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Editorials

debates the importance of the enviornment in our everyday lives

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Entertainment

International

In-Depth

covers the French Honor Society’s visit to the National Gallery of Art

highlights sophomore Steve Aderton’s recent ownership of a record label

showcases the various places sophomore Aaron Pierce has lived

tells you how to pay your way with a high school job

B last A

the Volume #58 Issue 8

10-11

Arts

Annandale High School 4700 Medford Dr. Annandale, VA 22003

Informing the Atoms since 1954

wednesday, March 6, 2013

www.thea-blast.org

(703) 642-4229

Sequester impacts AHS Several families begin to receive furloughs, cut hours and pay cuts

By the numbers

5

The number of must buys for spring fashion See page 14

6

The number of new players on the varsity girls lacrosse team See page 17

Senior Clare Lazar will usually go out to eat with her family every Friday or Saturday night. They’ve been known to enjoy trips to Coyote Grill, Silverado or Sweet Water. Starting April 21, these traditions, and a few other luxuries that AHS families enjoy will leave their lives as the doomed “sequester” hits the U.S. Her father, Joe Lazar, is an attorney for the Department of Justice. He found out before the sequester that he would be one of thousands in the U.S. to receive a furlough notice. A furlough is a temporary unpaid leave from a company. For Joe, it will be about 14 days off of work from April 21 to the end of the fiscal year in September. “I was really disappointed to find out about the furlough,” Joe Lazar said. “You go into government work because you know you won’t be rich, but because you love what you do and it’s a safe job. You never think you’ll be furloughed or get laid off or have funds cut.” The sequester is a cut in government spending that resulted from the 2011 debt ceiling negotiations. It was declared to be a “last resort,” but was finalized after the Republicans and Democrats failed to make a decision by March 1. Joe Lazar works for about 270 days a year. With his furlough, he will lose about five percent of his annual income, amounting to about $7,500 if the sequester continues to the end of the fiscal year. “Because my furlough is a staggered 14 days, it’s not like I can go out and get another job as opposed to if it were a continuous amount,” Joe Lazar said. “I’m probably just going to stay home and do yard work with my unpaid time off.” “Sequestration” continues on page 5

$9 16

The price that the minimum wage is proposed to be by President Obama See page 2

The number of places that Spanish teacher Benjamin Carlos has traveled See page 12

Extended Essay Pizza Party Senior IB Diploma candidates will be gathering in Clausen Hall during Atom Time on March 8 to celebrate the completion of their Extended Essays as part of the IB diploma program. Pizza and drinks will be provided.

Varsity math meet The Varsity Math Team will meet in Clausen Hall today at 2:15 p.m. Come prepared to complete your math test. Food and drinks will be provided.

Sophomore Deanna Gowland speaks with her father, Nano Gowland, about the sequestration’s effects on their family. Her mother, a flight attendant, and her father will have reduced hours and fewer work days as a result of the budget cuts.

SLEEP initiative continues Regional Parents propose later start science fair time for high school students By Sandra Webb and Christine Tamir Staff Writer and News Editor Concerned members of the FCPS community met in the auditorium to hold a SLEEP conference to discuss possible changes in school starting times. The SLEEP (Start Later for Excellence in Education Proposal) organization aims to get FCPS schools to start after 8 a.m. to eliminate the detrimental effects of chronic sleep deprivation in teens. The SLEEP conference held at AHS on Feb. 26 discussed the many consequences of teenagers getting insufficient sleep. Around 60 supporters and various community leaders were present at the meeting in the hopes to delay school start times to fix the many health and educational problems associated with sleep deprivation and to improve learning conditions for teens. The meeting lasted from 7-9:30 p.m., and the seven speakers all spoke in support of the initiative. The speakers ranged from health

photo illustration by olivia lafferty

8

The number of inches the sea level has risen See page 3

photo illustration by gwen levey

By Colleen Adenan Co-Editor in Chief

Junior Ronald Romero is one of many students who feel tired during the school day due to lack of sleep the night before. He says that an extra hour or two of sleep would help him to focus during classes.

specialists to teachers in counties where the starting times had been delayed from 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. and have only seen positive ramifications. Most teenagers are accustomed to crawling into bed late at night, waking up after only a few hours of sleep and spending the rest of “SLEEP” continues on page 5

‘Best year for science fair that we have had,’ says event coordinator By Sarah Metzel Staff Writer Thirty seven students and their 19 science fair projects will advance to the regional fair at Robinson Secondary School on March 15. Sophomore Thomas White was the first place winner in the Physics category. For his project, he tested the effect of temperature on battery output. “My favorite thing about [the school-wide] science fair was being able to show off all of the hard work I put in to my project,” White sad. “My least favorite thing was having to wait for the judges to come by; they took a long time.” Winners of the school-wide science fair were selected from six categories: General Biology, Plant Biology, Physics, Chemistry, Engineering and Earth Science. “When I found out I had won, I was shocked,” sophomore Lisa King said. King and her partner, sophomore Jennifer Lee, won first place in the Earth “Regionals” continues on page 5

Possible elimination of soda from school FCPS reviews the possibility of banning sugary drinks in schools

Students present at science fair On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to read about students participating in the Science Fair.

Senior Beatrice Ohene-Okae has been known to drink diet coke in her Oceanography class. Her friends warn her about her bad soda habits, but she doesn’t care. Her experience of drinking sodas in class is one that FCPS attempted to stop for students by banning soda vending machines during school hours. Now, some parents and school board member Ryan McElveen are working on a movement to stop the sale of soda in schools completely. “I do think my soda drinking is a problem because diabetes runs in my family and I’m an athlete,” Ohne-Okae said. “But it’s so good and it helps me concentrate and stay awake in school.

photo illustration by colleen adenan

By Colleen Adenan Co-Editor in Chief

Fairfax County parents and school board member Ryan McElveen are pushing to remove soda vendors from public schools.

“Soda elimination” continues on page 5


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Should businesses be able to track, and keep track of, our moves on the internet? “No, because I think it is kind of annoying and it is invading our personal choices”

Editorials

March 6, 2013

Lack of online privacy

Businesses track Internet searches to create personalized advertisements online By Destiny Gammon Editorials Editor

—Raymond Ma junior

Minimum wage must go up

— Christina Olkowski freshman

“No, because it is our personal searches and they should not be able to track everything.”

— Brandon Bethelmy sophomore

“No, because that is part of our privacy and they should not be able to invade it.”

—Angelica Santos sophomore

Graphic by Destiny Gammon

“No, because we have the right to privacy.”

Have you ever logged into your email and noticed that the advertisements on the side of your screen match the words or subject lines within each email? Every time an Internet user logs on and conducts a search, the websites they visit leave cookies, or bits of code that are left behind for businesses to track what is bought or browsed while they are online. As the Internet becomes more prominent in the everyday lives of Americans, it seems as though marketers are one step ahead of the game. This theory about the accuracy of cookies was tested by Jeffrey Rosen, a writer in a teen magazine by The New York Times called Upfront. In his article, Rosen creates two different profiles which he calls “Republican Jeff” and “Democratic Jeff” and searched sites that matched the average profiles. Republican Jeff looked up items such as diamond rings and Cadillacs while Democratic Jeff looked up Barack Obama’s website and Volvos. Within two days, Rosen noticed that the advertisements on each Web Browser were very different, but both represented the profiles of the different variations of himself. Although the process of adding cookies to website links is legal, it is uncomfortable to know that every move we make online is being watched by a higher power. The process of tracking our moves on the Internet brings up the question of whether or not our privacy is being ignored once we go online. According the Upfront article “Your Secret Online Profile,” Google and Facebook have both increased their use of real-time bidding, which is a technique that allows advertisers to send promotions to web users that have shown interest in that particular item, as shown by their search history. In Google terms, this act of tracking the searches of its users is referred to as being “scroogled.” This ability to watch our actions causes concern as the reliance for the Internet is increased. Many Americans now use their computers for online banking and often put their credit card numbers and other personal information on websites all over the Internet. This causes me to wonder how much businesses and even the government actually know about my identity

and personal interests. To prevent worries similar to my own, the Federal Trade Commision, or FTC, has asked the advertising industry to create a “Do Not Track” option which allows internet users to keep away from online cookies and tracking even more than they can currently. Luckily, big search engines such as Google and Internet Explorer 10 have listened and allow the Do Not Track button as an option on web browsers, but what about those companies that do not? Are Americans at risk of losing their privacy to businesses and their incessant spam advertisements? As society begins to shift towards their smartphones though, the ability to delete cookies is greatly decreased and the ability for pop-up advertisements is once again an issue due to technical issues. Even with the new option to prevent Internet tracking on our computers, the issue with personalized advertisements is much bigger. As the Internet decides the advertisement and news stories that we see and read everyday, the ability to share values and ideas with one another becomes a daily struggle and the ability to argue with things we read online is limited. If

the news we read is all relevant to our own personal views, how are there supposed to be strong debates about controversial topics? The truth is, there would not be due to the narrowing perspective of the world around us when we only read stories and ideas that we personally agree with. The thought of businesses controlling our thoughts and feelings is one that strikes fear within many. If what we see is decided by companies who are looking to make a quick buck, the lives of Americans and other citizens will become altered and reality will become based around money and inanimate objects making social stratification, or the gap between the rich and poor, a much more concerning issue. As long as the FTC and other organizations keep marketing publicity from getting too out of hand and too into our everyday lives, the issue concerning online tracking and the attachment of cookies will not become too much of an issue of privacy. But, if the advertisements on the side of my screen continue to replicate my everyday life and interests, than businesses need to understand that we all want our privacy, especially online.

“No, because if they can see what you search there many be something personal that you do not want anyone to know about. It is also an invasion of our privacy.”

—Jalen Barcenllia senior

— Compiled by Shira Steinberg

Minimum wage by the numbers

3 10 19 67

Number of times Congress passed legislation to increase minimum wage. Number of states that increase their minimum wage annually Number of states that have already raised their minimum wage Percentage of Americans that support raising the minimum wage

corrections Vol. 58, Issue 7:

–– On the rail of page 2, Sophomore Jamiah Harrison’s name was mispelt ‘Jamih.’ ––On the rail of page 3, Connor Beveridge is a junior, not a sophomore.

Most students have jobs whether they are during the summer or after school. With the current minimum wage at $7.25, there is much to be desired for those using their jobs as ways to make ends meet for their families. However, by the year 2015, the minimum wage may take an increase to $9, as proposed by President Barack Obama in his 2013 State of the Union address. Although Obama proposed a similar idea in 2008, in which he would increase the minimum wage to $9.50 by the year 2011, his most recent push for higher salaries is greatly influenced by the nation’s current economic state. With an increase in poverty rates and an existent unemployment rate, it seems as though Obama has hit his breaking point. This possible increase in hourly wage could directly benefit our economic status at AHS as many students work in order to support their families or pay for college. Many students rely on their jobs to not only fulfill their personal wants, but to help pay for necessities such as water and utility bills to ease the pressure on their parents. With most of AHS’s population coming from foreign countries, many depend on this minimum wage paycheck to help with their family’s survival as they adjust to the ways of the U.S. In a recent survey conducted by The A-Blast, over 12 percent of our school said that they use 21 to 30 percent of their paycheck for

Olivia Lafferty

By Destiny Gammon Editorials Editor

If Obama follows through with his proposal to raise the minimum wage, it will rise from $7.25 to $9 leaving more money in the pockets of teenagers for them to spend at stores.

utilities in their homes. On top of this, the ever-developing recession is putting more responsibility on students to pay for their own hobbies and accessories. Ever since freshman year, I have been working at Grasshopper Green Daycare everyday after school, using my paycheck to pay for items such as my cellphone, car and future college payments. With a paycheck that does not appropriately represent the amount of work I put into my job, this $1.75 increase could, surprisingly release a heavy burden off of my back on a biweekly basis. If Obama successfully increases the minimum wage, the economy could also begin to take a toll for the better. “One of the best ways to get the

economy going again is to put money in the pockets of people who work, who will spend it at small businesses in their communities,” Christine L. Owens, executive director of the National Employment Law Project, said. “A minimum wage increase will stimulate consumer demand and help drive economic growth for the people who most need it in America – workers.” If you direct her words at high school students, these students will have more money in their pockets, and will be more likely to spend these paychecks in their communities at places such as malls and restaurants. With this increased circulation of currency throughout businesses, the ability for our current recession to dissipate would be within

reach. This same proposal, as revealed by the Obama administration, says that as the price of living increases, the minimum wage would also increase, allowing an appropriate balance of spending and receiving within the economy. This would also benefit the AHS community as many students are forced to move to particular areas when the price of living becomes too high. Looking at this proposal from a political standpoint, our economy is very behind in regards to the current minimum wage. Over the past forty years, the value of the minimum wage made a slight upward trend but, with the negative effects of inflation over the past few decades, the current minimum wage should be around $10.59. Basically, Americans are being cheated out of their well-deserved money and this increase in salaries is more important now than ever before. With 19 states that have already raised their minimum wage, including D.C., above the federal level of $7.25, it only makes sense that the entire country follow along with this trend and increase the minimum wage all over the U.S. Teenagers, and adults alike, all need Obama’s proposal to become a reality in order to ease the financial stresses of everyday life. Even for those students that have few to no financial burdens in their lives, an increase in the minimum wage could allow for extra spending money in their pockets.

Staff Editors In Chief: Colleen Adenan Gwen Levey Managing Editor: Ngan Pham Editorials Editors: Destiny Gammon Omnia Saed News Editors: Dana Filipczyk Christine Tamir People Editors: Kate Grandchamp Carli Loeb Health Editors: Kylee Nisker Art Editors: Abby Barnes Carina Chu

Annandale High School 4700 Medford Dr. Annandale, Virginia 22003 email: ablast13@gmail.com

Academics Editors: Berta Tarqui In-Depth Editors: Noah Fitzgerel K.L. Hoang International Editors: Joe Sehrer Shamaim Syed Photography Editors: Priya Adhikary Chloe Loving Lifestyles Editors: Gaby Camilli Megan Flynn Sports Xtra Editors: Ayah Oweis Sports Editors: Jarod Golub Betsy Kruse

Vol. 58 No.8 Feb. 13, 2013 fax: (703) 642-4299

Entertainment Editors: Sarah Bergen Emily Blank Weekend Editors: Andrea Melendez Rowan Shartel Ad Manager: Stephanie Allshouse Circulation Manager: Hannah Carlson Copy Editors: Stephen Oakes Thien Mai Web Editor: Rachel Wilson Web Staff: Jared Lefbom Head Photographer: Olivia Lafferty

Head Videographer: Nadia Elgendy Staff Writers: James Barker Melanie Bennett Yesenia Blount Bayley Brill Nuhami Mandefro Sarah Metzel Omar Haddou Erin Johnson Megan Ryan Mark Slough Shira Steinberg Alec Stewart Jonathan Tedla Sandra Webb

Photographers: Melanie Bennett Katherine Bonilla Tiffany Huynh Erin Johnson Habib Khalid Videographers: Medhane Berihun Hiwot Daniel Alejandra Iriarte Habib Khalid Laelle Mekonen Amir Mohammed Fahmi Mohammad Rahel Tecle Adviser: Alan Weintraut

The A-Blast is an award winning newspaper that strives to inform, educate and entertain the student body and community. Published every three weeks, The A-Blast will not print any material that is obscene or libelous; or that which substantially disrupts the school day, or invades an individual’s right to privacy. The A-Blast is an independent, open forum for discussion that is printed at the Springfield Plant of The Washington Post. Signed letters to the editor of 250 words or less may be submitted to room 262 or mailed to the school. The A-Blast reserves the right to refuse advertisements. All submissions become property of The A-Blast, Copyright, 2013.


