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THE ULOLWE SOUTH AFRICA – SUID-AFRIKA A monthly railway research / historical publication ‘n Maandelikse spoorweg historiese en navorsing publikasie Un-official / Nie Amptelik

Patron – Les Pivnic – Beskermheer “Everything to do with the former South African Railways & Transnet; i.e. Railway Stations, Harbours, Airways, RMT, SAR Police, Armoured Trains, Lighthouses, Pipelines, Catering, SAR Models, Diagrams of Locomotives etc and books on the Railways in Southern Africa”

Hennie Heymans, Pretoria, South Africa - heymanshb@gmail.com March 2011 Vol 2 No 3 (Revised)

Cover photo by Charles Baker taken on 19th February 2011 when 18-619 and five Mates with CAR wagons were crossing over the bridge into Lions River Station.

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Contents - Inhoud Contents - Inhoud ................................................................................................................................ 2 Anglo-Boer War: Boer Armoured truck : Natal Front .................................................................... 4 Angolan Railways: Anton van Schalkwyk ....................................................................................... 4 DRC- Class 33-000 at Likasie: Chris van Wyk ................................................................................. 7 Natal Government Railways .............................................................................................................. 7 SAR Staff / SAS Personeel ................................................................................................................... 8 Railways & Postal History: Stan Kantor ......................................................................................... 11 Robberts’ Heights – Voortrekkerhoogte: Paul Els ......................................................................... 13 Milcol Halt & Artillery Halt ..................................................................................................... 14 Fatal Accident: 28 August 1942 ................................................................................................ 14 Artillery Halt............................................................................................................................... 17 Comments by Carlos Vieira: ..................................................................................................... 18 Humour on the SAR .......................................................................................................................... 19 Paul Els also sent the following railway joke: ........................................................................ 19 The following is an actual exchange of correspondence between a customer and the Irish Railway Company – Paul Els .......................................................................................... 19 Free State train travel in 1989: Jacque Wepener ............................................................................. 20 Virginia to Glen Harmony with 15F 2996: Jacque Wepener ........................................................ 22 NG G13 Joubertina: Koot Swanepoel .............................................................................................. 23 Andre Kritzinger sent us the following photograph ............................................................ 25 South African Class NG G13 2-6-2+2-6-2 – Andre Kritzinger...................................................... 25 Manufacturer .............................................................................................................................. 27 Service .......................................................................................................................................... 28 Preservation ................................................................................................................................ 29 Gallery ......................................................................................................................................... 29 References ................................................................................................................................... 29 NG G13: From my Scrapbook - HBH .............................................................................................. 30 Railways and Genealogy: Kelvin Naylor ....................................................................................... 38 2


Train accident : Paardevlei 20-05-1946 ............................................................................................ 38 Makkadas (“Make a dash!”) ..................................................................................................... 43 Makkadas hol vir kat weg: Petra Müller – Sent in by J Wepener........................................ 43 1930 Maydon Wharf: Durban ................................................................................................... 45 Mervyn Emms: Collector Extraordinary ................................................................................ 46 A NGR Station Bell .................................................................................................................... 47 Model ships for Africa – some models are built in bottles................................................... 48 What is this? ........................................................................................................................................ 53 Old Map of Durban ........................................................................................................................... 53 A Whaling story ......................................................................................................................... 59 Elephants and the old SAR ............................................................................................................... 65 Carlos’ Junction ................................................................................................................................. 66 Research Tour to Cape Town – HBH .............................................................................................. 71 Wepener's Wayside Wanderings & Peregrinations: J & J Wepener ........................................... 77 E-mails / Vonkpos ...................................................................................................................... 80 Conclusion / Slot ................................................................................................................................ 81

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Anglo-Boer War: Boer Armoured truck : Natal Front During a visit to the SA National Archives in Pretoria I found this photograph of a Natal Government Railways truck with a Long Tom on it, as part of the Boer-onslaught near Ladysmith – HBH.

Angolan Railways: Anton van Schalkwyk

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Anton van Schalkwyk was so kind as to share these photographs with us. The photographs were taken by Angop. One has to admit that everything is spotless especially when one looks at the track bed – no papers or empty tins lying about! [It has always been a lifelong dream to travel on the Benguella line (CFB).] •

More information on this line will be welcome.

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DRC- Class 33-000 at Likasie: Chris van Wyk

This striking photograph was published by Chris van Wyk on the Photos from SAR

Trainspotters http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150123361646385&set=o.16449322691337 9&theater

Natal Government Railways 1. 2nd Class Four-wheeler of 1878. 2. A six-wheeler coach.

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SAR Staff / SAS Personeel

Porter - Kruier

Chef - SAR

Trans-Karoo

Bert Lemon with E213 @ Braamfontein – Dave Parsons

Piet Scheepers @ Ladysmith

Driver Bie-Bie @ Worcester on the BTS

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Blue Train

Lucky with 34-851 near Waterpoort

Lucky with 34-851 near Waterpoort

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Train Manager Andrew in Bosveld Train Safi’s (BTS) Lounge Car

Train Manager Patrick with BTS on the line to Saldanha.

Retired steam driver Van Eeden captured at Nelspruit. In his day he drove 16E 858.

