Victoria: John Tanti Technical Groups Cathodic Protection: Bruce Ackland 61 3 9890 3096 Coatings: Matthew O'Keeffe 61 437 935 969 Concrete Structures & Buildings: Frédéric Blin 61 3 9653 8406 61 8 9456 0344 Mining Industry: Peter Farinha Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industry: Fikry Barouky 61 402 684 165 61 3 9905 4919 Research: Nick Birbilis 61 2 9385 4322 Research: David Young 61 419 816 783 Water & Water Teatment: David Mavros 61 3 9495 6566 Welding, Joining & Corrosion: Graham Sussex Young Corrosion Professionals: Erwin Gamboa 61 8 8303 5473 www.corrosion.com.au

4 » President’s Message 6 » Chief Executive Officer’s Message 8 » News 13 » ACA Branch News 14 » ACA Standards Update 18 » R  oadshow Summary: Corrosion Mitigation and Monitoring Seminar Series 20 » Mining Technical Group Seminar 22 » Cathodic Protection Technical Group Report 24 » University Profile: Charles Darwin University 26 » Project Profile: Management of Tasmanian Bridges 28 » P  roject Profile: Rust Never Sleeps: Recoating of Aboveground Bulk Water Pipes in Brisbane 31 » Coatings Group Member Profile 32 » Technical Note: Next Generation Metallic Coatings 36 » R  esearch Paper: Corrosion and the Role of Blistering at the Coating/Substrate Interface 42 » R  esearch Paper:Continual Remote Monitoring for Verification of AC Mitigation 49 » Suppliers and Consultants

Front Cover Photo Melbourne trams and trains, shown here at Flinders Street Station would cause serious stray current corrosion of pipelines and other services if it wasn’t for the mitigation provided by a vast network of drainage bonds and cathodic protection systems coordinated by the Victorian Electrolysis Committee.

The ACA is a founder member of the World Corrosion Organization

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

3


Accurate as of 20/7/2011 ACA takes this opportunity to acknowledge the following Gold Members for their ongoing support:

&

M

A

T

E

R

I

A

L

S

ISSN 1326-1932 Published by the Australasian Corrosion Association Inc. ABN: 66 214 557 257 Publications Director Mohammad Ali – GHD, MAli@ghd.com.au Editor Brian Cherry – Monash University, Brian.Cherry@monash.edu Associate Editors Research: Bruce Hinton – Monash University, bruce.hinton@monash.edu Professional Practice: Willie Mandeno – Opus International Consultants, willie.mandeno@opus.co.nz News: Ian Booth – Australasian Corrosion Association, ibooth@corrosion.com.au Reviewers Andy Atrens – University of Queensland Nick Birbilis – Monash University Lex Edmond – Monash University Harvey Flitt – Queensland University of Technology Maria Forsyth – Monash University Rob Francis – Aurecon Australia Warren Green – Vinsi Partners Doug John – Curtin University of Technology Graeme Kelly – Corrotec Services Nick Laycock – STOS Grant McAdam – Defence Science and Technology Organisation David Nicholas – Nicholas Corrosion John Robinson – Mount Townsend Solutions Paul Schweinsburg – Queensland University of Technology Raman Singh – Monash University Graham Sussex – Sussex Material Solutions Tony Trueman – Defence Science and Technology Organisation Geoffrey Will – Queensland University of Technology David Young – University of New South Wales Advertising Sales Wesley Fawaz - wesley.fawaz@corrosion.com.au Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Subscription Print Version: ISSN 1326-1932 Subscription rates to non members: Within Australia: A$72.60, incl GST, single copies A$16.50, incl GST Outside Australia: A$77, excl GST posted airmail, single copies A$22 incl GST On-Line Version: ISSN 1446-6848 Subscription rates to non members: A$22 incl GST The views expressed in Corrosion & Materials are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the ACA. Publication of advertisements does not imply endorsement by the ACA. Copyright of all published materials is retained by the ACA but it may be quoted with due reference. Australasian Corrosion Association Inc PO Box 112, Kerrimuir Vic 3129, Australia Ph: 61 3 9890 4833, Fax: 61 3 9890 7866 Email: aca@corrosion.com.au Internet: www.corrosion.com.au President: Ian MacLeod Chief Executive Officer: Ian Booth Operations Chairman: John Grapiglia Finance Director: Paul Vince Senior Vice President: Peter Dove Junior Vice President: Allan Sterling Immediate Past President: Roman Dankiw Technical Director: Graham Sussex Education Director: Geoffrey Will Membership Director: Fred Salome Communications Director: Bryan Pike Publications Director: Mohammad Ali Newcastle Representative: Matthew Dafter New Zealand Representative: John Duncan Branches & Divisions Auckland Division: Sean Ryder 64 9 261 1400 61 0 418 854 902 Newcastle: Karen Swain 61 0 404 646 272 New South Wales: Denis Jean-Baptiste 61 7 3821 0202 Queensland: Cathy Sterling 61 8 8267 4744 South Australia: Alex Shepherd 61 0 418 120 550 Tasmania: Grant Weatherburn 64 27 671 2278 Taranaki Division: Ron Berry 64 4 473 3124 Wellington Division: Alistair MacKenzie 61 0 408 413 811 Western Australia: Gary Bennett 61 3 9885 5305 Victoria: John Tanti Technical Groups Cathodic Protection: Bruce Ackland 61 3 9890 3096 Coatings: Matthew O'Keeffe 61 437 935 969 Concrete Structures & Buildings: Frédéric Blin 61 3 9653 8406 61 8 9456 0344 Mining Industry: Peter Farinha Petroleum & Chemical Processing Industry: Fikry Barouky 61 402 684 165 61 3 9905 4919 Research: Nick Birbilis 61 2 9385 4322 Research: David Young 61 419 816 783 Water & Water Teatment: David Mavros 61 3 9495 6566 Welding, Joining & Corrosion: Graham Sussex Young Corrosion Professionals: Erwin Gamboa 61 8 8303 5473 www.corrosion.com.au

4 » President’s Message 6 » Chief Executive Officer’s Message 8 » News 13 » ACA Branch News 14 » ACA Standards Update 18 » R  oadshow Summary: Corrosion Mitigation and Monitoring Seminar Series 20 » Mining Technical Group Seminar 22 » Cathodic Protection Technical Group Report 24 » University Profile: Charles Darwin University 26 » Project Profile: Management of Tasmanian Bridges 28 » P  roject Profile: Rust Never Sleeps: Recoating of Aboveground Bulk Water Pipes in Brisbane 31 » Coatings Group Member Profile 32 » Technical Note: Next Generation Metallic Coatings 36 » R  esearch Paper: Corrosion and the Role of Blistering at the Coating/Substrate Interface 42 » R  esearch Paper:Continual Remote Monitoring for Verification of AC Mitigation 49 » Suppliers and Consultants

Front Cover Photo Melbourne trams and trains, shown here at Flinders Street Station would cause serious stray current corrosion of pipelines and other services if it wasn’t for the mitigation provided by a vast network of drainage bonds and cathodic protection systems coordinated by the Victorian Electrolysis Committee.

The ACA is a founder member of the World Corrosion Organization

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

3


Greetings Members, It is most encouraging to read in the latest issue of Corrosion & Materials of the new developments in coatings for light materials that will allow magnesium-aluminium alloys to finally take their rightful place in the automotive industry. Not only does Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) produce brilliantly coherent oxide coatings on the light alloys, but the underlying chemistry has plenty of scope for optimisation that will lead to the development of speciality coatings for a myriad of applications, the range of which will be limited only by our imaginations. The details of Australia’s first carbon tax will be still fresh on readers’ minds by the time this column is read but the importance of this milestone for those involved in the corrosion mitigation processes is that it marks a watershed in the chances for creative solutions to perennial problems of unmanaged decay of materials. It is my firm belief that the changes that need to be wrought in turning around the uncontrolled waste of corrosion are at hand. It is up to all of us to continue to promote the work we do as managers of our environment. Congratulations go to all of the team at ACA Headquarters and on the Publications Committee for another bumper edition of the publication which is now regularly running to 60 pages. Mohammad Ali and his publications team of reviewers make a formidable team. Under the editorship of the remarkable Brian Cherry, Corrosion & Materials is committed to bringing a quality, vibrant and lively publication to our members. Commensurate with this leap of activity and coverage of company and product profiles is the decision by the board to buy the upstairs unit at the ACA Headquarters in Blackburn. This purchase will

4

Corrosion & Materials

allow the ACA to continue to develop a wide range of services and products that will better disseminate our knowledge and provide improved service outcomes for workshops and in the areas of knowledge sharing and communication. If your copy of Corrosion & Materials tends to sit at the bottom of the pile of things to read you can take it to bedside table and find plenty of material to keep you stimulated while others are reading recipes and the gossip or fashion columns in the newspaper. The assessment and treatment of a massive gilded bronze statue on top of the state parliament in Wisconsin USA by one of my conservation colleagues is a wonderful tale of creative thinking and innovation that is typical of the problems that our members overcome each day. The sculpture was made by Chester French (1850-1931) and had been subjected to various conservation treatments since 1914 when it was first unveiled. Owing to the disconnect between lofty thoughts of the members of parliament and their desire for a finished product, the voted budget was for a sum that only considered the costs of the restoration and conservation work. The cost of preparation of the tender documents had been ignored; there was no money to cover the very significant costs of inspection of the sculpture standing more than 100 metres above ground level. Imaging from a helicopter would not provide the detailed photos needed for assessment of the corrosion problems and the development of a methodology. My colleague is a student of history and inspired by the work of Galileo Galilee he decided on using a telescope to record all the details. He transported an ancient and very fine instrument into the modern structures which surrounded the state Capitol and gained permission of building owners to photograph the massive bronze through their office windows. Thus a full 360˚ map of the

only won the contract for the tender documentation but also snared the job. In the end they were able to erect a nine metre high cylindrical scaffolding to the top of the dome which enabled the workers to safely operate at heights, clean the degraded surfaces, stabilise the bronze and re-gild the sculpture. Attempts to minimise pigeon roosting on the completed sculpture by having a pair of falcons nesting on the roof of the building were effective in one part in that the pigeons kept away. However the talons of the birds of prey scratched the gilding so the birds were set free and some reserve gold sheets were applied over the damaged areas by a trusty steeplejack.

condition of the metal was obtained using photographs taken through a specially made adaptor attached to the eyepiece of the brass 19th century telescope which brought the images to a high resolution digital camera! Thus a detailed condition report of the “inaccessible” object was prepared from hundreds of metres distance. The high quality of the digital imaging gave close up views of the degraded surfaces which helped them formulate the scope of works that was necessary to bring about effective restoration. Since the 5.4 metre tall bronze sculpture had been well constructed and was mechanically sound there was no plan to bring it down to ground level. Previous experience with a helicopter lift had proven problematic at the Texas Capitol building for when the finished job was being reinstated it proved to be remarkably difficult to reposition and attach the object to the top of the building. Although the decision to strip back the multiple layers of previous re-gilding and repatination to the original metal surface may have seemed to be an extreme form of conservation it was the only viable option. Sections of the undisturbed surface were kept in-situ to allow for historic documentation and the stripped surface allowed for inspection and correction of defects in the original casting. Standard methods of metal plugs and a high grade industrial epoxy coating were used before the whole object was treated with a coating of benzotriazole as a corrosion inhibitor then the bronze was coated with a red oil-based primer similar in hue to the original red lead. A final preparative layer of zinc chromate was hand painted before more than 20,000 leaves of gold were applied by hand. No coating systems were placed over the gilding as very few can survive the wide range of temperatures from winter lows of -28˚C to summer highs of 48˚C. My colleague not

Members are encouraged to visit the conference URL at www.18iccperth2011.com to obtain the most up-to-date listings of the papers and posters being presented at the 18th International Corrosion Congress in Perth 20-24 November. Having reviewed several of the papers for the conference I can personally attest to the vibrancy and quality of the material that is being presented to members and visitors to Perth. The weather will be superb and the food and company brilliant. The local organising committee, in conjunction with the team from Melbourne, has worked hard to ensure that this conference will be truly memorable for its social and technical quality. Ring your travel agent now, fill in the forms and I look forward to welcoming you all in Perth in a few short months. Yours in corrosion, Ian MacLeod President

Photos supplied by Anton Rajer.

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

5


Greetings Members, It is most encouraging to read in the latest issue of Corrosion & Materials of the new developments in coatings for light materials that will allow magnesium-aluminium alloys to finally take their rightful place in the automotive industry. Not only does Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) produce brilliantly coherent oxide coatings on the light alloys, but the underlying chemistry has plenty of scope for optimisation that will lead to the development of speciality coatings for a myriad of applications, the range of which will be limited only by our imaginations. The details of Australia’s first carbon tax will be still fresh on readers’ minds by the time this column is read but the importance of this milestone for those involved in the corrosion mitigation processes is that it marks a watershed in the chances for creative solutions to perennial problems of unmanaged decay of materials. It is my firm belief that the changes that need to be wrought in turning around the uncontrolled waste of corrosion are at hand. It is up to all of us to continue to promote the work we do as managers of our environment. Congratulations go to all of the team at ACA Headquarters and on the Publications Committee for another bumper edition of the publication which is now regularly running to 60 pages. Mohammad Ali and his publications team of reviewers make a formidable team. Under the editorship of the remarkable Brian Cherry, Corrosion & Materials is committed to bringing a quality, vibrant and lively publication to our members. Commensurate with this leap of activity and coverage of company and product profiles is the decision by the board to buy the upstairs unit at the ACA Headquarters in Blackburn. This purchase will

4

Corrosion & Materials

allow the ACA to continue to develop a wide range of services and products that will better disseminate our knowledge and provide improved service outcomes for workshops and in the areas of knowledge sharing and communication. If your copy of Corrosion & Materials tends to sit at the bottom of the pile of things to read you can take it to bedside table and find plenty of material to keep you stimulated while others are reading recipes and the gossip or fashion columns in the newspaper. The assessment and treatment of a massive gilded bronze statue on top of the state parliament in Wisconsin USA by one of my conservation colleagues is a wonderful tale of creative thinking and innovation that is typical of the problems that our members overcome each day. The sculpture was made by Chester French (1850-1931) and had been subjected to various conservation treatments since 1914 when it was first unveiled. Owing to the disconnect between lofty thoughts of the members of parliament and their desire for a finished product, the voted budget was for a sum that only considered the costs of the restoration and conservation work. The cost of preparation of the tender documents had been ignored; there was no money to cover the very significant costs of inspection of the sculpture standing more than 100 metres above ground level. Imaging from a helicopter would not provide the detailed photos needed for assessment of the corrosion problems and the development of a methodology. My colleague is a student of history and inspired by the work of Galileo Galilee he decided on using a telescope to record all the details. He transported an ancient and very fine instrument into the modern structures which surrounded the state Capitol and gained permission of building owners to photograph the massive bronze through their office windows. Thus a full 360˚ map of the

only won the contract for the tender documentation but also snared the job. In the end they were able to erect a nine metre high cylindrical scaffolding to the top of the dome which enabled the workers to safely operate at heights, clean the degraded surfaces, stabilise the bronze and re-gild the sculpture. Attempts to minimise pigeon roosting on the completed sculpture by having a pair of falcons nesting on the roof of the building were effective in one part in that the pigeons kept away. However the talons of the birds of prey scratched the gilding so the birds were set free and some reserve gold sheets were applied over the damaged areas by a trusty steeplejack.

condition of the metal was obtained using photographs taken through a specially made adaptor attached to the eyepiece of the brass 19th century telescope which brought the images to a high resolution digital camera! Thus a detailed condition report of the “inaccessible” object was prepared from hundreds of metres distance. The high quality of the digital imaging gave close up views of the degraded surfaces which helped them formulate the scope of works that was necessary to bring about effective restoration. Since the 5.4 metre tall bronze sculpture had been well constructed and was mechanically sound there was no plan to bring it down to ground level. Previous experience with a helicopter lift had proven problematic at the Texas Capitol building for when the finished job was being reinstated it proved to be remarkably difficult to reposition and attach the object to the top of the building. Although the decision to strip back the multiple layers of previous re-gilding and repatination to the original metal surface may have seemed to be an extreme form of conservation it was the only viable option. Sections of the undisturbed surface were kept in-situ to allow for historic documentation and the stripped surface allowed for inspection and correction of defects in the original casting. Standard methods of metal plugs and a high grade industrial epoxy coating were used before the whole object was treated with a coating of benzotriazole as a corrosion inhibitor then the bronze was coated with a red oil-based primer similar in hue to the original red lead. A final preparative layer of zinc chromate was hand painted before more than 20,000 leaves of gold were applied by hand. No coating systems were placed over the gilding as very few can survive the wide range of temperatures from winter lows of -28˚C to summer highs of 48˚C. My colleague not

Members are encouraged to visit the conference URL at www.18iccperth2011.com to obtain the most up-to-date listings of the papers and posters being presented at the 18th International Corrosion Congress in Perth 20-24 November. Having reviewed several of the papers for the conference I can personally attest to the vibrancy and quality of the material that is being presented to members and visitors to Perth. The weather will be superb and the food and company brilliant. The local organising committee, in conjunction with the team from Melbourne, has worked hard to ensure that this conference will be truly memorable for its social and technical quality. Ring your travel agent now, fill in the forms and I look forward to welcoming you all in Perth in a few short months. Yours in corrosion, Ian MacLeod President

Photos supplied by Anton Rajer.

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

5


Additional office space will allow for increased member benefits

likely prospect of further growth in staff numbers. Staffing increases are likely in the training and education, technical, Branch service and general member service areas over the coming year.

ACA’s board has moved to secure additional office space which will allow for an increased level of service and the expansion of member benefits.

An important aspect of the purchase is ACA’s ability to secure the additional premises without having to borrow funds to support the purchase.

For some time the existing premises located in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs have been at capacity due to the growth in staff numbers and the increase in association activities.

Prior to considering the new premises ACA’s board approved the creation of a building asset replacement fund. This fund in a manner similar to the prior establishment of the ACA’s Future Fund is designed to ensure that ACA adequately plans and provides for the future of the Association. The annual allocation of an amount to fund the replacement cost of ACA’s premises also means that ACA is more realistically reflecting the cost of doing business in its accounting practices.

By the time this edition of Corrosion & Materials goes to press, the purchase of an additional suite of offices in the same building ACA currently occupies will have been completed. In considering the purchase ACA’s board critically examined the association’s financial performance in recent years, projected levels of activity into the future, the need to better manage the logistics associated with ACA training and the

ACA’s transition from a financially challenged organisation to one which enjoys sound financial health has been achieved under the stewardship of ACA’s Council, Operations Committee (board) and through the expansion of its training activities and the better management of its business risks. In addition to the important role played by members in governance roles, ACA’s staff has worked to implement the strategic direction and policy initiatives determined at Council and board level. Further announcements will be made in coming months about new staff appointments to support the expanded range of member benefits.

Perth, Australia 2011 Corrosion Control, Contributing to a Sustainable Future For All

Discover the latest international research, technology and trends in • Coatings • Cathodic Protection • Corrosion Management • Corrosion Modelling • Inhibitors • Advanced Materials • Failure Analysis • Sensors and Monitoring and more.

Ian Booth Chief Executive Officer ibooth@corrosion.com.au

Perth Convention & Exhibition Centre 20-24 November 2011

Global Experience – Local Presence Our advanced coatings provide protection for major infrastructure projects worldwide

Quality range of blasting grades for your blast cleaning requirements.

GMA NewSteelTM

Registrations now open www.18iccperth2011.com

New steel, surface with light rust & thin coatings

GMA SpeedBlastTM General purpose abrasive

GMA PremiumBlastTM Maintenance grade for tough jobs

Proudly Presented By

For more information, contact us at 08 9287 3250 or email sales@garnetsales.com

70 Jotun companies represented in more than 80 countries. 38 production facilities globally. Uniform standard of global service.

GMA Garnet Group Level 18, Exchange Plaza, The Esplanade, Perth, WA 6000

www.garnetsales.com

6

Corrosion & Materials

Major Sponsor

jotun.com

Jotun Australia Head Office – 03 9314 0722

52507 Infrastructure Adv Australia 95mm W x 125mm H.indd 1

27/06/2011 09:35

7


Additional office space will allow for increased member benefits

likely prospect of further growth in staff numbers. Staffing increases are likely in the training and education, technical, Branch service and general member service areas over the coming year.

ACA’s board has moved to secure additional office space which will allow for an increased level of service and the expansion of member benefits.

An important aspect of the purchase is ACA’s ability to secure the additional premises without having to borrow funds to support the purchase.

For some time the existing premises located in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs have been at capacity due to the growth in staff numbers and the increase in association activities.

Prior to considering the new premises ACA’s board approved the creation of a building asset replacement fund. This fund in a manner similar to the prior establishment of the ACA’s Future Fund is designed to ensure that ACA adequately plans and provides for the future of the Association. The annual allocation of an amount to fund the replacement cost of ACA’s premises also means that ACA is more realistically reflecting the cost of doing business in its accounting practices.

By the time this edition of Corrosion & Materials goes to press, the purchase of an additional suite of offices in the same building ACA currently occupies will have been completed. In considering the purchase ACA’s board critically examined the association’s financial performance in recent years, projected levels of activity into the future, the need to better manage the logistics associated with ACA training and the

ACA’s transition from a financially challenged organisation to one which enjoys sound financial health has been achieved under the stewardship of ACA’s Council, Operations Committee (board) and through the expansion of its training activities and the better management of its business risks. In addition to the important role played by members in governance roles, ACA’s staff has worked to implement the strategic direction and policy initiatives determined at Council and board level. Further announcements will be made in coming months about new staff appointments to support the expanded range of member benefits.

Perth, Australia 2011 Corrosion Control, Contributing to a Sustainable Future For All

Discover the latest international research, technology and trends in • Coatings • Cathodic Protection • Corrosion Management • Corrosion Modelling • Inhibitors • Advanced Materials • Failure Analysis • Sensors and Monitoring and more.

Ian Booth Chief Executive Officer ibooth@corrosion.com.au

Perth Convention & Exhibition Centre 20-24 November 2011

Global Experience – Local Presence Our advanced coatings provide protection for major infrastructure projects worldwide

Quality range of blasting grades for your blast cleaning requirements.

GMA NewSteelTM

Registrations now open www.18iccperth2011.com

New steel, surface with light rust & thin coatings

GMA SpeedBlastTM General purpose abrasive

GMA PremiumBlastTM Maintenance grade for tough jobs

Proudly Presented By

For more information, contact us at 08 9287 3250 or email sales@garnetsales.com

70 Jotun companies represented in more than 80 countries. 38 production facilities globally. Uniform standard of global service.

GMA Garnet Group Level 18, Exchange Plaza, The Esplanade, Perth, WA 6000

www.garnetsales.com

6

Corrosion & Materials

Major Sponsor

jotun.com

Jotun Australia Head Office – 03 9314 0722

52507 Infrastructure Adv Australia 95mm W x 125mm H.indd 1

27/06/2011 09:35

7


18th International Corrosion Congress update The 18th International Corrosion Congress organising committee continue their planning for the November (20th – 24th) event which is now only three months away.

Pending the full completion of the review process, the congress will involve seven or eight concurrent streams over the length of the four day congress.

As this article is prepared the peer review process of the 300 plus papers is in full swing with over half of the papers still being reviewed for approval. Technical Convenor Liam Holloway and members of the technical committee are busy reviewing papers left unreviewed or needing a second opinion/review.

At the time this issue of Corrosion & Materials is published, the ACA’s Technical Group steering committees as well at the World Corrosion Organisation would have finalised their forum programmes for during the congress.

Papers will be presented from across the globe including countries such as Sweden, China, Italy, India, USA, Russia, United Kingdom, Germany, Jordan, Spain, Brazil, Iran and many more.

to miss out on this international event and the opportunity to welcome corrosion researchers and practitioners from around the world. Visit www.18iccperth2011.com to register now – early bird closes 26th August.

The 80 booth exhibition was sold out a couple of months ago and a list of exhibitors and sponsors can be viewed at the congress website. Registrations are open and the congress is on track to welcome approximately 700 delegates. ACA members are encouraged not

ACA to establish strong links with European corrosion community ACA has applied for membership of the European Federation of Corrosion (EFC) as an international member society.

while the most recent, working party on Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Drinking Water Systems was formed in 2007.

EFC is a federation of over 30 societies with interests in corrosion in twenty-five different countries within Europe and beyond. Taken together, its member societies represent the corrosion interests of more than 25,000 engineers and scientists. Founded in 1955, its aim is to advance the science of corrosion and protection of materials by promoting cooperation in Europe and collaboration internationally.

The working parties help to organise, singly or jointly with other working parties, strong technical sessions at EUROCORR. Other valuable activities include participation in collaborative research and testing programmes, the organisation of courses and workshops, and the preparation of reports, guidelines and proceedings for publication in the highly regarded EFC Series of 'green books' of which there are now over fifty. The working parties are overseen by the Science and Technology Advisory Committee. Anyone with related interests is free to participate in working party meetings, which usually take place in conjunction with EUROCORR.