Editorials

March 6, 2013

Give all athletes a break PHOTO ILLUSTRATION OF JOEY RAINEY TAKEN BY OLIVIA LAFFERTY

Teachers need to give sports players leniency By Megan Ryan Staff Writer

For the common teenager, sports are a major part of life. If students are spending time at practices and games, when do they have time to finish all of their school work? Grade expectations for athletes should have a lower standard because of issues with time management and the dedication that comes with any sport. Teachers should go easier on the workload when these athletes have games or let them turn in the common homework assignment late. Sports from the fall, winter and spring all have practices before or after school for almost three hours. This does not include team dinners, bonding time and mandatory meetings that take up a lot of time as well. With the workload that high school students have these days, many students that don’t even play sports are struggling to complete everything. So what are student-athletes supposed to do? Get no sleep, quit sports or skip school work? None of the above. Teachers need to cut their student athletes some slack, by either giving them less homework on the day that they have a game or when they have something mandatory for that sport. Coaches encourage their athletes to get a lot of sleep for the next day or to keep working on skills outside of practice, and then teachers ask their students to study more, give them more homework or stay after school. The trick for student-athletes is to find the balance between it all.

Many people characterize a student-athlete as the “dumb jock” stereotype. But actually that’s quite the opposite. The national average high school GPA for athletes was 2.99 and 3.31 for non-athletes, which is not a huge difference considering athletes don’t have as much time for school work as the other kids. The national average college graduation rate was 34.2 percent whereas non-athletes average around 46.8 percent. Again, not a major difference with everything that athletes have on their plate. Some people might disagree, saying that the students knew what they were putting themselves through, and if they didn’t know how to manage their time, then they shouldn’t have done the sport. Students do sports because they love to be a part of a team or play with a passion. But if they can’t do what they love, where are they going to find their passion to do schoolwork? Athletes are not allowed to “get away with murder” either when it comes to grades. Fairfax County has a rule set in place where athletes are not allowed to be failing more than 2 classes to be able to play a sport. In addition, students with 3.5 or higher GPA’s get recognition for their achievements academically. Even if it is mainly only freshmen and sophomores considering they aren’t in the full IB program and IB classes yet. The vicious cycle never ends because to play a sport students are required to get good grades, but these students don’t have enough time to earn the good grades. Therefore, with everything that the student athlete has going on in their life, teachers of all subjects, IB or not, should be more lenient towards the athlete and give them a break.

Athletes find themselves struggling to balance the workload and their sports requirements.

Junior Erica Johnson, an IB Diploma Candidate, member of the Atoms Marching Band and Swim Team while also working part time at Wakefield Rec Center, just doesn’t see the time to complete everything. “Balance is hard when you’re trying to excel in all of the things you do, there aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything you want to get done completed,” Johnson said. There’s a triangle of the S’s; school, sports and sleep. The perfect student has an equal balance of the three S’s, but what actual student has that? In reality, a student can only pick two out of the three in order to do them thoroughly and thoughtfully. For example, students that are in the marching band have practice every day for four hours and competitions all day Saturday. Many of the students in marching band are trying to complete the IB Diploma and get into a good college, but there is no time to finish all of their homework. “Students are under a lot of

stress and we have do much to do between sports and school and work and there just isn’t the time to do everything,”Johnson said. For IB Diploma candidates, many are forced out of sports because of the homework load, the students don’t have time for sports. Some IB students can come home with five to six hours of homework. For the college search, many student-athletes are given scholarships to attend a university just because they are incredible at the sport they do. People might think that scholarships that are given to student-athletes with lower GPA’s than non athletes is unfair, but the students that are getting the higher GPA without any sports are working less than the well- rounded student. Besides, student-athletes not only learn and have great responsibility from team experiences, they also learn how to have better social skills and manners since coaches do raise their teams to a higher standard than any other club or activity in the school.

Bring oil back to the U.S.A. B

arker’s arks

Reports showcase that the widespread injury ensued by environmental damage is at a record high, but with an economic crisis and political nonpartisan the public simply doesn’t care; they have more “important” things to handle. However, it is time for that to change. In the last century, it is believed that sea levels have risen by eight inches and will increase by another one to four feet in the next 100 years. According to the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the overall temperature in the United States has increased by two degrees in the last 50 years and a five percent precipitation increase, which may

What is your opinion of teachers being more sympathetic towards athletes? E-mail your responses to ablast.editorials@gmail.com

Likes or Dislikes

Interims Distributed Third quarter interims are being distributed today, meaning we are halfway through the quarter

No AHS Harlem Shake The administration has not given a response to the leadership team of conducting the viral dance, the “Harlem Shake”

WASHINGTONPOST.COM

The recent rise in gas prices are a clear signal for the federal government to find and establish new U.S. oil refineries.

more difficult to travel; which in turn would negatively affect cities that rely on tourism. This high price for gasoline would also negatively affect the agricultural industry because farmers would have to spend even more money to power their machinery. If the demand for oil and gasoline cannot be met, the country might have to ration our gas distribution just like we did back in the 1970’s, because the government would have no choice but to control the amount it spends on gasoline. Much of the available gasoline would also have to be put aside in order to keep military vehicles going. Although the idea of rationing gas seems farfetched, the government is missing out on a valuable opportunity to make a profit within our borders, with its lack of oil drills and wells located in America. America has many oil-rich areas, such as Alaska, that are not being used at all, and according to the Energy Department, there could possibly be over 16 billion barrels of oil available there alone. The United States uses about 21 million barrels of oil a day. At this rate, Alaska alone could supply America with oil for around 20 years. This would

mean 20 less years of relying on Saudi Arabia. Although some would say that 20 years of oil isn’t that long, every drop counts. Not only is there an ample amount of undrilled oil in America, there is also shale oil. Shale is a type of organic substance that can be melted down into oil. Although there are concerns that shale oil can damage the environment, new techniques are being discovered that allow more amounts of oil to be saved, keeping the environment as clean as possible. We do not control Mother Nature; it controls us. The protection and cleanliness of the environment is important. Yet, the government should still utilize the natural resources it has to offer. If oil drills in foreign countries are localized within U.S. borders, our country will no longer be in fear of a possible loss of such an important resource in our economy, and America will now prosper on its own; without the dependency on other nations. God Bless America.

not seem like much, but the recent heat waves seen throughout the past few months are a noticeable difference. Last year set a century old record for the hottest year in the United States. “Sea level is rising, oceans are becoming more acidic, and glacier and Arctic Sea ice are melting,” a draft of the third federal Climate Assessment Report said, compromised by over 240 scientists for a federal advisory committee. “These changes are part of the pattern of global climate change, which is primarily driven by human activity.” It’s now the time more than ever to react to these alarming statistics. The world as a whole is pushing away one of the most dangerous and imminent problems of our time. I praise President Obama for finally bringing the environment to the table in both his inauguration speech and continuing the discussion in his State of the Union. Calling

on Congress to enact laws that would cut carbon pollution and increase clean energy production, he implicated a no-nonsense policy. “But if Congress won’t act soon to protect future generations, I will,” Obama said. “I will direct my cabinet to come up with executive actions we can take now and in the future to reduce pollution, prepare our communities for the consequences of climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy.” Well it’s time he acts on that very promise. But it’s not just the United States that needs to come aboard this new initiative. The majority of the globe has turned a blind eye. It is appalling to me, that latest reports conducted by The Chinese Academy of Science have put the total amount of pollutants suspending over the city of Beijing

Fairfax County Budget Proposal

There will be no pay increases for Fairfax County employees in 2014 which will increase the average taxes on households by $262 and gives FCPS $62 millions dollars less than what was asked for by school officials

Daylight-Savings

Pay attention to the environment By Omnia Saed Editorials Editor

The A-Blast wants to hear your opinion. Your response to the following question might be featured in our quote collection:

Spring Break

By James Barker

Climate change and pollution on the rise

QUOTE COLLECTION

Spring Break is officially less than two weeks away

Editorials Column

Oil is the most desired natural resource in America. Not everyone has a diamond ring and not everyone wants gold jewelry, but everyone needs oil because it is a necessary part of our lives. But if oil is such an important aspect of our lives, then why are we not using the oil that is in our own country? Right now in America, the average price for regular gasoline is $3.80 a gallon. The price of gasoline had not reached $2 until 2004, but in 2008, it drastically jumped to $4.11. Many factors have led to this escalation of gas prices. Oil purchases are dominated by America. When the inflation of the dollar occurred, gas prices rose and sadly this event cannot be reversed. The majority of the oil America uses, including gasoline, comes from the Middle East as opposed to only around 35 percent produced in our country. This severe reliance on foreign countries is unacceptable. If we went to war with one of the countries that supplies us our oil, such as Saudi Arabia, our economy would be crippled, as Middle Eastern gasoline companies would no longer support our demand for oil. Gas prices would go through the roof, making it

3

Daylight savings will begin on March 10 moving the clock one hour ahead

at over 4,000 tons. A visible smog spread throughout the Chinese capital, and instead of looking for a solution, a majority simply wear protective face masks and go on their day. To continue the story go on www. thea-blast.org

Environment Continued On your smartphone, scan the QR code to the rest of Omnia Saed’s story about the lack of attention towards the enviroment.


4

News

Mandatory CAS Meeting All junior IB diploma candidates are required to attend the midyear CAS meeting on Jan. 24 in M2 during Atom Time. If you cannot attend, you must see government teacher Lindsay Zurawski before the 24th.

Class of 2013 Bake Sale The Class of 2013 will hold a bake sale on Jan. 23 after school in front of the cafeteria. The money spent on baked goods will go towards Prom and other events.

FAFSA Completion Workshop Career Center specialist Robin Roth will hold the second FAFSA workshop of the year on Jan. 23 from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. in the library computer lab. Please see Robin Roth in the career center for a list of material needed to complete the application.

Elective Fair This year’s elective fair will be held on Feb. 15 during Atom Time. All underclassmen will be able to decide the locations they would like to attend that day prior to the event.

Music Department Boosters The orchestra and choral department will be holding booster meetings on Jan. 22. Orchestra will have the booster meeting as well as a rehearsal from 6 to 9 p.m. in the orchestra room. Chorus will have a booster meeting at 7:30 p.m. in the chorus room.

Parent Nights Multiple parent nights will occur within the next few weeks. The 8th grade parent night will be held on Jan. 24 at 7 p.m. in either the auditorium or the cafeteria. The junior parent night will be held on Feb. 7 in Clausen Hall at 7 p.m. The IB parent night will be held on Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. in Clausen hall for all students interested in participating in the IB program.

End of Second Quarter The last day of the second quarter will be on Jan. 25. As a result, Jan. 28 and 29 will be teacher workdays, so there will be no school for student. Report cards will be distributed on Feb. 1 and a new Atom Time cycle will begin on Feb. 11.

MIT Acceptance On your smartphone, scan the above code using the application “QR Code” to view a story about senior Kevin Kwok’s journey prior to getting accepted into the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

By Dana Filipczyk News Editor The Science National Honor Society (SNHS) is planning to raise $5,000 for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society through multiple events initiated by the annual campaign Pennies for Patients. The fundraiser will take place from Feb. 4 until March 1. The campaign will be introduced with a presentation during Atom Time on Jan. 30 in the auditorium. “Raising $5,000 is a very optimistic goal, but I think we can reach it,” SNHS Publicist and senior Katherine Mock said. “We have a lot of good ideas and we are trying to market this campaign well.” The main event is a coin collection competition, also knowns as a “penny war,” which will last the duration of the campaign. The donation collection boxes will be located in the cafeteria during all lunches. There will be different competitions where the most money donated for a category will win: a gender war one week, a class war for two weeks, and a pie-a-teacher theme week. A faculty competition between the departments will also be held. “We are trying to reach out to the community in an effective manner and make a strong public presence within our school,” SNHS co-sponsor and physics teacher Thomas Chorman said. Another main fundraising event is Date for a Cure. This will be held on Feb. 13 during Atom Time in the upstairs gym, where junior and senior male students will be auctioned off as dates. An entrance fee of $3 is required in order to attend the event. “We are trying to promote our events to the best of our ability and get large student involvement with all of them,” Mock said. Other events SNHS is hosting involve a movie night, a Silverado’s night, bake sales and chocolate and roses sales. The movie night is to be hosted on Feb. 22. The admission fee is $5 and Toy Story 3 will be played.

DANA FILIPCZYK

The AHS literary magazine, the Filament, is still accepting original works of art by students. Any appropriate poems, photography, music or works of prose are welcome. All submissions are due to English teachers by Jan. 25.

Yearly SNHS fundraiser to reach new heights

Senior Hung Truong, president of SNHS, and junior Ahyeong Park, vice president, talk about Pennies for Patients.

Chocolate bars will be sold for $3 each throughout the campaign, and roses will be sold during the week leading up to Valentines Day. Furthermore, there will be three bake sales after school on Jan. 30, Feb. 6 and 20. SNHS officers and members are focused on promoting their campaign to reach $5,000, which is $2,000 higher than the goal they exceeded last year. “I hope that people are willing to help out with our campaign and donate because this is for a great cause,” SNHS vice president and junior Ahyeong Park said. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is an organization that funds research on finding treatments for blood cancers and providing services and education to patients. SNHS is raising money in honor of Daniel

Eisig, a 15-year-old boy diagnosed with Leukemia when he was 10, who is now cancer free and has been for over three years. “This is why this fundraiser is so important, because our efforts help other patients like Daniel, who now have the chance to get better and beat cancer,” SNHS president and senior Hung Truong said. “Our goal is to raise awareness about these type of cancers around the Annandale community.” SNHS has an online donation website account. Students can visit http://nca.sy.llsevent.org/ AnnandaleHighSchool to make a donation.

Debate team competes in districts New club finalizes preparations for district competition By Sandra Webb Staff Writer After their successful debut, the Forensics and Debate Team will continue to compete at the district level. The district competition for speech is in two weeks and the competition for debate is in two months. “I didn’t expect it at the beginning of the year, but I think the team has owned their own success,” Forensics and Debate team sponsor Lynn Beal said. “Obviously I’m really proud of them.” The Forensics and Debate Team began in September and surprised AHS with sudden success. They have participated in one competition this year, during which one AHS student achieved first place. Another AHS student ranked second, one student ranked fourth and two others ranked sixth. “I’m really happy with our success. I think we’ve done a lot better than any of us assumed would happen,” senior team member Khadra Said said. Forensics and Debate is one team that is broken up into two separate categories. Even though they compete separately, the team feels united and

Senior Brian Quang performs an impromptu speech about the value of Starbucks.

has close bonds. “The best part is kind of how we’re like one big family and we kind of support one another, whether you’re doing debate, impromptu or improv or poetry or whatever it is we kind of just come together to help one another out,” Said said. Forensics students compete in an Interpretation category. Students

prepare a script from a piece of literature and select important passages to use in a 10 minute presentation that summarizes the story. “You have to present it using different character voices, gestures, facial expressions, bodily movements, without moving, pretty much,” Beal said. “[Students have to] then memorize

those quotes and then learn to present them in ways that are very dramatic, without acting.” Most team members spend long periods of time preparing their piece and making sure their presentation is perfect. “We work every class period, the whole class period and after school,” Said said. In addition, speech competitions include a Ritual Oratory where students have to write their own speeches or even participate in an impromptu section, where students must present a speech on a given topic with only a few minutes to prepare. “[It’s] a ton of work,” Beal said.“The class and the team are really self-driven. I’m more of a guide and they’ve done the work.” Students participating in the speech (forensics) competition are due to compete in two weeks at the district level, and many are hopeful for more high scores and great results. “Hopefully we’ll rank third, second or first so we can go to regionals,” senior team member Nisha Sarath said. AHS looks forward to supporting the new team and to their continued success. “My hope is that we do even better than we’ve already been doing and that we’re able to get more people involved in the club in the future to expand more from the class to a bigger after school club,” Said said.

