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PROGRAM OF STUDY The Academy at Penguin Hall’s Mission is to educate, enlighten and empower young women to live and to lead exemplary lives. The Academy is an independent, college preparatory secondary school for young women which is committed to developing the whole person: intellectually, spiritually, socially, physically and creatively.


educate

enlighten

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Prepared for College · Empowered for Life Students at The Academy at Penguin Hall are expected to be active participants in their education. The rigor of our academic offerings and the opportunities for personal growth in our co-curricular programming afford our young women the opportunity to become critical thinkers, dynamic problem-solvers, collaborative team-players, and caring, committed members of the community. Every programmatic decision at The Academy is designed to enhance the overall educational experience of our students and to provide them with the qualities of intellectual curiosity and tenacity that admission officers point to as predictors of success in today’s competitive college market. The Academy’s interdisciplinary teaching methodology invigorates the classroom environment and sparks our students’ desire to investigate, decipher, and analyze the world around them. Students gain knowledge and acquire core competencies by grappling with complex questions that lead to sustained inquiry, critique and revision, and, ultimately, self-assessment and reflection. Our commitment to educating the whole person enables meaningful student engagement within the curriculum, rewarding service learning, stimulating visual and performing arts, spirited athletic competition, and robust community partnerships. Instilled with the core values of resilience, wisdom, community, and compassion, our young women develop and stretch an academic and personal growth mindset.

An Engaging Curriculum Making the decision to attend The Academy at Penguin Hall is a conscious choice to “do school” differently. At APH, homework load does not equate to rigor. Classwork is about more than rote memorization of rules, information and formulas; rather, it is about understanding how to process information and ask the critical questions that will lead to deeper understanding. From the time they enter, our young women are given opportunities to develop their interests and their critical thinking skills in both core courses and a wide array of student interest-driven elective offerings. Firmly rooted in research that outlines best practices for how girls learn best and the necessary skills for a successful college experience, an education at The Academy at Penguin Hall is about more than accruing credits and grade points. We offer an educational environment where students are encouraged to step out of their comfort zones and to follow their passions as they embark on a journey of self-discovery critical to their future success. www.PenguinHall.org


We encourage students to become independent thinkers and learners. The Academy at Penguin Hall’s rich and varied curriculum is designed to draw students beyond a mastery of fundamental skills toward the rewards of inquiry, initiative, and reflection.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS To receive a diploma from The Academy at Penguin Hall a student must complete a total of 28 academic credits as follows: GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS English 4 Math 4 Science (2 years with a lab) 3 History 4 Foreign Language 3 (at least 2 consecutive years of one language and Latin I for incoming freshmen) Visual/Performing Arts 1 Computer Science .5 Social Science or Religion/Philisophy 1 Community Service 25 hours per year All students must carry (at least) 6 credits per year, but they have the option to carry 7. The course of study for each year is outlined on the school web site. GRADING SCALE A+ = 97-100 A = 93-96 A- = 90-92 B+ = 87-89 B = 83-86 B- = 80-82 C+ = 77-79 C = 73-76 C- = 70-72 D+ = 67-69 D = 63-66 D- = 60-62 F = 59-below The Academy at Penguin Hall does not compute a grade point average or calculate class rank. Colleges are provided with the school profile which explains the APH course of study and shows the grade distribution in all courses.

The Academy at Penguin Hall


Graduation Requirements & Course Offerings

1st Year

2nd Year

3rd Year

4th Year

Humanities: World Humanities American Humanities Global Humanities Voices in Literature English (4) (Eng + Hist.) required (Eng + Hist.) required (Eng + Hist.) required (Eng + Hist.) required History (4) English electives: English electives: English electives: English electives: Banned Books Banned Books Banned Books Banned Books Creative Writing Creative Writing Creative Writing Creative Writing Journalism Journalism Journalism Journalism Voices in Literature Voices in Literature Voices in Literature Voices in Literature Writing Styles Writing Styles Writing Styles Writing Styles Gothic and Horror Ficion Gothic Horror Fiction Gothic Horror Fiction Gothic Horror Ficion Writing to Change the World History electives: History electives: History electives: History electives: Art History Art History Art History Art History Art & Politics Art & Politics Art & Politics Art & Politics Asian History Asian History Asian History Asian History Drama of Politics Drama of Politics Drama of Politics Drama of Politics Economics Economics Economics Economics Greek & Roman Greek & Roman Greek & Roman Greek & Roman Mythology Mythology Mythology Mythology Intro to Russian History Intro to Russian History Intro to Russian History Intro to Russian History Middle Eastern History Middle Eastern History Middle Eastern History Middle Eastern History Political Science Political Science Political Science Political Science Women in History Women in History Women in History Women in History Critical Exploration Critical Exploration Critical Exploration Critical Exploration of Modern Issues of Modern Issues of Modern Issues of Modern Issues Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Greek and Latin Roots Greek and Latin Roots Greek and Latin Roots Greek and Latin Roots Phillis the Slave Phillis the Slave Phillis the Slave Phillis the Slave Taken Captive Taken Captive Taken Captive Taken Captive Dreamers and Misfits Dreamers and Misfits Dreamers and Misfits Dreamers and Misfits Math (4) Algebra I Geometry Algebra II Precalculus *Students must take Geometry Geometry Honors Algebra II Honors Precalculus Honors coursework through Geometry Honors Algebra II Precalculus Calculus Algebra 2 Algebra II Algebra II Honors Precalculus Honors Calculus Honors Algebra II Honors Financial Literacy Financial Literacy Statistics Statistics Topics in Mathematics Topics in Mathematics Critical Exploration Critical Exploration of Modern Issues of Modern Issues Language (3) French I, II, III, IV/V French I, II, III, IV/V French I, II, III, IV/V French I, II, III, IV/V (Latin 1 Required Latin I, II, III, IV/V Latin I, II, III, IV/V Latin I, II, III, IV/V Latin I, II, III, IV/V of incoming 1st years) Spanish I, II, III, IV/V Spanish I, II, III, IV/V Spanish I, II, III, IV/V Spanish I, II, III, IV/V Level determined by placement testing Science (3) - 2 lab Conceptual Physics Biology Anatomy & Physiology Anatomy & Physiology Intro to Engineering Biology Honors Biology & Ethics Biology & Ethics Integrated Science Chemistry Biology Biology Whaling in America Chemistry Honors Biology Honors Biology Honors Robotics Conceptual Physics Chemistry Chemistry Environmental Science Chemistry Honors Chemistry Honors Intro to Engineering Environmental Science Environmental Science Robotics Physics Physics Whaling in America Physics Honors Physics Honors Intro to Engineering Intro to Engineering Robotics Robotics Critical Explorations: Critical Explorations: Analysis of Society Analysis of Society and Science and Science Critical Exploration of Critical Exploration of Modern Issues Honors Modern Issues Honors Whaling in America Whaling in America Genetics Genetics

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Religious Studies Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Computer Science (.5) Foundations of Foundations of Foundations of Foundations of Computer Science Computer Science Computer Science Computer Science Robotics Advanced Coding Advanced Coding Advanced Coding Robotics Robotics Robotics Social Science (1) Global Health Seminar Global Health Seminar Global Health Seminar Global Health Seminar Sacred Activism Sacred Activism Social Justice Social Justice Social Justice Social Justice World Religions World Religions *World Religions World Religions World Religions Global Health and Global Health and required of all students Global Health and Global Health and the Girl Child the Girl Child the Girl Child the Girl Child Visual Arts (.5) Visual Arts Visual Arts Visual Arts Visual Arts Art History Art History Art History Art History Art & Politics Art & Politics Art & Politics Art & Politics Introduction to Art Ceramics Ceramics Ceramics 3D Design Darkroom Photography Darkroom Photography Darkroom Photography Drawing Digital Photography Digital Photography Introduction to Art Drawing Drawing Painting Introduction to Art Introduction to Art Painting Painting Painting & Mixed Media Painting Painting Printmaking & Mixed Media & Mixed Media Art & Wellness Printmaking Printmaking 3D Design Art & Wellness Art & Wellness Portfolio Portfolio 3D Design 3D Design Performing Arts (.5) Performing Arts Performing Arts Performing Arts Performing Arts Art of Theater Acting Styles Acting Styles Acting Styles Chorus Art of Theater Art of Theater Art of Theater Directing, Acting, Auditioning Auditioning Auditioning & Stage Technology & Marketing & Marketing & Marketing Instrumental Music Chorus Chorus Chorus Film Studies Directing, Acting, Directing, Acting, Directing, Acting, Music Appreciation & Stage Technology & Stage Technology & Stage Technology Film Studies Instrumental Music Instrumental Music Instrumental Music Music Appreciation Film Studies Film Studies Film Studies Music Theory Music Appreciation Music Appreciation Music Appreciation Play Production Music Theory Music Theory Music Theory Shakespeare Play Production Play Production Play Production for Modern Actors Playing Shakespeare Playing Shakespeare Playing Shakespeare Survey of World Music Shakespeare Shakespeare Shakespeare Women in Music for Modern Actors for Modern Actors for Modern Actors Choreography Survey of World Music Survey of World Music Survey of World Music Film Critique Voices & Dialects Voices & Dialects Voices & Dialects Women in Music Women in Music Women in Music Choreography Choreography Choreography Film Critique Film Critique Film Critique