There is a high degree of similarity between the objects of EFC and those of ACA. EFC accomplishes its most important activities through eighteen active working parties devoted to various aspects of corrosion and its prevention. The first working party, WP1 on Corrosion and Scale Inhibition was established in 1965

SUPER GARNET in Australia & New Zealand

• • • •

www.mineralscorp.com sales@industrial-minerals.co.nz

8

Corrosion & Materials

Further information on the benefits which will flow to ACA members is available from Ian Booth at ACA’s Melbourne office on (03) 9890 4833.

Dehumidification Technologies offers rental & sales of desiccant and refrigerant dehumidifiers. We have a wide range of dehumidification, cooling and heating equipment available to create any environment for our customer. Our innovative techniques, a wealth of knowledge and experience, and dependable service help customers achieve a successful project – on time and under budget.

High Garnet Purity (approx 99.5%) Low Chlorides Correctly Graded (7 grades available) Performance (cutting speed, profile, recyclability) Quality Certificate (to meet ISO standards) ISO 9001, ISO14000 & ISO 18000 Certified

Free Phone AU 1800 309 734 Free Phone NZ 0800 646 372

ACA is also considering entering into EFC’s membership card agreement which establishes additional reciprocal benefits in conjunction with 20 of EFC’s member societies.

We have the solution.

Abrasive Blast Media •

Important benefits available to EFC members which will flow to all ACA members under ACA’s international member society status include the opportunity to nominate candidates for the EFC Awards. Everyone who belongs to an EFC Member Society qualifies for reduced registration fees at EUROCORR and a 30% discount on the prices of the EFC publications.

Battling with Excessive Humidity?

Exclusive Distributor for

EUROCORR , the EFC's annual conference is the flagship event of the European corrosion calendar. Attracting upwards of six hundred delegates, it is held in a different

European country in September of each year. To date 26 of these conferences have been held in 11 different countries and they have become noted for their high technical quality as well as the very enjoyable social programme.

1800-RentDH

(736 834)

www.rentdh.com

www.corrosion.com.au

Melbourne

ddawson@rentdh.com

Sydney

Adelaide

Perth

Brisbane

24 hours a day / 7 days a week on-call service

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

9


18th International Corrosion Congress update The 18th International Corrosion Congress organising committee continue their planning for the November (20th – 24th) event which is now only three months away.

Pending the full completion of the review process, the congress will involve seven or eight concurrent streams over the length of the four day congress.

As this article is prepared the peer review process of the 300 plus papers is in full swing with over half of the papers still being reviewed for approval. Technical Convenor Liam Holloway and members of the technical committee are busy reviewing papers left unreviewed or needing a second opinion/review.

At the time this issue of Corrosion & Materials is published, the ACA’s Technical Group steering committees as well at the World Corrosion Organisation would have finalised their forum programmes for during the congress.

Papers will be presented from across the globe including countries such as Sweden, China, Italy, India, USA, Russia, United Kingdom, Germany, Jordan, Spain, Brazil, Iran and many more.

to miss out on this international event and the opportunity to welcome corrosion researchers and practitioners from around the world. Visit www.18iccperth2011.com to register now – early bird closes 26th August.

The 80 booth exhibition was sold out a couple of months ago and a list of exhibitors and sponsors can be viewed at the congress website. Registrations are open and the congress is on track to welcome approximately 700 delegates. ACA members are encouraged not

ACA to establish strong links with European corrosion community ACA has applied for membership of the European Federation of Corrosion (EFC) as an international member society.

while the most recent, working party on Corrosion and Corrosion Protection of Drinking Water Systems was formed in 2007.

EFC is a federation of over 30 societies with interests in corrosion in twenty-five different countries within Europe and beyond. Taken together, its member societies represent the corrosion interests of more than 25,000 engineers and scientists. Founded in 1955, its aim is to advance the science of corrosion and protection of materials by promoting cooperation in Europe and collaboration internationally.

The working parties help to organise, singly or jointly with other working parties, strong technical sessions at EUROCORR. Other valuable activities include participation in collaborative research and testing programmes, the organisation of courses and workshops, and the preparation of reports, guidelines and proceedings for publication in the highly regarded EFC Series of 'green books' of which there are now over fifty. The working parties are overseen by the Science and Technology Advisory Committee. Anyone with related interests is free to participate in working party meetings, which usually take place in conjunction with EUROCORR.

There is a high degree of similarity between the objects of EFC and those of ACA. EFC accomplishes its most important activities through eighteen active working parties devoted to various aspects of corrosion and its prevention. The first working party, WP1 on Corrosion and Scale Inhibition was established in 1965

SUPER GARNET in Australia & New Zealand

• • • •

www.mineralscorp.com sales@industrial-minerals.co.nz

8

Corrosion & Materials

Further information on the benefits which will flow to ACA members is available from Ian Booth at ACA’s Melbourne office on (03) 9890 4833.

Dehumidification Technologies offers rental & sales of desiccant and refrigerant dehumidifiers. We have a wide range of dehumidification, cooling and heating equipment available to create any environment for our customer. Our innovative techniques, a wealth of knowledge and experience, and dependable service help customers achieve a successful project – on time and under budget.

High Garnet Purity (approx 99.5%) Low Chlorides Correctly Graded (7 grades available) Performance (cutting speed, profile, recyclability) Quality Certificate (to meet ISO standards) ISO 9001, ISO14000 & ISO 18000 Certified

Free Phone AU 1800 309 734 Free Phone NZ 0800 646 372

ACA is also considering entering into EFC’s membership card agreement which establishes additional reciprocal benefits in conjunction with 20 of EFC’s member societies.

We have the solution.

Abrasive Blast Media •

Important benefits available to EFC members which will flow to all ACA members under ACA’s international member society status include the opportunity to nominate candidates for the EFC Awards. Everyone who belongs to an EFC Member Society qualifies for reduced registration fees at EUROCORR and a 30% discount on the prices of the EFC publications.

Battling with Excessive Humidity?

Exclusive Distributor for

EUROCORR , the EFC's annual conference is the flagship event of the European corrosion calendar. Attracting upwards of six hundred delegates, it is held in a different

European country in September of each year. To date 26 of these conferences have been held in 11 different countries and they have become noted for their high technical quality as well as the very enjoyable social programme.

1800-RentDH

(736 834)

www.rentdh.com

www.corrosion.com.au

Melbourne

ddawson@rentdh.com

Sydney

Adelaide

Perth

Brisbane

24 hours a day / 7 days a week on-call service

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

9


NEWS

Corrosion claims continue in defence

E-newsletter to improve communication Early July saw the first transmission of ACA’s e-newsletter. The e-newsletter will be transmitted to members and other ACA contacts on a regular basis. The first batch of e-newsletters was transmitted to 4000+ email

technical events, changes to ACA’s training calendar and staff contacts for ACA member services.

addresses predominantly in Australia and New Zealand. E-newsletters are not meant to replace content normally contained in Corrosion & Materials. Content will focus on reminding members and other subscribers of upcoming

Further information on ACA e-newsletters is available from Wesley Fawaz at ACA’s Melbourne office on (03) 9890 4833.

Future Fund on target The ACA’s board created a Future Fund in 2009 with a target of $250,000 to be set aside from income from ACA operations. The fund was initially secured against a term deposit of $130,000. In July 2011, a second term deposit for $120,000 was established with ACA’s bank. The secured balance of the fund now stands at $250,000. From the beginning of 2012, up to 40% of the balance of the fund will be released for special projects which as a consequence will not need to be

funded from cash flow. This translates into $100,000 being immediately available to fund initiatives which will deliver significant extra benefits for ACA members. ACA’s board has also reviewed the further development of the Future Fund and have agreed that the contribution rate to the fund from ACA operations will increase effective 1 January 2012. The development of the fund will see its balances increase significantly over time.

In addition to delivering an effective way to finance special projects and increase member benefits, the fund also provides a reserve buffer which can be drawn upon if association finances suffer a short term decline for any reason. The Future Fund was developed by ACA’s board as one means to better manage the association’s finances. Further information on the fund is available from Ian Booth at ACA’s Melbourne office on 903) 9890 4833.

GLOBAL COATINGS & CORROSION PROJECTS MANAGER INDUSTRIAL

Incospec & Associates Australia have an opportunity available for an experienced Project Manager to undertake a global position, managing various major coating and corrosion projects both in Australia and abroad. Industry experience in mining, oil and gas, bulk handling, marine or major infrastructure is preferred.

COATINGS

Simple Solutions to Complex Problems

Following press reports earlier this year, the Australian media have continued to report on corrosion claims within the defence industry. On June 20, 2011, The Sydney Morning Herald reported that “shipbuilder Austal's renewed focus on the defence sector has been dealt a blow, amid claims that a vessel built for the US Navy has ‘aggressive corrosion’ less than two years after it was commissioned. The aluminium warship - known as a ‘littoral combat ship’ for its ability to hug the shoreline, was the first of a possible 10 ships that Austal was

asked to build for the US Navy under a lucrative deal agreed in December. Reports by the Bloomberg news agency suggest the corrosion has been found in the propulsion system, and the ship may need to be drydocked for repairs.”

of severe rust soon after delivery had only occurred in a handful of cases. "In those cases the problems were primarily associated with maintenance and operation not fundamentally with the design or the build of the ship," he said.

The following day on June 21, 2011, The West Australian reported on a reply from Austal quoting chief executive Andrew Bellamy saying "we have built more than 230 aluminium vessels and know how to design, build and manage them to minimise corrosion." Mr Bellamy was reported to have said incidences

Following the ACA’s Corrosion Challenges report (published in Corrosion & Materials April 2011 and available to download off the ACA website) which focused on the Naval defence sector and these media reports, the ACA is now considering facilitating a corrosion symposium for the defence industry in 2012.

IPCQ celebrate 40 years ACA corporate members Industrial & Protective Coatings QLD (IPCQ) are proud to be celebrating their 40th year in business in 2011. IPCQ was founded as a company in 1971 and commenced operations that year with six partners. Today two of the existing partners, Colin Mears and Paul Jeffs along with newly appointed directors, Daryl Mears and Luke Emery, lead IPCQ with experience and dedication that has carried the IPCQ name for over 35 years.

Since their foundation in 1971, IPCQ has continued to offer a diverse range of corrosion control services while building and maintaining long lasting relationships with clients, suppliers and sub-contractors.

within Australia and overseas. For further information, please visit www.ipcq.com.au

“These relationships have given us the valued support that has assisted IPCQ to become the industry leading company that we are today” said director Luke Emery. IPCQ continue to complete numerous and varied projects both

DTM985

Required attributes: • 5-10 years Project Management experience in Coatings & Corrosion industry • People Management skills • Excellent understanding of full Microsoft Office suite of products • Ability to travel for extended periods • Technical expertise • Excellent written and oral skills • NACE CIP 2, Corrosion technology certs, field surveying or assessing experience

High solids, surface tolerant maintenance epoxy

M

• Atmospheric and immersion applications

• Direct to metal application

• Full AS2700 colour offer

• Rapid curing properties

• Approved to APAS 2793

ADE IN

A

US

For more information on Wattyl Epinamel high performance epoxies contact Wattyl Customer Service on 132 101 or visit us at www.wattyl.com.au I

A

C.V’s and enquires to be attention to: The General Manager: mail@incospec.com.au, (08)82674744

• Long term corrosion protection

TRAL

Wattyl® and Epinamel® are registered trademarks of Wattyl Australia Pty Limited A.B.N. 40 000 035 914

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

11


NEWS

Corrosion claims continue in defence

E-newsletter to improve communication Early July saw the first transmission of ACA’s e-newsletter. The e-newsletter will be transmitted to members and other ACA contacts on a regular basis. The first batch of e-newsletters was transmitted to 4000+ email

technical events, changes to ACA’s training calendar and staff contacts for ACA member services.

addresses predominantly in Australia and New Zealand. E-newsletters are not meant to replace content normally contained in Corrosion & Materials. Content will focus on reminding members and other subscribers of upcoming

Further information on ACA e-newsletters is available from Wesley Fawaz at ACA’s Melbourne office on (03) 9890 4833.

Future Fund on target The ACA’s board created a Future Fund in 2009 with a target of $250,000 to be set aside from income from ACA operations. The fund was initially secured against a term deposit of $130,000. In July 2011, a second term deposit for $120,000 was established with ACA’s bank. The secured balance of the fund now stands at $250,000. From the beginning of 2012, up to 40% of the balance of the fund will be released for special projects which as a consequence will not need to be

funded from cash flow. This translates into $100,000 being immediately available to fund initiatives which will deliver significant extra benefits for ACA members. ACA’s board has also reviewed the further development of the Future Fund and have agreed that the contribution rate to the fund from ACA operations will increase effective 1 January 2012. The development of the fund will see its balances increase significantly over time.

In addition to delivering an effective way to finance special projects and increase member benefits, the fund also provides a reserve buffer which can be drawn upon if association finances suffer a short term decline for any reason. The Future Fund was developed by ACA’s board as one means to better manage the association’s finances. Further information on the fund is available from Ian Booth at ACA’s Melbourne office on 903) 9890 4833.

GLOBAL COATINGS & CORROSION PROJECTS MANAGER INDUSTRIAL

Incospec & Associates Australia have an opportunity available for an experienced Project Manager to undertake a global position, managing various major coating and corrosion projects both in Australia and abroad. Industry experience in mining, oil and gas, bulk handling, marine or major infrastructure is preferred.

COATINGS

Simple Solutions to Complex Problems

Following press reports earlier this year, the Australian media have continued to report on corrosion claims within the defence industry. On June 20, 2011, The Sydney Morning Herald reported that “shipbuilder Austal's renewed focus on the defence sector has been dealt a blow, amid claims that a vessel built for the US Navy has ‘aggressive corrosion’ less than two years after it was commissioned. The aluminium warship - known as a ‘littoral combat ship’ for its ability to hug the shoreline, was the first of a possible 10 ships that Austal was

asked to build for the US Navy under a lucrative deal agreed in December. Reports by the Bloomberg news agency suggest the corrosion has been found in the propulsion system, and the ship may need to be drydocked for repairs.”

of severe rust soon after delivery had only occurred in a handful of cases. "In those cases the problems were primarily associated with maintenance and operation not fundamentally with the design or the build of the ship," he said.

The following day on June 21, 2011, The West Australian reported on a reply from Austal quoting chief executive Andrew Bellamy saying "we have built more than 230 aluminium vessels and know how to design, build and manage them to minimise corrosion." Mr Bellamy was reported to have said incidences

Following the ACA’s Corrosion Challenges report (published in Corrosion & Materials April 2011 and available to download off the ACA website) which focused on the Naval defence sector and these media reports, the ACA is now considering facilitating a corrosion symposium for the defence industry in 2012.

IPCQ celebrate 40 years ACA corporate members Industrial & Protective Coatings QLD (IPCQ) are proud to be celebrating their 40th year in business in 2011. IPCQ was founded as a company in 1971 and commenced operations that year with six partners. Today two of the existing partners, Colin Mears and Paul Jeffs along with newly appointed directors, Daryl Mears and Luke Emery, lead IPCQ with experience and dedication that has carried the IPCQ name for over 35 years.

Since their foundation in 1971, IPCQ has continued to offer a diverse range of corrosion control services while building and maintaining long lasting relationships with clients, suppliers and sub-contractors.

within Australia and overseas. For further information, please visit www.ipcq.com.au

“These relationships have given us the valued support that has assisted IPCQ to become the industry leading company that we are today” said director Luke Emery. IPCQ continue to complete numerous and varied projects both

DTM985

Required attributes: • 5-10 years Project Management experience in Coatings & Corrosion industry • People Management skills • Excellent understanding of full Microsoft Office suite of products • Ability to travel for extended periods • Technical expertise • Excellent written and oral skills • NACE CIP 2, Corrosion technology certs, field surveying or assessing experience

High solids, surface tolerant maintenance epoxy

M

• Atmospheric and immersion applications

• Direct to metal application

• Full AS2700 colour offer

• Rapid curing properties

• Approved to APAS 2793

ADE IN

A

US

For more information on Wattyl Epinamel high performance epoxies contact Wattyl Customer Service on 132 101 or visit us at www.wattyl.com.au I

A

C.V’s and enquires to be attention to: The General Manager: mail@incospec.com.au, (08)82674744

• Long term corrosion protection

TRAL

Wattyl® and Epinamel® are registered trademarks of Wattyl Australia Pty Limited A.B.N. 40 000 035 914

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

11


NEWS

ACA Auckland Division - June Meeting Report

ACA welcomes new members Blastcorp (blastcorp@bigpond.com) Commencing operations in Darwin N.T. in 1996, Blastcorp is a locally owned business which specialises in abrasive blasting and spray-painting applications across a number of facets of heavy industry; from the resources sector to maritime and general construction. Ganellen Asset Services (www.ganellen.com) Ganellen, a construction business completing projects up to $100m in value, has established a dedicated division to service the ongoing needs of clients owning building and infrastructure assets. Specialist services provided include façade refurbishment, maintenance & repair works, concrete & structural repairs, heritage restoration and programmed asset maintenance. Nanmah (kartya17@bigpond.com) Nanmah is a family owned and operated company based in the Goldfields with experience in the mining industry. The company provides a niche service and offer a multi-skilled workforce that is able to cater for their client's industrial sandblasting and painting requirements.

Gaurang Kansara of HRL Technology

Reno Blast (renoblast@bigpond.com) Located in Geraldton and servicing Western Australia, Reno Blast offer abrasive sand blasting, spray painting and powder coating services.

Balazs Kis of Advantage Quality Painting Services Ken Lucas of Lucas Painting Michel Nieuwoudt of The University of Auckland

Santos (www.santos.com) An Australian energy pioneer since 1954, Santos is one of the country’s leading gas producers, supplying Australian and Asian customers and pursuing a transformational liquefied natural gas (LNG) strategy. Santos operates in every major Australian petroleum province and in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and the Kyrgyz Republic. Santos has about 2,400 employees and a market capitalisation of approximately $13 billion.

Mar Quiapo Nigel Rees of Indianic Diving Daniel Reid of Sandvik Mining & Construction Jason Ross of J. Ross Inspections Services Ali Shams of Ausgrid Phillip Stroud of Kalgoorlie Consolidated Gold Mines David Stubbs of David Stubbs & Partners Andrew Thompson

Dylan Cawley of Vector Mike Cooke of Winnaleah Irrigation Scheme

Student Members

Ryan De Koh of GHD Huw Dent of Origin Energy Chris Hailes of Hunter Water Corporation

Igor Chaves of Newcastle University Lauren Curnow of Monash University Hoda Ehsani of Curtin University

Are you ready for your next career move?

Simon Golding of TAFE SA

GHD is an international professional services firm. Our people deliver innovative solutions by combining technical skill and experience with an understanding of our clients’ objectives and aspirations.

Jon Hodson of TAFE SA

Senior Corrosion Technologist

Laura Suarez of Curtin University

Abdul Halim Jaafar of Newmont Nusa Tenggara

• hydro-demolition • shotcreting • formwork • crack injection • coatings and linings • carbon fibre wraps

12 Corrosion & Materials

Speaker Wayne Thomson (left) with Auckland Chairman Michael Williams

William Ward of PCTE

Stephen Day of Stephen Day & Associates

Geoff Adlem Mob: 419 464 082 Office: 02 9519 8944 E-mail: info@silverraven.com.au

After an extensive Q&A session the ACA Auckland Chairman Michael Williams thanked Wayne for his excellent presentation. The attendees then retired to The Landing Restaurant where everyone enjoyed an excellent meal and great fellowship.

Kishore Venkatesan of CSIRO

Brett Aked of Control Synergy

Contact Us:

Wayne commenced his presentation with an outline of how over the past 30 years fibreglass flake reinforced linings have replaced older explosive-bonded metal claddings in process vessels containing very

corrosive chemicals. Denso market a wide range of glass flake linings specially for tanks, bunds, pumps, valves, process equipment and concrete structures, under the brand name Archco. Wayne outlined the properties of the fibreglass reinforcement and also the different types of polymers used as the resin matrix including polyesters and epoxies. In the selection and application of the lining system for a particular application Denso espouses the “Chain of Custody” concept that includes accredited lining applicators, which gives the asset owners much peace of mind. Applications for the glass flake linings include potable water and waste water treatment plants, pipelines, power stations, and chemical processing plants.

Peter Toulmin of Kaefer

Individual members

Concrete Repairs and Reconstruction

The June 16th meeting of the Auckland Division was the annual mid-year dinner held at The Landing hotel, at which Wayne Thomson, Business Development Manager of Denso (NZ) Ltd was the guest speaker. Wayne is a mechanical engineer who has worked in various roles in Africa, Italy, Australia and latterly in New Zealand, where he completed his MBA at Auckland University. His talk was entitled “Corrosion Prevention from Explosive Bonding to Glass Flake Reinforced Linings”.

• Cathodic protection • confined spaces • industrial rope access

Our Auckland and Brisbane offices each have an opportunity for a Senior Corrosion Technologist to join their teams. Due to the diverse nature of the role, consideration will be given to applicants with 8 years’ minimum experience with a technical, trade, industry or engineering background and knowledge of: • • • • • • •

Corrosion management services Condition assessment, pipeline assessment & rehabilitation Process corrosion control Cathodic protection Forensic corrosion investigation Materials and coating selection / specification Corrosion monitoring / testing

You will also have a current NACE or ACA Certification as a Corrosion Technician / Technologist, a track record of successful delivery of project programmes, excellent communication skills and demonstrated expertise in preparing reports and contract documents. GHD will provide you with a supportive environment where you’ll be encouraged to grow technically, personally and professionally to become a key player in our business. If you’re proactive and results-driven with a strong work ethic, and one who enjoys building strong relationships then we welcome your application

Blaze147516

Corporate Members

For further information and to submit your covering letter and CV please visit our website. www.ghd.com/careers

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

13


NEWS

ACA Auckland Division - June Meeting Report

ACA welcomes new members Blastcorp (blastcorp@bigpond.com) Commencing operations in Darwin N.T. in 1996, Blastcorp is a locally owned business which specialises in abrasive blasting and spray-painting applications across a number of facets of heavy industry; from the resources sector to maritime and general construction. Ganellen Asset Services (www.ganellen.com) Ganellen, a construction business completing projects up to $100m in value, has established a dedicated division to service the ongoing needs of clients owning building and infrastructure assets. Specialist services provided include façade refurbishment, maintenance & repair works, concrete & structural repairs, heritage restoration and programmed asset maintenance. Nanmah (kartya17@bigpond.com) Nanmah is a family owned and operated company based in the Goldfields with experience in the mining industry. The company provides a niche service and offer a multi-skilled workforce that is able to cater for their client's industrial sandblasting and painting requirements.

Gaurang Kansara of HRL Technology

Reno Blast (renoblast@bigpond.com) Located in Geraldton and servicing Western Australia, Reno Blast offer abrasive sand blasting, spray painting and powder coating services.

Balazs Kis of Advantage Quality Painting Services Ken Lucas of Lucas Painting Michel Nieuwoudt of The University of Auckland

Santos (www.santos.com) An Australian energy pioneer since 1954, Santos is one of the country’s leading gas producers, supplying Australian and Asian customers and pursuing a transformational liquefied natural gas (LNG) strategy. Santos operates in every major Australian petroleum province and in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, Vietnam, Bangladesh, India and the Kyrgyz Republic. Santos has about 2,400 employees and a market capitalisation of approximately $13 billion.

Mar Quiapo Nigel Rees of Indianic Diving Daniel Reid of Sandvik Mining & Construction Jason Ross of J. Ross Inspections Services Ali Shams of Ausgrid Phillip Stroud of Kalgoorlie Consolidated Gold Mines David Stubbs of David Stubbs & Partners Andrew Thompson

Dylan Cawley of Vector Mike Cooke of Winnaleah Irrigation Scheme

Student Members

Ryan De Koh of GHD Huw Dent of Origin Energy Chris Hailes of Hunter Water Corporation

Igor Chaves of Newcastle University Lauren Curnow of Monash University Hoda Ehsani of Curtin University

Are you ready for your next career move?

Simon Golding of TAFE SA

GHD is an international professional services firm. Our people deliver innovative solutions by combining technical skill and experience with an understanding of our clients’ objectives and aspirations.

Jon Hodson of TAFE SA

Senior Corrosion Technologist

Laura Suarez of Curtin University

Abdul Halim Jaafar of Newmont Nusa Tenggara

• hydro-demolition • shotcreting • formwork • crack injection • coatings and linings • carbon fibre wraps

12 Corrosion & Materials

Speaker Wayne Thomson (left) with Auckland Chairman Michael Williams

William Ward of PCTE

Stephen Day of Stephen Day & Associates

Geoff Adlem Mob: 419 464 082 Office: 02 9519 8944 E-mail: info@silverraven.com.au

After an extensive Q&A session the ACA Auckland Chairman Michael Williams thanked Wayne for his excellent presentation. The attendees then retired to The Landing Restaurant where everyone enjoyed an excellent meal and great fellowship.