In School Suspension Program to begin Administration renews discipline measures to keep students on campus By Gwen Levey Co-Editor in Chief Suspension is a word that most AHS students never have to hear. For those that do, however, this usually means a few days or more off from school at home missing class work and other vital school information. Starting second semester, going home will no longer be an option for those suspended students; instead, they will be making their way to school like everyone else, but spending their time in the new in-school suspension program. “It’s a different form of intervention and discipline,” assistant principal Aaron Schneider said. “We’ve had the idea and have wanted to do it for a while now. We’re starting the program now because Principal Randazzo was able to get a little more staffing.” According to Schneider, during a student’s suspension, they will have to report to a designated in-school suspension location and remain there for the day. Teachers provide students with work that they will work on at their location throughout the day. The general idea of the program is to keep suspended students working and caught up in class instead of not doing work at home and falling behind.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY OLIVIA LAFFERTY

Deadline for Filament Submissions

Pennies for Patients begins

CHRISTINE TAMIR

News Briefs

Jan. 22, 2013

Security specialist K.W Williams will be involved with the new in-school suspension program to be held in a trailer.

“I think [in-school suspension] would be better because out of school suspension. You can go ahead and do anything you want and it wouldn’t really be like it’s a punishment, it’d be more like you’re just getting out of school,” freshman Camile Soruco said. Principal Vincent Randazzo agrees that this is a good way to handle school discipline issues instead of having students go home to wait out their punishment. “We want to keep students on track with

schoolwork,” Randazzo said. The program will be run in a trailer located in the back of the school. While there, in coordination with suspended students’ teachers, their regular assignments will be sent for them to work on throughout the regular school day. “Nothing significant happened for [the program] to be put into place now,” Assistant Principal Jamie Carayiannis said. “We’re always looking for ways to support kids in endeavors here at school. We want to keep them engaged.”


NEWS

March 6, 2013

Budget cuts hurt families “Sequestration” continued from page 1

In addition to cutting eating out, Joe Lazar will also have to reconsider other luxuries he and his family enjoy. For the days that he will be working, Lazar plans to start bringing his lunch rather than buying it from a nearby vendor or restaurant. “I think if anyone gets a pay cut in their job it’s hard, but I’m just glad that my dad has a job because I know that there are a lot of people that are unemployed,” Clare Lazar said. Alumnus Michael Lazar is currently at the University of Georgia, while Clare Lazar will be enrolling at college next year. “This sequester won’t affect where Clare is going to college; she’ll still get to choose,” Joe Lazar said. “We will just have to cut corners in other things, things we take for granted. Paying for college won’t have a big disruption unless [the sequester] goes into the next

WHITEHOUSE.GOV

Students forced to make adjustments due to furloughs

year. “My parents are paying for my college and I can go anywhere in Virginia but if I want to go out of state I have to get some money from the college,” Clare Lazar said. “I’m definitely applying for scholarships and have already started to.” Some AHS students will have to start contributing to their family’s income as a result of the sequester. Senior Adam Cook’s mother works as a budget analyzer for the Department of Defense. With her furlough, she will receive a 20 percent pay decrease. “Because my mom’s the only one working in my family, I’m going to have to start putting my paychecks towards President Barack Obama responds to questions about the sequester budget cuts at a recent my family’s finances,” senior Adam press conference. Obama stressed that the cuts were a result of Republicans’ choices. Cook said. “Fortunately the furlough without payment,” Joe Lazar said. “In my mother right now,” Gowland said. doesn’t affect where I go for college this situation however, after the budget “Since she’s a flight attendant, she’ll because my mom’s been saving up for does pass, they will reimburse me. If it have to start getting to the airport me for awhile.” passes two days later, I would get paid earlier with the changes in the airports In addition to the sequester, the retroactively.” and I’m basically going to be seeing my continuing resolution to the budget will For sophomore Deanna Gowland mom a lot less.” end on March 27, resulting in an entire and her family, the sequestration means “I’m afraid my family won’t be able government shutdown if a new budget a more difficult move. Gowland’s dad is to afford things because of my mom’s isn’t passed. a firefighter and her mother is a flight pay cut,” Cook said. “We’re all really “There is a possibility that if the attendant. Both will have their hours worried. We’re not sure what’s going resolution ends without a new budget and days cut as a result of the sequester. to happen, but all we can do is remain being passed, I would have to work “The sequester is mainly affecting hopeful.”

Ban of soda sales proposed McElveen leads campaign to replace sodas with healthier options in schools

COLLEEN ADENAN

“Soda elimination” continued from page 1

In fact, if I couldn’t drink soda in school it’d be reflective in my schoolwork because it helps me cope with stress.” According to McElveen, the movement will get community input and communicate with other school board members. Officials are currently reviewing food services in FCPS. “I don’t want to take away the [vending] machines. I want to substitute [sodas] with something healthier,” McElveen said. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 43 percent of soft drinks that are consumed daily are obtained from school. Although while the other four sell Coca-Cola products. Soda soda machines are only turned on after school, on Senior Sherief Beshara purchases a soda after track practice. weekends and during holidays, parents in Fairfax County believe that soda machines are sending machines are turned off during school hours, but the wrong message to students about good eating some students have been able to buy a soda during habits. school hours sometimes. In addition to these At AHS, there are eight vending machines. vending machines, the snack bar in the athletic Four of these sell Veryfine and Powerade products, lobby is open after school until 3.

AHS parent Karen Neal, mother of senior Kurtis Neal, volunteers at the athletic lobby snack bar after school every Monday. “We sell about five sodas every day that I work, which is not as much as you’d think,” Neal said. “I’m glad to see the students that come by don’t buy sodas before practice; they usually just buy Gatorade.” Ohne-Okae is one of several students that has doubts about banning soda sales in school. “I feel that if the need arises, kids will still find some way to get their soda,” Ohne-Okae said. “I understand that this movement is to promote healthier habits, and I do think some people may stop, but I think they will still find a way to drink soda.” “I think students would still manage to drink soda if [FCPS] banned soda sales in schools, just not as many,” senior Kalie Rosati said. “I’d just bring my own.” Although students have doubts about the effort to ban sodas, Neal is confident in the movement. “I 100 percent think it would work,” Neal said. “As a parent, I allow my son to drink soda, but he makes the choice not to on his own because he is athletic and realizes that there are healthier choices. I’m glad to see the students that come by the snack bar can make the same decisions.”

Later start time may be enacted Sleep deprivation in teens raises need for new regulations “SLEEP” continued from page 1

their day in a haze. After school, club meetings, sport team practices and homework, the cycle repeats. This is what SLEEP is hoping to correct. Teenagers, on average, need about nine hours of sleep every night, however, the average high school student gets less than seven hours. “The reality is, and this data is now several years old from the National Sleep Foundation’s Sleep of America polls, I think it’s worse now, 80% of adolescents get less than that nine hours of sleep,” Judith Owens, a medical specialist who spoke at the SLEEP conference, said. “On a practical level, the average adolescent is best suited to fall asleep at around 11 o’clock at night...to get up at eight o’clock in the morning in order to get adequate sleep.” These poor sleep patterns have serious consequences for teenagers. A common side effect of sleep deprivation in students is low concentration in class, and lower grades as a result. Many may not realize that a lack of sleep also creates health problems for teens. Insufficient

sleep in adolescents was identified as a “public health crisis” by the American Medical Association in 2010. “The younger you are, the higher risk you have of becoming overweight or obese in relationship to insufficient sleep,” Owens said. Sleep deprivation can cause obesity. Sleep deprived teens are more likely to feel hungrier, eat more food, eat food with more calories and eat more carbohydrates. Studies also show that people are more likely to lack enough energy to exercise. One sleep poll concluded that almost a third of teenagers reported being too tired to exercise. Yet, because a lack of sleep can alter your mood and judgement, people can be less likely to stick to their diet. There can also be an increase in risk for type-2 diabetes, “not just as a result of obesity, but as a result of sleep deprivation itself,” Owens said. Lastly, another health risk is caused by the staple source of energy in many’s mornings: caffeine. “There is evidence to suggest that caffeine may function as a gateway drug, that the earlier you start caffeine use and the heavier your use is, the more likely you are to smoke cigarettes and to use other drug and stimulus,” Owens said. Sleep deprivation can even cause fatalities on the road. Many fatal crashes are caused by drowsy driving. Teenagers, while already young and inexperienced drivers, put themselves at an even greater risk by getting behind the wheel without

enough sleep. This year, 6 school board members support the SLEEP initiative and many members of the SLEEP organization are hopeful that the increase in support will initiate the change. Many parents support SLEEP because they have watched their children experience the effects of sleep deprivation. Laurie Lindberg, an AHS parent, has supported SLEEP since 2005. Her devotion to the cause is “because I have witnessed my own children make the transition from childhood to adolescence with a handicap, the handicap being sleep deprivation,” Lindberg said. Dr. Heleme Emsellem, the medical director of the Center for Sleep and Wake Disorders and author of the book Snooze or Lose, was one of several members on the SLEEP conference panel, and shared her experience with the negative effects of early school start times. “It became clear to me that there was a real disconnect between what my kids were being asked to do in terms of their timing of their lives and what was going on biologically with them,” Emsellem said. She also sees “an enormous number of adolescent patients...coping with this and their parents coping with the problem,” Emsellem said. “Everything in one’s life is enhanced and of higher quality and safer when one is well-rested,” Lindberg said.

Science fair winners advance to regionals “Regionals ” continued from page 1

Science category. “I was jumping around and really happy. For the rest of the week, I was ‘mentally celebrating’.” The regional science fair competition is a three day long event. On day one, students set up their projects in the evening and run them past inspection. Saturday, day two, is when the projects are judged. On the last day, Sunday, March 17, the fair is open to the public from

OLIVIA LAFFERTY

Preparations for the three day event set to begin

sent our top projects, and I expect that at least half of them should be able to win an award at regionals.” The regional contestants have been busy improving their projects for the upcoming event. They are allowed to continue collecting and analyzing data, but they must maintain the same procedure. “I am looking forward to seeing the other experiment and seeing how they compare to my own,” White said. “To prepare, I have practiced giving a presentation of my project at home several times.” With any luck, regional science Science teachers Elizabeth Tuffs, Rachel Lazar and Issac Boakye grade the projects after all of fair contestants will earn high marks the presentations. Science teachers and volunteers from the community chose the winners. from the judges and perhaps even “This was the best year for science advance to the state science fair 1-3 p.m. Regionals will end with an awards ceremony on the final day fair that we have had,” science fair competition. coordinator Yaara Crane said. “We from 3-5 p.m.

5 2013 Diploma Candidates wrap up BY BAYLEY BRILL Staff Writer After relentless hours of homework and months of preparation for the Extended Essay, the senior IB Diploma Candidates have finally submitted their Extended Essays and completed their Theory of Knowledge (TOK) class. The submission of these final works signify the end of the IB Diploma program, and the beginning of studying for the actual IB tests. On March 8, the Diploma Candidates will be rewarded with a pizza party during Atom Time to celebrate their completed Extended Essays. “I’m really relieved everything is submitted because now I have a lot more free time,” senior Brain Khong said. The beginning of the IB Diploma program starts at the end of student’s sophomore year, when they pick their classes for next year. A student must take three Higher Level classes and three Standard Level classes to be considered an IB Diploma candidate. At the beginning of the second semester of the candidate’s junior year, they begin to take TOK. TOK is a three hour after school class that meets once a week that is required to obtain the diploma.

At the beginning of junior year, the Diploma Candidates have a meeting with the IB Diploma Candidate coordinator Shirley Campbell, who introduces the CAS project. CAS is a series of community service projects done within the community. In the middle of the third quarter, juniors who are candidates begin to work on their Extended Essay. The extended essay is a 4,000 word essay on any topic the student chooses, as long as it fits within one of the five IB subjects (math, history, science, language, or an IB elective) and is worked on until the day before winter break ends. “In October, I worked on my outline and draft, then I spent a couple of weeks working on my final draft after school,” senior Jenny Jessen said. But in the end, they feel this whole process was worth it. “I learned a lot of study skills and ways to act awake even when I’m really tired,” said Jessen Now all of the candidates have to do is finish their CAS portfolios and take their tests and hope they score at least a five on each of their tests, which allows them to receive the actual IB Diploma. They will receive their scores during the summer, and will not receive their diploma until their winter break for college.

News Briefs French Honor Society Inductions The French Honor Society will hold its yearly induction ceremony on March 13 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the library.

Coins Competition Leadership is selling coins for 25 cents during all lunches for admission into Battle of the Classes on March 22. The W4 class with the most coins will receive an in-class breakfast.

Battle of the Classes Battle of the Classes will be on March 22 during W4 in the main gym. The schedule will be modified, making is W2, W8, W6 and ending with W4.

CAS Update The next CAS working session for Diploma Candidates is on March 14 in the library lab during Atom Time. 2014 candidates should have at least three junior year activities entered into Managebac with summaries.

Class of 2014 Bake Sale The Class of 2014 will hold a bake sale after school on March 20 by both the auditorium and the cafeteria.

PTSA Meeting The next PTSA meeting is on March 19 from 7 to 9 p.m. in the library.


PEOPLE

6 What are your plans over spring break?

March 6, 2013

Inside the world of raves

Senior Addy Bramson explains the rave scene of Baltimore

—Ashley Britton freshman

“I’m going to play lacrosse and hang out with my friends.”

—Danney Davalos junior

“My family and I are going to Hawaii. Hopefully I will go scuba diving with whales.”

—Meghan Lynn senior “I’m partying, working out and staying fit.”