Electives Asian History Asian History Asian History Asian History Banned Books Banned Books Banned Books Banned Books Creative Writing Creative Writing Creative Writing Creative Writing Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Cultural Psychology Drama of Politics Drama of Politics Drama of Politics Drama of Politics Economics Economics Economics Economics Global Health Seminar Global Health Seminar Global Health Seminar Global Health Seminar Greek & Roman Greek & Roman Greek & Roman Greek & Roman Mythology Mythology Mythology Mythology Intro to Russian History Intro to Russian History Intro to Russian History Intro to Russian History Journalism Journalism Journalism Journalism Mapping Meaning Mapping Meaning Mapping Meaning Mapping Meaning Middle Eastern History Middle Eastern History Middle Eastern History Middle Eastern History Political Science Political Science Political Science Political Science Sociology Sociology Sociology Sociology Urban Planning Urban Planning Urban Planning Urban Planning Women in History Women in History Women in History Women in History Writing Styles Writing Styles Writing Styles Writing Styles Critical Exploration Critical Exploration of Modern Issues of Modern Issues * Not all classes run every semester and we continually update our curriculum to accommodate a wide array of student interest-driven offerings.


Humanities Courses: American Humanities (Literature and History) Full Year This course will examine numerous historical and literary developments in American culture from the pre-colonial era into the present. Students will explore the tensions between the country’s founding ideals and the ways in which those ideals have been interpreted and applied in practice. Through literary analysis and historical study, students will appreciate how expansion, war, immigration, and social justice movements have continued to shape the course of the nation. Various discussions, papers, and projects will allow students to practice skills of critical thinking, writing, research, problem-solving, communication, and creative expression. A range of projects and assessments will be used. Honors placement subject to departmental recommendation and approval. Global Humanities (Literature and History) Full Year This course explores twentieth- and twenty-first century developments that have shaped contemporary global debates. Students will focus on connecting particular historical events and literary works to broader social and political trends. Students will examine how modern economics, globalization, and migration have sometimes fostered unprecedented opportunities and sometimes spurred ethnic, religious, and political conflicts. Various discussions, papers, and projects will allow students to practice skills of critical thinking, writing, research, problem-solving, communication, and creative expression. A range of projects and assessments will be used. Honors placement subject to departmental recommendation and approval. Grade 9: World Humanities (Literature and History) Through the examination of a wide variety of literary, political, and philosophical texts, students will acquire an understanding of the narratives and philosophies which underpin and shape their thinking. By working with these texts in their historical and cultural contexts, students will develop an appreciation for the complex and simultaneous development of artistic, economic, political, and social movements as they developed and changed over the centuries. Honors placement in the second semester subject to departmental recommendation and approval. English 12: Activist Literature To paraphrase one critic, many of our most compelling authors write their books not to qualify for some sort of literary hall of fame; they write their books to change the world. Stories can move us to action, and writers and artists often play a crucial role as the conscience of a society. In this course we will examine a range of works that call attention to injustice and that speak out on behalf of the voiceless. We will read works of fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction that promote a number of social causes: human rights, anti-racism, feminism, environmentalism, animal rights, and more. And while the issues are serious, the books themselves display beauty, humor, and satire in the service of activism and resistance. Coursework will include reading, seminar discussions, creative projects, and various writing responses. www.PenguinHall.org


English 12: Utopian Literature Who hasn’t dreamt of a perfect world? A “utopia” is an ideal place, one that is usually imaginary. Disappointed or disillusioned by the real world, numerous writers have imagined a better world in their works. In this course, we will read literary works that propose various visions of a perfect world. Some of these worlds are fictional, such as the all-female society of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s feminist novel Herland. Other dreamers attempted to put their plans for paradise-on-earth into actual practice, and the Greater Boston area is home to many of these utopian sites, some of which we may visit. The Brook Farm commune in West Roxbury sought equality of the sexes, and among its famous residents and visitors were Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Margaret Fuller. Henry David Thoreau’s perfect world meant living alone, and he founded his utopia-of-one on the banks of Walden Pond in Concord. And Louisa May Alcott offers a hilarious satire of the failed Fruitlands commune founded by her head-in-theclouds father, Bronson Alcott. Through a variety of readings, we will consider both the promise and limitations of utopian dreams. Coursework will include reading, seminar discussions, creative projects, and various writing responses. English 12: Voices in Literature One semester Whose voices count as Literature? What is our relationship to the written word as consumers and producers of literature/knowledge? How does literature shape our sense of self in subtle (or not so subtle) ways? How and why do those questions matter, even though the answers are complex? Through Socratic seminars and written pieces, students will explore and apply literary theories to the works read in order to prepare for literary analysis and written works at the college level. Equally as important, as we look closely at a variety of genres, we will also look deeply at our own cultural context and empower our voices for self-agency. Humanities Electives: The Art of Diversity: Public Images of Inclusion from Minoan Priestess Rituals to Contemporary Performance Art Prerequisite: None, One Semester The actual history of art offers more images of gender, racial, and wealth diversity than most textbooks provide. This class analyzes a series of historical and contemporary moments when women and diverse peoples visualized themselves in the public realm, and contrasts this “canon” with the traditional canon populating standardized textbooks, museum collections, and popular media representations of art history. Students will question the visualization of diversity and propose projects to introduce more diversity into the production, projection, and reception of art today. The class will involve field studies to look at public art in the Boston metropolitan area.

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American Short Stories Prerequisite: None, One Semester Introduction to the genre of the short story cycle. Through class discussions and writing, we will study the development in American Literature of the short story. Though the short story is a worldwide phenomenon, this course will look at the history of the short story’s evolution in America. In addition, the course will help the student better understand how to read, interpret, and enjoy the short story as an artistic medium. We will study the short story in-depth as a literary form with emphasis on analysis. Through reading, discussing, and writing about short stories, students understand plurality of values, ethics and aesthetics related to society and culture. There is no prerequisite for this course, but it will require a lot of reading and quizzes to go along with the readings. Asian History Prerequisite: None, One Semester This course will provide students with a general overview of the political, economic, and social developments of Asia from antiquity to modern times. Students will gain contemporary knowledge regarding geography, cultures, peoples, politics, and societies in Asia. Students will examine major developments in Indian, Chinese, and Japanese history in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Students will explore the historic foundation of Asia to understand the critical issues that significantly impact both Asia and the world. Topics will include early development of Asian religious history, Salem’s Maritime trade history with Asia, and the growth of Asian economic market. Banned Books Prerequisite: None, One Semester What do Harry Potter, The Handmaid’s Tale, and To Kill a Mockingbird have in common? They have all been placed on the very long list of books that have been banned from classrooms and libraries. Banned books are considered by some to be so objectionable that they think no one should EVER read them. Banned books, by their very nature, are filled with objectionable material. Censorship is nothing new; books have been banned, burned, and abridged for a very long time. In this course, we will study some of those books and work toward an understanding of what lies beneath the impulse to censor. Are some ideas simply so unpleasant that they need to be kept from the citizenry? We will read texts that have been banned for political or religious reasons, texts that have faced obscenity charges, and texts that have been challenged as inappropriate for schools and libraries. Our overarching concern will be to contemplate what place censorship has in a free society. There is no prerequisite for this course, but it will require a good amount of reading and quizzes to go along with the readings. Capturing Oral History Prerequisite: open to grades 10-12, semester The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the techniques and practices of the oral history interview including: the background research, drafting the interview questions, and planning the interview with awareness of the ethics and etiquette of oral history. The ultimate goal of this course will be to produce a well-researched, professionally conducted, transcribed, and contextualized oral history interview of people from diverse backgrounds, ethnicities and personal histories. www.PenguinHall.org