Kishore Venkatesan of CSIRO

Brett Aked of Control Synergy

Contact Us:

Wayne commenced his presentation with an outline of how over the past 30 years fibreglass flake reinforced linings have replaced older explosive-bonded metal claddings in process vessels containing very

corrosive chemicals. Denso market a wide range of glass flake linings specially for tanks, bunds, pumps, valves, process equipment and concrete structures, under the brand name Archco. Wayne outlined the properties of the fibreglass reinforcement and also the different types of polymers used as the resin matrix including polyesters and epoxies. In the selection and application of the lining system for a particular application Denso espouses the “Chain of Custody” concept that includes accredited lining applicators, which gives the asset owners much peace of mind. Applications for the glass flake linings include potable water and waste water treatment plants, pipelines, power stations, and chemical processing plants.

Peter Toulmin of Kaefer

Individual members

Concrete Repairs and Reconstruction

The June 16th meeting of the Auckland Division was the annual mid-year dinner held at The Landing hotel, at which Wayne Thomson, Business Development Manager of Denso (NZ) Ltd was the guest speaker. Wayne is a mechanical engineer who has worked in various roles in Africa, Italy, Australia and latterly in New Zealand, where he completed his MBA at Auckland University. His talk was entitled “Corrosion Prevention from Explosive Bonding to Glass Flake Reinforced Linings”.

• Cathodic protection • confined spaces • industrial rope access

Our Auckland and Brisbane offices each have an opportunity for a Senior Corrosion Technologist to join their teams. Due to the diverse nature of the role, consideration will be given to applicants with 8 years’ minimum experience with a technical, trade, industry or engineering background and knowledge of: • • • • • • •

Corrosion management services Condition assessment, pipeline assessment & rehabilitation Process corrosion control Cathodic protection Forensic corrosion investigation Materials and coating selection / specification Corrosion monitoring / testing

You will also have a current NACE or ACA Certification as a Corrosion Technician / Technologist, a track record of successful delivery of project programmes, excellent communication skills and demonstrated expertise in preparing reports and contract documents. GHD will provide you with a supportive environment where you’ll be encouraged to grow technically, personally and professionally to become a key player in our business. If you’re proactive and results-driven with a strong work ethic, and one who enjoys building strong relationships then we welcome your application

Blaze147516

Corporate Members

For further information and to submit your covering letter and CV please visit our website. www.ghd.com/careers

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

13


ACA Standards Officer Arthur Austin has prepared a schedule of the latest Standards developments. This year the report will comprise two parts; a search of SAI GLOBAL publications at https://infostore.saiglobal.com/ store as previously for new standards, amendments and drafts, and a search for all current publications and standards relating to one of the ACA Technical Groups. This issue will have a focus on the Cathodic Protection Technical Group.

durability

A search of SAI Global at http://www.saiglobal.com/online/ for new standards, amendments or drafts of AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI, and standards and amendments of ISO & IEC published between 23 May to 12 July 2011 was conducted using the following key words and key word groups:

anode or anodic

corrosion or corrosivity or corrosive; but not anodizing or anodize(d) paint or coating; but not anodizing or anodize(d) galvanize or galvanized or galvanizing cathode or cathodic

electrochemical or electrolysis or electroplated corrosion and concrete, or concrete and coatings

store with key words ‘Cathodically Protected’ revealed 14 publications, but none from AS or AS/NZS (see Table 1). As can be seen in Table 2, there was a total of 397 publications, with 9 AS or AS/NZS publications relating to Cathodic Protection. Across SAIGLOBAL online Standards Publications there was a total of 57 listings of new standards, Drafts and Amendments, found issued from to 23 May to 12 July 2011. There was one AS Publication the Draft DR AS 1085.14 Railway track material - Part 14: Prestressed concrete sleepers. These results are shown in Table 3. A copy of the full report can be downloaded from the ACA’s website www.corrosion.com.au

A title search through SAI Global at https://infostore.saiglobal.com/

American Petroleum Institute – 2

American Water Works Association – 2

Brazilian Standards – 2

Norsk Sokkels Konkuranseposisjon – 2

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials – 1

Anstat Legislation – 1

Energy Networks Association (UK) – 1

International Telecommunications Union – 1

Japanese Standards Association – 1

UK Ministry of Defence standards – 1

Title search of Australian Standards with keyword ‘Cathodic’ – 9 citations AS 2239-2003

Galvanic (sacrificial) anodes for cathodic protection

AS 2832.1-2004

Cathodic protection of metals - Pipes and cables

AS 2832.3-2005

Cathodic protection of metals - Fixed immersed structures

AS 2832.5-2008

Cathodic protection of metals - Steel in concrete structures

AS 4352-2005

Tests for coating resistance to cathodic disbonding

AS 4832-2007

Cathodic protection - Installation of galvanic sacrificial anodes in soil

AS 2832.2-2003

Cathodic protection of metals - Compact buried structures

AS 2832.4-2006

Cathodic protection of metals - Internal surfaces

RUL ML.1-2008

Rulings to metal Standards - Cathodic protection interference levels (Ruling to AS 2832.1-2004)

To access these publications, go to https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store and type ‘cathodic’ into the search box and examine the search results.

Table 1. Title search by publisher with keywords ‘Cathodically Protected’ – 14 citations NACE International - 2

Asociacion Espanola de Normalizacion - 1

Association Francaise de Normalisation - 1

Belgian Standards -1

British Standards Institution - 1

Comite Europeen de Normalisation - 1

Table 3. New standards, amendments or drafts for AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI and Standards or Amendments for ISO & IEC published between 23rd May &12th July 2011

German Institute for Standardisation - 1

Deutsches Institut für Normung - 1

Key word search on ‘durability’.- 1 IS-EN citations found

Italian Standards - 1

National Standards Authority of Ireland - 1

I.S. EN 60512-9-4:2011

Nederlands Normalisatie Instituut - 1

Osterreichisches Normungsinstitut - 1

Polish Committee for Standardization - 1

Standardiserings-Kommissionen I Sverige -1

To access these publications, go to https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store and type ‘Cathodically Protected’ into the search box and examine the search results. Table 2. Title search by publisher with keyword ‘Cathodic’ – 397 citations Italian Standards - 27

Deutsches Institut für Normung– 26

NACE International – 26

Nederlands Normalisatie Instituut – 22

British Standards Institution - 25

Association Francaise de Normalisation - 21

Polish Committee for Standardization – 20

Comite Europeen de Normalisation – 19

Osterreichisches Normungsinstitut - 18

Asociacion Espanola de Normalizacion - 16

Belgian Standards - 16

National Standards Authority of Ireland – 16

Standardiserings-Kommissionen I Sverige – 16

Ford Motor Company – 15

Norwegian Standards (Norges Standardiseringsforbund) – 15 Swiss Standards – 15

Connectors for Electronic Equipment - Tests and Measurements - Part 9-4: Endurance Tests Test 9d: Durability of Contact Retention System and Seals (maintenance, Ageing)

Key word search on ‘corrosion’ or ‘corrosivity’ or ‘corrosive’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’- 17 citations found; none from AS or AS/ASNZ ISO 8565:2011

Metals and alloys - Atmospheric corrosion testing - General requirements

ISO/FDIS 7539-6

Corrosion of metals and alloys - Stress corrosion testing - Part 6: Preparation and use of precracked specimens for tests under constant load or constant displacement

I.S. EN 1965-2:2011

Structural Adhesives - Corrosion - Part 2: Determination and Classification of Corrosion to a Brass Substrate

I.S. EN ISO 287061:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 1: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Acids at Room Temperature

I.S. EN ISO 287062:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 2: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Boiling Acids, Boiling Neutral Liquids And/ or Their Vapours

I.S. EN ISO 287063:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 3: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Alkaline Liquids Using a Hexagonal Vessel

US Military Specs/Standards/Handbooks – 15

International Organization for Standardization – 10

I.S. EN ISO 287064:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 4: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Alkaline Liquids Using a Cylindrical Vessel

Standards Australia – 9

American Society for Testing and Materials – 7

BS EN 1965-1:2011

Bundesamt F. Wehrtechnik unk Beschaffung – 7

Bureau of Indian Standard – 6

Structural adhesives. Corrosion. Determination and classification of corrosion to a copper substrate

Standardization Administration of China – 6

Wirtschafts und Verlagsgesellschaft Gas und Wasser – 4

BS EN 1965-2:2011

Det Norsk Veritas – 4

South African Bureau of Standards – 3

Structural adhesives. Corrosion. Determination and classification of corrosion to a brass substrate

14 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

15


ACA Standards Officer Arthur Austin has prepared a schedule of the latest Standards developments. This year the report will comprise two parts; a search of SAI GLOBAL publications at https://infostore.saiglobal.com/ store as previously for new standards, amendments and drafts, and a search for all current publications and standards relating to one of the ACA Technical Groups. This issue will have a focus on the Cathodic Protection Technical Group.

durability

A search of SAI Global at http://www.saiglobal.com/online/ for new standards, amendments or drafts of AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI, and standards and amendments of ISO & IEC published between 23 May to 12 July 2011 was conducted using the following key words and key word groups:

anode or anodic

corrosion or corrosivity or corrosive; but not anodizing or anodize(d) paint or coating; but not anodizing or anodize(d) galvanize or galvanized or galvanizing cathode or cathodic

electrochemical or electrolysis or electroplated corrosion and concrete, or concrete and coatings

store with key words ‘Cathodically Protected’ revealed 14 publications, but none from AS or AS/NZS (see Table 1). As can be seen in Table 2, there was a total of 397 publications, with 9 AS or AS/NZS publications relating to Cathodic Protection. Across SAIGLOBAL online Standards Publications there was a total of 57 listings of new standards, Drafts and Amendments, found issued from to 23 May to 12 July 2011. There was one AS Publication the Draft DR AS 1085.14 Railway track material - Part 14: Prestressed concrete sleepers. These results are shown in Table 3. A copy of the full report can be downloaded from the ACA’s website www.corrosion.com.au

A title search through SAI Global at https://infostore.saiglobal.com/

American Petroleum Institute – 2

American Water Works Association – 2

Brazilian Standards – 2

Norsk Sokkels Konkuranseposisjon – 2

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials – 1

Anstat Legislation – 1

Energy Networks Association (UK) – 1

International Telecommunications Union – 1

Japanese Standards Association – 1

UK Ministry of Defence standards – 1

Title search of Australian Standards with keyword ‘Cathodic’ – 9 citations AS 2239-2003

Galvanic (sacrificial) anodes for cathodic protection

AS 2832.1-2004

Cathodic protection of metals - Pipes and cables

AS 2832.3-2005

Cathodic protection of metals - Fixed immersed structures

AS 2832.5-2008

Cathodic protection of metals - Steel in concrete structures

AS 4352-2005

Tests for coating resistance to cathodic disbonding

AS 4832-2007

Cathodic protection - Installation of galvanic sacrificial anodes in soil

AS 2832.2-2003

Cathodic protection of metals - Compact buried structures

AS 2832.4-2006

Cathodic protection of metals - Internal surfaces

RUL ML.1-2008

Rulings to metal Standards - Cathodic protection interference levels (Ruling to AS 2832.1-2004)

To access these publications, go to https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store and type ‘cathodic’ into the search box and examine the search results.

Table 1. Title search by publisher with keywords ‘Cathodically Protected’ – 14 citations NACE International - 2

Asociacion Espanola de Normalizacion - 1

Association Francaise de Normalisation - 1

Belgian Standards -1

British Standards Institution - 1

Comite Europeen de Normalisation - 1

Table 3. New standards, amendments or drafts for AS, AS/NZS, EN, ANSI, ASTM, BSI, DIN, ETSI, JSA, NSAI and Standards or Amendments for ISO & IEC published between 23rd May &12th July 2011

German Institute for Standardisation - 1

Deutsches Institut für Normung - 1

Key word search on ‘durability’.- 1 IS-EN citations found

Italian Standards - 1

National Standards Authority of Ireland - 1

I.S. EN 60512-9-4:2011

Nederlands Normalisatie Instituut - 1

Osterreichisches Normungsinstitut - 1

Polish Committee for Standardization - 1

Standardiserings-Kommissionen I Sverige -1

To access these publications, go to https://infostore.saiglobal.com/store and type ‘Cathodically Protected’ into the search box and examine the search results. Table 2. Title search by publisher with keyword ‘Cathodic’ – 397 citations Italian Standards - 27

Deutsches Institut für Normung– 26

NACE International – 26

Nederlands Normalisatie Instituut – 22

British Standards Institution - 25

Association Francaise de Normalisation - 21

Polish Committee for Standardization – 20

Comite Europeen de Normalisation – 19

Osterreichisches Normungsinstitut - 18

Asociacion Espanola de Normalizacion - 16

Belgian Standards - 16

National Standards Authority of Ireland – 16

Standardiserings-Kommissionen I Sverige – 16

Ford Motor Company – 15

Norwegian Standards (Norges Standardiseringsforbund) – 15 Swiss Standards – 15

Connectors for Electronic Equipment - Tests and Measurements - Part 9-4: Endurance Tests Test 9d: Durability of Contact Retention System and Seals (maintenance, Ageing)

Key word search on ‘corrosion’ or ‘corrosivity’ or ‘corrosive’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’- 17 citations found; none from AS or AS/ASNZ ISO 8565:2011

Metals and alloys - Atmospheric corrosion testing - General requirements

ISO/FDIS 7539-6

Corrosion of metals and alloys - Stress corrosion testing - Part 6: Preparation and use of precracked specimens for tests under constant load or constant displacement

I.S. EN 1965-2:2011

Structural Adhesives - Corrosion - Part 2: Determination and Classification of Corrosion to a Brass Substrate

I.S. EN ISO 287061:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 1: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Acids at Room Temperature

I.S. EN ISO 287062:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 2: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Boiling Acids, Boiling Neutral Liquids And/ or Their Vapours

I.S. EN ISO 287063:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 3: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Alkaline Liquids Using a Hexagonal Vessel

US Military Specs/Standards/Handbooks – 15

International Organization for Standardization – 10

I.S. EN ISO 287064:2011

Vitreous and Porcelain Enamels - Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion - Part 4: Determination of Resistance to Chemical Corrosion by Alkaline Liquids Using a Cylindrical Vessel

Standards Australia – 9

American Society for Testing and Materials – 7

BS EN 1965-1:2011

Bundesamt F. Wehrtechnik unk Beschaffung – 7

Bureau of Indian Standard – 6

Structural adhesives. Corrosion. Determination and classification of corrosion to a copper substrate

Standardization Administration of China – 6

Wirtschafts und Verlagsgesellschaft Gas und Wasser – 4

BS EN 1965-2:2011

Det Norsk Veritas – 4

South African Bureau of Standards – 3

Structural adhesives. Corrosion. Determination and classification of corrosion to a brass substrate

14 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

15


Standards Update

BS EN ISO 28706-1:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by acids at room temperature

11/30244801 DC

BS EN 1096-3. Glass in building. Coated glass. Part 3. Requirements and test methods for class C and D coatings

BS EN ISO 28706-2:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by boiling acids, boiling neutral liquids and/or their vapours

11/30246684 DC

BS EN 1953. Atomising and spraying equipment for coating materials. Safety requirements

11/30248842 DC

BS EN 50050-1. Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment. Safety requirements. Part 1. Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable liquid coating materials

BS EN ISO 28706-3:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by alkaline liquids using a hexagonal vessel

11/30248845 DC

BS EN 50050-2. Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment. Safety requirements. Part 2. Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable coating powder

BS EN ISO 28706-4:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by alkaline liquids using a cylindrical vessel

11/30248856 DC

BS EN 50059. Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment. Safety requirements. Hand-held spraying equipment for non-ignitable coating materials

BS EN ISO 29601:2011

Paints and varnishes. Corrosion protection by protective paint systems. Assessment of porosity in a dry film

BS EN 16074:2011

Paints and varnishes. Determination of non-volatile matter content and spreading rate of coil coating materials

DIN 65480 (2011-07)

Aerospace - Hexagon nuts with flange and MJ thread, self-locking, corrosion-resisting steel - Class: 1 100 MPa/315 øC; Text in German and English

BS EN 50176:2009

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable liquid coating material. Safety requirements

DIN 65508 (2011-07)

Aerospace - Nuts, hexagon with MJ thread, captive washer and counterbore, self-locking, corrosion-resistant steel - Class: 1 100 MPa/315 øC/425 øC; Text in German and English

BS EN 50348:2010

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for non-ignitable liquid coating material. Safety requirements

DIN EN ISO 8994 (2011-06)

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Rating system for the evaluation of pitting corrosion - Grid method (ISO 8994:2011)

DIN EN 15812 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of crack bridging ability

Key word search on 'paint’ and or ‘coating’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ or 'corrosion'– 33 Publications found; including 7 Drafts; 0 AS or AS/NZS Publications

DIN EN 15813 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of flexibility at low temperatures

I.S. EN ISO 1518-1:2011

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Scratch Resistance - Part 1: Constant-loading Method

DIN EN 15815 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Resistance to compression

I.S. EN 16074:2011

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Non-volatile-matter Content and Spreading Rate of Coil Coating Materials

DIN EN 15816 (2011-06)

Polymer-modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Resistance to rain

BS EN 16074:2011

Paints and varnishes. Determination of non-volatile matter content and spreading rate of coil coating materials

DIN EN 15817 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Water resistance

DIN EN 15818 (2011-06)

BS EN ISO 29601:2011

Paints and varnishes. Corrosion protection by protective paint systems. Assessment of porosity in a dry

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of dimensional stability at high temperature

DIN EN 15819 (2011-06)

BS EN 4160:2011

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Determination of the effect of thermal exposure

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Reduction of the thickness of the layer when fully dried

BS EN 4476:2011

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Cold curing intermediate coat

DIN EN 15820 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of watertightness

BS 4800:2011

Schedule of paint colours for building purposes

DIN EN ISO 26945 (2011-06)

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Electrodeposited coatings of tin-cobalt alloy (ISO 26945:2011)

DIN EN ISO 2811-1 (2011-06)

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 1: Pyknometer method (ISO 2811-1:2011)

Key word search on 'galvanize' or ‘galvanized’ or 'galvanizing’ – 0 Standard Publications found.

DIN EN ISO 2811-2 (2011-06)

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 2: Immersed body (plummet) method (ISO 2811-2:2011)

DIN EN ISO 2811-3 (2011-06)

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 3: Oscillation method (ISO 2811-3:2011)

DIN EN ISO 2811-4 (2011-06)

Key word search on 'corrosion' and 'concrete' or ‘concrete’ and ‘coatings’ – 3 Standard Publications found; 1 AS Draft; 0 AS/NZS publications found. ISO/DIS 16311-1

Maintenance and repair of concrete structures - Part 1: General principles

DR AS 1085.14

Railway track material - Part 14: Prestressed concrete sleepers

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 4: Pressure cup method (ISO 2811-4:2011)

DIN EN 12001 (2011-06)

Conveying, spraying and placing machines for concrete and mortar - Safety requirements (includes Amendment A1:2009)

DIN EN 4160 (2011-07)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Determination of the effect of thermal exposure; German and English version EN 4160:2011

Key word search on ‘cathode’ or 'cathodic' -1 corrosion related Draft Standard Publications found; 0 AS AS/NZS publications found

DIN EN 4476 (2011-07)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Cold curing intermediate coat; German and English version EN 4476:2011

11/30248021 DC

ISO 21809-1:2011

Petroleum and natural gas industries - External coatings for buried or submerged pipelines used in pipeline transportation systems - Part 1: Polyolefin coatings (3-layer PE and 3-layer PP

Key word search on 'anode' or ‘anodes’ or ‘anodic’ – 0 Standard Publications found – None from AS/ANZS

11/30209609 DC

BS ISO 14188. Metallic and other inorganic coatings. Test methods for measuring thermal cycle resistance and thermal shock resistance for thermal barrier coatings

DIN EN ISO 2106 (2011-06)

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Determination of mass per unit area (surface density) of anodic oxidation coatings - Gravimetric method (ISO 2106:2011)

11/30244798 DC

BS EN 1096-2. Glass in building. Coated glass. Part 2. Requirements and test methods for class A, B and S coatings

DIN EN ISO 8994 (2011-06)

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Rating system for the evaluation of pitting corrosion - Grid method (ISO 8994:2011)

16 Corrosion & Materials

BS EN 16299. Cathodic protection of external surfaces of above ground storage tank bases in contact with soil or foundations

Keyword Search on 'electrochemical' or ‘electrolysis’ or ‘electroplated’ - 0 Standard Publications found

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

17


Standards Update

BS EN ISO 28706-1:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by acids at room temperature

11/30244801 DC

BS EN 1096-3. Glass in building. Coated glass. Part 3. Requirements and test methods for class C and D coatings

BS EN ISO 28706-2:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by boiling acids, boiling neutral liquids and/or their vapours

11/30246684 DC

BS EN 1953. Atomising and spraying equipment for coating materials. Safety requirements

11/30248842 DC

BS EN 50050-1. Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment. Safety requirements. Part 1. Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable liquid coating materials

BS EN ISO 28706-3:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by alkaline liquids using a hexagonal vessel

11/30248845 DC

BS EN 50050-2. Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment. Safety requirements. Part 2. Hand-held spraying equipment for ignitable coating powder

BS EN ISO 28706-4:2011 Vitreous and porcelain enamels. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion. Determination of resistance to chemical corrosion by alkaline liquids using a cylindrical vessel

11/30248856 DC

BS EN 50059. Electrostatic hand-held spraying equipment. Safety requirements. Hand-held spraying equipment for non-ignitable coating materials

BS EN ISO 29601:2011

Paints and varnishes. Corrosion protection by protective paint systems. Assessment of porosity in a dry film

BS EN 16074:2011

Paints and varnishes. Determination of non-volatile matter content and spreading rate of coil coating materials

DIN 65480 (2011-07)

Aerospace - Hexagon nuts with flange and MJ thread, self-locking, corrosion-resisting steel - Class: 1 100 MPa/315 øC; Text in German and English

BS EN 50176:2009

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for ignitable liquid coating material. Safety requirements

DIN 65508 (2011-07)

Aerospace - Nuts, hexagon with MJ thread, captive washer and counterbore, self-locking, corrosion-resistant steel - Class: 1 100 MPa/315 øC/425 øC; Text in German and English

BS EN 50348:2010

Stationary electrostatic application equipment for non-ignitable liquid coating material. Safety requirements

DIN EN ISO 8994 (2011-06)

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Rating system for the evaluation of pitting corrosion - Grid method (ISO 8994:2011)

DIN EN 15812 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of crack bridging ability

Key word search on 'paint’ and or ‘coating’; but not ‘anodizing’ or ‘anodize(d)’ or 'corrosion'– 33 Publications found; including 7 Drafts; 0 AS or AS/NZS Publications

DIN EN 15813 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of flexibility at low temperatures

I.S. EN ISO 1518-1:2011

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Scratch Resistance - Part 1: Constant-loading Method

DIN EN 15815 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Resistance to compression

I.S. EN 16074:2011

Paints and Varnishes - Determination of Non-volatile-matter Content and Spreading Rate of Coil Coating Materials

DIN EN 15816 (2011-06)

Polymer-modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Resistance to rain

BS EN 16074:2011

Paints and varnishes. Determination of non-volatile matter content and spreading rate of coil coating materials

DIN EN 15817 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Water resistance

DIN EN 15818 (2011-06)

BS EN ISO 29601:2011

Paints and varnishes. Corrosion protection by protective paint systems. Assessment of porosity in a dry

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of dimensional stability at high temperature

DIN EN 15819 (2011-06)

BS EN 4160:2011

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Determination of the effect of thermal exposure

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Reduction of the thickness of the layer when fully dried

BS EN 4476:2011

Aerospace series. Paints and varnishes. Cold curing intermediate coat

DIN EN 15820 (2011-06)

Polymer modified bituminous thick coatings for waterproofing - Determination of watertightness

BS 4800:2011

Schedule of paint colours for building purposes

DIN EN ISO 26945 (2011-06)

Metallic and other inorganic coatings - Electrodeposited coatings of tin-cobalt alloy (ISO 26945:2011)

DIN EN ISO 2811-1 (2011-06)

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 1: Pyknometer method (ISO 2811-1:2011)

Key word search on 'galvanize' or ‘galvanized’ or 'galvanizing’ – 0 Standard Publications found.