— Fonti Kanu senior

–Compiled by Melanie Bennett

Celebrity Birthdays

This specific senior ’s weekends tend to revolve around spandex, faux fur and pacifiers. Every weekend she attends a rave, or an organized, underground party that involves one or more disc jockeys playing electronic dance music and dancing. Bramson began going to raves after a friend brought her to her first in Baltimore, MD last year. “I started listening to [the music]… and started getting close with the people who were paid to work there,” Bramson said. She is now employed by a rave association that “[throws] raves… [loves] to party… [and] most of all [loves] creating memorable experiences.” She has since become part of the club’s Deco Team, meaning that she is in charge of Spandex, the stretchy, cut material ravers stretch across scaffolding by its pointed ends for decoration. Lights are then shown across the fabric for added effect. “My payment [comes in the form of] the $20-40, sometimes even $60, tickets to get in [to raves],” Bramson said. Raves place special emphasis on light shows. Bramson’s boyfriend and fellow raver spins Poi, balls of light or fire on the ends of a string. Bramson practices the performing arts of Object Manipulation with her LED hula hoop, but if she has no objects on hand, she will Flow, or Liquid, Dance. “Liquid dancing includes the use of Digits -fingers--, Tutting (changing the angles of your arms according to the beat of the music —Urban Dictionary) and, for me, pops and fluid-like arm motions,” Bramson said. “People often refer to [Liquid] as Dark Matter because of the Dark Matter Dancers [who are popular].” Rave dance is not choreographed but random and in harmony with the beats of the music. For performances, however, club dances like Tecktonik can be performed. EDM, or Electronic Dance music, provides the basis for raves, or radical audio visual experiences. Its sub-genres include Drum and Bass, Hardstyle, Happy Hard Core, Dubstep and Trap. “In my opinion, Trap—which, in terms of EDM, is like rap music without the lyrics—and Dubstep are stupid,” Bramson said, “My

COURTESY OF ADDY BRAMSON

BY KATE GRANDCHAMP People Editor

“I’m going to Paris to eat snails. I’ve been planning it for a while.”

Pacifiers have come into common use for ravers who clench their teeth while concentrating during Object Manipulation, contrary to the popular belief that ravers use pacifiers because they are ‘tripping out’ on Ecstacy.

favorites are Happy Hard Core and Hardstyle.” “[My parents] don’t like that I’m out all night but know that I’m safe because I keep in touch,” Bramson said. “They think it’s special and good that I’m active, but I’m still their little girl and they want me to be safe.” Traditionally, ravers emphasize the element of community, preaching PLUR—Peace, Love, Unity and Respect. According to Urban Dictionary, PLUR’s value has somewhat faded in recent years as new generations of rave-goers get further away from the ‘true’ elements of the original Scene. Bramson attributes the drug stigma often associated with raves to this distancing from ideals.

“I think it sucks that [raves are] stereotyped [as full of drugs and casual sex]…If you can’t go to a show and enjoy the music like any other concert then you shouldn’t be there in the first place… and I’ve never seen people having sex at a rave—you’d get kicked out,” Bramson said. “People at least go to their cars to do that kind of stuff.” Although ravers live by PLUR as much as possible, Bramson says it’s hard not to judge those who are giving The Scene a bad name. “We call girls who walk around in their underwear Prostitots—Toddle Prostitutes— because… those girls are, for lack of a better word, trashy,” Bramson said. “It’s not the way people dress that makes them a problem in the rave scene, it’s the way most of them act… I’ve never seen a Prostitot do anything but shake their butt and go around looking for Mollie (street name for Ecstasy).” Modern female ravers, or “rave bunnies,” are not the only problem when it comes to raves’ image. “ ‘Bros’ dress up in tight shirts and pants with their swag hats and do nothing but grind up on the Prostitots,” Bramson said. According to Bramson, “real” ravers wear Kikwear pants, which are denim cargo parachute pants, or Phat pants, which are similar to Kikwear pants but vary in material and color. Some girls choose to wear Fluffies, or fuzzy legwarmers. ‘Old school’ ravers wear visors. “[I’m a] Kandi Kid, which means that I have these colorful plastic bracelets covering my arms,” Bramson said. Being part of the rave scene means going against mainstream society, something which Bramson does by defining herself as pan-sexual, meaning that she is interested in both men and women. “It doesn’t matter what gender someone is to be in love with them,” Bramson said. “My boyfriend acts like a girl—he loves Hello Kitty.” Despite their tendency to stray from social norms, there is some organization that can be found in raves’ spiritual component of sacred geometry. Officially called Body Chakras, Bramson thinks they are “cool,” but does not live by them. “I’ve learned that everybody can do what they love and that [it’s possible for people like me] to meet people [they] can relate to,” Bramson said. Bramson has valuable advice for those trying to break into The Scene. “Be yourself. Don’t go in with the intention of trying to impress anybody, go to have fun and enjoy the music,” Bramson said. “Educate yourself about the music so other ravers will take you seriously.”

Alumni Postcard: Ahmed Bile, ’12 What college do you attend and what are you majoring in? Georgetown University for either economics or government.

March 6 Shaquille O’Neal 7 Jenna Fischer 8 Nick Zano 9 Emily Osment 10 Carrie Underwood 11 Elton Brand 12 Mitt Romney 13 Molly Stanton 14 Billy Crystal 15 Eva Longoria 16 Blake Griffin 17 Mia Hamm 18 Adam Levine 19 Bruce Willis 20 Pat Riley 21 Rosie O’Donnell 22 Reese Witherspoon 23 Hope Davis 24 Peyton Manning 25 Elton John 26 Keira Knightley 27 Quentin Tarantino 28 Lady Gaga 29 Lucy Lawless 30 Celine Dion 31 Christopher Walken

41 39 35 21 30 34 66 33 65 38 24 41 34 58 68 51 37 51 37 66 28 50 27 45 45 70

April 1 Susan Boyle 2 Lee Dewyze 3 Amanda Bynes 4 Robert Downey Jr. 5 Colin Powell 6 Paul Rudd 7 Jackie Chan 8 Kirsten Storms 9 Hugh Hefner

52 27 27 48 76 44 59 29 87

Alumni Postcard: John Oakes On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to see an alumni postcard from John Oakes.

What is the best part about college? The freedom. However, you don’t get nearly as much homework day to day, the assignments are spread further apart but far more substantial now, so most of my free time after practice is dedicated to work anyway.

What helped you the most while at AHS to prepare you for college? Taking IB classes. The classes I’m taking are very similar to Mr. Hawes’ class in the fact that there are lectures at times, but most of the time they’re very socratic, discussion based and very conceptual, so it wasn’t a very rough transition. What advice do you have for upcoming graduates at AHS? Take things slowly. The first two weeks or so of college were fun, but a bit overwhelming. If you need to make the choice to not hang out with friends to study, rest assured there is going to be something fun to do when you do have free time.


7

Health

March 6, 2013

Dealing with ADHD

Natural ways to focus

Students struggle maintaining good grades while having difficulty with concentration

Coffee:

Being a natural source of caffeine, coffee acts as a stimulant to the central nervous system. It can temporarily restore alertness and reduce drowsiness while adding a boost of energy.

By Kylee Nisker Health Editor

Peppermint:

A natural remedy that boosts memory, focus and concentration. It also lowers fatigue, anxiety and frustration, helping the person to focus better.

Photo Illustration by kylee nisker

Focusing: something that most students don’t have a problem doing. However, there are those few who are incapable of remaining focused for an extended period of time. In teens and adults, the average attention span is around 20 minutes. This is lowered to as little as eight minutes for those who deal with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). ADHD is a common condition in adults and children that negatively affects concentration. It is commonly found in high school students, but it is often not officially diagnosed. “I’ve had ADHD since elementary school but I wasn’t officially diagnosed until last year,” senior Julia Copenhaver said. There are three categories in which doctors diagnose this condition. However, the overall symptoms of this disorder include difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and anxiety or restlessness. Inattentive ADHD mainly involves having problems with paying attention and easily becoming distracted. Those who retain this type struggle with completing tasks and often find themselves daydreaming at inappropriate times. “I have had ADHD for six years now,” sophomore Rachael Allshouse said. “I take medication for it and that’s what helps me focus during the day.” Hyperactive ADHD causes one to become fidgety along with the feeling of constantly moving and being active. Talking in excessive amounts is also common when diagnosed with this classification. Lastly, impulsive ADHD makes waiting

Vitamin D:

Plays an important role in brain development and function. This vitamin affects proteins in the brain that are directly linked to learning and memory.

Students with ADHD have difficulty concentrating for extented periods of time especially during a regular school day.

difficult, causing one to speak and act out of turn. When used to medically diagnose, hyperactive and impulsive behavior can be combined, resulting in the most common type of ADHD. “I have combined hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive ADHD,” Copenhaver said. “I deal with it by taking my prescribed Adderall and doing most of my homework during school while I’m on the medication.” Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a general term often used to describe those who have ADHD without all of the hyperactive and impulsive behaviors. Identification of this disorder is based on the possession of at least six specific symptoms. They must be severe enough to cause an extreme amount of difficulties in many settings including

home, school and in relationships with other people. “I tend to have difficulty focusing on my task at hand,” senior Joe Bermingham said. “I take Vyvanse, which is a blue and orange pill, everyday and that seems to help my attentiveness.” What causes ADHD is still being determined but it is said that genes play a large role along with other conditions such as environmental factors, brain injuries, sugar or even other food additives. Regardless of age, ADHD can affect one’s memory and concentration making everyday tasks difficult to accomplish. With the help of medication, many discover a new way to cope with this disorder.

Classical Music:

Listening to instrumental music while working cuts down on distractions and helps focus on work. It improves the ability to think out longterm, more abstract solutions to logical problems.

What is your biggest distraction in class?

—Aaron Boyd freshman

“Friends, because when a group of your friends is doing something, then you’re tempted to join them. You can always procrastinate off your work.”

“My friends, because sometimes I worry about them, and it’s distracting when I play video games with them.”

— Diva Chowdary sophomore

—Ivan Esparza junior

Relax yourself by stretching

“My friends because they’re funny and annoying. They make jokes during class and they are loud in the halls.”

pictured: ashley whittle by kylee nisker

“The Internet (Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube) because it’s more interesting than homework.”

—Asia Muse senior

—Compiled by Sarah Metzel

Abusing amphetamines

weight. The lack of appetite that comes as an effect of the medicine causes the weight loss. According to the Center for Disease Control, about 66.3% of those currently diagnosed with ADHD have

been legally prescribed medication for their symptoms. However, there is no research conducted to determine how many actually use their medicine in a legal way. House parties and raves alike are well known for being populated with

kylee nisker kylee nisker

Every day, the pressure to be smarter, prettier and better plague the lives of teenagers. The standards for achievement in schools have also increased, including more homework, more effort and more time. Instead of turning to Monster, Red Bull or excessive amounts of junk food to stay awake, students turn to Adderall or Ritalin for a quick fix of energy. Adderall and Ritalin are prescribed pills for people that had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The medicine has paradoxical effects that aid in focusing and calming down patients. Students abuse this medicine to maintain focus during exams or to pull all-nighters. The medicine can also be used to lose

kylee nisker

By Yesenia blount Staff Writer

Adderall and Ritalin. The lack of adult supervision allows for the drug to be easily sold at these parties. The drug is normally swallowed or mixed with alcohol to increase the effects. It gives the user a euphoric “high” that lasts for about 12 to 14 hours. Prescription Adderall goes for $40-50 a prescription. For ADHD patients, the medicine is ingested after breakfast for eight to 12 hours of the calming effects. Those abusing the medicine could swallow the capsule or snort the fined powder. Students that sell the medicine are prescribed it. Some claim their dosage is not effective and need higher doses in order for them to be able to sell more product. Abusing Adderall may provide a quick fix but the side effects can leave permanent damage. It can cause high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, memory lapse, aggression and weight loss. When mixed with alcohol or other drugs, the effects are dangerous and uncontrollable. The long term effects include high risk of heart attack and even stroke.

Quad stretch: Grab the right ankle with your right hand and gently pull your heel up and back until you feel the stretch in the front of your thigh. Hold for a few seconds and then repeat with the right leg.

Calf stretch: Start with one foot infront of you and the other behind. Lean into the front foot until you feel the stretch in the half calf. Repeat with both legs for the same amount of time. Hurdler stretch: Begin by sitting in the ground with one leg bend. Stretch your hamstring by reaching out towards your toes on the straight out leg. Hold for several second then repeat on the opposide leg.

kylee nisker

Stress of high school causes students to misuse ADHD drugs

Standing groin stretch: Begin by standing with legs shoulder width apart. Shift body weight to one side as you bend one knee. Hold for same amount of time on each side.

Five minute meals On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to learn how to create a quick and easy crackerwich with only four ingredients.


ACADEMICS

March 6, 2013

Possible changes for SATs Details are unclear what kind of changes will be made The SAT has stayed the same for the past eight years, but now it will be another change once again. David Coleman, the president of The College Board, which runs the SAT recently made the decision to revise it. According to The Washington Post, Coleman was said not to like the current SAT, “He criticized some of the vocabulary words on the college admissions exam, saying that they had not real relevance to students’ lives.” Coleman wants to focus more on skills and knowledge. From this previous announcement, a change in the vocabulary words or essay portion could be possible. Coleman released no particular reason on why he wanted to change the SATs. “[I am] nervous because the SAT is a huge deciding factor that dictates what college I am going to attend,” junior Enrique Aguilar said. This revision may have been the result of the growing popularity of

BERTA TARQUI

BY BERTA TARQUI Academics Editor

SAT workbooks are available at the library, but will they need to be updated soon?

the ACT exam, which is a competitor of the SAT. The number of students who take took the ACT test passed the amount of students who took the SAT in 2011. The ACT test is usually less expensive and is popular among low income families who cannot afford the costs of the SAT. It is also seemingly more straightforward than the SAT. The ACT exam is usually more common in the Midwest, whereas the majority of the east and west coast take the SAT.

However, highly regarded colleges prefer the SAT over the ACT exam. Some colleges receive both, such as George Mason University. It really depends on the type of school a student is trying to get into and what the school prefers. Another reason to revise the SAT is to stay up to date with any new content or information. According to The Washington Post, “The SAT was last revamped in 2005, when a written essay was added, the test time expanded and the total

possible score raised from 1600 to 2400, among other changes. ” There has been positive and negative reactions to the upcoming SAT edits. “It really depends on how it is going to be changed. As of right now, there’s not a lot of given information so I don’t know if it will affect me in a negative or positive way,” sophomore Julie Nguyen said. According to The Washington Post, George Mason University is happy with the change because they know the College Board is constantly trying to improve itself. GMU makes an excellent point about how exams like the SAT have been checking to see if they are updated with everything. Not one exam can be perfect, but Coleman realizes that the SAT is not perfect. Not everyone is excited for the change, but there has not been serious backlash. The colleges though, are content with the current SAT. According to The Washington Post, the Dean of Undergraduate Admissions at GMU, Charles Deacon, believes the SAT is fine right now and is a good predictor of students success. The SAT has been around awhile and it has been revised a few times since it started back in the 1920’s. Right now, no one really knows what kind of changes will take place and whether they will either help students or not affect them.

New bill for school ratings BY BERTA TARQUI Academics Editor Some students remember looking up their teachers on ratemyteachers. com and reading through opinions of different teachers. Legislators approved a new bill in Virginia that may give people access to view a whole school’s rating. Schools already have evaluations, but there is no set grade that parents can ask about. Virginia releases one each year that exceeds 20 pages. They evaluate school graduation rates, testing results, safety violations and other factors. This bill will have schools evaluated by a single letter grade, ranging from an A to an F. Students across the nation and the world bring back grades from a wide range of subjects, so a student’s science grade won’t necessarily affect a math grade. This bill will combine everything from state testing scores to who passes or not. This in the long run, may cause problems because everything is put into one grade. A school may excel in one area, but not in another, so it will only look average. With one look, a parent may not know that a school

shines in one area. This bill could also cause parents to judge a school too quickly. It is ideal for a parent or guardian to see a whole review of a school rather than a letter grade. Schools will have strengths and weaknesses. The grading system will be similar to how students are graded. To earn a grade, the schools must fulfill the requirements. According to The Washington Post, “To earn an A, schools must be fully accredited by the state, achieve at least a 25 percent advanced proficiency pass rate on the state tests and meet all federal benchmarks for testing.” A “B” rated school would have about the same requirements, but won’t have as many students passing advanced. A “C” rated school will probably have a subject students are tested that they have fallen short. A “D” rated school will have a lower graduation rate and won’t have as many students passing more than one subject. Also according to The Washington Post, “F schools would be those denied accreditation or in the process of a government-mandated overhaul.” There could be positive outcomes to these ratings. “I say it’s probably a good idea so schools can try to get better,” junior Nora Belkhayat said. This new bill could help schools with not-so-satisfactory scores. Those schools will realize that they really

Down:

3. Formula with the exact ratio. 4. The majority whip. 6. A type of replacement; when a one cation switches with an anion. 7. The new Secretary of State. 11. A type of replacement; when cations switch with partners. 12. Formula with simplest form. 13. The minority whip right now.