Contemporary Ethics Seminar Prerequisite: None, One Semester Psychology, both scientifically and in practice, has mostly been developed in the western world. As a result, the discipline is often culture-bound and limits understanding among people. Cultural psychology is the study of how people grow and are shaped by their cultures. By examining contemporary events and the associated ethical dilemmas, we will look at norms across cultures taking into account personal and societal value systems, social structures, and rituals, and how these norms impact individuals and groups when conflict arises. Topics will include, but are not limited to, individual behavior, group dynamics, prosocial behavior, group think, and bystander behavior. The format of the class will include Harkness discussions, debates, projects, presentations, and research designs and writing. Cultural Psychology Prerequisite: None, One Semester Psychology, both scientifically and in practice, has mostly been developed in the western world. As a result, the discipline is often culture-bound and limits understanding among people. Cultural psychology is the study of how people grow and are shaped by their cultures. By examining contemporary events and the associated ethical dilemmas, we will look at norms across cultures taking into account personal and societal value systems, social structures, and rituals, and how these norms impact individuals and groups when conflict arises. Topics will include, but are not limited to, individual behavior, group dynamics, prosocial behavior, group think, and bystander behavior. The format of the class will include Harkness discussions, debates, projects, presentations, and research designs and writing. Death and Dying “Death is not the opposite of life, it is part of it.” Haruki Murakami Far from a morbid topic, every culture and faith tradition the world over has rituals and ceremonies to honor our loved ones when they die. As humans we strive to find meaning in both our living and our dying, and understanding that mortality is inescapable can actually lead to a deep appreciation for living. Through a study of the psychology and rituals around death and dying, we will explore with sensitivity what happens when we are faced with a loss. The invitation is to recognize the choices we have to either allow grief to to soften our hearts with compassion, or build walls around our hearts to protect them. Each and every day is filled with letting go, and with taking in, from our very breath, to those events both huge and seemingly insignificant that make up the fabric of human life. Drama of Politics Prerequisite: None, One Semester Shakespeare wrote, “All the world’s a stage, and all the men and women merely players.” This is especially true of politicians. From Nebuchadnezzar to Trump, politicians gain and maintain power by appealing to people’s hopes and fears through their performances. In this class students will examine many different kinds of politics and political performances, mostly American - from commercials to architecture to speeches to debates to demonstrations to the clothes politicians (especially women) wear. Students will create multimedia political performances to demonstrate their understanding of elements of political performances throughout history. The Academy at Penguin Hall


Economics Prerequisite: None, Full Year This course is designed to explore how individuals and groups make decisions on the best use of limited resources. The students will examine economic principles and theory, including microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, economic development and behavioral economics. A wide range of topics demonstrate how individuals make purchasing decisions, how business firms decide to introduce products to market, how governments attempt to stabilize the economy and how developing countries promote economic growth. Projects, problem-finding/solving, collaboration, research and creativity are required for this class; a variety of assessments and projects will be used to measure student understanding and mastery. Gothic and Horror Fiction Prerequisite: None, One Semester Do you love scary stories? Do you believe that it is indeed Ruby Boyer Miller who closes classroom doors at Penguin Hall? Then Gothic and Horror Fiction is the elective for you! This course will help you to develop skills in reading and analyzing fiction, as well as introduce you to the fascinating world of gothic and horror fiction. We’ll read writers from many different time periods, as we explore how the very earliest gothic works are still influencing horror writers today. We’ll also discuss the various elements of fiction: character analysis, plot, narration, use of symbols, theme, tone and style. There is no prerequisite for this course, but it will require a good amount of reading and quizzes to go along with the readings. The course will depend on your contributions through class discussion and writing assignments on the works we read. Greek and Latin Roots for the Health Professional Prerequisite: None, One Semester In this elective course, students who are planning a career in the health field will build related vocabulary through the study of ancient Greek and Latin. The focus of this course is not on the grammar of the languages but on becoming familiar with the languages in the context of their relationship to the English language and, specifically, their relationship to medical terminology. Each class will focus on a couple of specific related roots and involve activities to deepen the students’ knowledge of the most important terms with that root or roots. Heroes, Rebels and Saints: Lives of Faith and Dissidence Prerequisite: None, One Semester “Dare to declare who you are. It is not far from the shores of silence to the boundaries of speech.” — Hildegard of Bingen (1098–1179) These words, written centuries ago by a woman mystic and scientist, might have jumped right out of a social media meme today. Throughout the ages and throughout the world’s wisdom traditions, the lives of heroes and holy ones have often run counter to the prevailing power of the times. Karen Armstrong writes in The Spiral Staircase, “The myths of the hero...are not meant to give us historical information...Their purpose is to compel us to act in such a way that we bring out our own heroic potential.” Taking a cue from these women, this course will explore the complex relationship between role models of heroism, rebellion and faith. What does it mean to be both rebel and saint? What can we as women today learn from the lives of both well known and little known rebel saints? What is the role of women in today’s changing face of spirituality? How do we live in such a way as to bring out our full potential? www.PenguinHall.org


Introduction to Russian History and Language I Prerequisite: None, One Semester In this introductory course, students will embark on a journey into the Russian language and culture. Students begin by learning simple greetings and ways of introducing themselves and learn the Russian alphabet, and how to read and write in Cyrillic, as we work through the lessons in Mezhdu Nami, our online Russian textbook. We study the geography of Russia, the world’s largest nation in terms of land mass. We undertake an overview of Russian history from its early beginnings with Cyril and Methodius, to the development of the idea of Moscow Third Rome, up to Peter the Great and his creation of a “Window on the West.” Over the course of the semester, students read some key works of Russian literature, primarily in translation, and engage in Russian cultural activities like singing songs, trying tongue twisters, and watching Russian cartoons. Students research the biography of a Russian person of their choice to present to the class. Introduction to Russian History and Language II Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Russian History and Language I, One Semester In the second semester of this introductory class, students continue their lessons in Mezhdu Nami, learning the Russian language and building their vocabulary, while engaging in the study of Russian history and culture begun in the earlier course. We build on our ability to read, write, and speak Russian and continue to learn more complex grammar, including verb conjugations and impersonal constructions. In the second-semester course we focus mainly on the twentieth-century, especially the Russian Revolutions and the Soviet Regime, World War II on the Eastern Front, and the Cold War. Students do a research paper on a topic of their choice. Greek and Latin for Vocabulary Building Prerequisite: None, one semester In this elective course, students will build English vocabulary through the study of Greek and Latin roots in the English language. Each class will focus on 2-4 roots and advanced English vocabulary containing these roots, with special focus on in-depth study of certain important or very interesting terms. Students will be periodically quizzed on the roots and the terms containing the roots, and small projects will also be assigned and counted as part of the course grade. Journalism Prerequisite: None, One Semester Journalism is a course designed for students interested in newspaper journalism and developing their skills as a writer. The course explores the contemporary media and the ethical responsibility issues inherent in the press today. Students will learn the fundamentals of news, feature, editorial and other styles of writing. Copy reading, news style and editing will be stressed. Students will create multiple original stories using varied structures and writing techniques. Students will also learn to create computer generated layouts and graphics. Students must adhere to deadlines.

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The Mathematics of the Ideal City: The Economics, Engineering, and Politics of Urban Planning Prerequisite: for grades 10-12, One Semester This class analyzes the mix of economics, engineering, and politics that form our cities, historically and today. The core questions are how cities are able to maximize opportunities for all residents, what are the pitfalls that keep this from happening, and how might we use statistical and structural analysis as a basis for turning real human needs and opportunities into engineered frameworks for empowerment. We will look at studies of historical cities, historical and contemporary projects for economic, spatial, and infrastructural improvement, and conduct field research to develop data-driven project proposals for transforming individual towns and cities in Essex County. Middle Eastern History: Islam, the Middle East, and the West Prerequisite: None, One Semester This course will provide students with a general overview of the basic themes and issues in Middle Eastern history from the rise of Islam - 21st century. This will be done with an emphasis on the encounters and exchanges between what became known as the “Middle East” and the “West.” This course will examine in depth the history of the Middle East in the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will gain an understanding of the historical basis of current issues that affect countries of the Middle East in the 21st century and how such issues affect the United States. Topics will include the formation and spread of Islam; the origins of Arab-Israeli conflict; the rise of Islamic fundamentalism; the Persian Gulf War; the Arab Spring; the rise of ISIS. Students will also examine how terrorism that emanates from the Middle East poses a danger to America and its citizens and what strategies the US government might employ in response. During the course of the year, students will explore women’s rights issues, the role of oil in the world economy and the importance of religion in modern Middle Eastern Life. Mythology: Greece and Rome Prerequisite: None, One Semester This course is an overview of the major mythologies of Greece and Rome. Myths spring from a time before factual information was possible, and therefore occupy the grey area between history and fiction. Rather than representing literal history, ancient peoples accepted the limitations of these myths and sought truth from them, rather than factual information. In the ancient world, truth was to be found in tradition, and these myths formed a kind of symbolic history for the cultures that told and retold these stories, articulating values, fears, biases, etc. In this course, we will examine the cultural significance of these myths, their use in religion, their cultural position, their deployment in the propaganda of various imperial powers, and finally their afterlife in the Christian imagination. This course focuses on the power of stories, their immortality, and their ability to tell the truth, even in absence of factual information. Methods of assessment will be papers, projects, and participation. Class format will consist of lecture and discussion.