DIN EN ISO 2811-2 (2011-06)

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 2: Immersed body (plummet) method (ISO 2811-2:2011)

DIN EN ISO 2811-3 (2011-06)

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 3: Oscillation method (ISO 2811-3:2011)

DIN EN ISO 2811-4 (2011-06)

Key word search on 'corrosion' and 'concrete' or ‘concrete’ and ‘coatings’ – 3 Standard Publications found; 1 AS Draft; 0 AS/NZS publications found. ISO/DIS 16311-1

Maintenance and repair of concrete structures - Part 1: General principles

DR AS 1085.14

Railway track material - Part 14: Prestressed concrete sleepers

Paints and varnishes - Determination of density - Part 4: Pressure cup method (ISO 2811-4:2011)

DIN EN 12001 (2011-06)

Conveying, spraying and placing machines for concrete and mortar - Safety requirements (includes Amendment A1:2009)

DIN EN 4160 (2011-07)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Determination of the effect of thermal exposure; German and English version EN 4160:2011

Key word search on ‘cathode’ or 'cathodic' -1 corrosion related Draft Standard Publications found; 0 AS AS/NZS publications found

DIN EN 4476 (2011-07)

Aerospace series - Paints and varnishes - Cold curing intermediate coat; German and English version EN 4476:2011

11/30248021 DC

ISO 21809-1:2011

Petroleum and natural gas industries - External coatings for buried or submerged pipelines used in pipeline transportation systems - Part 1: Polyolefin coatings (3-layer PE and 3-layer PP

Key word search on 'anode' or ‘anodes’ or ‘anodic’ – 0 Standard Publications found – None from AS/ANZS

11/30209609 DC

BS ISO 14188. Metallic and other inorganic coatings. Test methods for measuring thermal cycle resistance and thermal shock resistance for thermal barrier coatings

DIN EN ISO 2106 (2011-06)

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Determination of mass per unit area (surface density) of anodic oxidation coatings - Gravimetric method (ISO 2106:2011)

11/30244798 DC

BS EN 1096-2. Glass in building. Coated glass. Part 2. Requirements and test methods for class A, B and S coatings

DIN EN ISO 8994 (2011-06)

Anodizing of aluminium and its alloys - Rating system for the evaluation of pitting corrosion - Grid method (ISO 8994:2011)

16 Corrosion & Materials

BS EN 16299. Cathodic protection of external surfaces of above ground storage tank bases in contact with soil or foundations

Keyword Search on 'electrochemical' or ‘electrolysis’ or ‘electroplated’ - 0 Standard Publications found

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

17


Roadshow Summary

LOCATIONS:

Y 11Th MAY

ESDA DARWIN WEDN Austr alia, Engineers St, Darwin 14 Shepherd

TUES MELBOURNE ,

DAY 17Th MAY

SEMINAR SERIES:

House Engineering Melbourne Street, North 21 Bedford 19Th MAY IA ThURSDAY

TASMAN

Corrosion mitigation and monitoring seminar series

Zeps Café, bell Town Street, Camp 92–94 High MAY TUESDAY 24Th AUCKLAND ellor Auckland Airport, Chanc Auckland Hotel Grand , Airport Oaks, Roads Ascot 26Th MAY ThURSDAY

MITIGATION CORROSION RING te AND MONITO on techniques used to mitiga classic

WELLINGTON

Hotel Abel Tasman t, Wellington 169 Willis Stree FRIDAY 3RD ADELAIDE ,

JUNE

enor Hotel Mercure Grosv ce, Adelaide 125 North Terra

GLADSTONE

TUESDAY 7Th

JUNE

ty, tone CQUniversi n Drive, Glads Bryan Jorda JUNE

9Th ThURSDAY BRISBANE Ground (GABBA), et Brisbane Crick t, East Brisbane Stree 411 Vulture 16Th JUNE Th ThURSDAY

PER

ery, The Old Brew Road, Perth Bay 173 Mounts

An array of traditional and not so common techniques used to mitigate the onset and progress of corrosion were presented during the ACA’s 2011 seminar series.

The ACA would also like to take this opportunity to thank all the speakers and convenors for their valuable time and support during the series:

Conducted in May and June, the seminar series entitled ‘Corrosion Mitigation & Monitoring’ was exclusively sponsored by International Protective Coatings who presented on ‘Tank Coating Technologies for Aggressive Storage’ at all locations during the series.

Aaron Davey, Marine and Civil Solutions Ltd

The ACA would like to take this opportunity to once again thank International Protective Coatings for their sponsorship of the series and their continuous support of the ACA. A total of 343 people attended at least one seminar with some attendees and speakers attending numerous seminars with each location attracting:

Adrian Dundas, Building Rectification Services Alex Gouch, ASSDA Allan Sterling, Anode Engineering Andrew Hargrave, Hargrave Pipeline Group Barry Eldridge, Thomas Contracting Brenton Watts, Lloyd’s Register Asia Brett Aked, Control Synergy Brett Willcox, Onesteel ATM

Darwin: 27 attendees

Brian Mubaraki, AECOM

Melbourne: 43 attendees

David Harrison, Onesteel ATM

Campbell Town (Tas.): 48 attendees

David Towns, Denso

Auckland: 24 attendees

Dean Wall, Jotun Dec McInnes, Tarong Energy

G TUESDAY 21ST WOLLONGON

JUNE

tive, Medina Execu t, Wollongong 19 Market Stree

Y 22ND JUNE

ESDA SYDNEY WEDN

the comm and not so all based on t, apply a corrosion are The traditional progress of the environmen s of each the onset and e materials, change The effectivenes ical controls. management plan and methods: chang electrochem sion y or coating or use observed using a corro ction surve be as an inspe method can amme such progr a measured using ed corrosion monitoring. sticat d used to metho more sophi any defined as sion. It oring can be ess of corro iques, techn Corrosion monit and analyse the progr ent ure measurem rt, data observe, meas variables – materials, d logistical suppo gement. involves myria budgets, standards, ation mana tion, critically, inform ives when instrumenta unication and, sion monitoring initiat into effective corro analysis, comm is translated is gained from period a Real value over gathered s. the information tion/control programme by visiting corrosion mitiga be available amme will ion.com.au. seminar progr by emailing aca@corros ration. Each local your regist or sion.com.au you following page. www.corro emailed to reverse of this y, this will be found on the Alternativel form can be The registration

Supported

Sponsored

by:

Ryde RSL, North Ryde Roads, North & Pittwater Cnr Magdala 23RD JUNE ThURSDAY

NEWCASTLE

Austr alia, West Engineers t, Newcastle 122 Parry Stree

by:

for CPD hours to choose to record Members should refer members can CPD logs. conditions. Engineers Australiaevent in their personal of requirements and at this for details attendance s CPD Policy Engineers Australia’

Mick Morris, Zintec Corrosion Solutions Miles Dacre, AECOM Nick Marston, BRANZ Paul Davis, AECOM

Grahame Vile, BCRC

Paul Utting, LinkWater

Greg Blomfield, Northport Ltd

Peter Dove, GHD

Hayden Dagg, Onesteel ATM

Peter Freeth, Korvest Galvanisers

Ian MacLeod, Western Australian Museum

Peter Gray, Bredero Shaw

Ian Ward, ASSDA

Peter Mays, Bredero Shaw Phil Layton, Industrial Galvanisers

Jaimie Shaw, International Protective Coatings

Phil Vimpani, AECOM

James Aldred, AECOM

Reuben Barnes, PCTE

James Wu, Jemena

Richard Mattheson, ASSDA

Jim Galanos, Corrosion Control Engineeering

Rob Kilgour, AECOM

John Duncan, BRANZ John Menzies, AECOM Jozef Soltis, Quest Integrity NZ June Zhang, VicRoads Kingsley Brown, ASC Les Boulton, Nickel Institute NZ Consultant

Rolf Gubner, Curtin University Ryan Hilton, AECOM Ryan Smyth, Hydro Tasmania Sean Ryder, GHD Shane Jimmink, International Protective Coatings

Ted Riding, Jotun

Don Wimpenny, Halcrow Group

Lyndon Zimmermann, MPower Solaris

Tim Gowans, McElligott Partners

Adelaide: 28 attendees

Fikry Barouky, Anti Corrosion Technology

Mark Jones, MRJ Industrial

Tony Curcic, International Protective Coatings

Perth: 65 attendees Wollongong: 29 attendees

Geoff Adlem, Silver Raven Geoff Mulcahy, DIER

Sydney: 24 attendees

George Curran, Sinclair Knight Merz

Newcastle: 31 attendees

Graham Carlisle, Orontide

Mark Lackenby, NT Gas Matthew Brown, International Protective Coatings Matthew O’Keeffe, International Protective Coatings Michael Battaini, AECOM

Willie Mandeno, Opus International Consultants ACA members who would like an electronic copy of presentations conducted by any of the above speakers, contact Katherine Webber at kwebber@corrosion.com.au

Graham Sussex, ASSDA

18 Corrosion & Materials

Willie Mandeno of Opus International Consultants presenting in Wellington

Steven Evans, Korvest Galvanisers

Wellington: 27 attendees

Brisbane: 29 attendees

Jaimie Shaw of International Protective Coatings presenting in Sydney

Graham Sussex representing ASSDA presenting in Adelaide

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

19


Roadshow Summary

LOCATIONS:

Y 11Th MAY

ESDA DARWIN WEDN Austr alia, Engineers St, Darwin 14 Shepherd

TUES MELBOURNE ,

DAY 17Th MAY

SEMINAR SERIES:

House Engineering Melbourne Street, North 21 Bedford 19Th MAY IA ThURSDAY

TASMAN

Corrosion mitigation and monitoring seminar series

Zeps Café, bell Town Street, Camp 92–94 High MAY TUESDAY 24Th AUCKLAND ellor Auckland Airport, Chanc Auckland Hotel Grand , Airport Oaks, Roads Ascot 26Th MAY ThURSDAY

MITIGATION CORROSION RING te AND MONITO on techniques used to mitiga classic

WELLINGTON

Hotel Abel Tasman t, Wellington 169 Willis Stree FRIDAY 3RD ADELAIDE ,

JUNE

enor Hotel Mercure Grosv ce, Adelaide 125 North Terra

GLADSTONE

TUESDAY 7Th

JUNE

ty, tone CQUniversi n Drive, Glads Bryan Jorda JUNE

9Th ThURSDAY BRISBANE Ground (GABBA), et Brisbane Crick t, East Brisbane Stree 411 Vulture 16Th JUNE Th ThURSDAY

PER

ery, The Old Brew Road, Perth Bay 173 Mounts

An array of traditional and not so common techniques used to mitigate the onset and progress of corrosion were presented during the ACA’s 2011 seminar series.

The ACA would also like to take this opportunity to thank all the speakers and convenors for their valuable time and support during the series:

Conducted in May and June, the seminar series entitled ‘Corrosion Mitigation & Monitoring’ was exclusively sponsored by International Protective Coatings who presented on ‘Tank Coating Technologies for Aggressive Storage’ at all locations during the series.

Aaron Davey, Marine and Civil Solutions Ltd

The ACA would like to take this opportunity to once again thank International Protective Coatings for their sponsorship of the series and their continuous support of the ACA. A total of 343 people attended at least one seminar with some attendees and speakers attending numerous seminars with each location attracting:

Adrian Dundas, Building Rectification Services Alex Gouch, ASSDA Allan Sterling, Anode Engineering Andrew Hargrave, Hargrave Pipeline Group Barry Eldridge, Thomas Contracting Brenton Watts, Lloyd’s Register Asia Brett Aked, Control Synergy Brett Willcox, Onesteel ATM

Darwin: 27 attendees

Brian Mubaraki, AECOM

Melbourne: 43 attendees

David Harrison, Onesteel ATM

Campbell Town (Tas.): 48 attendees

David Towns, Denso

Auckland: 24 attendees

Dean Wall, Jotun Dec McInnes, Tarong Energy

G TUESDAY 21ST WOLLONGON

JUNE

tive, Medina Execu t, Wollongong 19 Market Stree

Y 22ND JUNE

ESDA SYDNEY WEDN

the comm and not so all based on t, apply a corrosion are The traditional progress of the environmen s of each the onset and e materials, change The effectivenes ical controls. management plan and methods: chang electrochem sion y or coating or use observed using a corro ction surve be as an inspe method can amme such progr a measured using ed corrosion monitoring. sticat d used to metho more sophi any defined as sion. It oring can be ess of corro iques, techn Corrosion monit and analyse the progr ent ure measurem rt, data observe, meas variables – materials, d logistical suppo gement. involves myria budgets, standards, ation mana tion, critically, inform ives when instrumenta unication and, sion monitoring initiat into effective corro analysis, comm is translated is gained from period a Real value over gathered s. the information tion/control programme by visiting corrosion mitiga be available amme will ion.com.au. seminar progr by emailing aca@corros ration. Each local your regist or sion.com.au you following page. www.corro emailed to reverse of this y, this will be found on the Alternativel form can be The registration

Supported

Sponsored

by:

Ryde RSL, North Ryde Roads, North & Pittwater Cnr Magdala 23RD JUNE ThURSDAY

NEWCASTLE

Austr alia, West Engineers t, Newcastle 122 Parry Stree

by:

for CPD hours to choose to record Members should refer members can CPD logs. conditions. Engineers Australiaevent in their personal of requirements and at this for details attendance s CPD Policy Engineers Australia’

Mick Morris, Zintec Corrosion Solutions Miles Dacre, AECOM Nick Marston, BRANZ Paul Davis, AECOM

Grahame Vile, BCRC

Paul Utting, LinkWater

Greg Blomfield, Northport Ltd

Peter Dove, GHD

Hayden Dagg, Onesteel ATM

Peter Freeth, Korvest Galvanisers

Ian MacLeod, Western Australian Museum

Peter Gray, Bredero Shaw

Ian Ward, ASSDA

Peter Mays, Bredero Shaw Phil Layton, Industrial Galvanisers

Jaimie Shaw, International Protective Coatings

Phil Vimpani, AECOM

James Aldred, AECOM

Reuben Barnes, PCTE

James Wu, Jemena

Richard Mattheson, ASSDA

Jim Galanos, Corrosion Control Engineeering

Rob Kilgour, AECOM

John Duncan, BRANZ John Menzies, AECOM Jozef Soltis, Quest Integrity NZ June Zhang, VicRoads Kingsley Brown, ASC Les Boulton, Nickel Institute NZ Consultant

Rolf Gubner, Curtin University Ryan Hilton, AECOM Ryan Smyth, Hydro Tasmania Sean Ryder, GHD Shane Jimmink, International Protective Coatings

Ted Riding, Jotun

Don Wimpenny, Halcrow Group

Lyndon Zimmermann, MPower Solaris

Tim Gowans, McElligott Partners

Adelaide: 28 attendees

Fikry Barouky, Anti Corrosion Technology

Mark Jones, MRJ Industrial

Tony Curcic, International Protective Coatings

Perth: 65 attendees Wollongong: 29 attendees

Geoff Adlem, Silver Raven Geoff Mulcahy, DIER

Sydney: 24 attendees

George Curran, Sinclair Knight Merz

Newcastle: 31 attendees

Graham Carlisle, Orontide

Mark Lackenby, NT Gas Matthew Brown, International Protective Coatings Matthew O’Keeffe, International Protective Coatings Michael Battaini, AECOM

Willie Mandeno, Opus International Consultants ACA members who would like an electronic copy of presentations conducted by any of the above speakers, contact Katherine Webber at kwebber@corrosion.com.au

Graham Sussex, ASSDA

18 Corrosion & Materials

Willie Mandeno of Opus International Consultants presenting in Wellington

Steven Evans, Korvest Galvanisers

Wellington: 27 attendees

Brisbane: 29 attendees

Jaimie Shaw of International Protective Coatings presenting in Sydney

Graham Sussex representing ASSDA presenting in Adelaide

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

19


ACA Seminar INAR NC SEM TION I SSOCIA SION A CORRO TED BY: PROUDLY PRESEN ASIAN STRAL THE AU

Mining Technical Group seminar The ACA recently conducted a Mining Technical Group seminar entitled ‘Mining; Best Practice in Corrosion Management – Or Is It?’ in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia on Friday 8th July 2011. The aim of the seminar was to enhance corrosion awareness to local personnel who are involved

in optimising mining operations to ensure plant safety and availability is not compromised by corrosion. Below is a synopsis of each of the presentations. If ACA members would like a copy of any of the presentations, please email Katherine Webber at kwebber@corrosion.com.au

ractice Mining; Best P nagement a in Corros ion M – Or Is It? 8th July 2011 Date: Friday Centre, C Conference Location: WM ian School of Mines, tral Western Aus tralia Western Aus Kalgoorlie,

nt in the efficie rtant factor when poor rity is an impo Asset integ ies; particularly ent wet/dry mining facilit ), frequ operation of e conditions debris ty (hypersalin erature and excessive water quali st continuous UV, high temp ces are almo cycling, high to exposed surfa and durability issues on tion collec sion tures on site. oting corro etallic struc factors prom and ete and non-m gies (simple metallic, concr many strate e that the plant tly there are ensur to equen oyed Cons and cost e) being empl nt, durable not so simpl a safe, efficie in ted items are opera er. nt effective mann manageme n, e the use of gies includ sses of desig These strate physical proce well as the systems as

Schedule ing coffee n over morn Registratio opening Symposium Welcome & ha, Extrin corrosion ces Australia Peter Farin a recipe for bility Servi its processes, rity and Relia Mining and Facility s Asset Integ Production Bureau Verita an Operating Wolfgang Mika, of Managing Integrity at 9.40 – 10.20 The Importance Morning Tea 10.20 – 10.40 , WGIM Handling Code David Olsen the Cyanide Inspection and 10.40 – 11.20 Risk Based Structures ms ete & Steel Central Syste dial Solutions for Concr Ivan Ruefli, tion of Reme 11.20 – 12.00 Innovative Execu enance orth, BCRC ion of Maint ility, a Funct Frank Papw Concrete Durab rced 12.00 – 12.40 Reinfo

Time

8.15 – 8.45 8.45 – 9.00

9.00 – 9.40

12.40 – 13.40 13.40 – 14.20 14.20 – 15.00 15.00 – 15.20 15.20 – 16.30 16.30 – 18.00

Reinforced Concrete Durability, a Function of Maintenance

Risk Based Inspection and the Cyanide Management Code

Frank Papworth of BCRC

David Olsen of Wood Group Integrity Management

Reinforcement corrosion is a major consideration in the design of new concrete structures and assessment of existing structures in marine, coastal, salt contaminated ground and saline process water exposures. For owners of structures reinforcement corrosion is difficult to manage due to the lack of objective tools that give information on the actual corrosion state of the embedded steel. With such information they could take remedial actions well before damage appears and their spending on repairs would be reduced. On many structures monitoring would allow a more cost effective management of reinforcement corrosion in concrete. A major risk mitigation measure during maintenance is the ability to apply low cost deterioration prevention methods. However these can only be applied if monitoring methods are used to assess the rate of ingress of a corrosion activation front. The paper discussed the application of risk assessment to maintenance management and outlines tools that can be used to assess deterioration during a structures life.

20 Corrosion & Materials

The "International Cyanide Management Code” for the manufacture, transport, and use of cyanide in the production of gold aspires to improve the management of cyanide used in gold mining with the objectives to assist in the protection of human health and the reduction of environmental impacts. Inspection and preventative maintenance is highlighted in the code as a standard operating practice that can be used for negating the potential consequences of failure. Risk based inspection (RBI) provides a means of prioritizing and planning for inspection and monitoring of assets, including tanks, so as to maintain their technical integrity. This presentation provided an overview of an RBI process applied specifically to ring-beam storage and process tanks that have cyanide in their process stream.

All of nt methods. manageme d. inter-relate and corrosion fabrication rtant and are gies are impo ’s Mining these strate Association to n Corrosion g a seminar The Australasia Group is hostin to encourage ical Techn and Industry ntly mitigating sion awareness enhance corro various aspects of efficie iar the the pecul dialogue on al focus on ral processing with a speci g and mine corrosion, sed by minin to anyone be of value demands impo seminar will related managers, activities. The tions involved ce and Opera visors etc.) (Maintenan dents, super e that plant superinten tions to ensur by corrosion. operators, opera g minin romised in optimising is not comp availability and y safet

Lunch

Jotun coatings Ted Riding, with proprietary The problem ons r nges and soluti way, Savco Liam Hollo the unique challe the goldfields: Concrete in Tea noon After Close and Seminar discussion Open floor Drinks Post Seminar

Mining and its Processes, a Recipe for Corrosion Peter Farinha of Extrin Consultants Though the mining industry in Australia is currently enjoying a boom as the price of commodities continue to rise, corrosion in the mining industry remains a major issue and significant contributor to increased production costs of a mine by: Promoting premature failure of equipment Increasing the costs of maintaining corroding assets. In the 1980’s, mining infrastructure was based on a typical 5 - 10 year period, however, with improving technology, infrastructure service lives have been extended considerably and new major minesite lives have operating lives of 25 – 30 years. The presentation discussed the factors of the mining processes which make it more susceptible to corrosion than most. It also commented on the likely corrosion mechanisms and critical plant areas more inclined to deterioration. Finally, it closed on preserving plant integrity by implementation of corrosion management options and the early intervention of such.

The difference in the quality of water obtained at Australian mine site is the major contributor to the levels of accelerated corrosion and this can be reflected in the level of dissolved solids and pH. Additionally, minesites also favour the use of process or recycled plant water for both production requirements and washdown or housekeeping purposes. It is the increased use of these more aggressive waters that is greatly attributing to the increased rate and extent of corrosion deterioration being experienced on Australian minesites. Through a better understanding of the factors that affect corrosion, an understanding of the predominant corrosion mechanisms and the implementation of a more considered approach to corrosion management, then a more cost effective approach to plant performance, availability and ultimately plant life can be achieved.

Concrete in the Goldfields: the Unique Challenges and Solutions Liam Holloway of Savcor Concrete and mining infrastructure in the gold fields of WA is exposed to a range very harsh and often unique exposure conditions. Therefore, we need to employ specialised design solutions to ensure that our assets achieve satisfactory durability. This presentation first highlighted some of the typical exposure conditions that are encountered on various sites throughout the gold fields and described some of the material degradation mechanisms that occur.  Following this some of the solutions that have been used to protect assets under these conditions were discussed in terms of their technology and performance in the field.

www.corrosion.com.au

The Importance of Managing Integrity at an Operating Production Facility Wolfgang Mika of Bureau Veritas Asset Integrity and Reliability Services Australia Plant operators have a common objective of operating the plant in a safe and profitable manner, with due consideration for the environment. The safety aspects are also addressed in the state regulations. For mine sites in Western Australia, these are specifically addressed in the Mines Safety and Inspection Act 1994 / Regulations 1995, with the regulations being enforced by the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Safety. The presentation discussed the processes of maintaining plant integrity through an understanding of the degradation mechanisms and taking the appropriate steps to manage the degradation. As a minimum, this aims to avoid failures and demonstrate due care. However, there are also upsides in cost effectively improving plant availability and managing plant life. The presentation discussed examples of this process and highlighted some of the challenges and opportunities to a plant operator in ensuring ongoing success in operating a safe and productive site.

Innovative Execution of Remedial Solutions for Concrete & Steel Structures Ivan Ruefli of Central Systems The presentation focus was on two separate but equally important facets of asset maintenance and remediation.

The first topic addressed the combined requirement to protect steel structures for chemicals, impact and wear in aggressive environments. The presentation focused on an immerging trend of companion coatings from different manufacturers used together to provide effective solutions. Product selection and testing regimes were discussed along with practical case studies featuring details of how and where this approach may be beneficial and successful. The second topic focused on cathodic protection of reinforcing within concrete structures. An alternative external galvanic anode approach is discussed and compared to the readily available internal lump anodes systems currently in use. The objective is to address the advantages this method has in short windows of opportunity often available to execute remedial work in processing environments.

The Problem with Proprietary Coatings Ted Riding of Jotun Mining processes often involve the creation of corrosive micro-climates or are carried out in aggressive locations where the environment is generally corrosive. Many of the processes utilize proprietary equipment that has had surface coatings applied that are unsuitable for the specific harsh conditions. This presentation discussed the consequences of these limitations and the available options to provide supplementary corrosion protection. The ACA takes this opportunity to thank the presenters and their companies for taking the time to support this regional ACA event.