1. Alaska 2. California 3. Delaware 4. Florida 5. Georgia 6. Massachusetts 7. New York 8. Texas 9. Virginia 10. Washington

Ten states where the majority of students take the ACT test 1. Alabama 2. Colorado 3. Kansas 4. Louisiana 5. Minnesota 6. Mississippi 7. Nevada 8. Oklahoma 9. South Dakota 10. Wyoming

These facts are from: Studypoint.com

Vocabulary Words Virginia could release letter grades to schools, but will the outcome be good or bad?

need to help pick up test scores or graduation rates. A school won’t want to see themselves as “C” or “D” school. “We need it because we’ll know whether we need to improve our education system,” junior Sara Belay said. Bad school ratings don’t look good for the community and the state. It will indirectly implement pressure for schools to do better.

This idea of rating schools by a letter grade is not new. About ten years ago, Florida had this bill passed. New York also has this grading system for their schools. The real point of this bill is to make it easier for people to know how a school is doing.

Test Your Knowledge Crossword Puzzle Across:

Ten states where the majority of students take the SATs

No matter where a student lives, ACT exams and SATs are available for them to take.

BERTA TARQUI

By the fall of 2014, schools may be rated by a single letter grade

9

AKIN adjective Of similar nature or qualities CONGEST verb To collect into a mass IRASCIBLE adjective Prone to anger MALIGN verb To speak evil of, especially to do so falsely and severely SEMBLANCE noun Outward appearance

1. The most intense or important part of a story. 2. When a character doesn’t show much feeling or develop. 5. Invented greek tragedies. 8. Speaker of the house. 9. Found often in Shakespeare’s work. “The food want I.” 10. The domain is on the... 11. Example of an organic polymer.

Answers to this crossword puzzle On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to view the answers to this mixed crossword puzzle.

Vocabulary words to use: Week two On your smart phone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to view new vocabulary words to spread around.


Academics

March. 6 2013

Possible changes for SATs Details are unclear what kind of changes will be made The SAT has stayed the same for the past eight years, but now it will be another change once again. David Coleman, the president of The College Board, which runs the SAT recently made the decision to revise it. According to The Washington Post, Coleman was said not to like the current SAT, “He criticized some of the vocabulary words on the college admissions exam, saying that they are not revelant to students’ lives.” Coleman wants to focus more on skills and knowledge. From this previous announcement, a change in the vocabulary words or essay portion could be possible. Coleman released no particular reason on why he wanted to change the SATs. “[I am] nervous because the SAT is a huge deciding factor that dictates what college I am going to attend,” junior Enrique Aguilar said. This revision may have been the result of the growing popularity of the ACT exam, which is a competitor

BERTA TARQUI

By Berta Tarqui Academics Editor

SAT workbooks are available at the library, but will they need to be updated soon?

of the SAT. The number of students who take took the ACT test passed the amount of students who took the SAT in 2011. The ACT test is usually less expensive and is popular among low income families who cannot afford the costs of the SAT. It is also seemingly more straightforward than the SAT. The ACT exam is usually more common in the Midwest, whereas the majority of the east and west coast take the SAT. However, highly regarded colleges

prefer the SAT over the ACT exam. Some colleges receive both, such as George Mason University. It really depends on the type of school a student is trying to get into and what the school prefers. Another reason to revise the SAT is to stay up to date with any new content or information. According to The Washington Post, “The SAT was last revamped in 2005, when a written essay was added, the test time expanded and the total possible score raised from 1600 to

2400, among other changes. ” There has been positive and negative reactions to the upcoming SAT edits. “It really depends on how it is going to be changed. As of right now, there’s not a lot of given information so I don’t know if it will affect me in a negative or positive way,” sophomore Julie Nguyen said. According to The Washington Post, George Mason University is happy with the change because they know the College Board is constantly trying to improve itself. GMU makes an excellent point about how exams like the SAT have been checking to see if they are updated with everything. Exams attempt to be perfect, but Coleman realizes that the SAT is not perfect. Not everyone is excited for the change, but there has not been serious backlash. The colleges though, are content with the current SAT. According to The Washington Post, the Dean of Undergraduate Admissions at GMU, Charles Deacon, believes the SAT is fine right now and is a good predictor of students success. The SAT has been around awhile and it has been revised a few times since it started back in the 1920’s. Right now, no one really knows what kind of changes will take place and whether they will either help students or not affect them.

New bill for school ratings By Berta Tarqui Academics Editor Some students remember looking up their teachers on ratemyteachers. com and reading through opinions of different teachers. Legislators approved a new bill in Virginia that may give people access to view a whole school’s rating. Schools already have evaluations, but there is no set grade that parents can ask about. Virginia releases one each year that exceeds 20 pages. They evaluate school graduation rates, testing results, safety violations and other factors. This bill will have schools evaluated by a single letter grade, ranging from an A to an F. Students across the nation and the world bring back grades from a wide range of subjects, so a student’s science grade won’t necessarily affect a math grade. This bill will combine everything from state testing scores to who passes or not. This in the long run, may cause problems because everything is put into one grade. A school may excel in one area, but not in another, so it will only look average. With one look, a parent may not know that a school

shines in one area. This bill could also cause parents to judge a school too quickly. It is ideal for a parent or guardian to see a whole review of a school rather than a letter grade. Schools will have strengths and weaknesses. The grading system will be similar to how students are graded. To earn a grade, the schools must fulfill the requirements. According to The Washington Post, “To earn an A, schools must be fully accredited by the state, achieve at least a 25 percent advanced proficiency pass rate on the state tests and meet all federal benchmarks for testing.” A “B” rated school would have about the same requirements, but won’t have as many students passing advanced. A “C” rated school will probably have a subject students are tested that they have fallen short. A “D” rated school will have a lower graduation rate and won’t have as many students passing more than one subject. Also according to The Washington Post, “F schools would be those denied accreditation or in the process of a government-mandated overhaul.” There could be positive outcomes to these ratings. “I say it’s probably a good idea so schools can try to get better,” junior Nora Belkhayat said. This new bill could help schools with not-so-satisfactory scores. Those schools will realize that they really

Down:

3. Formula with the exact ratio. 4. The majority whip. 6. A type of replacement; when a one cation switches with an anion. 7. The new Secretary of State. 11. A type of replacement; when cations switch with partners. 12. Formula with simplest form. 13. The minority whip right now.

1. Alaska 2. California 3. Delaware 4. Florida 5. Georgia 6. Massachusetts 7. New York 8. Texas 9. Virginia 10. Washington

Ten states where the majority of students take the ACT test 1. Alabama 2. Colorado 3. Kansas 4. Louisiana 5. Minnesota 6. Mississippi 7. Nevada 8. Oklahoma 9. South Dakota 10. Wyoming

These facts are from: Studypoint.com

Vocabulary Words Virginia could release letter grades to schools, but will the outcome be good or bad?

need to help pick up test scores or graduation rates. A school won’t want to see themselves as “C” or “D” school. “We need it because we’ll know whether we need to improve our education system,” junior Sara Belay said. Bad school ratings don’t look good for the community and the state. It will indirectly implement pressure for schools to do better.

This idea of rating schools by a letter grade is not new. About ten years ago, Florida had this bill passed. New York also has this grading system for their schools. The real point of this bill is to make it easier for people to know how a school is doing.

Test Your Knowledge Crossword Puzzle Across:

Ten states where the majority of students take the SATs

No matter where a student lives, ACT exams and SATs are available for them to take.

BERTA TARQUI

By the fall of 2014, schools may be rated by a single letter grade

9

AKIN adjective Of similar nature or qualities CONGEST verb To collect into a mass IRASCIBLE adjective Prone to anger MALIGN verb To speak evil of, especially to do so falsely and severely SEMBLANCE noun Outward appearance

1. The most intense or important part of a story. 2. When a character doesn’t show much feeling or develop. 5. Invented Greek tragedies. 8. Speaker of the House. 9. Found often in Shakespeare’s work. “The food want I.” 10. The domain is on the... 11. Example of an organic polymer.

Answers to this crossword puzzle On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to view the answers to this mixed crossword puzzle.

Vocabulary words to use: Week two On your smart phone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to view new vocabulary words to spread around.


12

International

March 6, 2013

PHOTO COURTESY OF AARON PIERCE

Pierce’s pictures from across the globe

Left: Pierce’s dad (second from the left) stands in uniform with his peers. Right: An aqueduct from Segovia, Spain, taken by sophomore Aaron Pierce when living in Spain.

Pierce visits a castle in Nagasaki, Japan.

Moving with the military Sophomore Aaron Pierce shares his story about being stationed by the military By Shamaim Syed and Joe Sehrer International Editors

Pierce climbing Mount Fuji in Japan.

Pierce at another point on Mount Fuji.

It is your first day at a new school in a foreign country and as you walk through the halls, you see a blend of saris, hijabs, yamakas and western style clothing that inundate the school.Although a student atAnnandale may be used to this form of diversity, being forced into this setting in a foreign country out of necessity can be stressful. Sophomore Aaron Pierce, whose dad works in the Navy at the Pentagon, and mom whom was stationed in Honolulu, Hawaii, has experienced this transition. Pierce’s family has spent many years across the U.S. and has lived in many countries overseas. “I lived in Spain for two years and Japan for three years, but I loved Spain the most,” Pierce said. Pierce was born in Hawaii, then moved to Chicago when he was a year old. He went to Florida when he was five, and three years after that, he moved again to Madrid, Spain. He then came back to Chicago for a year, went back to Spain, moved to Japan when he was 11 years old

and then finally came back to the U.S. at the age of 14. “We’ve adjusted pretty well overall, but it can be stressful because sometimes I didn’t see my dad for nearly nine months,” Pierce said. “Personally, I enjoy the experience.” Overseas, his father worked with NATO in Spain and worked with the Navy while stationed in Japan. He is currently the Assistant Secretary of the Navy and is working in the Pentagon. Even though  some people would think that it was difficult to move from one place to another and constantly be changing friends and schools, Pierce has a very positive outlook on being part of a military family. “It has a positive effect because even though I didn’t see [my friends], I saw them a lot more than other military kids,” Pierce said. “It also made my mind more open.” Transitioning from one country to another was also easy for Pierce since he has become so open, and  he didn’t isolate himself from everyone else. “The best part of being part of a military family is being able to travel to so many places and explore everything,” Pierce said. Among his best experiences, Pierce visited the Tokyo Tower and Universal Studios in Japan, climbed Mt. Fuji, and roamed through the many streets of Madrid. “I miss Spain the most because it had great education and generally the place was amazing,” Pierce said. According to Pierce, he received a strong education

there because it was a military installation, or a DODDS school (Department of Defense Dependents Schools. DODDS schools haveAmerican school systems and serve many different dependents of the U.S military and are located in many other countries around the world. “I made a lot of friends in Spain,” Pierce said. “They were from nearly 47 different countries around the world.” Pierce’s dad is currently stationed in the Pentagon. When Pierce returned, it was somewhat difficult for him to readjust to the American culture. “At first I experienced culture shock because I was overseas for nearly five years,” Pierce said. “It was hard in Japan because the portions were smaller, and in Spain the food is delicious and I miss that the most.” Pierce also talked about how it was easy for him to adapt to the new culture, by making new friends and being open minded. “Once I got more adapted to the environment I became more social and made new friends.” Pierce said. Having reached the three year mark of his time here in the U.S., the time for Pierce to move is approaching. “We are not sure where we are going to move, but we are pretty sure we will be moving in the summer.” Pierce said.

Traveling with the troops Members of military families share their enlightening experiences abroad

Pierce at the lantern festival in Nagasaki.

Pierce as an infant, with his father in uniform, and his grandparents.

“It has been amazing with good experiences. I’m from California originally, so I did training in San Francisco then went to Texas. Then I went to Germany and then was stationed in Vietnam. From there I came back to the U.S. to Oklahoma, but then back to Germany. Then I went to Greece and was soon sent to Korea. From there I was stationed to the 82nd Airborned division in Colorado. After that I went to university in Spain and soon started working with the embassay of Spain. Then I was sent to Panama. I was invited to be a professor in Peru and then moved to Norfolk, Virginia. I went to Turkey and then went to Mianmu to get my degree. ”

— Benjamin Carlos Spanish teacher

“My favorite place was by far Italy. I lived there for three years and I was able to see so many things that I wouldn’t have normally seen if I lived in the states. I met life long friends and got to experience a new culture as well”

— Brianna Carcamo sophomore “It’s very similar [military] to Annandale. You learn about people’s differences and what people are like in different places in the world.”

— Brandon Atkins senior

—PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY RACHEL WILSON

Adapting to the American life The view from the Tokyo Tower in Japan.

­—­Photos courtesy of Aaron Pierce

Comparing Western lifestyle to that in Ethiopa By Fasika Tadesse Special to The A-Blast

On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR code” to read the American story of Jameelah Alfahad

Our world has a lot of beautiful countries; Ethiopia and the U.S. are two examples. Everybody likes to move from place to place. Many people want to go to Egypt to visit the pyramids. When I came to the U.S., it was difficult, but it was also amazing to see all the different landmarks. It was scary for me because I had never seen this country before. It was also my first time living with people from other countries. Ethiopia and the U.S. are very different because of culture, language and weather. First off, Ethiopia has a different culture from U.S. Ethiopia has different food, clothes and holidays. The cultural food is so delicious. When you eat Ethiopian food, you want to eat it every day. The foods have different names like kitfo, doro, kocho, and injera. They all use lots of spices, vegetables, chicken, false banana tree, and tef grain. It takes a lot of power and knowledge to make Ethiopian food. In the U.S. , there is not a lot of cultural food. Instead, the U.S. has food like burgers and pizza, mainly fast foods. That’s the difference between the food in Ethiopia and the U.S. In Ethiopia, we wear cultural clothes too, but not

every day; mostly for weddings and ceremonies. However, some people wear traditional clothing every day because people wear what they want to wear. We wear habesha dresses or suits that look white and have some designs on the dress. In the U.S., people don’t wear cultural clothes, but they wear a lot of different clothes. They are not traditional. Ethiopia has a lot of cultural holidays like Easter, Christmas, Eid and others. The U.S. also has cultural holidays too, like Christmas and Halloween. Ethiopia has more than 81 languages. They speak different languages in Ethiopia then in the U.S. In Ethiopia, we speak a common language Amharic, but there are more than 81 languages including Tigirga, Guragiga, Oromiga, and Arabic. In U.S. the common language is English. That is the difference between the two countries. Most people speak more than three or four languages. I speak three languages Amharic, Guragiga , and English. When I was in my country, I spoke Amharic and Guragiga well, but now I am able to speak English well, too. Finally, the weather in Ethiopia and the U.S. is different. There is a lot of snow in the U.S. The warm weather only comes for a little bit of the time, and there is also a lot of storms and hurricanes. It’s so hard to move and change from one place to another place. It is also very difficult to adapt to a new place, but I think I am doing well in adapting.