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Out of the Shadows: The Untold Story of Phillis the Slave Prerequisite: None, One Semester This class aims to draw certain invisible women out of the shadows and into the light of our awareness. In particular, we will focus on the lives of enslaved women in early America and ask how it was that they attempted to assert agency over their lives. We will begin with the story of Phillis, a woman who served as a slave in the household of an eighteenth-century Massachusetts minister for over fifty years. Using entries culled from the minister’s vast diary, we will sketch the story of Phillis’s life and acknowledge the contributions she made to the Longmeadow community. We will then shift our focus to explore the ways enslaved women in the south attempted to assert a measure of control over their lives. How could a colorful pair of shoes worn to an illegal “frolic” represent an act of resistance? Political Science Prerequisite: None, One Semester Politics is a battleground of stories and ideas. To better understand the many stories in contention, we will dig into the origins and evolution of American politics and democracy, with emphasis on the origins and evolution of rights and civil liberties. We’ll also dig into the history of the ideas and arguments behind our current political situation, to try to understand its ideas and debates. James Madison wrote that, “Knowledge will forever govern ignorance; and a people who mean to be their own governors must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” We will try to prove him right by emphasizing learning how to identify and evaluate arguments and the evidence that underpin them. We’ll empower ourselves with the knowledge of how the system works and how it can be changed. Sacred Activism: Be The Change Prerequisite: None, One Semester Faced with a world where social problems can seem overwhelming and impossible to change, what is our responsibility and calling as individuals and as a school community? From Jesus to Gandhi to Dorothy Day to Peace Pilgrim to the Nuns on the Bus, we have many examples of how to craft a life of purpose. This course will consist of a close look at the key principles of Catholic social teaching, as well as models of how women and men from across traditions and time periods have answered the call to be of service in the world. We will be challenged to notice what needs there are in our own inner lives and in our communities, and then through practices of reflection and discernment, find ways to create positive change. We will nurture our compassionate action through spiritual practices that foster an open mind and open heart. Seminar on Global Health and The Girl Child Prerequisite: None, One Semester Girls present a unique set of issues and opportunities in the global health landscape. Students will engage in research to understand these issues and opportunities and seek solutions to the challenges girls face worldwide. Students will be encouraged to take on a philanthropic cause or present solutions to the problems girls face globally.

The Academy at Penguin Hall


Social Justice Prerequisite: None, One Semester This course provides students with a foundational understanding of Catholic social teaching along with opportunities for meaningful community service. Students also engage in personal reflection on the lessons learned through their community service experiences. To support their classroom learning, students volunteer at various social agencies including day-care centers, nursing homes, soup kitchens, and hospitals. Additionally, students reflect regularly on their service experiences by way of journal writing, group discussion and meetings with their teachers. Sociology Prerequisite: None, One Semester This course illustrates how the groups or social structures that one belongs to have a profound influence on the way they think, feel and act. Sociology looks at groups rather than individuals. Major themes include deviance and social control, inequalities of gender and age, family and marriage, and social issues surrounding modern sports and media trends. Students will demonstrate understanding through a variety of assessments and projects. Taken Captive in Early America Prerequisite: None, One Semester “. . . there is something about kidnapping that retains a unique horror.” Thus begins historian John Demos as he sets out to tell the story of Eunice Williams in The Unredeemed Captive: A Family Story from Early America. Eunice was eight years old when she was taken captive during the Deerfield Raid of 1704. Despite her family’s repeated attempts to restore her to New England, Eunice refused to return. Instead, she remained in Canada, converted to Roman Catholicism, and married a Mohawk man. Why did Eunice make the decisions she did? Using her story as a jumping-off point, we will explore the impact of the trauma of captivity upon children and adults in early New England. We will also explore the impact of various kinds of captivity in human experience. Women’s History: Well Behaved Women Rarely Make History Prerequisite: None, One Semester Students will research and explore the lives of women who have made a difference. Be it an entrepreneur, a scientist, an artist, an inventor or a politician, women have directly impacted our lives. Students will explore their contributions to society, examine the historical roadblocks they faced and ascertain if these obstacles still exist and why. This class will culminate in a research project of each student’s choice. Writing to Change the World: Activism and Resistance in Literature Prerequisite: None, One Semester, Seniors Only To paraphrase one critic, many of our most compelling authors do not write their books to qualify for some sort of literary hall of fame; they write their books to change the world. Stories can move us to action, and writers and artists often play a crucial role as the conscience of a society. In this course we will examine a range of works that call attention to injustice and that speak out on behalf of the voiceless. We will read works of fiction, poetry, drama, and non-fiction that www.PenguinHall.org


promote a number of social causes: human rights, anti-racism, feminism, environmentalism, animal rights, and more. And while the issues are serious, the books themselves display beauty, humor, and satire in the service of activism and resistance. Coursework will include reading, seminar discussions, creative projects, and various writing responses. Writing Styles Prerequisite: none, one semester This course provides an overview of the major styles of nonfiction writing. Students will write personal essays, journalism (short and long-form), criticism, college essays, cover letters, and scholarly essays, familiarizing themselves with the particular idiom of each. Through repeated practice, students will improve their writing technique (grammar, punctuation, structure), and develop personalized editing strategies, as well as techniques to combat writer’s block and procrastination. Students will also analyze a wide variety of non-fiction writing, learning through the example of great writers past and present. As they write, each student will begin to hone a personal voice and style, which they can forward in their academic and professional lives. Women In Ministry Prerequisite: None, One Semester As every woman is unique in her views of the world and herself, this course explores the challenge of crafting a balanced life of service, self-care and joy, whether ministry takes on a formal role or not. Looking at historical, theological and sociological contexts of women in society, students are given the opportunity to gain a better understanding of their personal aspirations, beliefs and vocations/avocations in this reflection-based course. World Religions: Finding Unity in Diversity Prerequisite: None, One Semester Students consider the major teachings, beliefs and devotional practices of the world’s religions, including views of the absolute, ceremonial rituals, sacred experiences and prevalent stories. This course commonly includes modules on Buddhism, Christianity, Judaism, Taoism, Confucianism, Islam, Hinduism and various indigenous traditions. Whatever your faith background, in this class you are invited to explore the basic tenets and practices of the major world traditions. Learn about and from each other and in the process deepen your personal spiritual journey. Sadly, throughout history, and certainly today in the global community, religion has too often been a source of misunderstanding, confusion and conflict. Yet we have a unique opportunity to forge bridges of understanding and respect if we can look past differences in dogma to find the unity in our diversity.

The Academy at Penguin Hall


Mathematics Courses: Algebra I Prerequisites: Placement exam and/or departmental approval This course is designed to provide students with the requisite skills needed for all other high school level math classes. It will cover traditional first-year algebra topics in the context of real-world problems and applications. Topics include properties of real numbers, exponents, linear equations and inequalities, graphing, functions, factoring quadratic equations and the quadratic formula. Geometry Prerequisite: Algebra I and/or departmental approval This course is designed for the student who has completed algebra I and shows above average mathematical ability. This course covers traditional topics in geometry to emphasize discovery along with application of algebraic skills. Topics include plain, solid, and coordinate geometry. Students will apply properties, postulates and theorems to study mathematical proofs in a logical and reasoned way. Geometry Honors Prerequisite: Placement test and/or Algebra I Honors and/or departmental approval This course is designed for the student who has completed algebra I and shows high mathematical ability. This course covers traditional topics in geometry to emphasize discovery along with application of algebraic skills. Topics include an in-depth analysis of plain, solid, and coordinate geometry. Students will apply properties, postulates and theorems to develop mathematical proofs in a logical and reasoned way. Algebra II Prerequisite: Algebra I, Geometry and/or departmental approval The topics studied in this course include modeling of linear functions, quadratic functions, transformations, complex numbers, polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and probability. Algebra II Honors Prerequisite: Honors Algebra I, Geometry and/or departmental approval The topics studied in this fast paced course include the modeling of linear functions, quadratic functions, transformations, complex numbers, polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and probability. Additional topics may include conic sections, systems of linear equations and inequalities, and rational functions. Pre-Calculus Prerequisite: Algebra II and/or departmental approval This course is designed for students who intend to study calculus. Students in this course study functions: polynomial, exponential and logarithmic, trigonometric and rational. Topics also include series and sequences, and may include matrices, and conic sections. Completion of this course does not guarantee entry to Calculus. Department approval required. www.PenguinHall.org