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

21


ACA Seminar INAR NC SEM TION I SSOCIA SION A CORRO TED BY: PROUDLY PRESEN ASIAN STRAL THE AU

Mining Technical Group seminar The ACA recently conducted a Mining Technical Group seminar entitled ‘Mining; Best Practice in Corrosion Management – Or Is It?’ in Kalgoorlie, Western Australia on Friday 8th July 2011. The aim of the seminar was to enhance corrosion awareness to local personnel who are involved

in optimising mining operations to ensure plant safety and availability is not compromised by corrosion. Below is a synopsis of each of the presentations. If ACA members would like a copy of any of the presentations, please email Katherine Webber at kwebber@corrosion.com.au

ractice Mining; Best P nagement a in Corros ion M – Or Is It? 8th July 2011 Date: Friday Centre, C Conference Location: WM ian School of Mines, tral Western Aus tralia Western Aus Kalgoorlie,

nt in the efficie rtant factor when poor rity is an impo Asset integ ies; particularly ent wet/dry mining facilit ), frequ operation of e conditions debris ty (hypersalin erature and excessive water quali st continuous UV, high temp ces are almo cycling, high to exposed surfa and durability issues on tion collec sion tures on site. oting corro etallic struc factors prom and ete and non-m gies (simple metallic, concr many strate e that the plant tly there are ensur to equen oyed Cons and cost e) being empl nt, durable not so simpl a safe, efficie in ted items are opera er. nt effective mann manageme n, e the use of gies includ sses of desig These strate physical proce well as the systems as

Schedule ing coffee n over morn Registratio opening Symposium Welcome & ha, Extrin corrosion ces Australia Peter Farin a recipe for bility Servi its processes, rity and Relia Mining and Facility s Asset Integ Production Bureau Verita an Operating Wolfgang Mika, of Managing Integrity at 9.40 – 10.20 The Importance Morning Tea 10.20 – 10.40 , WGIM Handling Code David Olsen the Cyanide Inspection and 10.40 – 11.20 Risk Based Structures ms ete & Steel Central Syste dial Solutions for Concr Ivan Ruefli, tion of Reme 11.20 – 12.00 Innovative Execu enance orth, BCRC ion of Maint ility, a Funct Frank Papw Concrete Durab rced 12.00 – 12.40 Reinfo

Time

8.15 – 8.45 8.45 – 9.00

9.00 – 9.40

12.40 – 13.40 13.40 – 14.20 14.20 – 15.00 15.00 – 15.20 15.20 – 16.30 16.30 – 18.00

Reinforced Concrete Durability, a Function of Maintenance

Risk Based Inspection and the Cyanide Management Code

Frank Papworth of BCRC

David Olsen of Wood Group Integrity Management

Reinforcement corrosion is a major consideration in the design of new concrete structures and assessment of existing structures in marine, coastal, salt contaminated ground and saline process water exposures. For owners of structures reinforcement corrosion is difficult to manage due to the lack of objective tools that give information on the actual corrosion state of the embedded steel. With such information they could take remedial actions well before damage appears and their spending on repairs would be reduced. On many structures monitoring would allow a more cost effective management of reinforcement corrosion in concrete. A major risk mitigation measure during maintenance is the ability to apply low cost deterioration prevention methods. However these can only be applied if monitoring methods are used to assess the rate of ingress of a corrosion activation front. The paper discussed the application of risk assessment to maintenance management and outlines tools that can be used to assess deterioration during a structures life.

20 Corrosion & Materials

The "International Cyanide Management Code” for the manufacture, transport, and use of cyanide in the production of gold aspires to improve the management of cyanide used in gold mining with the objectives to assist in the protection of human health and the reduction of environmental impacts. Inspection and preventative maintenance is highlighted in the code as a standard operating practice that can be used for negating the potential consequences of failure. Risk based inspection (RBI) provides a means of prioritizing and planning for inspection and monitoring of assets, including tanks, so as to maintain their technical integrity. This presentation provided an overview of an RBI process applied specifically to ring-beam storage and process tanks that have cyanide in their process stream.

All of nt methods. manageme d. inter-relate and corrosion fabrication rtant and are gies are impo ’s Mining these strate Association to n Corrosion g a seminar The Australasia Group is hostin to encourage ical Techn and Industry ntly mitigating sion awareness enhance corro various aspects of efficie iar the the pecul dialogue on al focus on ral processing with a speci g and mine corrosion, sed by minin to anyone be of value demands impo seminar will related managers, activities. The tions involved ce and Opera visors etc.) (Maintenan dents, super e that plant superinten tions to ensur by corrosion. operators, opera g minin romised in optimising is not comp availability and y safet

Lunch

Jotun coatings Ted Riding, with proprietary The problem ons r nges and soluti way, Savco Liam Hollo the unique challe the goldfields: Concrete in Tea noon After Close and Seminar discussion Open floor Drinks Post Seminar

Mining and its Processes, a Recipe for Corrosion Peter Farinha of Extrin Consultants Though the mining industry in Australia is currently enjoying a boom as the price of commodities continue to rise, corrosion in the mining industry remains a major issue and significant contributor to increased production costs of a mine by: Promoting premature failure of equipment Increasing the costs of maintaining corroding assets. In the 1980’s, mining infrastructure was based on a typical 5 - 10 year period, however, with improving technology, infrastructure service lives have been extended considerably and new major minesite lives have operating lives of 25 – 30 years. The presentation discussed the factors of the mining processes which make it more susceptible to corrosion than most. It also commented on the likely corrosion mechanisms and critical plant areas more inclined to deterioration. Finally, it closed on preserving plant integrity by implementation of corrosion management options and the early intervention of such.

The difference in the quality of water obtained at Australian mine site is the major contributor to the levels of accelerated corrosion and this can be reflected in the level of dissolved solids and pH. Additionally, minesites also favour the use of process or recycled plant water for both production requirements and washdown or housekeeping purposes. It is the increased use of these more aggressive waters that is greatly attributing to the increased rate and extent of corrosion deterioration being experienced on Australian minesites. Through a better understanding of the factors that affect corrosion, an understanding of the predominant corrosion mechanisms and the implementation of a more considered approach to corrosion management, then a more cost effective approach to plant performance, availability and ultimately plant life can be achieved.

Concrete in the Goldfields: the Unique Challenges and Solutions Liam Holloway of Savcor Concrete and mining infrastructure in the gold fields of WA is exposed to a range very harsh and often unique exposure conditions. Therefore, we need to employ specialised design solutions to ensure that our assets achieve satisfactory durability. This presentation first highlighted some of the typical exposure conditions that are encountered on various sites throughout the gold fields and described some of the material degradation mechanisms that occur.  Following this some of the solutions that have been used to protect assets under these conditions were discussed in terms of their technology and performance in the field.

www.corrosion.com.au

The Importance of Managing Integrity at an Operating Production Facility Wolfgang Mika of Bureau Veritas Asset Integrity and Reliability Services Australia Plant operators have a common objective of operating the plant in a safe and profitable manner, with due consideration for the environment. The safety aspects are also addressed in the state regulations. For mine sites in Western Australia, these are specifically addressed in the Mines Safety and Inspection Act 1994 / Regulations 1995, with the regulations being enforced by the Department of Mines and Petroleum Resources Safety. The presentation discussed the processes of maintaining plant integrity through an understanding of the degradation mechanisms and taking the appropriate steps to manage the degradation. As a minimum, this aims to avoid failures and demonstrate due care. However, there are also upsides in cost effectively improving plant availability and managing plant life. The presentation discussed examples of this process and highlighted some of the challenges and opportunities to a plant operator in ensuring ongoing success in operating a safe and productive site.

Innovative Execution of Remedial Solutions for Concrete & Steel Structures Ivan Ruefli of Central Systems The presentation focus was on two separate but equally important facets of asset maintenance and remediation.

The first topic addressed the combined requirement to protect steel structures for chemicals, impact and wear in aggressive environments. The presentation focused on an immerging trend of companion coatings from different manufacturers used together to provide effective solutions. Product selection and testing regimes were discussed along with practical case studies featuring details of how and where this approach may be beneficial and successful. The second topic focused on cathodic protection of reinforcing within concrete structures. An alternative external galvanic anode approach is discussed and compared to the readily available internal lump anodes systems currently in use. The objective is to address the advantages this method has in short windows of opportunity often available to execute remedial work in processing environments.

The Problem with Proprietary Coatings Ted Riding of Jotun Mining processes often involve the creation of corrosive micro-climates or are carried out in aggressive locations where the environment is generally corrosive. Many of the processes utilize proprietary equipment that has had surface coatings applied that are unsuitable for the specific harsh conditions. This presentation discussed the consequences of these limitations and the available options to provide supplementary corrosion protection. The ACA takes this opportunity to thank the presenters and their companies for taking the time to support this regional ACA event.

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

21


CP Technical Group Report Recent ash cloud disruptions caused the annual Australian Electrolysis Committee (AEC) meeting in Launceston to be postponed from June 24th to July 28th 2011. A report from the AEC meeting would normally be published in this issue of Corrosion & Materials, but due to the new postponed date and production dates of Corrosion & Materials, this was not possible. Therefore, below are two summaries from recent cathodic protection focused presentations at recent ACA events. Satellite-based Communications for Remote CP systems

More readily – CP power supply output voltage and current

Time of day charging system achieves ‘float’ – a measure of reserve solar and battery capacity Routine achievement of battery equalisation – a metric for likely battery life Low volts cutout events – often occur at night and go undetected during daytime surveys That sites are being visited and maintained Who is interested?

The vast bulk of impressed current cathodic protection power supplies are the ‘TR’ Transformer-Rectifier type powered from mains power supplies, but in many remote areas sophisticated DC-DC converters powered by batteries charged by solar power provide the impressed current. Australia hosts one of the world’s most urbanised populations, but

22 Corrosion & Materials

Local CP Technician Pipeline Integrity Supervisor Operations Supervisor CP contractors and consultants Management What does the data tell us?

Impact of weather conditions – catastrophic; variations in soil moisture; variations in solar resource Validation and calibration of other data sources 297 x 21

0 6PP DL

ROLL FO

How does current-generation satellite communications work? Work ex pe in respo rience and wo rk nsible charge Work exp

Use of a high-reliability LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite constellation such as Iridium would be prohibitively expensive for broadscale implementation. Simplex communication, with Globalstar for example, “is a low cost, one way satellite data delivery solution. It 98mm is ideal for tracking the location of mobile assets such as shipping containers, land transport vehicles including road and rail, heavy industrial equipment and any other high value assets that operate in regional and rural areas around Australia.” Data is logged perhaps four times a day and uploaded once a day, when a satellite is available. erience related in corros fiel ion or in corros d is defined as practic corrosion ion me chanis monito ms, cau al experience ring. It ses, con covers implem the inve trol and ent stigatio must be ation of corros n, design technical ion or and in in nature control. The the cor wor (not sal ros inspec es for exa k tion, Non ion field. Me tallurg mple) are not Destru y, wel ctive Tes acc ting (ND ding to corros eptable, exc ept T) ion. etc, when dire ctly rela Work in ted respon sible cha corrosion rge in cor related above, rosion which inc field is, work or a experie requiri ludes a nce as ng level of defined respon must be technical jud gem sibility in techni respon cal con ent. The applica sib trol and and fail ility. Work suc have tec nt ure ana h lysis etc as design, spe hnical work in are con cification charge , as opp sidered applica , ose res tion or install of corrosion d to routine tes ponsible control ing ano ting or measu des. res, ie paintin g Aff

ect on

LD BACK CO VE ion pro

ACA Me mb

ership

ACA acc reditat ion as Techno a Corros log ion Tec privileg ist will have hnician no es / office or including the affect on a me ir right mber’s partici to vote, pate in any ass hold any ociated activity.

Satellite synchronised interrupters have a precision clock on board but these tend to lose accuracy in extremes of temperature. They access GPS satellites to update the clock. Dual reporting/ synchronising systems have two satellite antennae, to access different satellite types. Towards Unified Engineering CP System Theory (ueCPst) for CP of Steel in Aqueous Environments This is a summary of a recent presentation by Rajko Vukcevic of SMPS at the Victorian Branch June 2011 Technical meeting.

Rajko set out his paradigm for CP education and practice, attempting to unify the distinct areas of science, engineering theory and engineering practice, which often do not seem to overlap. He started with his definition of what a CP system is, and what it should include. He then identified a new criterion to classify the type of CP system based on the source of energy: internal (galvanic) and external (ICCP) and combinations of these (hybrid). Drawing on his electronics background, Rajko described different sorts of current regulators, and their reliability. This was closely followed up by his observations

on how CP effectiveness might be improved by using alternative direct current waveforms to the usual square wave, and use of pulsed signals. This is an area ripe for some R&D. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Rajko’s somewhat radical ideas sparked out many questions and vigorous debate, which extended as long as his presentation. Additional ideas discussed included increased use of smart/self-checking sensors, and improved electronic monitoring and control algorithms.

R

Applicat

cedure A comple ted app payme lication nt and form docum ACA Cer entatio with accompan tificatio n should ying n VIC 312 be sen 9 or fax Scheme, PO t to the Box 112 ed to +61 , Kerrim Your app 3 9890 uir 7866. lication you will will be initially be con tacted require if any fur assessed and d. The ACA the then forw r inform will con Review ard your applica tact your refe ation is Board rees and tion to (which every 3 the Cer meets month tificatio per s) n iodical contac for ass ly - app ted by the ACA essment. You rox Review ma or Board members one of the Cer y be needed tific to proper if furthe review r inform ation ly assess ed, ation is the Cer you will receive your applica tion. Onc tificatio n Review notification by letter e For fur Boa rd’s dec the as to ision. Applica r information tion For on the Cer m please visit our or the Compla tification Rul es, website ints Pro or call the ACA ces at www.c on +61 orrosio s, 3 9890 n.com 4833.

FRONT

The Au

stralasia n

COVER

Corrosio

n Asso

ciation

Inc

Certification Program Working toward Professional Development in Corrosion

The Australasian Corrosion Association (ACA) provides a pathway to formal recognition of education, knowledge and work 100mm experience for those working in corrosion related industries through its certification program. ACA members are able to apply for recognition as either an ACA Corrosion Technician or ACA Corrosion Technologist depending on their ability to satisfy the eligibility criteria. M

Performance of the solar power supply and SOC (State of Charge) of the battery bank.

Trends – coating deterioration; impacts of other infrastructure; anode health

ROGRA

‘Holidays’ will occur in protective coatings, and grow as an asset ages, and Cathodic Protection using impressed current or sacrificial (galvanic) anodes is a third strategy in mitigating damage.

Ideally – polarisation potential

Is the CP’s solar power supply overworked

CERTIF ICATIO NP

Cathodic protection is part of a tiered approach to protecting metallic infrastructure from corrosion. Selection, supply and installation of suitable materials is the core strategy. Selection, application, protection and maintenance of suitable protective coatings provide the next level of defence.

What do we seek to measure?

As an electronics engineer with a background in design of advanced power supplies and control systems, sometimes for the CP industry, Rajko has cast a critical eye and original thinking over the whole approach to the education and practice of cathodic protection of steel in aqueous environments. For example, why make a distinction between galvanic and impressed current CP, when the outcome is the same, only the source of power is different? Why are the accepted practices so different in oil and gas, water, marine and concrete structure sectors? Why does no one define what is meant by a CP system?

Is the asset or CP power supply damaged

Wor ki ng toward Professi onal De velopm ent in Co rrosion

This is a summary of a seminar presentation by Lyndon Zimmermann of MPower Solaris during the Adelaide leg of the ACA ‘Corrosion Mitigation and Monitoring Seminar Series’ on the 3rd June 2011.

relies heavily on remote area infrastructure to provide key products and services, most notably gas and water. Relying on worker site visits to monitor the state and efficacy of infrastructure and its services is expensive, and often near impossible during and in the aftermath of extreme weather events. Modern communications systems not only reduce monitoring costs, but deliver that information rapidly and direct to key decision makers. In the most remote of locations modestly-priced satellite communications are playing a growing role in the overall monitoring mix.

99mm

Why apply for certification? Satisfy criteria in Australian Standards such as AS2832.5 that specifically call for qualified ACA Corrosion Technicians/ Technologists. Recognition from industry peers that you have met stringent minimum standards and have satisfied a number of requisite criteria. Provide a competitive advantage over others when applying/tendering for work. Formal recognition of your training and education activity in the industry. Ensures you stay up to date with the latest in corrosion industry news, events and information through your ongoing ACA membership.

www.corrosion.com.au

Requirements to become an ACA Corrosion Technician: Ongoing ACA membership as an individual member or an ACA corporate member’s representative. Satisfactory completion of a recognised basic corrosion course such as the Corrosion Technology Certificate offered by the ACA. At least 4 years work experience in corrosion or a corrosion related position. Completion of courses in corrosion or corrosion subjects.

Work experience and work in responsible charge Work experience in corrosion or corrosion related field is defined as practical experience in corrosion mechanisms, causes, control and monitoring. It covers the investigation, design or implementation of corrosion control. The work must be technical in nature (not sales for example) and in the corrosion field. Metallurgy, welding inspection, Non Destructive Testing (NDT) etc, are not acceptable, except when directly related to corrosion.

Applicants for the grade of Technologist will need to satisfy all requirements of an ACA Corrosion Technician and the following additional requirements:

Work in responsible charge in corrosion or a corrosion related field is, work experience as defined above, which includes a level of responsibility requiring technical judgement. The applicant must be in technical control and have technical responsibility. Work such as design, specification, and failure analysis etc are considered responsible work in charge, as opposed to routine testing or application of corrosion control measures, ie painting or installing anodes.

An additional 6 years work experience in corrosion (at least 10 in total) with 5 years in responsible charge. (Please see below for definitions of work experience and work in responsible charge.)

For further information on the Certification Rules, Application Form or the Complaints Process, please visit our website at www.corrosion.com or call the ACA on +61 3 9890 4833.

A signed ACA Affirmation, which details the values and standards expected of accredited technicians by the ACA. Requirements for certification as an ACA Corrosion Technologist:

An extra 4 points (or 10 points in total) achieved through courses and other work. Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

23


CP Technical Group Report Recent ash cloud disruptions caused the annual Australian Electrolysis Committee (AEC) meeting in Launceston to be postponed from June 24th to July 28th 2011. A report from the AEC meeting would normally be published in this issue of Corrosion & Materials, but due to the new postponed date and production dates of Corrosion & Materials, this was not possible. Therefore, below are two summaries from recent cathodic protection focused presentations at recent ACA events. Satellite-based Communications for Remote CP systems

More readily – CP power supply output voltage and current

Time of day charging system achieves ‘float’ – a measure of reserve solar and battery capacity Routine achievement of battery equalisation – a metric for likely battery life Low volts cutout events – often occur at night and go undetected during daytime surveys That sites are being visited and maintained Who is interested?

The vast bulk of impressed current cathodic protection power supplies are the ‘TR’ Transformer-Rectifier type powered from mains power supplies, but in many remote areas sophisticated DC-DC converters powered by batteries charged by solar power provide the impressed current. Australia hosts one of the world’s most urbanised populations, but

22 Corrosion & Materials

Local CP Technician Pipeline Integrity Supervisor Operations Supervisor CP contractors and consultants Management What does the data tell us?

Impact of weather conditions – catastrophic; variations in soil moisture; variations in solar resource Validation and calibration of other data sources 297 x 21

0 6PP DL

ROLL FO

How does current-generation satellite communications work? Work ex pe in respo rience and wo rk nsible charge Work exp

Use of a high-reliability LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite constellation such as Iridium would be prohibitively expensive for broadscale implementation. Simplex communication, with Globalstar for example, “is a low cost, one way satellite data delivery solution. It 98mm is ideal for tracking the location of mobile assets such as shipping containers, land transport vehicles including road and rail, heavy industrial equipment and any other high value assets that operate in regional and rural areas around Australia.” Data is logged perhaps four times a day and uploaded once a day, when a satellite is available. erience related in corros fiel ion or in corros d is defined as practic corrosion ion me chanis monito ms, cau al experience ring. It ses, con covers implem the inve trol and ent stigatio must be ation of corros n, design technical ion or and in in nature control. The the cor wor (not sal ros inspec es for exa k tion, Non ion field. Me tallurg mple) are not Destru y, wel ctive Tes acc ting (ND ding to corros eptable, exc ept T) ion. etc, when dire ctly rela Work in ted respon sible cha corrosion rge in cor related above, rosion which inc field is, work or a experie requiri ludes a nce as ng level of defined respon must be technical jud gem sibility in techni respon cal con ent. The applica sib trol and and fail ility. Work suc have tec nt ure ana h lysis etc as design, spe hnical work in are con cification charge , as opp sidered applica , ose res tion or install of corrosion d to routine tes ponsible control ing ano ting or measu des. res, ie paintin g Aff

ect on

LD BACK CO VE ion pro

ACA Me mb

ership

ACA acc reditat ion as Techno a Corros log ion Tec privileg ist will have hnician no es / office or including the affect on a me ir right mber’s partici to vote, pate in any ass hold any ociated activity.

Satellite synchronised interrupters have a precision clock on board but these tend to lose accuracy in extremes of temperature. They access GPS satellites to update the clock. Dual reporting/ synchronising systems have two satellite antennae, to access different satellite types. Towards Unified Engineering CP System Theory (ueCPst) for CP of Steel in Aqueous Environments This is a summary of a recent presentation by Rajko Vukcevic of SMPS at the Victorian Branch June 2011 Technical meeting.

Rajko set out his paradigm for CP education and practice, attempting to unify the distinct areas of science, engineering theory and engineering practice, which often do not seem to overlap. He started with his definition of what a CP system is, and what it should include. He then identified a new criterion to classify the type of CP system based on the source of energy: internal (galvanic) and external (ICCP) and combinations of these (hybrid). Drawing on his electronics background, Rajko described different sorts of current regulators, and their reliability. This was closely followed up by his observations

on how CP effectiveness might be improved by using alternative direct current waveforms to the usual square wave, and use of pulsed signals. This is an area ripe for some R&D. Perhaps unsurprisingly, Rajko’s somewhat radical ideas sparked out many questions and vigorous debate, which extended as long as his presentation. Additional ideas discussed included increased use of smart/self-checking sensors, and improved electronic monitoring and control algorithms.

R

Applicat

cedure A comple ted app payme lication nt and form docum ACA Cer entatio with accompan tificatio n should ying n VIC 312 be sen 9 or fax Scheme, PO t to the Box 112 ed to +61 , Kerrim Your app 3 9890 uir 7866. lication you will will be initially be con tacted require if any fur assessed and d. The ACA the then forw r inform will con Review ard your applica tact your refe ation is Board rees and tion to (which every 3 the Cer meets month tificatio per s) n iodical contac for ass ly - app ted by the ACA essment. You rox Review ma or Board members one of the Cer y be needed tific to proper if furthe review r inform ation ly assess ed, ation is the Cer you will receive your applica tion. Onc tificatio n Review notification by letter e For fur Boa rd’s dec the as to ision. Applica r information tion For on the Cer m please visit our or the Compla tification Rul es, website ints Pro or call the ACA ces at www.c on +61 orrosio s, 3 9890 n.com 4833.

FRONT

The Au

stralasia n

COVER

Corrosio

n Asso

ciation

Inc

Certification Program Working toward Professional Development in Corrosion

The Australasian Corrosion Association (ACA) provides a pathway to formal recognition of education, knowledge and work 100mm experience for those working in corrosion related industries through its certification program. ACA members are able to apply for recognition as either an ACA Corrosion Technician or ACA Corrosion Technologist depending on their ability to satisfy the eligibility criteria. M

Performance of the solar power supply and SOC (State of Charge) of the battery bank.

Trends – coating deterioration; impacts of other infrastructure; anode health

ROGRA

‘Holidays’ will occur in protective coatings, and grow as an asset ages, and Cathodic Protection using impressed current or sacrificial (galvanic) anodes is a third strategy in mitigating damage.

Ideally – polarisation potential

Is the CP’s solar power supply overworked

CERTIF ICATIO NP

Cathodic protection is part of a tiered approach to protecting metallic infrastructure from corrosion. Selection, supply and installation of suitable materials is the core strategy. Selection, application, protection and maintenance of suitable protective coatings provide the next level of defence.

What do we seek to measure?

As an electronics engineer with a background in design of advanced power supplies and control systems, sometimes for the CP industry, Rajko has cast a critical eye and original thinking over the whole approach to the education and practice of cathodic protection of steel in aqueous environments. For example, why make a distinction between galvanic and impressed current CP, when the outcome is the same, only the source of power is different? Why are the accepted practices so different in oil and gas, water, marine and concrete structure sectors? Why does no one define what is meant by a CP system?

Is the asset or CP power supply damaged

Wor ki ng toward Professi onal De velopm ent in Co rrosion

This is a summary of a seminar presentation by Lyndon Zimmermann of MPower Solaris during the Adelaide leg of the ACA ‘Corrosion Mitigation and Monitoring Seminar Series’ on the 3rd June 2011.

relies heavily on remote area infrastructure to provide key products and services, most notably gas and water. Relying on worker site visits to monitor the state and efficacy of infrastructure and its services is expensive, and often near impossible during and in the aftermath of extreme weather events. Modern communications systems not only reduce monitoring costs, but deliver that information rapidly and direct to key decision makers. In the most remote of locations modestly-priced satellite communications are playing a growing role in the overall monitoring mix.

99mm

Why apply for certification? Satisfy criteria in Australian Standards such as AS2832.5 that specifically call for qualified ACA Corrosion Technicians/ Technologists. Recognition from industry peers that you have met stringent minimum standards and have satisfied a number of requisite criteria. Provide a competitive advantage over others when applying/tendering for work. Formal recognition of your training and education activity in the industry. Ensures you stay up to date with the latest in corrosion industry news, events and information through your ongoing ACA membership.

www.corrosion.com.au

Requirements to become an ACA Corrosion Technician: Ongoing ACA membership as an individual member or an ACA corporate member’s representative. Satisfactory completion of a recognised basic corrosion course such as the Corrosion Technology Certificate offered by the ACA. At least 4 years work experience in corrosion or a corrosion related position. Completion of courses in corrosion or corrosion subjects.

Work experience and work in responsible charge Work experience in corrosion or corrosion related field is defined as practical experience in corrosion mechanisms, causes, control and monitoring. It covers the investigation, design or implementation of corrosion control. The work must be technical in nature (not sales for example) and in the corrosion field. Metallurgy, welding inspection, Non Destructive Testing (NDT) etc, are not acceptable, except when directly related to corrosion.