PHOTO

March 6, 2013

Wandering Waldo

13 The Wonderful Waldo —The character “Wally” was first illustrated by Martin Hanford in 1986 in the United Kingdom.

Waldo (junior Hannah Coulter) is roaming around Pentagon City Mall in Arlington. Help us figure out what store she is visiting. Check your answers online using the QR code at the bottom right hand corner of the page.

—The first “Where’s Waldo?” book was published in 1987. —The collection was known as “Where’s Wally?” in the United Kingdom and “Where’s Waldo?” in the U.S. —Waldo became an icon featured in various television series, video games and comic strips.

If you were Waldo, where would you go?

PRIYA ADHIKARY

“I would go to Venice if it weren’t so polluted. I wish it were more magical like it is in story books.”

Best known for their preppy couture and their well fitting jeans, this brand name is very popular among students.

— Jennifer Kange freshman

“I would hide on a speck of dust like in ‘Horton Hears a Who.’” —Leif Jomuad freshman

CHLOE LOVING

PRIYA ADHIKARY

“I would go to the UK and stalk One Direction. By stalk, I mean admire them from afar.”

This mall has a Metro station, where the red and blue lines are connected.

— Sumaiya Emran sophomore

Currently celebrating its 25th anniversary, this business has been offering scrumptious pretzels to customers in 46 states and over 25 countries. Its products can most commonly be found in malls.

“I would go to the bathroom because no one would disturb me there.” —David Ngoma sophomore

This sweet candy store provides a variety of yummy treats from chocolate bark to oversized jelly beans. With only $2.99 for a pound of confections, it is easy for customers to get carried away.

Known for its affordable yet chic clothing, this California born store sells merchandise for any style.

— Yanwei Ly junior

CHLOE LOVING

CHLOE LOVING

PRIYA ADHIKARY

“I would want to go to Australia because I want to see the ocean and Sydney.”

Recognized for its signature hoodies and comfortable exercise pants, this store sells fragrances and bags as well.

“I would hide in Mr. Commons’ hair.”

Where Is Waldo?

—Oscar Sahonero senior

CHLOE LOVING

CHLOE LOVING

—Compiled by Sarah Metzel

In this retail make up store, customers can sample various types of beauty products and can even receive a free makeover from a trained beautician.

Find where Waldo is in the picture and check your answer on the side rail to the right.

On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to find out what store she is in.


Advice Column

By Olivia Lafferty Dear Livi, My parents are always yelling at me for spending too much time on my phone and computer. I admit that technology is a big part of my life, however I do not see it as a problem. The majority of the time I spend using my computer and phone is for school purposes. My mom always talks about how when she was a kid, she got her work done without a computer. She doesn’t understand how times have changed. Sometimes she even takes my electronics away for no reason and it really irritates me. I need her to hear me out but she always thinks I am talking back. Help me, Technically tormented Dear technically tormented, Sometimes it is hard for parents to understand that the world we live in today is centered on technology. Times have evolved. You should try showing your parents that you’re not absorbent in your phone and technology. Stay involved in lots of extracurricular activities, spend quality time with your parents, and make sure to keep your grades up. This way they will have no reason to worry. Another thing to remember is to avoid utilizing your phone in family situations such as at the dinner table. If your parents don’t see you using your electronics frequently, then they will assume that you have taken proper responsibility and limited yourself. Love, Livi

Have a problem? E-mail Livi at: livi.listens@gmail.com

Top five Spring fashion “must-haves”

1.

2.

3.

4.

Buttern London Fiver Nail Lacquer: $15.00

Pink Original Rayband Wayfarer: $155.00

Floral Printed Leggings from Forever 21: $12.80

Mens broken-in Khaki Shorts from Old Navy: $19.94

Technology tears us apart Has addiction to cell phones made keeping close relationships a thing of the past? BY GABY CAMILLI AND MEGAN FLYNN Lifestyles Editors The whole premise behind texting and social media is to keep people connected, but is this actually the truth? As the use of technology for communication increases, face to face time and traditional relationships have become a thing of the past. When people text, they are able to edit themselves and chose their words very wisely. Yes, this may save you from saying offensive things, but in the end the person who you are communicating with isn’t getting the real you. It’s also very easy to embellish and lie over text in hopes of impressing the person who you’re talking to, making it harder for people to get to know you for who you really are. “It has changed how relationships develop in recent years,” junior Hayat Yusuf said. “It makes it hard for people to build an actual relationship. Also, like the MTV show Catfish, people can make up fake identities and information about themselves.” Instead of settling problems in person, people result to fighting over text. But in cyber fights, people have a screen to hide behind and will say much more hurtful things than if the fight was in person. This leads to bad breakups and broken friendships. Broken friendships are not only caused by online fights, but also by a lack of communication when actually hanging out in person. Almost any high schooler can think back to a time when they’ve been at a dinner or something with their friends and have noticed that every single person is on their phones. “I think texting negatively impacts relationships and friendships; whenever my friends and I are together we’re always on our phones and rarely actually talk,” freshman Jacob Roop said. Since we are a generation addicted to technology, we often forget how others can perceive excessive texting while on a date as rude. “I believe that neither person should be on their phone during a date since they are in fact there to socialize with each other,” senior Gunnar Thompson said. “The only time phone use is appropriate during a date is maybe for an ice breaker.”

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY OIVIA LAFFERTY

Livi Listens

March 6, 2013

Juniors Megan Dinh and Charlie Montano show the difficulties texting presents to modern day teenage relationships

Texting and technology do however have their benefits when it comes to relationships. It’s much easier to make plans and stay in touch through instant messaging. Also, social media allows you to meet new people a lot easier and broaden your friend groups. “It can have a positive effect for people with long distance relationships since they don’t get to see each other as often as they like they can Skype or FaceTime,” senior Rabeeah Raza said. As technology advances we continually seem to forget the importance and preciousness of face to face time and what it actually feels like to have a real, close relationship. “There are times that technology makes communication easier when there’s distance but you run the risk of communication being less personal that it becomes a substitute for person to person interaction,” Spanish teacher Maureen Hunt said. Personal relationships have also changed through social media sites, such as Facebook and Twitter, taking society by storm. People now equate maintaining relationships as liking old friend’s statuses and profile

pictures, without actually having human contact. Often times people will comment on an old friend’s picture saying, ‘I miss you, we have to catch up soon!’ but never actually make the effort to see each other in person. “Facebook is a way for people to contact each other without facing the consequences of meeting in person,” senior Ulugbek Israilov said. “Also for existing friendships, people use Facebook instead of meeting up to avoid awkward situations. Over the Internet, one has time to plan out their responses but in real life people are expected to respond automatically.” English teacher Joy Korones tells a story about how she saved all of the letters her current husband wrote to her while they were dating, and comments that the youth of today will not have written letters and things to save and reminisce with. “Emails and texts are so casual, I think there’s something nice about letters,” Korones said. At the end of the day sending a smiley face emoticon and liking a photo does not equate to a real hug and face to face time with friends. Some things in life are too precious to experience behind a screen.

Could you live without your phone? One student shares her high school experience without a cell phone BY OLIVIA FRANJIE Special to the A-blast It is extremely crazy to think that a senior in high school has never had a cell phone. Well, it is true. My family made it a rule a long time ago that we are not allowed to get a phone until we graduate. To most of you, this might sound mind boggling but to me, it’s really not a big deal. I used to argue with my parents and try really hard to get them to change their mind but if you knew my parents, you’d know that they stick to their word.After a while, I just gave up and accepted the fact that I was not going to get a cell phone any time soon. Upon not having a cell phone, I have noticed many things. The first thing is that with the entire social network advancing, it’s still not that hard to get in contact with me. Instead of my friends calling my nonexistent cell phone, they would just call my house phone or just shoot me a message on Twitter or Facebook. Not having a cell phone hasn’t stopped me from maintaining communication and friendships outside of school. When I go out with my friends or we are just chilling at someone’s house, everyone is always on their iPhones. It throws me off how we would make plans to hang out but most of the time is spent scrolling down Twitter feed and texting other people. What is the point of hanging out if we aren’t even going to pay attention to each other? There isn’t that much human interaction anymore.

Students share what they would be willing to go one month without to hold on to their cell phones 20% of kids said that they would go without their favorite food

14% of kids said that they would go without music

49% of kids said that they would go without video games

53% of kids said that they would go without makeup 9% of kids said that they would go without a car 25% of kids said that they would go without playing sports

12% of kids said that they would go without sleeping in

24% of kids said that they would go without netflix/ watching T.V.

14% of kids said that they would go without social networking 4%

of kids said that they would go without hanging out with friends

400 surveys were distributed, 364 were returned and counted on Feb. 28th during B Lunch.

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LIFESTYLES

How to have a successful thrift shopping experience 5.

SM Women’s Sli Wedge Sandal from DSW:$59.95

Seniors shop for Prom On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to read a story a Facebook Prom dress sharing group for seniors.

In this tough economy paying $80 for a pair of jeans is not something many people can afford. Shopping at thrift stores is becoming more popular especially among high school and college students. When shopping at thrift stores you can find fashionable shirts and pants for less than half of what you would normally pay. It’s also a great way to make your style more unique and fit to your personality for a lesser price. Good items to look for at thrift stores include high waisted jeans that you can cut and personalize into shorts, oversized sweaters, and cute vintage shoes to help make your

wardrobe more one of a kind. Other advantages of shopping at Thrift stores: 1. You can find unique things that can’t be found in regular stores 2. If you look hard enough you can find name brand items that cost less than $10 3. No one else in school will have the exact shirt or pair of jeans as you. 4. Not only can you find clothes you can also find jewelry, hats, shoes, books, cd’s, movies, records, and purses. The next time you go shopping for clothes consider looking at a local thrift store near you. It’s the easiest way to save money and stay fashionable. Places to thrift near Annandale: Unique thrift Store 2956 Gallows Road, Falls Church On Monday’s everything is 25% off. Goodwill This outfit has a $2.99 Goodwill cardigan, 7031 Columbia Pike, Annandale $1.99 Salvation Army shirt and $5.99 shoes On Tuesday’s everything is 25% off. from Unique. The total cost is $11. Salvation Army 6528 Little River Tpke, Lincolnia On Wednesday’s everything is 50% off.

This outfit has $3.99 Unique shorts, a $1.99 goodwill shirt and $6.99 Salvation Army shoes. The total cost is $13.

–Photos courtesy of Diana Quezada


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Sports X-tra

March 6, 2013

Playing for Team USA

March Madness by the numbers

Junior Jocelyn Hotter is traveling to the Dominican Republic to play softball and do volunteer work this summer

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By Ayah Oweis Sports X-tra Editor Q. How did you get this opportunity? A. I got this opportunity because I was asked to go by one of the AHS softball coaches who was recruiting players. I was also asked by one of the South County High School coaches to go to Italy for the same program.

19th

Q. How did your family and coaches react to you being recruited? A. My family was really happy for me because I get to go to a new country to play softball. My coaches were also extremely proud of me because of the opportunity I have gotten, which is to meet softball olympian, Dot Richardson.

Q. How long have you been playing softball? Why have you stuck with it through all these years? A. I have been playing softball since I was about 7. I started playing when my dad started coaching my older sister’s team. I have stuck with softball because I love playing it and I have had a great relationship with my travel team, the Stingrays, and my coaches. They have become like a second family for me. Q. How do you think the upcoming softball season is going to go? A. We are going to be in a tough district this year because South County High School and Lake Braddock High School have really good softball teams. I am still very excited to see how the new team, along with the new freshmen and sophomore players, are going to work.

Hotter runs from base to base during a tournament this past summer with her travel team, the Stingrays. She has been playing softball since she was 7.

courtesy of jocelyn hotter

Q. What are you looking forward to most? A. I am very excited about the new experiences I am going to have while meeting and playing against new people. I am also excited to go sight seeing in the Dominican Republic. I am looking forward to helping people in the Dominican Repbulic by doing volunteer work as well.

75 40 8.4 3.5

Teachers and bracketology

AHS staff get involved in the insanity of March Madness By Erin Johnson Staff Writer

It’s almost time for the craziest sports month of the year: It’s March Madness time. On Tuesday, March 19, 72 of the nations top college basketball teams, both boys and girls: will face off in their 1st round games of the NCAA tournament. Teams from all over the nation including the South, East, Midwest, and West regions will be battling each other for the most honorable title in the nation: NCAA Champions. For the past few years, teachers have been getting into the madness by making their own brackets and betting on who will win. Each teacher has their own bracket and personalize their bracket based on who they believe will win. The teacher who is closest to the actual outcome wins the prize money. “I like the competition and it makes me enjoy watching the tournament more,” gym teacher Amy Lipicky said. Following the first round games the 72 teams playing in the beginning drops down to only 32 teams, eliminating 40 teams whose dreams of being the NCAA Champions unfortunately fall short. For most fans participating in the NCAA bracket, the first round isn’t much of a big deal because there are more opportunities to get the outcome of the rest of the games right. This is also true for the teachers; the tension does not start building until the Sweet Sixteen. For some teachers, it is all about winning the prize money. “I’d like to finish in the top five of all the teachers, or win money” Lipicky said. In the following round of games, the number of teams now drops from 32 to 16. These set of games are now called the Sweet Sixteen; this is

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March Madness Fun Facts 1. The championship is divided into four regions; each region has at least 16 teams. 2. Teams are prohibited from playing tournament gsmes on home courts.

2 1939

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3. Since the tournament is singleeliminations, there is a greater chance of a “Cinderella team” advancing. 4. Last year, the Virginia Commonwealth University Rams made it to the Final Four for the first time. They played against the Butler University Bulldogs. 5. It is technically against school policy for teachers to gamble on school grounds. -Compiled from multiple online sources where the games start to really get interesting as the final 16 teams in the tournament continue to battle against each other for the National Championship. As the trend continues the number of teams drop from 16 to 8, again cutting the number of teams in half through single elimination games. Now these final eight teams are now apart of the Elite 8. “I’ve seen a lot of teams play and you always have to keep an eye on Duke and the ACC,” health teacher Gabriel Romano said. “My picks are either Kansas or Florida [for the championship]. I like Florida a lot also.” Some fans’ money may be riding on how well their bracket are set up; some are just doing

it for the fun of it to see how good they are at predicting the outcomes of all the games. The teams now go from eight to four. The last four teams in the tournament are called the Final Four. Finally, following the devastating loss of two teams in the Final Four, there are now only two teams left. These two teams will then compete in the Championship game to see who the 2013 NCAA National Championship will be. The boy’s championship game will be held in Atlanta, Georgia this year while the girl’s championship game will be held in New Orleans, Louisiana. As the past has proved, anything is possible.