Pre-Calculus Honors Prerequisite: Honors Algebra II and/or departmental approval This rigorous course is designed for students who intend to study calculus. Students in this course conduct an extensive study of functions: polynomial, exponential and logarithmic, trigonometric and rational. Topics also include series and sequences, matrices, and conic sections. Additional topics may include limits, vectors, and polar coordinates. Completion of this course does not guarantee entry to Honors Calculus. Teacher recommendation required. Calculus Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus and/or departmental approval This course is appropriate for those who plan to study calculus in college. Calculus expands the study of functions, geometry, and advanced algebra to include the study of instantaneous change and summations. Students will study the fundamental concepts of differential calculus, including limits, derivatives, derivative applications as well as integral calculus and its applications. Calculus Honors Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus and/or departmental approval This course is appropriate for those who plan to continue studying calculus in college. Calculus expands the study of functions, geometry, and advanced algebra to include the study of instantaneous change and summations. Students will study the fundamental concepts of differential calculus, including limits, derivatives, derivative applications as well as integral calculus and its applications. The pace and level of difficulty of problems in this course is significantly more challenging than Calculus. Critical Exploration of Science and Society Prerequisite: Departmental approval How do we as good citizens of this planet make sense of the statistical, social and scientific claims we hear daily as others attempt to influence our thinking and our actions? There are many thought-provoking and controversial issues in our world today; perhaps these are the questions that will inspire our explorations this year, or perhaps the issues that will grab our attention have yet to hit our news-feeds. Either way, students in this honors level course will develop a numerical and statistical fluency that allows informed interpretation of the statistics and data they confront. Students will explore the who, what and how behind the issues that face our world today and learn to interpret, understand, and create visual displays of quantitative information. Research skills and communications skills will be mastered in this project-based, discussion-oriented course. Economics Prerequisite: None, One Semester This course is designed to explore how individuals and groups make decisions on the best use of limited resources. The students will examine economic principles and theory, including microeconomics, macroeconomics, international economics, economic development and behavioral economics. A wide range of topics demonstrate how individuals make purchasing decisions, how business firms decide to introduce products to market, how governments attempt The Academy at Penguin Hall


to stabilize the economy and how developing countries promote economic growth. Projects, problem-finding/solving, collaboration, research and creativity are required for this class; a variety of assessments and projects will be used to measure student understanding and mastery. Mathematical Finance (Full Year) Prerequisite: Algebra II This course provides students with a mathematical framework to make important personal financial decisions using algebraic and statistical skills. Students will investigate the time value of money; the characteristics and risk/reward tradeoff of different financial instruments, such as stocks and bonds; and taxes and tax deferred vehicles such as 401k plans. The course will stress use of the calculator and Excel spreadsheets. Multivariable Calculus Prerequisite: Calculus In this course, students will extend what was learned in Calculus and learn about the subtleties, applications, and beauty of limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration in higher dimensions. Computer-based interactives, homework and quizzes help to reinforce concepts taught in the class. Online course materials supplement the required textbook. Selected Topics in Mathematics Prerequisite: Algebra II This course is devoted to Finite Mathematics; it focuses on mathematical concepts that have applications to business-related ideas. The purpose of the course is to give a survey of mathematical analysis techniques used in the working world, a valuable experience to organize and analyze information. Students will apply the principles covered in this class to real-world applications. Statistics Prerequisite: Algebra II and/or departmental approval Students in this course explore the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Emphasis will be placed on applied projects and problems in the social sciences, natural sciences, and business. Science Courses Anatomy & Physiology Prerequisite: Biology Anatomy & Physiology provides students an opportunity to explore the intricate and sophisticated relationship between structure and function in the human body. The course offers students an environment in which they may probe topics such as homeostasis, anatomical and physiological disorders, medical diagnosis and treatment, modern and past imaging techniques, biochemistry, cytology, histology, and survey of the remarkable array of body systems that comprise the human body. Laboratory activities reinforce concepts and principles presented in the course. www.PenguinHall.org


Biology Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics and Chemistry and/or departmental approval This course is designed to give students a strong grasp of the biological concepts and the major themes that can be applied to life sciences. Evolution, biodiversity, cell biology, ecology and the structure and function of body systems will be explored. Students will gain an understanding as to how interdependent these things are to life on Earth, as well as how this understanding can help protect the future. A variety of labs, assessments and projects will be used to measure student understanding and mastery. Honors placement subject to departmental recommendation and approval. Biology and Ethics Prerequisite: Biology and/or departmental approval This science class investigates a variety of biological issues and the complex ethical implications that arise when the needs of society are in conflict with advances in technology or the natural world. Through various activities and lab experiments, students will examine and understand the underlying science, as well as consider and evaluate the controversies surrounding each topic. Students will conduct investigations and research, analyze data, and apply various ethical constructs as they pertain to ethical decision making and how it affects individuals, communities, and nations. Emphasis will be placed on class participation and writing which demonstrates comprehension and analysis of pertinent facts and issues. Topics may vary due to student interest but may include: Defining life and the rights of humans and other organisms; Ecological restoration and protected areas and species; Genetic information and manipulation. Chemistry Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics and/or departmental approval This course focuses on scientific observation and investigation in developing the core concepts of chemistry, starting with the structure of atoms and how it governs the patterns of chemical behavior of the elements. Through collaborative and individual work, students will explore and increase their understanding of the behavior of atoms and molecules. Laboratory experiments, class discussions, and activities will contribute to the investigations of atomic structure, classes of chemical reactions, kinetic theory, stoichiometry, and the nature of matter. An emphasis on real world chemistry applications and their roles in science and technology will allow students to apply their knowledge to make connections to authentic chemical processes. Honors placement subject to departmental recommendation and approval. Genetics Prerequisite: Biology This science semester elective builds upon introductory Biology, diving deep into genetics and unpacking the molecular mechanisms that define each organism on Earth. This course will go beyond Mendelian genetics, first examining simple organisms, such as bacteria, and their role as tools in genetic research before investigating the complex interactions of polygenic inheritance and eukaryotic gene regulation in more complex organisms, including humans. Through deeper study, students will better understand the current and future role of genetics in medicine, agriculture, and biotechnology. The Academy at Penguin Hall


Engineering: an Introduction Prerequisite: none This course gives students an experiential introduction to engineering projects and principles, which allows them to make informed college and career decisions in the engineering field. Topics include robotics, engineering design and engineering method, engineering discipline differentiation, cross-discipline problem-solving and other STEM topics. Environmental Science Prerequisite: Biology This course explores the interrelationships of biological, chemical, physical, and environmental factors and how they influence social, ethical, and economic issues. Activities, projects, and class discussions concentrate on the causes, consequences, and the possible solutions of environmental problems on a local and global scale. Topics may include ecosystems, renewable and nonrenewable resources, water quality, food resources, conservation biology, and population studies. Laboratory investigations focus on our fifty acre campus, its vernal pools and ecology, and the surrounding community. Integrated Science (Grade 9) Prerequisite: None This course is designed to introduce first-year students to the laws that govern the physical world. Students will utilize the processes of engineers and scientists to explore phenomena of the world around them. An introduction to motion, mechanics, energy, electricity, and simple circuits will enable students to build confidence and apply these skills to other sciences. Additional topics may include optics, harmonics, astronomy and introduction to the life sciences of biology and chemistry. A variety of labs, assessments, and projects will give students the opportunity to approach science with creativity and a sense of adventure. Honors placement subject to departmental recommendation and approval. Physics Prerequisite: Integrated Science. Students must have completed Algebra II or have departmental approval to enroll in both Algebra II and Physics simultaneously. This course is designed to prepare students for advanced studies in the sciences. Mechanics, harmonics, optics, sound, electricity and magnetism are just a few of the topics we will explore. Experimental processes will include acquisition, reliability and manipulation, and analysis will be emphasized throughout the course. This class will utilize advanced mathematics on a regular basis. Students must have a math teacher’s recommendation to take this course. Honors placement subject to departmental recommendation and approval. A Whale of a Tale: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Whaling in America Prerequisite: none, one semester This interdisciplinary course explores the whaling industry’s influence on the development of the American nation as well as its implications for modern conservation efforts and ethical concerns. Whaling offers a rich documented history, with deep roots in New England. Students will have the opportunity to better understand the prosperity and tragedy that the whaling industry www.PenguinHall.org


brought to famous New England places such as Nantucket and New Bedford, MA. With whaling as a major economic resource, Americans’ dominance in whaling helped propel the fledgling United States into a position of power in the global economic market. The course will include a final study of modern day whaling practices, investigating topics such as aboriginal subsistence whaling, modern Japanese whaling, and the practice of live capture for aquaria worldwide. Students will investigate the role the United States played in the establishment and implementation of the International Whaling Commission’s 1986 moratorium on whaling as well as this moratorium’s ecological effects. Current articles and films will be used to debate the supposed necessity and ethics of modern day whaling and whale captures. Computer Science Courses: Foundations of Computer Science Prerequisite: none This hands-on course will give students a foundation in the theory and practice of computer programming and how the Internet works. The useful and modern language of Javascript is utilized to explore concepts that are common to almost all programming languages including: algorithms, functions, parameters, debugging, abstraction. Simulations are used to understand how the Internet works and scales. Robotics Prerequisite: Foundations of Computer Science (or permission of the Instructor) Robotics is a project-based course that uses a hands-on approach to introduce the basic concepts of robotics, focusing on problem-solving and the programming of autonomous mobile robots. Concepts are introduced as needed to solve successive challenges. Students will work in pairs to build and test increasingly complex solutions, culminating in an end-of-semester project of the student’s design. Advanced Coding - Web Development Prerequisite: Foundations of Computer Science (or permission of the Instructor) This course introduces students to modern web development. While using the latest industry tools, students will learn about the technologies that deliver web applications to users: HTML/ CSS, object-oriented Javascript, server-side programming, SQL databases, and Github. In the process, real-world practices of modern development teams will be employed. The course is project-based and allows for creative freedom. World Languages Courses: Spanish I Prerequisite: placement exam Spanish I is the introductory course in Spanish for beginning students that develops the fundamentals of grammar and practical vocabulary needed to reach specific communicative benchmarks within the cultural framework of Spain and Latin America. Classroom activities are designed to develop skills in listening and reading comprehension, as well as written and oral proficiency. Reading selections give contextualized examples of the grammatical structures The Academy at Penguin Hall