Applicants for the grade of Technologist will need to satisfy all requirements of an ACA Corrosion Technician and the following additional requirements:

Work in responsible charge in corrosion or a corrosion related field is, work experience as defined above, which includes a level of responsibility requiring technical judgement. The applicant must be in technical control and have technical responsibility. Work such as design, specification, and failure analysis etc are considered responsible work in charge, as opposed to routine testing or application of corrosion control measures, ie painting or installing anodes.

An additional 6 years work experience in corrosion (at least 10 in total) with 5 years in responsible charge. (Please see below for definitions of work experience and work in responsible charge.)

For further information on the Certification Rules, Application Form or the Complaints Process, please visit our website at www.corrosion.com or call the ACA on +61 3 9890 4833.

A signed ACA Affirmation, which details the values and standards expected of accredited technicians by the ACA. Requirements for certification as an ACA Corrosion Technologist:

An extra 4 points (or 10 points in total) achieved through courses and other work. Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

23


University Profile Charles Darwin University North Australian Centre for Oil and Gas Charles Darwin University (CDU), with support from the Northern Territory Government and the oil and gas industry, has established the North Australian Centre for Oil and Gas at the School of Engineering & Information Technology, Casuarina campus. The Centre will be a hub for training and education programs (both residential and external) together with research capabilities targeted at the specific needs of oil and gas operations and developments in the region.

capabilities and develop a new research focus under the general themes of process engineering & process operations, and maintenance & asset management.

Darwin sits adjacent to major offshore gas, oil and condensate reserves and is already a substantial gas processing and supply & service hub for projects off northern and northwestern Australia. The scale and expected long life of planned and proposed developments, as well as the distance from research, education and training facilities in southern capitals, highlights the need for Darwin to boost its training and research infrastructure in support of the petroleum industry. The North Australian Centre for Oil & Gas is a direct response to this need.

The Centre will benefit the oil and gas industry and the Darwin community through: Improved training and education outcomes

CDU is a dual sector institution with a strong Vocational Education and Training (VET) Division as well as extensive Higher Education and Research activities. It also has particular cross cultural strengths in indigenous and East Timorese education and training. CDU is a public university with over 50 years experience in delivering education and training across the Territory, and through external programs, to students across Australia. A range of engineering and VET courses relevant to the oil & gas industry is already available. CDU will build on these established teaching

24 Corrosion & Materials

A dedicated new building is planned as a focal point for the Centre for Oil and Gas which will incorporate teaching space, house specialised equipment for teaching and research and accommodate staff and graduate students. There will also be exhibition space to showcase the industry and scope to provide tailored short courses for industry.

Encouraging more students to consider careers in the resources sector Expansion of the locally based workforce (in both the construction and operational phases) Solutions-oriented research and consultancy plus long term strategic research Providing a forum to explain industry issues to the wider community Research Once fully operational from January 2012, the Centre will incorporate a state of the art laboratory with process simulation and testing equipment for gas and oil stream analysis and materials analysis. These facilities will allow students, researchers and industry to observe and test processes, materials, and potential solutions in a simulated environment.

AS 1554.1. This work will be carried out as a student project. Krishnan is also engaged in developing welding procedures for some unusual processes; for example, electro-slag cladding.

There will be a particular research focus on: Process stream analysis Phase separation Hydrate formation in pipelines and equipment CO2 capture Corrosion control and prevention in the wet tropics Materials testing Some research will be undertaken in collaboration with established groups elsewhere in Australia and overseas including other universities and research centres such as the CO2 Cooperative Research Centre and the WA Corrosion Centre. Assoc. Prof. Krishnan Kannoorpatti Assoc Prof Krishnan Kannoorpatti is developing a metallography and corrosion lab facility and is actively engaging the local industries to identify issues and opportunities in the fast developing oil and gas sector. Recently, he investigated the corrosion of 316 type stainless steel wires meant for making mesh frames. It was found that some wires had corroded even before the wires were put to service. During the investigation it was found that though the wires had met the chemical specifications for a typical 316 stainless steel, the surface quality of the wires was poor. The wires that had corrosion were found to have spiral defects introduced during manufacture. The research highlighted the importance of specifying the surface quality of wires in addition to chemical composition. A paper based on this work will be presented at the International Corrosion Congress in Perth in November.

Presently, he is engaged with a local company in developing an overlay weld procedure specification involving a 316L type stainless steel. The overlay is intended for a unit which is part of an oil and gas plant. As a continuation of this work, Krishnan is engaged in developing an expert system for developing a weld procedure specification as per

Krishnan has over 25 years of experience in Corrosion, Welding and Materials Engineering. He completed his PhD at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras investigating the effect of ferrite content and post weld heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic clad metals. In 1993-94 Krishnan carried out research under the Marie Curie Bursarie at the University of Birmingham, UK on Corrosion Fatigue of Super Duplex Stainless Steels and weldments. In 1996 Krishnan joined the Mechanical Engineering department at Adelaide University teaching the first Australian qualified International Welding Engineers course. Krishnan has worked on and solved a number

Corrosion Technology Certificate Member AU $2115 Non member AU Melbourne October

$2480 24-28

Introduction to Protective Coatings Member AU $550 Non member AU Brisbane August

$680 29

Coatings Selection & Specification Member AU $1415 Non member AU Adelaide November

$1725 02-04

Coating Inspection Refresher Member AU $550 Non member AU Sydney December

$680 14

Cathodic Protection Monitoring Member AU $1415 Non member AU Melbourne August

$1725 23-25

Corrosion & CP of Concrete Structures Member AU $1010 Non member AU Perth October

$1265 25-26

ACA/ACRA Corrosion & Protection of Reinforced Concrete Member AU $1010 Non member AU $1265 Melbourne December 05-06 NACE – CP Tester Level 1 Member $3235 Non member Kuala Lumpur November

www.corrosion.com.au

$3715 07-12

of cases of corrosion and welding metallurgy issues for the industry and has several publications in corrosion, materials and fabrication engineering. Krishnan looks forward to further collaboration with industry and invites any queries regarding corrosion, weld metallurgy and materials engineering. Contact Details: Krishnan Kannoorpatti Associate Professor (Corrosion and Materials) North Australian Centre for Oil and Gas T.+61 8 8946 6219 | F. +61 8 8946 6366 krishnan.kannoorpatti@cdu.edu.au www.cdu.edu.au

NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 1 Member AU $3560 Non member AU $4070 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 Bangkok August 15-20 Melbourne September 05-10 September 12-17 Kuala Lumpur Perth November 07-12 Kuala Lumpur Nov/Dec 28-03 NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 2 Member AU $3560 Non member AU $4070 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 Singapore August 15-20 Bangkok August 22-27 Melbourne September 12-17 Perth November 14-19 Kuala Lumpur December 05-10 NACE – Peer Review Member AU $1399 Member SE Asia & NZ* $1272 Perth Kuala Lumpur

Non member AU Non member SE Asia & NZ* November December

$1643 $1494 17-19 11-13

*All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free To check the currency of this information please view the latest information at www.corrosion.com.au Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

25


University Profile Charles Darwin University North Australian Centre for Oil and Gas Charles Darwin University (CDU), with support from the Northern Territory Government and the oil and gas industry, has established the North Australian Centre for Oil and Gas at the School of Engineering & Information Technology, Casuarina campus. The Centre will be a hub for training and education programs (both residential and external) together with research capabilities targeted at the specific needs of oil and gas operations and developments in the region.

capabilities and develop a new research focus under the general themes of process engineering & process operations, and maintenance & asset management.

Darwin sits adjacent to major offshore gas, oil and condensate reserves and is already a substantial gas processing and supply & service hub for projects off northern and northwestern Australia. The scale and expected long life of planned and proposed developments, as well as the distance from research, education and training facilities in southern capitals, highlights the need for Darwin to boost its training and research infrastructure in support of the petroleum industry. The North Australian Centre for Oil & Gas is a direct response to this need.

The Centre will benefit the oil and gas industry and the Darwin community through: Improved training and education outcomes

CDU is a dual sector institution with a strong Vocational Education and Training (VET) Division as well as extensive Higher Education and Research activities. It also has particular cross cultural strengths in indigenous and East Timorese education and training. CDU is a public university with over 50 years experience in delivering education and training across the Territory, and through external programs, to students across Australia. A range of engineering and VET courses relevant to the oil & gas industry is already available. CDU will build on these established teaching

24 Corrosion & Materials

A dedicated new building is planned as a focal point for the Centre for Oil and Gas which will incorporate teaching space, house specialised equipment for teaching and research and accommodate staff and graduate students. There will also be exhibition space to showcase the industry and scope to provide tailored short courses for industry.

Encouraging more students to consider careers in the resources sector Expansion of the locally based workforce (in both the construction and operational phases) Solutions-oriented research and consultancy plus long term strategic research Providing a forum to explain industry issues to the wider community Research Once fully operational from January 2012, the Centre will incorporate a state of the art laboratory with process simulation and testing equipment for gas and oil stream analysis and materials analysis. These facilities will allow students, researchers and industry to observe and test processes, materials, and potential solutions in a simulated environment.

AS 1554.1. This work will be carried out as a student project. Krishnan is also engaged in developing welding procedures for some unusual processes; for example, electro-slag cladding.

There will be a particular research focus on: Process stream analysis Phase separation Hydrate formation in pipelines and equipment CO2 capture Corrosion control and prevention in the wet tropics Materials testing Some research will be undertaken in collaboration with established groups elsewhere in Australia and overseas including other universities and research centres such as the CO2 Cooperative Research Centre and the WA Corrosion Centre. Assoc. Prof. Krishnan Kannoorpatti Assoc Prof Krishnan Kannoorpatti is developing a metallography and corrosion lab facility and is actively engaging the local industries to identify issues and opportunities in the fast developing oil and gas sector. Recently, he investigated the corrosion of 316 type stainless steel wires meant for making mesh frames. It was found that some wires had corroded even before the wires were put to service. During the investigation it was found that though the wires had met the chemical specifications for a typical 316 stainless steel, the surface quality of the wires was poor. The wires that had corrosion were found to have spiral defects introduced during manufacture. The research highlighted the importance of specifying the surface quality of wires in addition to chemical composition. A paper based on this work will be presented at the International Corrosion Congress in Perth in November.

Presently, he is engaged with a local company in developing an overlay weld procedure specification involving a 316L type stainless steel. The overlay is intended for a unit which is part of an oil and gas plant. As a continuation of this work, Krishnan is engaged in developing an expert system for developing a weld procedure specification as per

Krishnan has over 25 years of experience in Corrosion, Welding and Materials Engineering. He completed his PhD at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras investigating the effect of ferrite content and post weld heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of austenitic clad metals. In 1993-94 Krishnan carried out research under the Marie Curie Bursarie at the University of Birmingham, UK on Corrosion Fatigue of Super Duplex Stainless Steels and weldments. In 1996 Krishnan joined the Mechanical Engineering department at Adelaide University teaching the first Australian qualified International Welding Engineers course. Krishnan has worked on and solved a number

Corrosion Technology Certificate Member AU $2115 Non member AU Melbourne October

$2480 24-28

Introduction to Protective Coatings Member AU $550 Non member AU Brisbane August

$680 29

Coatings Selection & Specification Member AU $1415 Non member AU Adelaide November

$1725 02-04

Coating Inspection Refresher Member AU $550 Non member AU Sydney December

$680 14

Cathodic Protection Monitoring Member AU $1415 Non member AU Melbourne August

$1725 23-25

Corrosion & CP of Concrete Structures Member AU $1010 Non member AU Perth October

$1265 25-26

ACA/ACRA Corrosion & Protection of Reinforced Concrete Member AU $1010 Non member AU $1265 Melbourne December 05-06 NACE – CP Tester Level 1 Member $3235 Non member Kuala Lumpur November

www.corrosion.com.au

$3715 07-12

of cases of corrosion and welding metallurgy issues for the industry and has several publications in corrosion, materials and fabrication engineering. Krishnan looks forward to further collaboration with industry and invites any queries regarding corrosion, weld metallurgy and materials engineering. Contact Details: Krishnan Kannoorpatti Associate Professor (Corrosion and Materials) North Australian Centre for Oil and Gas T.+61 8 8946 6219 | F. +61 8 8946 6366 krishnan.kannoorpatti@cdu.edu.au www.cdu.edu.au

NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 1 Member AU $3560 Non member AU $4070 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 Bangkok August 15-20 Melbourne September 05-10 September 12-17 Kuala Lumpur Perth November 07-12 Kuala Lumpur Nov/Dec 28-03 NACE – Coating Inspection Program CIP Level 2 Member AU $3560 Non member AU $4070 Member SE Non member Asia & NZ* $3235 SE Asia & NZ* $3715 Singapore August 15-20 Bangkok August 22-27 Melbourne September 12-17 Perth November 14-19 Kuala Lumpur December 05-10 NACE – Peer Review Member AU $1399 Member SE Asia & NZ* $1272 Perth Kuala Lumpur

Non member AU Non member SE Asia & NZ* November December

$1643 $1494 17-19 11-13

*All SE Asia and NZ courses are GST free To check the currency of this information please view the latest information at www.corrosion.com.au Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

25


Management of Tasmanian Bridges Introduction The Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources, Tasmania, (DIER) is responsible, as part of its overall responsibility for managing the State’s road network, for the management of over 1200 bridges, major culverts, retaining walls and sign gantries with a replacement cost of approximately $1.5B.

Management Issues Issues relating to the management of the asset are common, to a greater or lesser extent, to other State Road Authorities and include:

Concrete Bridges A well designed and built concrete bridge is a durable structure. Good design detail and attention to the 4 C’s of concrete (cover, compaction, curing and cement) during construction will substantially delay the need for future remedial interventions and accordingly investment in diligent contract surveillance at this time makes good economic sense.

Heavy loads High loads Impact

The average age of the bridge infrastructure is 42 years, with the nature of the asset shown in figures 1 and 2. The focus of this discussion is on concrete bridges.

Corrosion- steel and reinforced concrete Waterway- capacity, vegetation, debris, siltation and erosion Budget and resources

Environment Tasmania is an island State with relatively populous coastal communities and associated infrastructure. It has 47% of its DIER managed bridges located within 5km of the coast, with a further 27% being within 1km. Tasmania also has significant road and bridge infrastructure located in central highland environments subject to winter ice and snow.

7%

Bridge Inspections Inspection of bridges provides basic data for the management of the bridge asset. The condition of the asset must be known, even if remedial strategies or funding may be uncertain. In the extreme, a bridge may always be closed. DIER has a three tier bridge inspection program and a full time bridge inspector, largely involved with rigorous visually based inspections (level 2).

0.3% 2%

Principal deterioration mechanisms Chloride Ingress Chloride induced reinforcement corrosion is the most prevalent form of corrosion in Tasmanian bridges. The high alkaline environment in concrete normally provides reinforcing steel with excellent corrosion protection. However, chloride ion at the steel reinforcement, having migrated through the concrete cover from the environment, disrupts this protection and, in the presence of oxygen and water, promotes corrosion. The extent and rate of chloride induced reinforcement corrosion is exacerbated when in combination with poor quality concretes, particularly with respect to permeability, and low covers to reinforcements. $M 500

300

450 250

51%

350

200

Number

300 250

150

11%

200 100

Total $1.5B Prestressed Concrete Steel Beams Timber

100

50

50

Reinforced Concrete Culvert Masonary

Figure 1: Bridge Types by Replacement Cost

26 Corrosion & Materials

150

0

0-10

10-20

20-30

30-40

40-50

50-60

60-70

Age (years) Figure 2: Bridge Age Profile

70-80

80-90

90-100

>100

0

Replacement Value

29%

400

systems wherever possible, including replacement of existing impressed current systems with passive systems as appropriate.

Chloride concentration profiles with depth are obtained as part of DIER bridge condition assessments. The threshold for corrosion initiation is usually taken as 0.4% by weight of cement (%bwoc). Typical chloride induced corrosion of a coastal bridge is shown in figure 3. Carbonation Carbonation induced reinforcement corrosion, usually in association with low cover to reinforcement concretes, is generally the main cause of corrosion in Tasmania’s non-coastal bridges. Carbonation occurs when concrete reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide, resulting in a reduction of its alkalinity and associated disruption of the reinforcing steel’s passivity. Propagation of corrosion is not as aggressive as chloride induced corrosion and priority of remedial works can be programmed accordingly. Depth of carbonation is obtained as part of DIER bridge condition assessments. Alkali Silica Reaction Alkali silica reaction is not a significant problem for Tasmanian bridges, with only one known DIER managed structure being affected (McPartlan Pass Bridge on Gordon Main Road). Alkali Silica reaction is an expansive reaction between susceptible aggregates and alkalis principally derived from cements. The reaction requires water and is usually associated with exposed bridge elements such as wing-walls and above deck elements. Testing for potentially reactive aggregates is a requirement of DIER Specification B10, Supply of Concrete. Alkali Silica attack in McPartlan Pass Bridge is shown in figure 4. Sulphate Attack Sulphate attack is a chemical breakdown mechanism where www.corrosion.com.au

Figure 3: Chloride Induced Corrosion Damage

Chloride extraction- Chloride extraction involves the use of an appropriately directed temporary electric field to draw chloride ions away from the reinforcing steel. DIER has not used this technique to date, however it remains an attractive option for future remedial works. Coatings- Carbonation barrier coatings (flexible acrylics) and silanes to prevent absorption of CO2 and chloride ions respectively are used extensively by DIER, particularly in combination with concrete repairs.

Figure 4: Alkali Silica Reaction, McPartlan Pass Bridge

sulphate ions attack components of the cement paste. It is not a significant problem for Tasmanian bridges, however sulphate concentrations are obtained as part of DIER bridge condition assessments. The threshold concentration is taken as 5%bwoc. Freeze Thaw damage Freeze thaw damage is evident in Tasmanian bridges located in highland areas. Spalling of concrete results from cyclic freezing and thawing of water within concrete elements, such as bridge kerbs. The damage is not a significant problem as it is usually associated with benign environments and corrosion rates are minimal. Remedial Techniques Cathodic protection- DIER has number of galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems installed on coastal bridges. The systems were largely installed in the 1990’s and it is fair to say have produced mixed results. In particular, the impressed current systems have proved difficult to maintain and interpret. The preference for future installations on Tasmanian bridges is for galvanic

Crack and patch repairs- Cementitious concrete repair mortars remain the basic material for repair of spalled concrete and are installed on Tasmanian bridges in accordance with DIER’s Specification B15, Concrete Repairs. Epoxy resins, in accordance with DIER’s Specification B16, Concrete Crack Injection, are used for crack repairs. Care needs to be exercised to ensure that repairs are not simply treating the symptoms without addressing the cause. As per new construction works, contract surveillance is essential to ensure quality installations, particularly to avoid differential shrinkage cracking in repair mortars as has been DIER’s experience in some past installations. Monitor with view to replacementThis is a legitimate management technique, however care needs to be exercised to ensure funds provided in future programs for such works are actually available when required. Geoff Mulcahy Asset Engineer Bridges Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources, Tasmania

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

27


Management of Tasmanian Bridges Introduction The Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources, Tasmania, (DIER) is responsible, as part of its overall responsibility for managing the State’s road network, for the management of over 1200 bridges, major culverts, retaining walls and sign gantries with a replacement cost of approximately $1.5B.

Management Issues Issues relating to the management of the asset are common, to a greater or lesser extent, to other State Road Authorities and include:

Concrete Bridges A well designed and built concrete bridge is a durable structure. Good design detail and attention to the 4 C’s of concrete (cover, compaction, curing and cement) during construction will substantially delay the need for future remedial interventions and accordingly investment in diligent contract surveillance at this time makes good economic sense.

Heavy loads High loads Impact

The average age of the bridge infrastructure is 42 years, with the nature of the asset shown in figures 1 and 2. The focus of this discussion is on concrete bridges.

Corrosion- steel and reinforced concrete Waterway- capacity, vegetation, debris, siltation and erosion Budget and resources

Environment Tasmania is an island State with relatively populous coastal communities and associated infrastructure. It has 47% of its DIER managed bridges located within 5km of the coast, with a further 27% being within 1km. Tasmania also has significant road and bridge infrastructure located in central highland environments subject to winter ice and snow.

7%

Bridge Inspections Inspection of bridges provides basic data for the management of the bridge asset. The condition of the asset must be known, even if remedial strategies or funding may be uncertain. In the extreme, a bridge may always be closed. DIER has a three tier bridge inspection program and a full time bridge inspector, largely involved with rigorous visually based inspections (level 2).

0.3% 2%

Principal deterioration mechanisms Chloride Ingress Chloride induced reinforcement corrosion is the most prevalent form of corrosion in Tasmanian bridges. The high alkaline environment in concrete normally provides reinforcing steel with excellent corrosion protection. However, chloride ion at the steel reinforcement, having migrated through the concrete cover from the environment, disrupts this protection and, in the presence of oxygen and water, promotes corrosion. The extent and rate of chloride induced reinforcement corrosion is exacerbated when in combination with poor quality concretes, particularly with respect to permeability, and low covers to reinforcements. $M 500

300

450 250

51%

350

200

Number

300 250

150

11%

200 100

Total $1.5B Prestressed Concrete Steel Beams Timber

100

50

50

Reinforced Concrete Culvert Masonary

Figure 1: Bridge Types by Replacement Cost

26 Corrosion & Materials

150

0

0-10

10-20

20-30

30-40

40-50

50-60

60-70

Age (years) Figure 2: Bridge Age Profile

70-80

80-90

90-100

>100

0

Replacement Value

29%

400

systems wherever possible, including replacement of existing impressed current systems with passive systems as appropriate.

Chloride concentration profiles with depth are obtained as part of DIER bridge condition assessments. The threshold for corrosion initiation is usually taken as 0.4% by weight of cement (%bwoc). Typical chloride induced corrosion of a coastal bridge is shown in figure 3. Carbonation Carbonation induced reinforcement corrosion, usually in association with low cover to reinforcement concretes, is generally the main cause of corrosion in Tasmania’s non-coastal bridges. Carbonation occurs when concrete reacts with atmospheric carbon dioxide, resulting in a reduction of its alkalinity and associated disruption of the reinforcing steel’s passivity. Propagation of corrosion is not as aggressive as chloride induced corrosion and priority of remedial works can be programmed accordingly. Depth of carbonation is obtained as part of DIER bridge condition assessments. Alkali Silica Reaction Alkali silica reaction is not a significant problem for Tasmanian bridges, with only one known DIER managed structure being affected (McPartlan Pass Bridge on Gordon Main Road). Alkali Silica reaction is an expansive reaction between susceptible aggregates and alkalis principally derived from cements. The reaction requires water and is usually associated with exposed bridge elements such as wing-walls and above deck elements. Testing for potentially reactive aggregates is a requirement of DIER Specification B10, Supply of Concrete. Alkali Silica attack in McPartlan Pass Bridge is shown in figure 4. Sulphate Attack Sulphate attack is a chemical breakdown mechanism where www.corrosion.com.au

Figure 3: Chloride Induced Corrosion Damage

Chloride extraction- Chloride extraction involves the use of an appropriately directed temporary electric field to draw chloride ions away from the reinforcing steel. DIER has not used this technique to date, however it remains an attractive option for future remedial works. Coatings- Carbonation barrier coatings (flexible acrylics) and silanes to prevent absorption of CO2 and chloride ions respectively are used extensively by DIER, particularly in combination with concrete repairs.

Figure 4: Alkali Silica Reaction, McPartlan Pass Bridge

sulphate ions attack components of the cement paste. It is not a significant problem for Tasmanian bridges, however sulphate concentrations are obtained as part of DIER bridge condition assessments. The threshold concentration is taken as 5%bwoc. Freeze Thaw damage Freeze thaw damage is evident in Tasmanian bridges located in highland areas. Spalling of concrete results from cyclic freezing and thawing of water within concrete elements, such as bridge kerbs. The damage is not a significant problem as it is usually associated with benign environments and corrosion rates are minimal. Remedial Techniques Cathodic protection- DIER has number of galvanic and impressed current cathodic protection systems installed on coastal bridges. The systems were largely installed in the 1990’s and it is fair to say have produced mixed results. In particular, the impressed current systems have proved difficult to maintain and interpret. The preference for future installations on Tasmanian bridges is for galvanic

Crack and patch repairs- Cementitious concrete repair mortars remain the basic material for repair of spalled concrete and are installed on Tasmanian bridges in accordance with DIER’s Specification B15, Concrete Repairs. Epoxy resins, in accordance with DIER’s Specification B16, Concrete Crack Injection, are used for crack repairs. Care needs to be exercised to ensure that repairs are not simply treating the symptoms without addressing the cause. As per new construction works, contract surveillance is essential to ensure quality installations, particularly to avoid differential shrinkage cracking in repair mortars as has been DIER’s experience in some past installations. Monitor with view to replacementThis is a legitimate management technique, however care needs to be exercised to ensure funds provided in future programs for such works are actually available when required. Geoff Mulcahy Asset Engineer Bridges Department of Infrastructure, Energy and Resources, Tasmania

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

27


Rust never sleeps: recoating of aboveground bulk water pipes in Brisbane Timely renovation of surface coatings is essential to maximise the life of above-ground pipes and avoid loss of service during repair or replacement. LinkWater found that, while appropriate preparation and product choice are important, there are other factors at play. This recoating project demonstrates the importance of appropriate allocation of risk between the contractor and asset owner, the potential to use new products innovatively and the importance of considering stakeholder and environmental issues. Introduction LinkWater was formed as part of the Queensland government’s drought response to own, manage and operate bulk water transport assets in South East Queensland (SEQ). LinkWater is now responsible for approximately 535km of bulk water pipelines extending from Tugun on the Gold Coast to Landers Shute on the Sunshine Coast. These trunk mains link Seqwater’s dams, treatment plants and desalination plant with the three distribution/retailers.