Nolan Gilbert commits to UMW Senior plans on going to University of Mary Washington to play baseball

Gilbert pitches at a previous game with his travel team, the Stars.

courtesy of nolan gilbert

By Ayah Oweis Sports X-Tra Editor Nolan Gilbert was recruited to Davidson College, Piedmont College, Catholic University, Millersville University and Brevard College, but in the end, he chose the University of Mary Washington. Gilbert chose the University of Mary Washington because it was the best opportunity to succeed. “The new coaches are dedicated and the baseball program is growing,” Gilbert said. “I also have a good chance of getting a lot of playing time my freshman year.” He was pleasantly surprised to see that the school was bigger than expected and surrounded by a developed area and multiple restaurants. “My favorite part is that it

is on Rappahannock River so I can fish whenever,” Gilbert said. Gilbert’s family and friends were all extremely proud and excited for the opportunity; his mother even posted the good news on Facebook. While some high school athletes are nervous to start playing college sports, Gilbert is used to the pressure of baseball due to the fact that he has been playing it since he was four years old. “I love baseball because it is a challenging sport,” Gilbert said. “My dad and I would always play catch when I was a little kid.” Not only are his coaches proud of his accomplishment, they are also relieved because he will finally be able to stop thinking about college and focus on the upcoming spring baseball season.

Gilbert is looking forward to playing his last season at AHS and surprising other schools. Many other schools underestimate AHS; Gilbert is looking forward to changing those views this season. “We are usually known to be one of the lower seeds in the district,” Gilbert said. “I seriously think it will be different this year; we are going to surprise a lot of people.” Gilbert’s goal of hopefully winning a National Championship in college is pretty high but fellow teammates are sure he’ll be able to do it. “I am happy for Nolan,” teammate senior David Paik said. “He worked really hard to go play for a college so he definitely deserves this opportunity.” While Gilbert is extremely excited to start playing college baseball and going to a great college, Gilbert is also excited to spend his weekends fishing.

The number of college teams that play in March Madness

The first day of March Madness 2013 The number of years being celebrated for the March Madness Championship Million brackets will be filled out by fans

Million hours fans will spend watching games

Billion dollars will be bet on March Madness bracket pools

The number of games being played in the tournament

The number of outcomes per game

The year the March Madness tournament began

The day in April that the March Madness Championship game will be held

Would you ever pay to play on a higher level sports team? Why or why not? “I think it is worth the money, but only if you like the team enough to pay for it.” —Shelby Runolfson freshman “Yes. I dance on a team and pay for it and it is definitely worth it.” —Kelcie Chandler junior “Yes, because it helps you get better at the sport you play.” —Kendall Sapp junior

“Yes, because you get to enjoy the sport you play; nothing comes for free.” —Ulugbek Israilov senior

Wrestling in danger of being cut in 2020 Olypmics On your smartphone, scan this code above using the application “QR Code” to view a story about wrestling being cut from the upcoming Olympics.


16

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March 6, 2013


Sports

March 6, 2013

Lax’s fresh faces

Coach’s Corner Lacrosse: Bill Maglisceau

After tryouts, the varsity team finds itself with six girls new to the program The first time nerves of a tryout can either make or break an athlete, but typically those tryouts result in a player earning a spot on the junior varsity level. However, the tryouts for girls lacrosse ended with six players new to the AHS program finding themselves placed on the varsity team. While it may be expected that freshman who have played before high school will become varsity players, and three freshmen found this to be true this season, what is less conventional is when upperclassmen tryout without experience and earn that same spot. “The tryout process was really nerve racking, but I had worked really hard before tryouts and gone to green days, so I felt familiar with the people and drills,” junior Lizzie Manthos said. Freshmen Sara Deible, Janan Gokturk and Ashley Britton, with juniors Melanie Bennett and Manthos, along with senior Shannon Casey earned a spot on the varsity team. While their grades may vary, they all share the commonality of this being their first season playing AHS lacrosse. “The tryout process was a little stressful since I didn’t really know what was going on, but I thought

playing was really fun,” Casey said. “Playing with more experienced girls really helped me learn the game a lot faster and they always give me tips on what to do on the field.” Casey is not stranger to making varsity during her first tryouts as she had previously made varsity softball as a freshmen, but decided not to continue after her sophomore year. Manthos and Bennett both played soccer during their freshmen and sophomore years on the junior varsity level. “Deciding not to play soccer was definitely a really difficult choice. I played most of my life so it was hard to give up, but I was never an amazing player,” Manthos said. “So when I started to pick up lacrosse really fast, I felt like I could do better there.” Manthos was unsure of whether or not trying out for lacrosse was what she really wanted to do, but knew that if she wanted to be prepared, then she would need to do some work during the off season. Both Bennett and Manthos both played with many AHS players on Triple Edge, an indoor league, during the winter and also went to the green days that took place during the three weeks prior to the season. “I was just playing around with a couple of the girls who played

Q: How do you expect the team to perform this year? A: “I expect the team to compete for ground balls, to be tough on defense and our three senior attackmen to lead the offense.”

Betsy Kruse

By Jarod Golub Sports Editor

Junior Lizzie Manthos made varsity lacrosse despite this being her first season playing.

[lacrosse] and thought it was really fun,” Manthos said. “After awhile I thought it would be fun to try something new so I joined the winter league and loved it.” Despite Manthos not playing soccer at AHS, she still plays for a club team outside of school. “It doesn’t feel like I really gave [soccer] up,” Manthos said. Opening up to a new sport while having to compete with more experienced players could potentially be daunting, but with a large group of new players the pressure did not seem to faze Manthos, Bennett nor Casey. “I’m not really intimidated playing with the more experienced players, it motivates me to practice harder

to keep up with them. I also learn a lot from them since they have a better understanding of the game and are happy to help,” Manthos said. “But, playing with the other newcomers definitely made it less scary knowing that I wasn’t the one who was trying out for the first time.” “Having so many other new girls at tryouts helped because we were all able to learn together,” Casey said. The divide between old and young and new and returning players does not seem to affect the team. “I love everyone on the team,” Deible said. “They’re so nice and supportive. I’m looking forward to improving as a team.”

Varsity baseball comes off first two scrimmages with a 1-0-1 record

Jarod Golub

By Betsy Kruse Sports Editor

Freshman Colin Corey practices his hitting off of a tee.

During the first game every batter got on base at least once, whether it was a walk or a hit. “We came up with a plan and we executed that plan while applying the things we work on in practice,” junior Tyler Pacak said. Along with the hitting in their scrimmages, the teams pitchers also did well. Collectively their strike percentage was about 65 percent. “I think we performed really well. We had solid pitching from Stephen Schwartz and Joey Rainey,”senior Michael Hennessy said. Despite this great start to the season the team feels as if there is still room to improve on this success. “We looked good in these scrimmages, but we can definitely look better,” senior Nolan Gilbert said. “We’re going to practice hard, put in the time and effort, and we’re going to succeed.” “As a team, we definitely have a lot of work to do before we get into the season and take on the Patriot District, and hopefully into the region,” Rainey said. The team’s next games take place on March 13 and March 21.

By Betsy Kruse Sports Editor Starting off the season with a win during their first scrimmage, made possible by a last second goal, the boys soccer team has high hopes for the upcoming games. The boys defeated Patriot HS 2-1 with a goal by senior Cesar Flores in the last ten seconds after junior Luis Perez crossed the ball to him. “During the last five minutes of the game, I had a feeling we could win it and the ball just came to me and I was able to score,” Flores said. The first half of the game was scoreless, with the Atoms controlling the ball for majority of the half. “The first half of we played pretty strong and we had possession,” senior David Belay said.

Q: What is going to be the key to success this year? A: “The guys need to come everyday and get excited about our chances in the district because the district is wide open and anyone can be champion.”

March 21 vs. West Springfield March 25-28 Spring Break Tournament April 3 @ West Potomac April 5 vs. Woodson April 9 @ Lee April 12 @ T.C. Williams April 15 vs. Lake Braddock April 17 @ South County April 19 @ West Springfield April 23 vs. West Potomac April 26 @ Woodson April 30 vs. Lee May 3 vs. T.C. Williams May 7 @ Lake Braddock May 9 vs. South County

Girls varsity lacrosse schedule March 16 Atomic Blast Tournament Stephanie Allshouse

Last second goal gives team an optimistic feeling towards season

Q: Are you doing anything different to prepare this year? A: “We’re getting more Ossian turf field time this year, which helps us to practice full field. We’re also focusing on stick skill improvement a lot more. There’s going to be more individual attention.”

March 13 @ Stuart

Boys soccer earns win Ten minutes into the second half, junior Erick Callao scored the Atoms’ first goal, but Patriot HS quickly retaliated and had the game tied within five minutes. While the game from that point was an even match, with possession switching back and forth, the Atoms offense was able to get through with Flores’ goal. “I think the scrimmage went well for our first time playing,” junior Kyle Peich said. “We didn’t have much practice playing together before the game, so considering that I thought it went well.” Despite the win, the Atoms are already focusing on the rest of the season and how they can improve. “We played too much in the middle of the field, so we should work on spreading out more,” Peich said. However, Peich is optimistic about the season. “Our veterans on the team are our strength,” Peich said. “We had a lot of people come back this season, so we should be better this year.”

Q: What are your goals for the season? A: “Our goals for the season are to get more ground balls than our opponent in each game and to get better in practice everyday.”

Varsity baseball schedule

Strong start with season opener The varsity baseball team has a large percentage of players with little to no varsity experience. Despite some of the players inexperience, they defeated Mount Vernon HS 10-3 and tied with Fairfax HS 3-3. “Our pitching dominated in both games,” head baseball coach Ron Abrigo said. “We hit well too, and I’d say we won both games.” Throughout the game the team played well and stayed focused. The second game was no different than the first aside from the players that were on the field. “In the second game we had a freshman on the mound that gave up two runs, an error was made towards the end, but despite this, I thought we were the better team there,” Abrigo said.

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Junior Michelle Burnett dribbles the ball down the field while looking for a passing option.

Girls soccer faces loss Opening scrimmage against Patriot HS results in a 0-2 score By Melanie Bennett Staff Writer The varsity girls soccer team’s first scrimmage against Patriot HS ended with a 0-2 loss. This, however, was the girls first time playing together full field after only a week of practicing. “I think we did alright considering the fact that it was our first full field scrimmage as a team,” senior Connie Tran said. “We definitely need to work on communication and movement off the ball.” With 11 returning varsity players, the team’s level of experience bodes well for the future.   “Even though we lost, I feel if we work hard this season, we can improve enough to have a great record,” junior Vivian Choe said. “We

could have definitely done better, but since it is so early in the season and we had no real time to play together, we weren’t used to each other which affected our playing,” said Choe. The team only had a few days of practicing together before the scrimmage after cuts were made. “I thought tryouts this year were tough but rewarding,” junior Erika Alwes said. “There were some surprises, but for the most part you knew where you stood when it came to what team you were going to make based on your effort.” The team’s next game will be held tonight against Herndon HS. “I am excited for the next game because I think we have a lot of individual talent on the team,” Tran said. “Once we start to work together, I believe we’ll go far in the district and possibly regionals.”  “I am very happy with the teams and I have a bright out look on the season. I think we will do really well,” Alwes said.

April 4 vs. West Springfield April 6 Atomic Blast Tournament April 10 vs. West Potomac April 12 @ Lake Braddock April 16 vs. South County April 18 vs. Lee April 22 @ Woodson April 29 @ T.C. Williams

Boys tennis season preview On your smart phone, scan the code above using the application “QR Code” to view a story on a tennis tryouts.


18 Upcoming movies

ENTERTAINMENT Jennifer Lawrence on the rise

March 6, 2013

Oscar winning actress is on the road to success and creating a promising career BY EMILY BLANK & THIEN MAI Entertainment Editor & Copy Editor

OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN: Disgraced former Presidential guard Mike Banning finds himself trapped inside the White House in the wake of a terrorist attack; using his inside knowledge, Banning works with national security to rescue the President from his kidnappers. Fri. March 22

THE CROODS: This is a prehistoric comedy adventure that follows the world’s first family as they embark on a journey of a lifetime when the cave that has always shielded them from danger is destroyed. Traveling across a spectacular landscape, the Croods discover an incredible new world filled with fantastic creatures. Fri. March 22

ADMISSION: A Princeton admissions officer who is up for a major promotion takes a professional risk after she meets a college-bound alternative school kid who just might be the son she gave up years ago in a secret adoption. Fri. March 22

It takes someone with a lot of guts, brains, and beauty to play Mystique in X-Men, Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games, and a woman struggling with bipolar disorder in a little film called Silver Linings Playbook, which just happened to earn the leading lady the Oscar for Best Actress on Feb. 24. With versatility that ranges from major blockbusters to indie films, it’s hard to believe this Kentucky native is only 22 and started acting professionally after her senior year of high school. This is why actress Jennifer Lawrence is having the incredible year that she is: not only does she stand out as an incredibly talented actress, but also as a down to earth girl who is blessed with the ability to live her dream. She is humble and her career in the movie industry is only just beginning. Lawrence scored her first big break in Hollywood when she starred in Winter’s Bone, which earned Lawrence her first Oscar nomination. This success would continue with X-Men: First Class the popular movie in the X-Men series; but that wasn’t the end of it. One of the biggest movies to

debut in 2012 was The Hunger Games, adapted from the popular book series. Lawrence starred as the main character and immediately became one of Hollywoods biggest stars. It didn’t stop there. Lawrence was then casted to act in Silver Linings Playbook, where she got the opportunity to act alongside one of Hollywood’s biggest stars, Bradley Cooper. The movie was not only a success at the box office, but Lawrence’s stellar performance won her an Best Actress at the 85th Academy Awards.

Lawrence has gone from a normal teenage girl to one of the biggest actresses in the movie industry today. This is just the beginning for her. She is said to be in under wraps for a number of movies she is due to film in the next few months. Right after her appearance at the Oscars, she boarded a flight back to Hawaii to continue filming Catching Fire, the sequel to The Hunger Games. Lawrence has also signed on for another film directed by David O. Russell that will begin filming following the completion of Catching Fire.

Magic and mortals clash to thrill critics of places and opportunities past Gatlin borders. When Ethan begins receiving visions of a girl whose face is covered by long, silken black hair every night, he becomes haunted with the image of the girl that he is unable to forget. BY GWEN LEVEY This all becomes more apparent once 15-yearCo-editor in Chief old Lena Duchannes moves to Gatlin to live with There is always something fascinating about a her uncle, who is a cranky, mysterious man who is story that can take the imagination of a magical hardly ever seen by the ignorant community. Due to her family’s well-known indifference, world and merge it with historical facts Lena quickly becomes the target of that relate to our seemingly mediocre one. In the recent film, Beautiful Creatures, Movie Review: public persecution as she is deemed as these elements are beautifully produced Beautiful Creatures a witch under the powers of the devil. Ethan, however, recognizes the girl as to tell the story of two teenagers who the one from his dreams and befriends desperately want to be together despite Lena with an open, caring heart. large extenuating circumstances. As someone who has never read the Based on the best-selling book series by novels, seeing the movie with fresh eyes Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl, Beautiful immune to preconceived bias helped me Creatures tells the story of a down to earth to easily critique the movie as a whole. southern boy, Ethan Wate, living in the small fictional town of Gatlin, South Carolina. Growing With this in mind, I have to say that the whole up in the conformative, highly religious, post-Civil production was incredibly moving and left me as War community inspires Ethan to develop dreams a fan of the ingenious storyline. Newcomers Alden Ehrenreich and Alice Englert

Beautiful Creatures satisfies fans of the original novel

B+

play Ethan and Lena in the film adaptation. Ehrenreich and Englert easily play to audience’s heartstrings as Ethan and Lena battle to be together despite suppression from her magical family because of his mortality, as well as from the ignorant community around them. Their chemistry on screen is incredibly evident and leaves audiences routing for their ability to be together, especially as the plot takes twists and turns that force to tear them apart.