being studied while giving students a glimpse into the richness, diversity and complexity of the Spanish-speaking world. The online textbook uses integrated audio and video material to strengthen aural comprehension and comfort with a range of native speaker accents and intonation. The course is designed for students with little or no knowledge of Spanish. Spanish II Prerequisite: Spanish I or satisfactory placement exam results Spanish II is the intermediate course in Spanish that builds upon the basic content of Spanish I. In this course, the linguistic fundamentals of vocabulary and grammar are closely linked to their communicative functions within a cultural framework. Each unit in the textbook revolves around a challenge (desafío) that motivates the students to sharpen the soft skills of critical thinking and problem solving. The five standards at the core of each unit are: communication, culture, connections, comparisons and communities. Through cultural readings and related activities, students grow in their understanding and appreciation of Spanish and Latin American peoples and cultures. The ultimate goal is to increase communicative competency and strengthen confidence in self-expression. Hence we will gradually be progressing toward total immersion in Spanish. Spanish III Prerequisite: Spanish II or satisfactory placement exam results Spanish III is the advanced intermediate course in Spanish that builds upon the basic course content of Spanish I and II with more complex grammatical structures and thematic vocabulary aimed at strengthening the four language skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing. The higher level vocabulary and grammar are closely linked to their communicative functions within a cultural framework. Each unit in the textbook revolves around a challenge (desafío) that motivates the students to sharpen the soft skills of critical thinking and problem solving. The five standards at the core of each unit are: communication, culture, connections, comparisons and communities. Emphasis is placed on developing communicative competence and fluency, so active daily participation in Spanish is essential. Spanish will be the primary means of communication in this course. Spanish IV Prerequisite: Spanish III or satisfactory placement exam results Spanish IV is the advanced course in Spanish at the high school level. It enriches students’ proficiency and cultural understanding, preparing them for college and career-level Spanish. Thematic unit organization encourages students to make cross-cultural and cross-curricular comparisons as they take on more advanced cultural and linguistic adventures. Cultural challenges encourage students to apply Spanish vocabulary and more advanced Spanish grammar concepts in context. Each unit in the textbook revolves around a challenge (desafío) that motivates the students to sharpen the soft skills of critical thinking and problem solving. The five standards at the core of each unit are: communication, culture, connections, comparisons and communities. All four languages skills – listening, speaking, reading and writing – continue to be developed. However, emphasis is placed on developing communicative competence and fluency, so active daily participation in Spanish is essential. The class will be conducted in Spanish. www.PenguinHall.org


Spanish V Prerequisite: Spanish IV or satisfactory placement exam results Spanish V focuses on language and culture through literature, art, and film. Students will continue to hone their command of the finer points of Spanish grammar and expand their vocabulary through short literary texts and analytical writing. They will gain an appreciation for Spanish and Latin American artists and develop their understanding of film as an art form as it reflects the history, mores, class and gender issues of society. French I Prerequisite: none In this introductory-level course, we will learn the basics of expressing ourselves in French, including basic survival and etiquette in a French-speaking context. Class is immersive, active, and proficiency-driven. We will communicate across the four skills of reading, writing, speaking and listening, using basic French vocabulary and simple grammatical structures to speak about ourselves, navigate everyday situations, and learn about French and Francophone cultures. Topics covered may include introductions, school, shopping, hobbies, food, travel, family, daily life and the home. We will learn basic grammatical concepts including but not limited to: present tense verbs, gender of nouns, asking questions, making comparisons, and the passé composé. Students have the option of participating in a trip to Montreal and Quebec City in February 2020. French II Prerequisite: French I or instructor approval In this upper-elementary-level course, we will continue to develop our skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. By participating in communicative classroom activities, reading texts in French, listening to songs and videos, learning and reviewing grammar structures, writing short compositions, and preparing oral presentations you will have an opportunity to develop basic French language proficiency. Topics covered include daily life and routines, housing and directions, childhood and family memories, communication and technology, school and problem-solving, fashion and personality. We will focus on reviewing and learning basic grammatical concepts including but not limited to: present tense, near future, passé composé, imparfait, reflexive verbs, direct and indirect object pronouns, commands, comparisons, and adjective placement/agreement. Furthermore, we will discover the intersection of language and culture as we explore authentic cultural materials from Francophone communities. Students have the option of participating in a trip to Montreal and Quebec City in February 2020. French III Prerequisite: French II or instructor approval In this intermediate-level course, we will continue to develop our skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. By participating in communicative classroom activities, reading texts in French, listening to songs and videos, learning and reviewing grammar structures, writing short compositions, and preparing oral presentations you will have an opportunity to expand upon your skills and develop deeper French language proficiency. Topics covered include traveling in the Francophone world, French cooking and baking, leisure time activities, stories The Academy at Penguin Hall


of childhood, future career plans, and news/the media. We will focus on reviewing and learning grammatical concepts including but not limited to: present tense, near future, passé composé vs. imparfait, quantities and articles, adjectives and adverbs, future (futur simple) and conditional tenses. Furthermore, we will discover the intersection of language and culture as we explore authentic cultural materials from Francophone communities. Students have the option of participating in a trip to Montreal and Quebec City in February 2020. French IV Prerequisite: French III or instructor approval In this intermediate/advanced-level course, we will continue to develop our skills in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing French. Our course will be organized around four major themes, each driven by a central film or text that will focus our inquiries into French language and culture, and accompanied by related projects, exercises and materials: 1) food/dining & humor, 2) regional differences and stereotypes, 3) friendship and love, 4) truth and self-expression. Through these themes we will focus on consolidating the basic grammatical concepts of French I–III and delving deeper into meaningful ways to express ourselves in French. We will review and learn grammar including but not limited to: passé composé vs. imparfait; simple future and conditional tenses; subjunctive mood; pluperfect, future perfect, and past conditional tenses. Students have the option of participating in a trip to Montreal and Quebec City in February 2020. French V/VI: Women in 17th/18th-Century French Literature and Society Prerequisite: French IV or instructor approval; sophomores and above Students who have completed French I–IV have the option of continuing their studies with an upper-level literature seminar. This course will prepare you for college-level work in French with an emphasis on analyzing works of literature, as we continue to learn and refine vocabulary and grammar structures through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Texts and topics studied will alternate each year to allow students to take a class at this level two years in a row. In 2019–2020, our topic of focus will be women’s representation and roles in 17th- and 18th-century French literature and society. In our study of the 17th century we will read Les Femmes Savantes, a play by Molière, and discover the roles of women in shaping literary and linguistic discourse through their salons. Next, we will dive into the 18th-century epistolary novel Lettres d’une Péruvienne to learn about French attitudes regarding the New World and observe French society of the day through the eyes of a female newcomer. We will also discuss the causes and events of the French Revolution. Students have the option of participating in a trip to Montreal and Quebec City in February 2020. Latin I Prerequisite: none Latin I is a requirement for incoming first-years at The Academy at Penguin Hall. Our curriculum covers Latin noun declensions, verb conjugations, and the Imperfect, Perfect, and Pluperfect Tenses. There are frequent readings, quizzes, chapter tests, and projects. We focus on the first two books in the Cambridge Latin Course: Units 1 and 2. Students learn to read Latin for increasing flow and fluency. Latin I provides students with the necessary foundation for www.PenguinHall.org


the study of any world language and for continuing the study of Latin. Practice is devoted to pronunciation; reading skills and strategies; listening comprehension; vocabulary and syntax; analysis of texts and storytelling techniques. In addition, we practice using some spoken Latin. Students are introduced to Greek and Roman mythology, Ancient History, and Roman culture with emphasis on the first century C.E. We devote special attention to English derivatives of Latin words and how to break English words down into prefixes, suffixes, and roots. By the end of the course, students will be able to read and analyze Latin texts, will have expanded their English vocabulary, and will have improved their understanding of English grammar. Students gain an understanding of the Classical roots of Western civilization and of American society and are able to better appreciate why Latin continues to persist in our culture today. The National Latin Exam is taken in the third quarter. Latin II Prerequisite: Latin I Latin II is a continuation of Latin I. It begins with a review of the material covered in first-year Latin and progresses further in the study of Latin grammar, including the remaining noun declensions, the passive voice, the subjunctive mood, and indirect speech. We study Unit 3 of the Cambridge Latin Course. Grammar and vocabulary are emphasized, together with the ongoing study of Roman culture, geography, and history. We will read supplementary texts, as time allows. The National Latin Exam is taken in the third quarter. Latin III Prerequisite: Latin II In third-year Latin, students review and consolidate their Latin vocabulary and grammar, complete their study of fundamental Latin grammar, and read gently edited and unedited Latin texts. We study Unit 4 in the Cambridge Latin Curriculum and read supplementary literature as time allows. Literary selections in prose and poetry are taken from the works of Martial, Pliny, Catullus, Cicero, Caesar, and Ovid, among others. Students learn about rhetorical devices and methods for analyzing the stylistic elements in Latin texts. To contextualize our readings, we build on our knowledge of Ancient Roman history, mythology, and culture. The National Latin Exam is taken in the third quarter. Latin IV Prerequisite: Latin III Upon completion of Unit 4 of the Cambridge Latin Curriculum, we study works by the most famous Latin authors. We will study the methodology of scansion and analyze the metrical features of Vergil’s poetry. The theory and practice of translation will be addressed, as students develop and refine their translation methods. Time is devoted to poetic meter, rhetorical devices, imagery, and figures of speech. Students are introduced to Latin poetry at large through the reading and discussion of a range of poets, including Catullus, Horace, Vergil, and Ovid. Students study advanced topics in Latin grammar. The National Latin Exam for Latin IV is taken in the third quarter.