Photo of pipe before coating

28 Corrosion & Materials

The project Over 25 kilometres of the LinkWater pipelines were built above ground for various historical reasons, constructed typically of mild steel with a mortar lining. Today the exterior surface coatings are a mix of corrosion-resistant paints, surface coatings, patches and graffiti. This project involved recoating approximately one kilometre of 1060mm and 1670mm diameter mains running between the Mount Crosby water treatment plant, the largest water treatment facility in South-East Queensland, and the Brisbane water distribution system. The pipelines, acquired from Brisbane City Council as part of the SEQ water industry restructure, are now almost 70 years old. Project justification A survey undertaken by Savcor on behalf of LinkWater found that some surface coatings were in poor condition and widespread surface corrosion was evident in these areas. Although there was no

immediate threat of pipe failure, not undertaking immediate remedial work could result in the need for a major renovation in a few years or eventually total failure and the need for full replacement. Given the critical nature of the pipe in relation to the Water Grid and the potential consequences of failure, the ’do nothing’ option was not acceptable by LinkWater.

pipe adjacent to each block. The tenders received revealed that contractors were not willing to accept responsibility for pipeline ruptures arising from the jacking and temporary works. While this was understandable from the contractor perspective, LinkWater was not prepared to allow the works to proceed on an ‘all care, no responsibility’ basis and required an alternative approach.

Recoating specification The recoating specification was typical for such work: abrasive Garnite blasting to Class Sa 2½, followed by International Paint’s Interzinc 42 (zinc-rich epoxy) with a topcoat of Interplus 1180 (surface tolerant high build epoxy containing micaeous iron oxide). The preferred coating option offered a 15 year guarantee.

The agreed solution used a product range from STOPAQ including anticorrosion fillers and tapes. These are claimed to be impermeable to moisture and air and were used to seal the edges between the supporting blocks and the pipe. Given that the concrete blocks are not equally impermeable and corrosion may continue at the block/pipe interface, a number of the supports will be dismantled in future to check the performance of this solution.

Pipeline supports The pipeline is supported on pairs of removable concrete blocks at approximately six metre spacing to allow access to the entire pipe surface. This requires jacking and temporarily supporting the

Adjacent buried and partially- buried pipe While the project was focussed on above ground pipe, the opportunity was taken to repair adjacent buried or partially buried pipeline.

Photo of above ground pipe recoating within sealed enclosures

Photo of pipe after coating

www.corrosion.com.au

A number of abutments were constructed to provide better definition between above and belowground pipe and to allow adjacent buried pipe to be fully covered. Where underground coatings had deteriorated, they were replaced with a standard Denso Primer and Densopol 80 HT wrap system. A SolarTech Laminate PE 55 fibreglass protective layer was installed where only minimal cover was available. At the same time, LinkWater agreed to trial the STOPAQ underground wrapping system, which may offer a viable option for future works. Other contract considerations Although LinkWater has easements and/or legal access for maintenance, this pipeline runs largely through private land. An extensive lead-up of communication and consultation with land-owners was undertaken to provide for the works, contractor access and to address any issues raised.

unknown content of other older coatings. Blasted waste material was collected on groundsheets and disposed of at certified land-fills. These requirements were particularly arduous at elevated sections or where the pipe crossed natural waterways. Ongoing project Ongoing inspection, condition assessment and remedial works have been included in LinkWater’s Asset Management Plan and work will continue on our above ground pipelines identified as being in poor condition. Given the size of the mains, environmental and access constraints, the cost of the work is approximately $1,000 to $1,500/linear metre of pipe. Paul Utting LinkWater

Environmental requirements were significant and all blasting and painting had to be undertaken in an enclosed space complete with air filtration. This was due to the known presence of zinc and the

Photo of pipe after STOPAQ coating

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

29


Rust never sleeps: recoating of aboveground bulk water pipes in Brisbane Timely renovation of surface coatings is essential to maximise the life of above-ground pipes and avoid loss of service during repair or replacement. LinkWater found that, while appropriate preparation and product choice are important, there are other factors at play. This recoating project demonstrates the importance of appropriate allocation of risk between the contractor and asset owner, the potential to use new products innovatively and the importance of considering stakeholder and environmental issues. Introduction LinkWater was formed as part of the Queensland government’s drought response to own, manage and operate bulk water transport assets in South East Queensland (SEQ). LinkWater is now responsible for approximately 535km of bulk water pipelines extending from Tugun on the Gold Coast to Landers Shute on the Sunshine Coast. These trunk mains link Seqwater’s dams, treatment plants and desalination plant with the three distribution/retailers.

Photo of pipe before coating

28 Corrosion & Materials

The project Over 25 kilometres of the LinkWater pipelines were built above ground for various historical reasons, constructed typically of mild steel with a mortar lining. Today the exterior surface coatings are a mix of corrosion-resistant paints, surface coatings, patches and graffiti. This project involved recoating approximately one kilometre of 1060mm and 1670mm diameter mains running between the Mount Crosby water treatment plant, the largest water treatment facility in South-East Queensland, and the Brisbane water distribution system. The pipelines, acquired from Brisbane City Council as part of the SEQ water industry restructure, are now almost 70 years old. Project justification A survey undertaken by Savcor on behalf of LinkWater found that some surface coatings were in poor condition and widespread surface corrosion was evident in these areas. Although there was no

immediate threat of pipe failure, not undertaking immediate remedial work could result in the need for a major renovation in a few years or eventually total failure and the need for full replacement. Given the critical nature of the pipe in relation to the Water Grid and the potential consequences of failure, the ’do nothing’ option was not acceptable by LinkWater.

pipe adjacent to each block. The tenders received revealed that contractors were not willing to accept responsibility for pipeline ruptures arising from the jacking and temporary works. While this was understandable from the contractor perspective, LinkWater was not prepared to allow the works to proceed on an ‘all care, no responsibility’ basis and required an alternative approach.

Recoating specification The recoating specification was typical for such work: abrasive Garnite blasting to Class Sa 2½, followed by International Paint’s Interzinc 42 (zinc-rich epoxy) with a topcoat of Interplus 1180 (surface tolerant high build epoxy containing micaeous iron oxide). The preferred coating option offered a 15 year guarantee.

The agreed solution used a product range from STOPAQ including anticorrosion fillers and tapes. These are claimed to be impermeable to moisture and air and were used to seal the edges between the supporting blocks and the pipe. Given that the concrete blocks are not equally impermeable and corrosion may continue at the block/pipe interface, a number of the supports will be dismantled in future to check the performance of this solution.

Pipeline supports The pipeline is supported on pairs of removable concrete blocks at approximately six metre spacing to allow access to the entire pipe surface. This requires jacking and temporarily supporting the

Adjacent buried and partially- buried pipe While the project was focussed on above ground pipe, the opportunity was taken to repair adjacent buried or partially buried pipeline.

Photo of above ground pipe recoating within sealed enclosures

Photo of pipe after coating

www.corrosion.com.au

A number of abutments were constructed to provide better definition between above and belowground pipe and to allow adjacent buried pipe to be fully covered. Where underground coatings had deteriorated, they were replaced with a standard Denso Primer and Densopol 80 HT wrap system. A SolarTech Laminate PE 55 fibreglass protective layer was installed where only minimal cover was available. At the same time, LinkWater agreed to trial the STOPAQ underground wrapping system, which may offer a viable option for future works. Other contract considerations Although LinkWater has easements and/or legal access for maintenance, this pipeline runs largely through private land. An extensive lead-up of communication and consultation with land-owners was undertaken to provide for the works, contractor access and to address any issues raised.

unknown content of other older coatings. Blasted waste material was collected on groundsheets and disposed of at certified land-fills. These requirements were particularly arduous at elevated sections or where the pipe crossed natural waterways. Ongoing project Ongoing inspection, condition assessment and remedial works have been included in LinkWater’s Asset Management Plan and work will continue on our above ground pipelines identified as being in poor condition. Given the size of the mains, environmental and access constraints, the cost of the work is approximately $1,000 to $1,500/linear metre of pipe. Paul Utting LinkWater

Environmental requirements were significant and all blasting and painting had to be undertaken in an enclosed space complete with air filtration. This was due to the known presence of zinc and the

Photo of pipe after STOPAQ coating

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

29


Prevent corrosion and expensive shutdowns

Doito Industrial Painting Contractors In what year was your company established?

Is the business yard based, site based or both?

Doito Pty Ltd was established in Newcastle in 1980 and is a family owned and operated business. It is the oldest established industrial painting company in Newcastle, operating under the original management.

Site based business.

How many employees did you employ when you first started the business?

How many do you currently employ? 38 currently, however is often increased to over 50, on major projects. Do you operate from a number of locations in your home state or in other states of Australia? Newcastle and the Hunter Valley Region. What is your core business? (e.g. blasting and painting, rubber lining, waterjetting, laminating, insulation, flooring etc.) High Pressure Water Cleaning Abrasive Blast Cleaning Industrial Painting Wear Resistant Linings Floorings. What markets do you cover with your products or services? eg: oil & gas, marine, chemical process, general fabrication, tank lining, offshore etc.

Anti Corrosion Technology (ACT) is the exclusive Australian agent for STOPAQ BV, the manufacturer of the state-of-the-art visco elastic coating suitable for pipelines operating in the harshest service conditions, ensuring optimum performance and asset reliability. ACT, with over 35 years of national and international experience, is dedicated to providing Australia’s pipeline operators in various industries with comprehensive corrosion management and protection for all their onshore and offshore assets. ACT has been working successfully in Australia with STOPAQ BV to provide innovative corrosion control solutions. The major features of STOPAQ’s visco elastic products, making it a truly unique and world class pipeline and splash zone corrosion protection solution, are: • Impermeable to air and water • Minimal surface preparation

• Full adhesion to any surface • Full conformity to any shape • Self-healing coating with no disbondment • Non-toxic and environmentally friendly • Simple to apply • Life cycle cost effective • 30-year performance guarantee

Specialist approved applicators of wear resistant coatings. What is the most satisfying project that you have completed in the past two years and why?

6.

STOPAQ – groundbreaking ‘visco elastic’ coating suitable for severe service conditions

Do you offer any specialty services outside your core business? (eg. primary yard based but will do site touch up etc.)

Construction Mining Coal Handling Facilities.

STOPAQ is approved and specified for major pipeline projects by key Oil & Gas, Water, Mining and Power Generation industries in Australia. For more information on ACT’s expert corrosion consulting services or STOPAQ’s corrosion prevention products, please email us at info@anticorrosiontechnology.com or visit www.anticorrosiontechnology.com

Stage 3Exp/KEP Expansions for Port Waratah Coal Services (PWCS) Kooragang Coal Terminal. Stage 1 for Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group (NCIG) Coal Export Terminal. PWCS operates the largest Coal Loading Facility in the World. Working on their expansions and helping to maintain existing infrastructure, seeing the benefits that flow through to Newcastle and the Hunter Valley Region, brings tremendous satisfaction, to the management and employees of Doito. What positive advice can you pass on to the Coatings Group from that satisfying project or job? “Safety, Service & Standard of Work” must be paramount and strived for at all times. Do you have an internal training scheme or do you outsource training for your employees? We conduct both internal and external training schemes for all of our employees.

Contact Details: Jeff Stephen, Managing Director Unit 2/28 Portside Crescent, Maryville NSW 2293 Ph (02) 4927 6688 Fax (02) 4927 6699 PO Box 837, The Junction NSW 2291 doito@bigpond.com

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

31


Prevent corrosion and expensive shutdowns

Doito Industrial Painting Contractors In what year was your company established?

Is the business yard based, site based or both?

Doito Pty Ltd was established in Newcastle in 1980 and is a family owned and operated business. It is the oldest established industrial painting company in Newcastle, operating under the original management.

Site based business.

How many employees did you employ when you first started the business?

How many do you currently employ? 38 currently, however is often increased to over 50, on major projects. Do you operate from a number of locations in your home state or in other states of Australia? Newcastle and the Hunter Valley Region. What is your core business? (e.g. blasting and painting, rubber lining, waterjetting, laminating, insulation, flooring etc.) High Pressure Water Cleaning Abrasive Blast Cleaning Industrial Painting Wear Resistant Linings Floorings. What markets do you cover with your products or services? eg: oil & gas, marine, chemical process, general fabrication, tank lining, offshore etc.

Anti Corrosion Technology (ACT) is the exclusive Australian agent for STOPAQ BV, the manufacturer of the state-of-the-art visco elastic coating suitable for pipelines operating in the harshest service conditions, ensuring optimum performance and asset reliability. ACT, with over 35 years of national and international experience, is dedicated to providing Australia’s pipeline operators in various industries with comprehensive corrosion management and protection for all their onshore and offshore assets. ACT has been working successfully in Australia with STOPAQ BV to provide innovative corrosion control solutions. The major features of STOPAQ’s visco elastic products, making it a truly unique and world class pipeline and splash zone corrosion protection solution, are: • Impermeable to air and water • Minimal surface preparation

• Full adhesion to any surface • Full conformity to any shape • Self-healing coating with no disbondment • Non-toxic and environmentally friendly • Simple to apply • Life cycle cost effective • 30-year performance guarantee

Specialist approved applicators of wear resistant coatings. What is the most satisfying project that you have completed in the past two years and why?

6.

STOPAQ – groundbreaking ‘visco elastic’ coating suitable for severe service conditions

Do you offer any specialty services outside your core business? (eg. primary yard based but will do site touch up etc.)

Construction Mining Coal Handling Facilities.

STOPAQ is approved and specified for major pipeline projects by key Oil & Gas, Water, Mining and Power Generation industries in Australia. For more information on ACT’s expert corrosion consulting services or STOPAQ’s corrosion prevention products, please email us at info@anticorrosiontechnology.com or visit www.anticorrosiontechnology.com

Stage 3Exp/KEP Expansions for Port Waratah Coal Services (PWCS) Kooragang Coal Terminal. Stage 1 for Newcastle Coal Infrastructure Group (NCIG) Coal Export Terminal. PWCS operates the largest Coal Loading Facility in the World. Working on their expansions and helping to maintain existing infrastructure, seeing the benefits that flow through to Newcastle and the Hunter Valley Region, brings tremendous satisfaction, to the management and employees of Doito. What positive advice can you pass on to the Coatings Group from that satisfying project or job? “Safety, Service & Standard of Work” must be paramount and strived for at all times. Do you have an internal training scheme or do you outsource training for your employees? We conduct both internal and external training schemes for all of our employees.

Contact Details: Jeff Stephen, Managing Director Unit 2/28 Portside Crescent, Maryville NSW 2293 Ph (02) 4927 6688 Fax (02) 4927 6699 PO Box 837, The Junction NSW 2291 doito@bigpond.com

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

31


Technical Note Next Generation Metallic Coatings

The corrosion resistance of a galvanized coating is largely linear, so for a given environment, a thicker coating equates to a longer service life. For batch galvanized coatings the coating thickness is not readily controlled by the galvanizer and can vary with dipping time (increases alloy layer growth), steel thickness and surface roughness; it is also influenced by steel chemistry, particularly silicon and phosphorus levels. In a batch galvanized coating, the iron-zinc alloy layer makes up a significant part of the overall coating thickness. And although offering similar corrosion resistance to zinc, the zinc iron intermetallic layers in galvanized coatings are brittle and may crack or delaminate during subsequent bending or forming operations. For both manufacturing process and end-use considerations, continuous galvanized coatings require a high degree of ductility which is achieved by suppressing the growth of the iron-zinc alloy layer through the addition of aluminium (nominally 0.18%) to the zinc bath. Because of this, the coating microstructures of batch and continuous galvanized coatings are quite different, as shown in figures 1 and 2.

Delta and zeta (Fe Zn) alloy Zinc

As the alloy layer is inhibited on continuous galvanized coatings, the coating thickness is independent of dipping time, steel gauge and chemistry. Surface roughness can have an effect however is only relevant if the process includes some form of abrasive cleaning; in almost all cases coating thickness is controlled by gas wiping of the molten zinc1. Continuous galvanizers are able to vary and control the coating thickness much better than in batch galvanizing, however are still limited in the amount of zinc that they can apply. This has driven the development of hotdip zinc-aluminium based coatings which offer improved corrosion resistance over traditional galvanized zinc coatings of similar coating thicknesses. Unlike galvanized coatings, hot-dip zinc-aluminium coatings do not exhibit a linear corrosion rate. For example the weight loss of Galfan (Zn-5Al) during the first two or three years is slightly less than a galvanized coating, but as its surface passivates its rate of weight loss decreases parabolically. Over a long term exposure period, Galfan typically provides 2 to 4 times the durability of galvanized coatings of the same thickness2 (Figure 3).

GPR

Hot-dip coatings are widely used for the corrosion protection of steel, with zinc based alloys providing both barrier and galvanic protection to the steel substrate.

In general, zinc-coated (Type Z) steel is intended for applications requiring low to moderate corrosion resistance.

4.5 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

0

10

20

30 YEARS

40

50

Figure 3. Galfan (Zn-5Al) performance ratio as compared to heavy galvanizing3

50 µm

Steel

Figure 1. Microstructure of a batch galvanized pipe

Continuous hot-dip metallic coated steel sheet is specified according to AS 13974, which is currently under review to include three new coating classes, all of which contain zinc and aluminium, and two of which also contain magnesium. Existing coating classes in AS 1397 comprise: Zinc (Z): 99% Zn Zinc/Iron (ZF): Zn converted to ZnFe alloy Aluminium/Zinc (AZ): 50-60% Al, 1-2% Si The revised version of AS 1397 will allow alternate (nonchromate) passivation treatments and include three new coating classes:

Zinc

Ternary Fe Zn alloy Steel

32 Corrosion & Materials

20 µm

Figure 2. Microstructure of a continuously galvanized strip

Zinc/Aluminium (ZA): 4-15% Al Zinc/Aluminium/Magnesium (ZM): 5-13% Al, 2-4% Mg Aluminium/Zinc/Magnesium (AM): 47-57% Al, 1-4% Mg, 1-2% Si

60

Zinc-aluminium-coated (Type ZA) steel is used mostly for applications that require good coating ductility and in environments requiring moderate to high corrosion resistance with good galvanic protection. Zinc-aluminium has the best formability of all the coating classes and its corrosion resistance is much better than zinc, but less than unformed ZM coatings. ZA coatings retain a higher degree of corrosion resistance after forming than coatings with brittle alloy layers. Zinc/aluminium/magnesium-coated (Type ZM) steel has high to very high corrosion resistance in many aggressive environments with good galvanic protection.

increases with increasing substrate gauge and decreasing bend radius and can be influenced by steel grade. Cracking through the coating provides initiation points for corrosion with a corresponding decrease in service life (see figures 4 and 5); in extreme cases disbonding of the coating may occur.

Ductile Zn

Steel Brittle Zn Fe intermetallic layer

20 µm

Figure 4. External corner on roll formed tube 65x65x2.5 showing cracking through the alloy layer

Zinc/aluminium/magnesium is being offered as a more corrosion resistant alternative to Zinc. Aluminium/zinc alloy coatings (Type AZ) offer excellent barrier-coating protection combined with some galvanic protection and very high corrosion resistance on unformed panels. Aluminium/zinc/magnesium alloy coatings (Type AM) are being offered as a more corrosion resistant alternative to AZ coatings and give excellent barrier-coating protection combined with better galvanic protection than AZ. The corrosion resistance of these coatings is very high in most environments, however these coatings give less galvanic protection than Zn based alloys, and are therefore less suitable for thicker gauges. Aluminium alloy coatings also have poorer alkali resistance compared to zinc alloy coatings, although AM is better than AZ, so are not suited for applications involving intensive animal farming or contact with concrete. It is difficult to specify the absolute relative performance of each of the above coating types as performance varies with end use and exposure environment, however for all coating types, coating life is a function of coating thickness. The key benefit of using high performance metallic coatings is increased service life over traditional galvanized coatings, particularly in unwashed and marine applications. Typically, improved product durability can be achieved at lower coating thicknesses than traditional zinc coatings. Some coating classes offer additional benefits, such as improved formability or paintability, so selection of the appropriate coating for a given application should be made based on a range of considerations including the application, the environment and the durability requirement. For heavier gauge products such as roll-formed structural sections, formability of the coating is an important consideration. Roll forming may have no effect whatsoever on the coating, however the likelihood of damage

www.corrosion.com.au

Figure 5. Structural section rolled from 55Al-1.5Si coated strip showing failure on the external corners in a neutral salt spray test.

A case in point is OneSteel’s development of Duragal Platinum, a Zn-12Al coating for cold formed structural steel profile sections, produced at their Somerton, Victoria, plant. Profile shapes produced at Somerton include angles, channels and flat sections in gauges to 8mm and strip widths to 490mm. Sections are hot-dip coated after forming but before the final sizing operation, so formability was a key consideration in the selection of the coating. Atmospheric corrosion resistance in marine and sheltered environments was another key consideration and under these conditions Zn-12Al can provide three times the durability of a galvanized coating of the same coating thickness5. Included in the product range are brick lintels, which were previously rated as R26 (suitable for use up to 10 km from breaking surf) with a 300 g/m2 Zn coating. The new Zn-12Al coating achieves an R3 rating (suitable for use up to 1 km from the coast) at a nominal coating weight of 250 g/m2. Other considerations in the selection of this ZA type coating similar galvanic protection to zinc and being suitable for embedding in concrete. These last two considerations and the ductility requirement rule out AZ and AM type coatings for this application. Type ZM coatings meet the requirements for galvanic protection and concrete compatibility and have excellent atmospheric corrosion resistance, however adding magnesium to a zinc aluminium

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

33


Technical Note Next Generation Metallic Coatings

The corrosion resistance of a galvanized coating is largely linear, so for a given environment, a thicker coating equates to a longer service life. For batch galvanized coatings the coating thickness is not readily controlled by the galvanizer and can vary with dipping time (increases alloy layer growth), steel thickness and surface roughness; it is also influenced by steel chemistry, particularly silicon and phosphorus levels. In a batch galvanized coating, the iron-zinc alloy layer makes up a significant part of the overall coating thickness. And although offering similar corrosion resistance to zinc, the zinc iron intermetallic layers in galvanized coatings are brittle and may crack or delaminate during subsequent bending or forming operations. For both manufacturing process and end-use considerations, continuous galvanized coatings require a high degree of ductility which is achieved by suppressing the growth of the iron-zinc alloy layer through the addition of aluminium (nominally 0.18%) to the zinc bath. Because of this, the coating microstructures of batch and continuous galvanized coatings are quite different, as shown in figures 1 and 2.

Delta and zeta (Fe Zn) alloy Zinc

As the alloy layer is inhibited on continuous galvanized coatings, the coating thickness is independent of dipping time, steel gauge and chemistry. Surface roughness can have an effect however is only relevant if the process includes some form of abrasive cleaning; in almost all cases coating thickness is controlled by gas wiping of the molten zinc1. Continuous galvanizers are able to vary and control the coating thickness much better than in batch galvanizing, however are still limited in the amount of zinc that they can apply. This has driven the development of hotdip zinc-aluminium based coatings which offer improved corrosion resistance over traditional galvanized zinc coatings of similar coating thicknesses. Unlike galvanized coatings, hot-dip zinc-aluminium coatings do not exhibit a linear corrosion rate. For example the weight loss of Galfan (Zn-5Al) during the first two or three years is slightly less than a galvanized coating, but as its surface passivates its rate of weight loss decreases parabolically. Over a long term exposure period, Galfan typically provides 2 to 4 times the durability of galvanized coatings of the same thickness2 (Figure 3).

GPR

Hot-dip coatings are widely used for the corrosion protection of steel, with zinc based alloys providing both barrier and galvanic protection to the steel substrate.

In general, zinc-coated (Type Z) steel is intended for applications requiring low to moderate corrosion resistance.