Celebri-

SUDOKU

Get inside your favorite celebrities’ heads

JURASSIC PARK 3D: A wealthy man has created an island amusement park filled with dinosaurs cloned from fossilized DNA. When he invites experts to endorse it, nature takes over. This is the release of 1993’s Jurassic Park as a remastered and IMAX 3D film. Fri. April 5

THE EVIL DEAD: Five friends head to a remote cabin, where the discovery of a Book of the Dead leads them to unwittingly summon up demons living in the nearby woods. The evil presence possesses them until only one is left to fight for survival. Fri. April 5

Crysis 3 Game Review On your smartphone, scan this code using the application “QR Code” to read a game review of Crysis 3.

WEBSUDOKU.COM

GI JOE: RETALIATION: The G.I. Joes are not only fighting their mortal enemy Cobra; they are forced to contend with threats from within the government that jeopardize their very existence. Thurs. March 28

“#TheMostAnnoyingThings Going to bed with popsicle toes, losing a sneeze and getting deodorant marks on dark clothes.” —Victoria Justice @VictoriaJustice

“Man I can’t believe my life is real. Honestly laughing out loud I’m so happy right now. Thank you guys so much!”

“I just released something I did’t even realize I was still holding on to. It feel good to let go....”

“The last leg of an unbelievable journey. Thanks to the amazing cast, crew and fans that got us here. #Oscars”

—Mike Posner @MikePosner

—Jordin Sparks @JordinSparks

—Ben Affleck @BenAffleck


A Blast

the

March. 6, 2013

Entertainment

Look out for these artists in 2013 Bands and musicians that will be making a name for themselves this year, from hip hop to pop rock Krewella

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Upcoming Concerts

Moosh & Twist

Song suggestion: “Alive”

Song suggestion: “City Kids”

The popular trio from the (Electric Dance Music) EDM genre originated from Chicago, Illinois. The group has multiple free download’s available on SoundCloud and Facebook as well as their latest EP Play Hard. Other popular hit songs are “Strobelights,” “Killin It,” and “Life of the Party.” If you are interested in EDM, such as Zeds Dead and Dirtyphonics, you’ll like Krewella.

The hip-hop duo from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania will soon be on the top of the charts in the hip-hop industry. Starting their career by using YouTube to upload their music videos. The pair uses Rex Films for their videos, the same as popular rapper Mac Miller. Other popular hit songs are “Live It Up,” and “Take Me Back.”

Karmin

AARON CARTER Sun., Mar. 10 Jammin Java

Tonight Alive

Song suggestion: “Hello”

Song suggestion: “Wasting Away”

The dynamic pop pair of Amy Heidemann and Nick Noonan have begun to hit the charts in the music industry. Starting off with covering pop hits and uploading them to YouTube. The pair has now been featured on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and Good Morning America. Heidemann was recently published on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine. If you like Ke$ha, Nicki Minaj or Cher Lloyd, you’ll enjoy Karmin. Other hit songs are “Brokenhearted” and “Crash Your Party.”

The five-piece pop-punk band from Sydney, Australia is rising to the top. The band played on the Vans Warped Tour this past summer as well as the Bamboozle Festival. The band has released three EP’s and one full length album . If you are interested in We Are The In Crowd, Paramore or Simple Plan, you will enjoy Tonight Alive. Other popular song is “Breaking and Entering.”

P!NK Thurs., Mar. 14 The Verizon Center

Aer

Walk The Moon

SPARKS THE RESCUE Wed., Mar. 13 Empire

Song suggestion: “Feel I Bring”

Song suggestion: “Tightrope”

Wayland, Massachusetts locals David Von Mering and Carter Schultz would be classified as making music in the reggae, indie-rock genre. The duo have released mixtapes and EP’s in the past year and are imerging on a North America Tour called “The Bright Side Tour,” in the near future. Other popular songs are “Wonderin’ Why,” “Like The Way” and “Floats My Boat.”

The indie rock band from Cincinnati, Ohio, Walk The Moon is gaining fans fast as they are about to perform in the Firefly Festival. The band has released three albums on RCA Records. Another popular song of theirs is “Anna Sun,” playing on the popular hit series The Vampire Diaries. Walk The Moon’s sound resembles that of Young the Giant, Grouplove or Imagine Dragons.

SECONDHAND SERENADE Mon., Mar. 18 Jammin Java

Steve Aderton: The dubstep producer Sophomore Steve Aderton, a dubstep producer who started out composing and mixing tracks in the confines of his basement, has hundreds of thousands of hits on YouTube. Several of his songs have been used in YouTube commercials, and he has even produced a song titled “Hide in the Dark” for singer/songwriter Amanda Lee. Most recently, Aderton has recently released his first full EP “Fancy Noise,” which is available for $4.95 on iTunes. The EP is a compilation of tracks that Aderton has been working on over the course of a year. He is currently building a record label with the help of his current distributor after having scored films, as well as the soundtrack for two video games. Q: What’s the most exciting part about releasing your first EP? A: The actual release of my EP wasn’t as exciting as was simply creating the music. The wonderful thing about music is that to some extent, most everything needs a form of further explanation or hyperbole to be understood, but with music

there’s an instant connection emotionally just by hearing it. To think I’m able to create something with that amount of power is exciting.

JOE BROOKS Mon., Mar. 25 Jammin Java

Q: Do you have any advice for anyone looking to produce music either for fun or professionally? A: I am absolutely a proponent of following passions. When it comes to music, it’s a learning curve. It takes time and can be frustrating whether you’re learning an instrument like piano or guitar, or producing on computers and software. To start off, it’s good to get in the mindset that you will improve, and really while there’s other reasons to make music, at least for me, the main purpose is because it’s something that makes me happy, and that’s a healthy mindset to be able to grow in both talent and identity. But always remember why you’re making the music in the first place. Money, views and attention among other things are driving factors for too many artists when really, the music itself is what’s most important.

THE WONDER YEARS Wed. Mar. 27 Empire

STEVE ADERTON : DUBSTEP PRODUCER

COLLEEN ADENAN

COURTESY OF MICHAEL SEGRECCI

Students interested in entertainment industry

Senior Paula Naanou is an avid singer/songwriter. She has performed in countless showcases,coffee houses and looks to pursue a recording career in music after high school. She has already been recognized by the Songwriter’s Association of Washington as an artist to look out for in the upcoming year. Q: Tell us a little bit about your plans for pursuing your career after high school. A: My dream is obviously to become a singer/songwriter. I plan on going to college and recording and performing on the side.After high school I’m expecting to be performing locally every once in a while. I’ll also definitely be focusing on writing more songs. Q: Who are your musical influences? A: Hmm this is a hard one. Artists that influence me range from Sara

Bareilles to Beyonce. I also love Jon McLaughlin, Adele, John Mayer, Joss Stone, John Legend, Katy Perry, The Beatles, The Civil Wars, I could literally go on forever! Q: If there was one venue where you could play, what would it be and why? A: As cliche as it may sound, I would love to perform at Madison Square Garden. It would be such an honor to sing in a venue in which many inspirations of mine have. Q: Do you have any advice for someone looking to pursue the career you are interested in? A: It seems like an impossible dream to pursue, but nothing is impossible. We can each be that one in a million that makes it, it just takes some dedication! However, there is also nothing more important than being yourself!

Junior Michael Sgrecci is the top french horn player in the school and is part of All-State Band. He hopes to aspire to be a professional French horn player and to play in either a professional orchestra (such as the National Symphony Orchestra), an opera orchestra (such as the Metropolitan Opera), in a pit orchestra for a show on Broadway or playing in recording studios for movie soundtracks. He is currently instructed by members of the National Symphony Orchestra.

Q: Do you have any advice for someone looking to pursue the career you are interested in? A: To pursue a career as a classical musician, you have to be extremely dedicated and willing to practice for two or more hours every day. If you don’t like to practice, you should probably choose a different career. Also, always love what you do and love the music that you create! If it is not in your heart, you are not going to put all that you possibly can into your music.

Q: How do you see your career progressing after high school? A: After high school, most classical musicians continue their education in college at music schools within larger universities or conservatories (schools that do not require you to take general education classes to complete your degree).

Q: Who were your musical influences ? A: My influences include my dad, who was a professional trumpet player for 30 years; my private teachers, who play in the National Symphony Orchestra; and many directors I have played with.

FLORIDA GEORGIA LINE Sat., Mar. 30 Rams Head Live!

MAROON 5 Wed., Apr. 3 The Verizon Center

GREEN DAY Thurs. Apr. 4 The Patriot Center

Safe Haven movie review Download the QR code app and scan the QR code on your smartphone to read a review of Safe Haven.


What is your favorite nearby restaurant?

The best dishes in the area Individual menu items take the spotlight as some of the area’s best eats FRENCH TOAST 1 Smith and Clarkson’s

“Smith and Clarkson’s because I love their breakfast food and I love how it’s local and not a chain.”

ANDREA MELENDEZ

Kara Hoisington— sophomore

“My favorite restaurant is McDonald’s.”

March 6, 2013

What it is: the french toast is a classic favorite with powdered sugar and butter to satisfy a delicious breakfast craving. Price: $5.66 Where to get it: 8015 Braddock Rd, Springfield, Va 22151

2

What it is: this classic Chinese dish is made with soy sauce, cashews and oyster sauce. It has a great crunch and flavor. Price: $6.25 Where to get it: 6960 Braddock Rd Annandale, VA 22003

CASHEW CHICKEN Szechuan Star

“It’s inexpensive and easy to go with friends on the weekend.”

“It’s very delicious and has a lot of flavor.”

ROWAN SHARTEL

20

WEEKEND

Jenny Nguyen— junior

The french toast is served with powdered sugar.

Nicole Montevilla— senior

The cashew chicken is dark and flavorful.

—Bernard Andoh sophomore

CHEESE PIZZA 3 Valentino’s Pizza “Hard Times Cafe because their chili is so spicy.”

ROWAN SHARTEL

Nick Ursini— senior

Clark Girardin— senior

The pizza slices are massive and flat.

What it is: this Korean cafe is especially talented at making baked goods. They have a huge variety of pastries and breads. Try the coffee bun, which has a unique taste. Price: $2-$5 each Where to get it: 7039 Little River Tpke

BAKED GOODS Shilla Bakery

“I like Outback for the steak. I’m a meat and potatoes man.” ROWAN SHARTEL

Phil Harris— tech. ed. teacher

Chicken is spiced and served with a choice of sides, such as salad and fries.

These baked goods include red bean walnut bread, a coffee bun and a chicken curry pastry.

Maddy Delarosa— senior

E-mail Ms. Roth as you hear from more colleges and universities!

ANDREA MELENDEZ

Turn in forms and money now for the All Night Grad Celebration.

Graduation countdown: 99 days

The cheeseburger is a good meal size.

8

What it is: strawberries, pineapple, mango and orange are blended together with sweetener to create this refreshing drink. Price: $4.79 Where to get it: 6552 Little River Tpke Alexandria, VA 22312

SUNRISE SUNSET Tropical Smoothie

“The burgers are good and so are the peanuts.”

Alex Ellison— senior

Jonthan York— history teacher

Abigail Palacios— senior

A steaming bowl of pho is a great way to warm up on a chilly day and to taste international cuisine.

What it is: Five Guys does not dissapoint with their take on the American classic. Two beef patties, cheese, a sesame bun and nearly unlimited toppings comprise this burger. Price: $5.99 Where to get it: 6546 Little River Tpke Alexandria, VA 22312

“It’s so moist and tasty. The key is the secret sauce.”

“I think this has an interesting taste.”

ANDREA MELENDEZ

2013 class bulletin

Pho Cong Ly

“The baked goods are erally sweet and fresh .”

––Compiled by Andrea Melendez and Rowan Shartel

7 CHEESEBURGER Five Guys

6

What it is: the classic Peruvian chicken is the star dish here, as it is one of the only things available. Try it for a great flavor. Price: $12.00 whole chicken Where to get it: 7320 Little River Tpke Annandale, VA 22003

What it is: this traditional Vietnamese noodle soup is served with beef broth, rice noodles, bean sprouts, lemon and basil, with beef pieces throughout. Price: $6.95 Where to get it: 6920-I Braddock Rd Annandale, VA 22003

PHO BO

ROWAN SHARTEL

5

Chicken Pollo

“I love this pizza because it has a chewy crust and is cheesy.”

“I like Mike’s American Grill because of the filet.”

—Jonathan Pratt senior

4

PERUVIAN CHICKEN

ANDREA MELENDEZ

What it is: forget delivery pizza. This is a traditional New York style, with fresh tomato sauce and a generous helping of mozzarella. Price: $11.95 small pizza Where to get it: 4813 Beauregard Street, Alexandria, VA 22312

The smoothie cups are large and insulated.

“It’s a healthy snack and it tastes good.”

Kaitlin Martindale— junior

Five things to do this weekend On your smartphone, scan the code using the application “QR code” to view an exclusive story about five things you can do this weekend.

NBC4HEALTHEXPO.COM

DCIFF-INDIE.ORG

WWW.KENNEDY-CENTER.ORG/NORDICCOOL

Head downtown for festivals and events

D.C INDEPENDENT FILM

NORDIC COOL 2013

NBC4 HEALTH AND FITNESS

The Washington, D.C. Independent Film Festival presents short films, animations and documentaries by independent filmmakers from the area, as well as some international filmmakers. Tickets are $7 for students to view a film, and the festival runs from Mar. 6-10 at the Navy Memorial Heritage Center and the E Street Cinema, depending on the film. This year, international films include those from India, Switzerland, the UK and Canada. Films can run anywhere from four minutes to two hours, depending on the category. Seminars and classes are also available for anyone interested more in filmmaking, behind-the-scenes information and other aspects of the films.

The Nordic Cool Festival is a huge celebration of Nordic life, but it is appealing for all kids of people. The Nordic region includes Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Greenland and several groups of islands. The festival includes films, food, dance performances, visual arts, literature, theater, music and more. It is currently taking place at the Kennedy Center and will run through Mar. 17. Prices depend on the event you will be viewing that day, but many are free. Events include performances by the Iceland Dance Company and a cuisine demonstration from Iceland and Finland. Check out this festival for a truly unique experience and an opportunity to check out a new culture.

The NBC4 Health and Fitness Expo is a huge event that includes over a hundred booths, tables and events in the Convention Center. The theme of health and fitness broadens to include a wide variety of topics. Booths include places to get your body mass index checked, a rock climbing wall, healthy snacks, information about dental health, zumba, asthma screenings and more. The event runs from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Mar. 16 and 17. Best of all, this is a free event to the public. If you have any interest in your own health or are just looking for an interesting way to spend the day, check this out. If you do go, plan for large crowds and consider using public transportation as parking will be difficult.

On your smartphone, scan the code using the application “QR code” to view more information about the D.C. Independent Film Festival.

On your smartphone, scan the code using the application “QR code” to view more information about the Nordic Cool Festival 2013.

On your smartphone, scan the code using the application “QR code” to view more information about the exhibits at the NBC4 Health and Fitness Expo.

Issue 8  

the a-blast

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