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Mandarin Offered through a partnership with Gordon College, Beginning Mandarin will be offered from 3:20-4:20 p.m. on the Gordon College campus. The cost of this class is $500 and students will earn college credit. Students will be transported to the Gordon campus and returned to APH in time for late afternoon transportation. A placement test will be required. Students and families should be mindful that the Gordon College academic calendar is slightly different than the APH calendar and should plan school breaks accordingly. Visual Arts: Art History Prerequisite: none, One Semester This survey course will introduce art historical images and cultural context as students learn and react to paintings, architecture, sculpture, and musical examples from the Classical Greek through late 19th Century Post-Impressionism {focusing on Roman through Renaissance}. Art and Politics Prerequisite: none, One Semester This course will provide a historical and artistic overview from the 1980s to present day. From the feminist revolution, atomic bombs, political corruption and protest, this course will dive into the historical and artistic narratives of our history. Artists will range from Keith Haring, Barbara Kruger, Basquiat to Banksy and Shepard Fairey. Desire for political change, new beginnings and equality are not new trends in our society. This course will show how artists, writers and activists have made change over the last several decades. We will cover political and cultural events that have shaped our society into what it is today. Students will be asked to think critically and question trends in our society then and now. Ceramics Prerequisite: Intro to Art, One Semester Ceramics will cover a range of concepts, traditions and techniques. Through practice, students will develop skills will develop that will give them greater confidence with the clay medium. Students will learn how to control and mold the clay using a variety of techniques. Projects will revolve around the topics of space, structure and form and the development of ideas. Techniques and processes throughout the history of clay, including hand-building, surface treatment and glazes, will be covered. Students will approach these dynamic skills through installation and construction. 3D Design & Sculpture Prerequisite: Foundations in Art, one semester An introductory course that invites students to creatively explore the fundamentals of sculpture while maximizing their potential within and outside the classroom. Students will discover a variety of materials and methods while learning the elements and principles of sculpture. This will occur through projects involving interdisciplinary study, environmental awareness and research. The goal is to create or raise awareness in the students about their impact on the environment and their ability to make a difference. A way to achieve this is by creating pieces of art www.PenguinHall.org


that use exclusively recycled materials or materials that can be found in nature. Assignments are structured, but also allow for student choice. While experiencing the art process, students will discover ideas for creative problem-solving and respect for their own creativity and self-expression. Self and group critiques will be used to encourage effective communication as a valuable life skill. Students will draw upon inspiration from past and contemporary artists for projects. Design Learning / 3-D Studio I Prerequisite: none, One Semester Design Learning /3-D Studio will alternate between three- dimensional media projects and students will be introduced to the iterative Design Learning process to solve relevant design problems. Students will collaborate in teams utilizing Design Learning skills to design, test, and construct a dimensional solution to a campus-based need/ ”problem”. (Semester) Digital Photography Prerequisite: Intro to Art This class will introduce students to the fundamentals of digital photography. The four major areas of study will be the technology behind how cameras work, composition, lighting and editing software like Photoshop and Lightroom. Students will receive basic instruction and demonstration and see samples of master photographers. Students will work outside the studio and all over The Academy campus to shoot assignments, based on what they are learning. In addition, they will learn the elements and principles of design and how these are employed in photography in developing strong visual compositions. Drawing Studio Prerequisite: none, One Semester Drawing Studio will focus on traditional drawing and print media as students explore and expand their understanding of the elements and principles of art. Students will explore direct observation rendering, semi-abstraction, and concept-based imagery. Students will be encouraged to enter at least one art competition beyond campus in this semester course. (course can be taken a second time as Drawing II Studio) Foundations in Art Prerequisite: none This course will provide a sequential study of artistic elements and technique, with emphasis on each student’s creative identity and critical thinking. Students will be introduced to drawing, painting, and mixed media. The fundamentals of studio art will be the baseline for this class. Students will be encouraged to explore media, think critically, talk and write about art. Throughout this class students will build a strong foundation of skills, as well as the beginning of a portfolio, through hands-on practice and projects. Students will study line, shape and form, focusing on light, tonal drawing and linear and atmospheric perspective in color and black and white. Students will gain historical and cultural knowledge throughout the course through presentations and visits to local museums. Students will learn the process of critique to evaluate their own and others’ works. Through this course students will explore how studying and creating art can lead to a more in-depth understanding of the world around them. The Academy at Penguin Hall


Honors Portfolio Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This advanced course will be offered to students who intend to pursue more advanced study in visual art and design. Students will develop a portfolio of art work focusing on personal concentration. Instruction in drawing, two-dimensional design, and three-dimensional design will all be incorporated into the course. Research into visual art forms, as well cultural topics, will inform and expand each student’s art portfolio. Students enrolled in the course will be expected to produce a body of work for their portfolio and record their imagery in digital form for presentation to colleges or a supplement to college applications. (in exceptional cases course can be taken a second time as Honors Portfolio II) Painting and Mixed Media Prerequisite: Painting or Foundations in Art, One Semester During this course, skills from the painting course will be expanded by introducing other 2D materials. Design, composition and techniques that study past and modern problems in painting will all be explored. Finding an equilibrium between mediums will be the challenge students will learn to embrace in order to allow students to develop a higher understand of each medium. Topics explored through art will be climate change, charity outreach and social change. Students will explore how studying painting and mixed media can lead to a more in-depth understanding of the world around them. Painting Studio Prerequisite: Foundations in Art, Drawing Studio, or Permission of Instructor, one semester Painting Studio will focus on traditional painting media as students explore and expand their understanding of the elements and principles of art. Students will explore direct observation rendering, semi-abstraction, and concept-based imagery. Students will be encouraged to enter at least one art competition beyond campus in this semester course. Portfolio Honors Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation This advanced course will be offered to students who intend to pursue the fine arts at a college level or as a career. Students will develop a portfolio of studio work focusing on a theme or concentration. Instruction in drawing, two-dimensional design, and three-dimensional design will all be incorporated into the course. Research into visual art forms, as well cultural topics, will inform and expand each student’s art portfolio. Students enrolled in the course will be expected to produce a body of work for their portfolio and record their imagery in digital form for presentation to colleges or a supplement to college applications. Printmaking Prerequisite: Intro to Art Students will be guided through printmaking with a lens that includes historical, cultural and conceptual aspects of printmaking. They will learn and use a variety of printmaking techniques. Student projects will allow an opportunity to practice design fundamentals of art while learning technical skills in printmaking. Basic elements of art and principles of design learned in Intro to Art will be utilized within printed compositions. www.PenguinHall.org


Performing Arts: Music: Choreography (Fall or Spring) Prerequisite: none, one semester Anyone can learn to dance at any time! In this class, we’ll learn how to create choreography and also teach it to others. We’ll learn how to find inspiration from your life experiences and the world around you to tell a story through dance. You’ll discover how to move your body in ways that creates beautiful lines and motions, and work as team through dance. Fall Choreography students will assist in creating dance for the musical. Chorus (Full Year) Prerequisite: none “The only thing better than singing is more singing” - Ella Fitzgerald Chorus is our non-audition option that is open to everyone who loves singing, and we highly encourage you to join! We’ll explore traditional choral music as well as more contemporary music. For those students enjoy the spotlight, there will be solo opportunities as well. We also encourage singers who double on instruments to showcase their talents in that format as well. The class will also learn basic reading and aural skills, and vocal skills and care. Introduction to Music Theory & Ear Training (Fall) Prerequisite: none, one semester Music is the universal language that we all identify with and speak on some level, and this class will help you to read, write, and speak and understand the language of music. Combining music theory and solfege (ear training), the class will help you identify notes, rhythm, pitch, scales, harmony, musical terminology and more. Learn how to become a more confident and accomplished musician and how to express yourself musically through creative musical projects in class! Jazz, Rock, & Concert Band (Full Year) Prerequisite: some basic to intermediate reading and playing level skills Any student that plays any instrument at any level is encouraged to join the APH Bands class that will run during the day (as opposed to after school). We will pair students in different types of band combinations based on skill level, individual interest, and need. The bands will include jazz band, rock band, and student-driven ensembles. Students will not only learn to play in these ensembles, but they’ll also learn to conduct, select music, read scores, and work as both a leader and team member in extremely fun ensembles! Music Appreciation Prerequisite: none, one semester This general music course presents a historical perspective of the history of music and how it connects the humanity in all of us. It will teach you not only the history of music, but how to listen to music with a more knowledgeable ear and a different perspective than you had before. Learning to listen to music and truly appreciate melody, rhythm, harmony, and all of the components of music will help you to connect with the music (and arts) all around you for the rest of your life. The Academy at Penguin Hall