4.5 4 3.5 3 2.5 2 1.5 1 0.5 0

0

10

20

30 YEARS

40

50

Figure 3. Galfan (Zn-5Al) performance ratio as compared to heavy galvanizing3

50 µm

Steel

Figure 1. Microstructure of a batch galvanized pipe

Continuous hot-dip metallic coated steel sheet is specified according to AS 13974, which is currently under review to include three new coating classes, all of which contain zinc and aluminium, and two of which also contain magnesium. Existing coating classes in AS 1397 comprise: Zinc (Z): 99% Zn Zinc/Iron (ZF): Zn converted to ZnFe alloy Aluminium/Zinc (AZ): 50-60% Al, 1-2% Si The revised version of AS 1397 will allow alternate (nonchromate) passivation treatments and include three new coating classes:

Zinc

Ternary Fe Zn alloy Steel

32 Corrosion & Materials

20 µm

Figure 2. Microstructure of a continuously galvanized strip

Zinc/Aluminium (ZA): 4-15% Al Zinc/Aluminium/Magnesium (ZM): 5-13% Al, 2-4% Mg Aluminium/Zinc/Magnesium (AM): 47-57% Al, 1-4% Mg, 1-2% Si

60

Zinc-aluminium-coated (Type ZA) steel is used mostly for applications that require good coating ductility and in environments requiring moderate to high corrosion resistance with good galvanic protection. Zinc-aluminium has the best formability of all the coating classes and its corrosion resistance is much better than zinc, but less than unformed ZM coatings. ZA coatings retain a higher degree of corrosion resistance after forming than coatings with brittle alloy layers. Zinc/aluminium/magnesium-coated (Type ZM) steel has high to very high corrosion resistance in many aggressive environments with good galvanic protection.

increases with increasing substrate gauge and decreasing bend radius and can be influenced by steel grade. Cracking through the coating provides initiation points for corrosion with a corresponding decrease in service life (see figures 4 and 5); in extreme cases disbonding of the coating may occur.

Ductile Zn

Steel Brittle Zn Fe intermetallic layer

20 µm

Figure 4. External corner on roll formed tube 65x65x2.5 showing cracking through the alloy layer

Zinc/aluminium/magnesium is being offered as a more corrosion resistant alternative to Zinc. Aluminium/zinc alloy coatings (Type AZ) offer excellent barrier-coating protection combined with some galvanic protection and very high corrosion resistance on unformed panels. Aluminium/zinc/magnesium alloy coatings (Type AM) are being offered as a more corrosion resistant alternative to AZ coatings and give excellent barrier-coating protection combined with better galvanic protection than AZ. The corrosion resistance of these coatings is very high in most environments, however these coatings give less galvanic protection than Zn based alloys, and are therefore less suitable for thicker gauges. Aluminium alloy coatings also have poorer alkali resistance compared to zinc alloy coatings, although AM is better than AZ, so are not suited for applications involving intensive animal farming or contact with concrete. It is difficult to specify the absolute relative performance of each of the above coating types as performance varies with end use and exposure environment, however for all coating types, coating life is a function of coating thickness. The key benefit of using high performance metallic coatings is increased service life over traditional galvanized coatings, particularly in unwashed and marine applications. Typically, improved product durability can be achieved at lower coating thicknesses than traditional zinc coatings. Some coating classes offer additional benefits, such as improved formability or paintability, so selection of the appropriate coating for a given application should be made based on a range of considerations including the application, the environment and the durability requirement. For heavier gauge products such as roll-formed structural sections, formability of the coating is an important consideration. Roll forming may have no effect whatsoever on the coating, however the likelihood of damage

www.corrosion.com.au

Figure 5. Structural section rolled from 55Al-1.5Si coated strip showing failure on the external corners in a neutral salt spray test.

A case in point is OneSteel’s development of Duragal Platinum, a Zn-12Al coating for cold formed structural steel profile sections, produced at their Somerton, Victoria, plant. Profile shapes produced at Somerton include angles, channels and flat sections in gauges to 8mm and strip widths to 490mm. Sections are hot-dip coated after forming but before the final sizing operation, so formability was a key consideration in the selection of the coating. Atmospheric corrosion resistance in marine and sheltered environments was another key consideration and under these conditions Zn-12Al can provide three times the durability of a galvanized coating of the same coating thickness5. Included in the product range are brick lintels, which were previously rated as R26 (suitable for use up to 10 km from breaking surf) with a 300 g/m2 Zn coating. The new Zn-12Al coating achieves an R3 rating (suitable for use up to 1 km from the coast) at a nominal coating weight of 250 g/m2. Other considerations in the selection of this ZA type coating similar galvanic protection to zinc and being suitable for embedding in concrete. These last two considerations and the ductility requirement rule out AZ and AM type coatings for this application. Type ZM coatings meet the requirements for galvanic protection and concrete compatibility and have excellent atmospheric corrosion resistance, however adding magnesium to a zinc aluminium

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

33


Technical Note

Hours to Initial Red Rust (hrs)

coating decreases its formability and cracking resistance7 (due to formation of a hard & brittle MgZn2 phase) so the effect of cold forming heavy gauge product would require careful evaluation before being deemed suitable for this particular application.

1400

In summary, the trend in metallic coating development is for thinner, more corrosion resistant alloys with zinc/aluminium/magnesium alloys replacing zinc, and aluminium/zinc/magnesium replacing aluminium-zinc. For applications requiring maximum ductility, zinc-aluminium is the best choice with a corrosion resistance between zinc and zinc/aluminium/magnesium. All zinc alloy coatings require passivation and the common trend among all coating classes is the phasing out of hexavalent chromiumbased treatments in favour of less hazardous alternatives. References [1] Pad wiping and magnetic wiping are used in continuous wire and rod galvanizing lines as an alternative to gas wiping

1200 1000 800

Galfan

600 400 Galvanize

200 31 61 92 122 153 Coating Weight Each Side (g/m2)

12AI coated profile sections, test stopped at 810 hours with no sign of red rust

Z200 GI coated rolled hollow sections, first red rust developed around 170 hours

Figure 6. 12Al coated profile sections, compared to published ASTM B 117 test data for Galfan and galvanized sheet3

Elongated apha-grain Beta-zinc

 alvInfoNote 1.9, Zinc-5% Aluminum Alloy-Coated [2] G Steel Sheet (2011) [3] H  ot-dip 5%Al-Zn (Galfan) coated and pre-painted 5%Al-Zn(ColorFan) coated steel products, Yieh Phui Enterprise’s Product Brochure (data courtesy of the Galfan Development Organisation) [4] A  S 1397-2001, Steel sheet and strip—Hot-dip zinc-coated or aluminium/zinc-coated will be renamed in the revised standard to: Continuous hot-dip metallic coated steel sheet and strip: Coatings of aluminium, zinc and magnesium (DR AS 1397)  avid HARRISON and Yihui LIU, Corrosion Resistance of [5] D Continuous Hot-dip Zn-12Al Coatings, 8th International Conference on Zinc and Zinc Alloy Coated Steel Sheet (Galvatech), Genova, Italy (2011) [6] L  intels are subject to the durability requirements of AS/NZS 2699.3:2002, Built-in components for masonry and shelf angles. AS/NZS 2699.3 classifies durability using an R rating, which is based on airborne salt deposition rates. [7] E  vy De BRYCKER, Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings: Thermodynamic Analysis and Microstructure Related Properties, PhD Thesis, University of Ghent, 2005-2006

Intermetallic layer is submicron in thickness

David Harrison OneSteel Australian Tube Mills

Steel Substrate Figure 7. Air cooled 15Al coating – convex side of 180° bend, back scatter image, showing elongation of the alpha-grains, note that 10-15% Al coatings have the same microstructure. Quenching produces a finer “honey combed” microstructure with enhanced corrosion resistance.

34 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

35


Technical Note

Hours to Initial Red Rust (hrs)

coating decreases its formability and cracking resistance7 (due to formation of a hard & brittle MgZn2 phase) so the effect of cold forming heavy gauge product would require careful evaluation before being deemed suitable for this particular application.

1400

In summary, the trend in metallic coating development is for thinner, more corrosion resistant alloys with zinc/aluminium/magnesium alloys replacing zinc, and aluminium/zinc/magnesium replacing aluminium-zinc. For applications requiring maximum ductility, zinc-aluminium is the best choice with a corrosion resistance between zinc and zinc/aluminium/magnesium. All zinc alloy coatings require passivation and the common trend among all coating classes is the phasing out of hexavalent chromiumbased treatments in favour of less hazardous alternatives. References [1] Pad wiping and magnetic wiping are used in continuous wire and rod galvanizing lines as an alternative to gas wiping

1200 1000 800

Galfan

600 400 Galvanize

200 31 61 92 122 153 Coating Weight Each Side (g/m2)

12AI coated profile sections, test stopped at 810 hours with no sign of red rust

Z200 GI coated rolled hollow sections, first red rust developed around 170 hours

Figure 6. 12Al coated profile sections, compared to published ASTM B 117 test data for Galfan and galvanized sheet3

Elongated apha-grain Beta-zinc

 alvInfoNote 1.9, Zinc-5% Aluminum Alloy-Coated [2] G Steel Sheet (2011) [3] H  ot-dip 5%Al-Zn (Galfan) coated and pre-painted 5%Al-Zn(ColorFan) coated steel products, Yieh Phui Enterprise’s Product Brochure (data courtesy of the Galfan Development Organisation) [4] A  S 1397-2001, Steel sheet and strip—Hot-dip zinc-coated or aluminium/zinc-coated will be renamed in the revised standard to: Continuous hot-dip metallic coated steel sheet and strip: Coatings of aluminium, zinc and magnesium (DR AS 1397)  avid HARRISON and Yihui LIU, Corrosion Resistance of [5] D Continuous Hot-dip Zn-12Al Coatings, 8th International Conference on Zinc and Zinc Alloy Coated Steel Sheet (Galvatech), Genova, Italy (2011) [6] L  intels are subject to the durability requirements of AS/NZS 2699.3:2002, Built-in components for masonry and shelf angles. AS/NZS 2699.3 classifies durability using an R rating, which is based on airborne salt deposition rates. [7] E  vy De BRYCKER, Zn-Al-Mg Alloy Coatings: Thermodynamic Analysis and Microstructure Related Properties, PhD Thesis, University of Ghent, 2005-2006

Intermetallic layer is submicron in thickness

David Harrison OneSteel Australian Tube Mills

Steel Substrate Figure 7. Air cooled 15Al coating – convex side of 180° bend, back scatter image, showing elongation of the alpha-grains, note that 10-15% Al coatings have the same microstructure. Quenching produces a finer “honey combed” microstructure with enhanced corrosion resistance.

34 Corrosion & Materials

www.corrosion.com.au

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

35


David Pocock

SICK OF RUST EATING YOUR ASSETS? THEN USE RUST CONQUEROR .........................TO BEAT RUST!

MANAGER

22 Irvine Street Bayswater WA 6053 T: 08 9721 2265 F: 08 9271 2235 M: 0409 112 010 E: david@tfgpumpline.com.au www.pumpline.com.au

M: 0413 806 232 michal@atlasaccess.com.au www.atlasaccess.com.au P: 61-2-9700 0812 F: 61-2-9700 0813 9/41 – 43 GREEN ST BOTANY NSW 2019 IRATA

-

LEEA

-

AINDT

-

WITH A 20+ YEAR HISTORY, THIS PROVEN, COST EFFECTIVE, ORGANIC BASED, SIMPLE & SAFE TO USE PRODUCT, REALLY WORKS! Available Australia wide! www.xtrollglobal.com.au Email: sales@xtrollglobal.com.au Phone 07 3865 1077 Xtroll offers a wide range of excellent products that work.

-

ACA

-

David Dawson National Sales & Operations Manager

Phone: 1800-RENT-DH (736 834) Mobile: 0450 008 259 Fax: (02) 8525 8850 ddawson@rentdh.com www.rentdh.com

SuPPLying inSPection & teSting equiPment

Welding Supervision Welding Inspection NDT Specialist Coating Inspection Inservice Inspection

DeHumidification Technologies PTY LTD 113 Bonds Road Riverwood NSW 2210 Australia

Abelmet

Abel Metal Services Pty Ltd

• Mg & Alloy Ingots • Mg Anodes • Backfill

Specialist Infrastructure and durability consultants Ph: 1300 763 319 | www.bcrc.com.au

CICIND

Russell Fraser Sales Pty Ltd

David May

Mail: PO Box 90, Moorebank, NSW, 2170 Phone: 02 9602 7740 Fax: 02 9602 7780 Email: mckimmie@abelmet.com.au Web: www.abelmet.com.au

SYDNEY t: 02 9545 4433 F: 02 9545 4218 rfs@rfsales.com.au www.rfsales.com.au

Manufacturing anodes since 1984 Queensland (Head Office)

Phone: +61 7 5476 9788 Fax: +61 7 5476 8268

Melbourne

Phone: +61 3 9755 3770 Email: sales@cathodicdiecasting.com.au

ABN: 93 821 370 828

www.cathodicdiecasting.com.au

ANNOUNCEMENT

Cathodic Diecating - small advert 3-2-10.indd 1

3/3/10 10:51:21 AM

The new name andPROTECTION address for Ian Godson & Associates: CATHODIC

N I C H O L A S C O R R O S I O N P T Y LT D

Infracorr Consulting PL.

Agent for:

Dr David Nicholas

LIDA® – Mixed Metal Oxide Anodes

Ph.D, B.Sc (Hons), FIE Aust, CP Eng

• Ultrasonic Thickness Gauges • Holiday Detectors • Coating Thickness Gauges • Pit Gauges • Borescopes & Magnifiers • Surface Replication products

Geelong Office: 193 Station Street, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Postal Address: P.O. Box 1080, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Tel: +61 3 5275 3339 Fax: +61 3 5275 0585 Mob: 0412 520 699 Email: dmay@drmay.com.au

Cathodic Diecasting

Industrial Chimney Services Windshield / Flue / Lining Crown Dams / Bridges / Jetties Silos / Towers / Buildings Concrete Surveys Remedial Repairs Protective Coating Industrial Rope Access & Suspended Platforms Confined Space Entry & Standby Rescue Height Safety System NATA

D R MAY Inspections

Principal Consultant

• Sacrificial Anodes • Silicon Iron Anodes • Transformer Rectifiers • Reference Electrodes

Tel: 02 4952 6593 Int: (+612) Mob: 0421 745 059 8 Bambara Close, Lambton, NSW 2299, Australia Email: david@nicholascorrosion.com.au

Prevent corrosion on your:-

D E NORA

�/��� Burwood Rd Hawthorn East VIC ���� –Zinc, Aluminium Magnesium Ph: +�� (�)�and ���� ���� • Calcined Petroleum Backfill www.infracorr.com • Surge Protection, Insulation

• Strip, Rod, Tubular, Ribbon, Disk and Wire

Infracorr

–Copper, Zinc and Silver

PIPELINES, TANKS, BRIDGES, WHARVES, OFFSHORE PLATFORMS

Materials and Corrosion Consultancy to the Water Industry

Tel: +61 (03) 94672520 or 0413 201562

Corrosion Durability Repair

Email: robertcox@pipecorr.com.au • www.pipecorr.com.au Committed to Professional Service, Competitive Pricing and Customer Satisfaction

ANNOUNCEMENT

The new name and address for Ian Godson & Associates:

PREMIUM PROTECTION

Infracorr Consulting PL.

Providing proven, tested & superior spray applied elastomeric protective coating solutions against Impact, Abrasion, Corrosion, Chemical Attack & Containment issues.

�/��� Burwood Rd Hawthorn East VIC ���� Ph: +�� (�)� ���� ���� www.infracorr.com

Infracorr

Rhino Linings Australasia Pty Ltd

501-505 Olsen Avenue, Molendinar Qld 4214

Ph: +61 7 5585 7000 Fax: +61 7 5539 6399

info@rhinolinings.com.au

RESPONSIVE SERVICE EXPERTISE INDEPENDENCE

A.B.N. 82 101 032 788 1300 723 924

www.industrialpainter.com.au

• Anti Graffiti • Sign Writing • Line Marking • Pressure Cleaning • PCCP/NACE Accredited • • Protective Coatings • All Related Services • Building Maintenance •

MR JUSTIN RIGBY

Business Development Manager Factory 5, 227 Wells Rd Chelsea Heights 3196 jrigby@industrialpainter.com.au • www.industrialpainter.com.au 1300 723 924 • Fax 9773 3522 • 0417 338 773

50 Corrosion & Materials

Front

Corrosion Durability Repair

www.rhinolinings.com.au

JUSTIN BREEDON Divisional Manager Abrasives (Australasia)

Abrasive Blast Media Supplier

Specialist Manufacturer of DIMET Aluminium & Zinc Anodes (Cathodic Protection.) ICCP design and commissioning are also available by NACE certified CP Engineers.

Corrosion and Coating Failure Investigations Coating Specification and Review Fitness for Purpose and Remnant Life Assessment Expert Witness and Litigation Support Corrosion, Materials & Mechanical Engineers Applied Scientists, Metallurgists, Coating Inspectors NDT Technicians

MASTERCOTE PTFE Coated, and other special fasteners. ZINGA Film Galvanizing System.

SUPER GARNET Exclusive Distributor for Australia & New Zealand www.mineralscorp.com

Australia Wide

AU Free Phone 1800 309 734

sales@industrial-minerals.co.nz NZ Free Phone 0800 646 372

www.corrosion.com.au

Phone: +61 7 3718 0300

Gareth van Loggerenberg TITANUM ELECTRODE PRODUCTS

t: +61 (0) 8 9256 4499 f: +61 (0) 8 9256 4599 m: +61 (0) 408 931 072 e: gareth@telpro.com.au w: www.telpro.com.au Unit 2, 26 Baile Road Canning Vale Western Australia 6155

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

51


David Pocock

SICK OF RUST EATING YOUR ASSETS? THEN USE RUST CONQUEROR .........................TO BEAT RUST!

MANAGER

22 Irvine Street Bayswater WA 6053 T: 08 9721 2265 F: 08 9271 2235 M: 0409 112 010 E: david@tfgpumpline.com.au www.pumpline.com.au

M: 0413 806 232 michal@atlasaccess.com.au www.atlasaccess.com.au P: 61-2-9700 0812 F: 61-2-9700 0813 9/41 – 43 GREEN ST BOTANY NSW 2019 IRATA

-

LEEA

-

AINDT

-

WITH A 20+ YEAR HISTORY, THIS PROVEN, COST EFFECTIVE, ORGANIC BASED, SIMPLE & SAFE TO USE PRODUCT, REALLY WORKS! Available Australia wide! www.xtrollglobal.com.au Email: sales@xtrollglobal.com.au Phone 07 3865 1077 Xtroll offers a wide range of excellent products that work.

-

ACA

-

David Dawson National Sales & Operations Manager

Phone: 1800-RENT-DH (736 834) Mobile: 0450 008 259 Fax: (02) 8525 8850 ddawson@rentdh.com www.rentdh.com

SuPPLying inSPection & teSting equiPment

Welding Supervision Welding Inspection NDT Specialist Coating Inspection Inservice Inspection

DeHumidification Technologies PTY LTD 113 Bonds Road Riverwood NSW 2210 Australia

Abelmet

Abel Metal Services Pty Ltd

• Mg & Alloy Ingots • Mg Anodes • Backfill

Specialist Infrastructure and durability consultants Ph: 1300 763 319 | www.bcrc.com.au

CICIND

Russell Fraser Sales Pty Ltd

David May

Mail: PO Box 90, Moorebank, NSW, 2170 Phone: 02 9602 7740 Fax: 02 9602 7780 Email: mckimmie@abelmet.com.au Web: www.abelmet.com.au

SYDNEY t: 02 9545 4433 F: 02 9545 4218 rfs@rfsales.com.au www.rfsales.com.au

Manufacturing anodes since 1984 Queensland (Head Office)

Phone: +61 7 5476 9788 Fax: +61 7 5476 8268

Melbourne

Phone: +61 3 9755 3770 Email: sales@cathodicdiecasting.com.au

ABN: 93 821 370 828

www.cathodicdiecasting.com.au

ANNOUNCEMENT

Cathodic Diecating - small advert 3-2-10.indd 1

3/3/10 10:51:21 AM

The new name andPROTECTION address for Ian Godson & Associates: CATHODIC

N I C H O L A S C O R R O S I O N P T Y LT D

Infracorr Consulting PL.

Agent for:

Dr David Nicholas

LIDA® – Mixed Metal Oxide Anodes

Ph.D, B.Sc (Hons), FIE Aust, CP Eng

• Ultrasonic Thickness Gauges • Holiday Detectors • Coating Thickness Gauges • Pit Gauges • Borescopes & Magnifiers • Surface Replication products

Geelong Office: 193 Station Street, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Postal Address: P.O. Box 1080, Corio, Victoria 3214 Australia Tel: +61 3 5275 3339 Fax: +61 3 5275 0585 Mob: 0412 520 699 Email: dmay@drmay.com.au

Cathodic Diecasting

Industrial Chimney Services Windshield / Flue / Lining Crown Dams / Bridges / Jetties Silos / Towers / Buildings Concrete Surveys Remedial Repairs Protective Coating Industrial Rope Access & Suspended Platforms Confined Space Entry & Standby Rescue Height Safety System NATA

D R MAY Inspections

Principal Consultant

• Sacrificial Anodes • Silicon Iron Anodes • Transformer Rectifiers • Reference Electrodes

Tel: 02 4952 6593 Int: (+612) Mob: 0421 745 059 8 Bambara Close, Lambton, NSW 2299, Australia Email: david@nicholascorrosion.com.au

Prevent corrosion on your:-

D E NORA

�/��� Burwood Rd Hawthorn East VIC ���� –Zinc, Aluminium Magnesium Ph: +�� (�)�and ���� ���� • Calcined Petroleum Backfill www.infracorr.com • Surge Protection, Insulation

• Strip, Rod, Tubular, Ribbon, Disk and Wire

Infracorr

–Copper, Zinc and Silver

PIPELINES, TANKS, BRIDGES, WHARVES, OFFSHORE PLATFORMS

Materials and Corrosion Consultancy to the Water Industry

Tel: +61 (03) 94672520 or 0413 201562

Corrosion Durability Repair

Email: robertcox@pipecorr.com.au • www.pipecorr.com.au Committed to Professional Service, Competitive Pricing and Customer Satisfaction

ANNOUNCEMENT

The new name and address for Ian Godson & Associates:

PREMIUM PROTECTION

Infracorr Consulting PL.

Providing proven, tested & superior spray applied elastomeric protective coating solutions against Impact, Abrasion, Corrosion, Chemical Attack & Containment issues.

�/��� Burwood Rd Hawthorn East VIC ���� Ph: +�� (�)� ���� ���� www.infracorr.com

Infracorr

Rhino Linings Australasia Pty Ltd

501-505 Olsen Avenue, Molendinar Qld 4214

Ph: +61 7 5585 7000 Fax: +61 7 5539 6399

info@rhinolinings.com.au

RESPONSIVE SERVICE EXPERTISE INDEPENDENCE

A.B.N. 82 101 032 788 1300 723 924

www.industrialpainter.com.au

• Anti Graffiti • Sign Writing • Line Marking • Pressure Cleaning • PCCP/NACE Accredited • • Protective Coatings • All Related Services • Building Maintenance •

MR JUSTIN RIGBY

Business Development Manager Factory 5, 227 Wells Rd Chelsea Heights 3196 jrigby@industrialpainter.com.au • www.industrialpainter.com.au 1300 723 924 • Fax 9773 3522 • 0417 338 773

50 Corrosion & Materials

Front

Corrosion Durability Repair

www.rhinolinings.com.au

JUSTIN BREEDON Divisional Manager Abrasives (Australasia)

Abrasive Blast Media Supplier

Specialist Manufacturer of DIMET Aluminium & Zinc Anodes (Cathodic Protection.) ICCP design and commissioning are also available by NACE certified CP Engineers.

Corrosion and Coating Failure Investigations Coating Specification and Review Fitness for Purpose and Remnant Life Assessment Expert Witness and Litigation Support Corrosion, Materials & Mechanical Engineers Applied Scientists, Metallurgists, Coating Inspectors NDT Technicians

MASTERCOTE PTFE Coated, and other special fasteners. ZINGA Film Galvanizing System.

SUPER GARNET Exclusive Distributor for Australia & New Zealand www.mineralscorp.com

Australia Wide

AU Free Phone 1800 309 734

sales@industrial-minerals.co.nz NZ Free Phone 0800 646 372

www.corrosion.com.au

Phone: +61 7 3718 0300

Gareth van Loggerenberg TITANUM ELECTRODE PRODUCTS

t: +61 (0) 8 9256 4499 f: +61 (0) 8 9256 4599 m: +61 (0) 408 931 072 e: gareth@telpro.com.au w: www.telpro.com.au Unit 2, 26 Baile Road Canning Vale Western Australia 6155

Vol 36 No 4 August 2011

51


ORON320028

Delivering Integrity

orontide.com.au

à UHP/HP Water Jetting Originating in Western Australia, ORONTIDE Industrial Services is a privately owned and operated company providing services to the Oil & Gas, Mining, Naval Defence and Commercial Marine Industries.

à Protective Coatings Application and Remediation à NACE Inspections à Abrasive Blasting (Wet/Dry/Pliable) à Passive Fire Protection à Application and Removal of Thermally Sprayed Coatings

8 AS 4

ORONTIDE Industrial Services 14 Sparks Road Henderson WA 6166 T 08 9437 3055 E industrial.services@orontide.com.au

01

Corrosion & Materials August 2011  

Corrosion & Materials August 2011