Piano For Singers and Non-Instrumentalists Prerequisite: none, one semester This course is for singers and non-instrumentalists who would like to learn how the basics of playing piano as well as playing chord changes and “comping” to accompany themselves and rehearse. It’s designed as a fast-track piano course to get you up and playing quickly and creatively! Podcast Development (Fall or Spring) Prerequisite: none, one semester Students in this class will be in complete control of the creation and production of the podcast from research, writing and collaboration to pre-production, recording, post-production, and publishing. For any musicians in the class, they’ll learn to create music for the intro, outro, and any commercials. There will be hosts, interviews, and a place for everyone to participate in making the podcast come alive! Vocal Performance Masterclass Prerequisite: some singing experience necessary, one semester This class is designed to help vocalists build the necessary skills to perform with confidence and professionalism onstage and in the real world. Students will prepare pieces to sing in variety of different vocal performance situations, learn about musical professionalism, leading a group, conquering stage-fright and anxiety, and how to self-critique constructively develop positive habit as a performer. Women In Music Prerequisite: none, one semester This course will introduce and explore the substantial contributions and roles of women as performers, composers, conductors and patrons in music. We will begin with classical music and work through contemporary music today. Students will be required to participate in listening (perhaps concert attendance), research, and discussion as well as prepare a major project for presentation at the end of the semester. Creative project work, particularly in musical form, will be highly encouraged. This course provides students with the foundation necessary to assist them in their own musical compositions. Music is the unique combination of science and art into a universally understood language. No previous knowledge is required to take this course. Performing Arts: Drama: Acting Styles through the Ages Prerequisite: Art of Theater, one semester This class will encompass a wide range of acting styles from classical Greek through modern realism. In so doing, students will be able to immerse themselves in acting with the development and performance of many different characters while learning theater history. Multiple plays will be studied and analyzed in relation to their place in theater history. Delving into acting in those styles will take the learning from the page to the stage. Styles covered in detail are Greek Theater, Shakespeare, Oscar Wilde and the Victorian Era, mid-twentieth century American realism and modern American realism. www.PenguinHall.org


Auditioning and Marketing: The Business of Acting (Fall 2019) Prerequisite: Juniors and Seniors only. Teacher approval. This is an upper level acting course designed to help prepare students who are interested in pursuing acting in college and professionally. Topics covered will be; types of auditions (college, theatrical, on camera, musical theater), preparing for callbacks, major acting meccas (NYC, LA, Chicago), marketing (headshots, website), finding representation, networking, and finding your niche(s). Design for Theater (Spring 2020) Prerequisite: none In this course, students will move through units covering all elements of theatrical design: set, props, costumes, sound, lights, hair/makeup, and multimedia. Working with a play that allows for creativity and ingenuity in design, students will gain insight into the crafts of each of these disciplines and produce authentic products such as full costume renderings, a 3D set model, and the appliance of character makeup. A wonderful course for those who are interested in technical theater. Directing, Acting and Stage Technology Prerequisite: none Students will direct two modern two-person scenes of their choice and also perform as actors in each others scenes. Balancing leadership with teamwork will provide excellent opportunity for ensemble building while exploring the fundamentals of acting and directing. Students will then analyze a Shakespeare play thoroughly becoming immersed in his language, style, environment and dramatic structure. Afterwards, students will create a concept for a production of the Shakespeare play and support their concept with in-depth presentations on Sound Design, Costume Design and Set Design. Film: Critique and Creation Prerequisite: none The first portion of Film Studies focuses on analytical and critical thinking devoted to the study of six film masterpieces such as, but not limited to “The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari,” “Sunrise,” “Citizen Kane,” “Casablanca,” “Chinatown,” “The Godfather,” “Psycho,” “2001: A Space Odyssey,” “Schindler’s List,” “Amelie” and “Pan’s Labyrinth.” This class will discuss, explore and record critiques of these films in order to develop each student’s understanding of cinema. Turning towards shorts students will analyze and critique the most recent year’s Oscar-nominated Live Action and Animated Shorts. With half of the semester remaining, students will write, storyboard, cast, direct and edit their own short films. The following semester upper level Music students will create an Original Score for the films. Film Studies Prerequisite: none Acting is not required for this course. The first portion of Film Studies focuses on analytical and critical thinking devoted to the study of six film masterpieces spanning genres and continents. This class will discuss and explore critiques of these films and write their own criticism in order to develop each student’s understanding of cinema. Students will learn the many elements of filmmaking from pre-production through post-production. The heart and soul of this course will be the opportunity for each student to storyboard, write, cast, produce, shoot, and edit their own short film. The Academy at Penguin Hall


Play Production Prerequisite: none During the course, students will have opportunities to act as writers, actors, producers, publicity, designers, directors, front of house crew, and stage crew in the development of an original play built from the ground up, produced, and presented at the close of the semester. Devised theatre is an excellent opportunity to work as an ensemble to create something original and directly involves students with learning what is needed to create and produce a play. This class is meant to be inclusive for students of all levels of experience and interest. Playing Shakespeare Prerequisite: Art of Theater and Directing, Acting and Stage Technology Shakespeare’s plays are considered, by many, to be the penultimate in dramatic literature. His plays have been abundantly produced and adapted all over the world for over four centuries. His language is a fantastic tool for all actors to connect vocally, physically and imaginatively. This class will focus on Acting Shakespeare and use John Barton’s text Playing Shakespeare and supplemental videos from the Royal Shakespeare Company to guide students through the processes of understanding and delivering his rich and complicated language. Several showcases of the work will be provided to give the actors opportunities to perform, an essential part of studying acting. Playwriting Prerequisite: none In this course, each student will write a full length stage play. The process will be followed collaboratively but each student is working on their own script. Students will be exposed to modern playwrights and read a lot of plays before even typing a word. After sufficient exposure to the work of accomplished modern playwrights, students will choose a topic or idea of focus, develop characters, develop an outline, develop drafts, receive feedback, and move through the drafting process landing at the finished product. Political Theater Prerequisite: none Acting is not required for this course. “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players”. During this course students will delve into current events in an effort to make vital and impactful theater. Using a subscription to the New York Times and frequent viewing of HBO’s Vice News as well as a myriad of examples of political theater activists from the hippie revolution through to modern YouTubers, students will develop -individually and collaboratively- sketches, scenes, and group presentations with theatricality and power. All political affiliations are encouraged and will be respected and heard.


Public Speaking Prerequisite: none This course is designed to help you gain the skills and insight to provide polished, well-rehearsed, thought-provoking, and engaging oral presentations. Skills in public speaking will not only help you in giving your next audio/visual class presentation in History but they will help you in every interaction you will ever have professionally. This course is appropriate for anyone, those who feel that public speaking is an area for growth or those who feel they have a knack for it. Shakespeare for Modern Actors Prerequisite: none During this course, actors will become “versed” in the Bard’s language and style, building a developed understanding of how to effectively “speak the speech”. With a strong understanding of the poetry and prose of Shakespeare, students will explore how to bring modern, realistic acting methods to his language. So often Shakespeare’s work is thought of as archaic and disconnects actors from their audiences. This class will facilitate bridging the gap between Elizabethan England and 2019 America. Theater History Prerequisite: none A comprehensive history of theater from the early foundations of Greek Theater through to modern theater covering both the Western and the Eastern stages. This class provides an opportunity for students to explore how theater has grown and developed. To expand on the historical context, full plays will be read to further deepen the understanding and appreciation of this rich history. Voice and Dialects Prerequisite: Art of Theater and Directing, Acting and Stage Technology The Voice is an essential tool that all actors must develop. Once its many uses are made clear the actor has a fantastic technical tool to assist in connecting emotionally to their character. Students will study renowned teacher Kristin Linklater’s text Freeing the Natural Voice and learn how to use their voices to the fullest potential. Students will also explore Dialects. Actors are often called to speak with a dialect that is not their own. Students will learn the International Phonetic Alphabet and explore General American, Boston, American Deep South, Received Pronunciation (upper class British) and Cockney (lower class British).

Profile for The Academy at Penguin Hall

The Academy at Penguin of Hall's Program of Study  

The Academy at Penguin Hall’s Mission is to educate, enlighten and empower young women to live and to lead exemplary lives. Our Program of S...

The Academy at Penguin of Hall's Program of Study  

The Academy at Penguin Hall’s Mission is to educate, enlighten and empower young women to live and to lead exemplary lives. Our Program of S...

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