Alan Watson with 16E 858 – Dave Parsons

Drywer Willie van Zyl en Piet Scheepers

Boon Boonzaaier talking to Driver Peter 10


captured in Natal on 12-11-2003

Mardell somewhere west of Potch

Train Manager Neels Kuhn

Train Manager Tina Stewart

Railways & Postal History: Stan Kantor

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Robberts’ Heights – Voortrekkerhoogte: Paul Els Military author and researcher Paul Els sent in the following report: Robberts’ Heights Halt

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Unknown too many, there was a railway to the Heights 1902-1914.

Milcol Halt & Artillery Halt As from August 1921 a railways line ran from Pretoria West to the Heights. This line ran past the SA Military School and a halt was built next to the School. It was later named ‘Milcol halt’. Many soldiers and civilians made use of this train service that worked to the Heights, they used this as their transport from Pretoria to various units in the Heights. Artillery Halt is around 200 metres west of Milcol halt. Troops embarked at this point for National Service or departing to do duty on the ‘Border’. Train services were discontinued in 1998.

Fatal Accident: 28 August 1942 The darkest day in the Heights history was perhaps the railway accident that occurred at the ‘Milcol’ road crossing, on a cold misty morning of 28 August 1942. The train, no 809, with seven passenger coaches, left the Cordelfos halt around 07h35 and Milcol halt around 07h45, and collided, two minutes later, with a municipal bus no 27 (TP5122) which was pushed along for 177 feet, before the train came to a halt. 41 people were removed to the Military Hospital and two passengers died. They were Lieutenant G.C.P. Sanders, SAIC, and Private 14


(Miss) M.E. Lane, WAAS Military Hospital.

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16


Artillery Halt

SAR Map: Pretoria to Roberts Heights – Paul Els

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Comments by Carlos Vieira: Great photos. The b/w show loco 2127 from what I can see which would be a 12A/12AR. Good photos. Cheers, Carlos

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Humour on the SAR Paul Els also sent the following railway joke: A mother was working in the kitchen, listening to her five-year-old son playing with his new electric train set in the living room. She heard the train stop and her son saying, 'All of You bastards who want off, get off now, 'cos we're in a hurry! And all of you bastards, who are getting on, get on now, 'cos we're going down the tracks'. The horrified mother went in and told her son: 'We don't use that kind of language in this house. Now I want you to go to your room and stay there for TWO HOURS. When you come out, you may play with your train, but I want you to use nice language.' Two hours later, the son came out of the bedroom and resumed playing with his train. Soon the train stopped and the mother heard her son say: 'All passengers who are disembarking the train please remember to take all of your belongings with you. We thank you for travelling with us today and hope your trip was a pleasant one.' She hears the little boy continue: 'For those of you just boarding, we ask you to stow all of your hand luggage under your seat. Remember, there is no smoking on the train. We hope you will have a pleasant and relaxing journey with us today.' As the mother began to smile, the child added: “For those of you who are p@ssed off about the TWO HOUR delay, please see the fat controller in the kitchen”.

The following is an actual exchange of correspondence between a customer and the Irish Railway Company – Paul Els Gentlemen, I have been riding your trains daily for the last two years, and the service on your line seems to be getting worse every day. I am tired of standing in the aisle all the time on a 14-mile trip. I think the transportation system is worse than that enjoyed by people 2,000 years ago. Yours truly, Patrick Finnegan

Dear Mr. Finnegan, We received your letter with reference to the shortcomings of our service and believe you are somewhat confused in your history. The only mode of transportation 2,000 years ago was by foot.

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Sincerely, Irish Railway Company

Gentlemen, I am in receipt of your letter, and I think you are the ones who are confused in your history. If you will refer to the Bible and the Book of David, 9th Chapter, you will find that Balaam rode to town on his ass. That.... gentlemen, is something I have not been able to do on your train in the last two years! Yours truly, Patrick Finnegan.

Free State train travel in 1989: Jacque Wepener Hi to all. We've been scratching around in our "archives" and found a couple of rail trips we'd like to share with you. Here's the first. Welkom - Hennenman - Bloemfontein - Zastron - Aliwal-North – Return Today, 1989 seems a long time ago, but back then it was still safe enough to leave your car parked at the station and it still would still be there when you returned. We departed Welkom station (height 1376m) at 18:05 on 27 September 1989 on the daily "Sandveld Express" from Allanridge to Johannesburg as far as Hennenman. The train consisted of seven passenger coaches, steam car and 2x 5E's up front. Back then this train was well used by migrant mine workers and at our first stop, Mothusi the platform was alive with people and the large shunting yard was a hive of activity. (Now closed and yard uplifted, even the foot bridge is being carried away as scrap). Next we crossed a block load of maize at Kaalvlei. Then Mooiveld and Whites and finally Henneman, platform 3. At Hennenman (height 1405m) we boarded the Amatola to Bloemfontein at 19:26. We enjoyed dinner in the dining car just after Virginia, then on to Theunissen and Brandfort and arriving at Bloemfontein (height 1392m) at 21:48. =154 km.

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The Zastron train was a mixed train. Upfront were 2x 35 Class diesels, a steam heating van, 6x passenger coaches, a variety of goods trucks and a goods guards van painted in red and grey. We departed Bloemfontein at 22:45 on a very cold Free State evening as a cold front was moving through the country. Soon we were snugly tucked into our compartment and the heater on fully. Unfortunately the heater was stuck in the on position and close to Sannaspos we started feeling the heat. This meant we had to open the windows ever so slightly to let the cold winter creep in. After that the night went smoothly with lots of stops to do some shunting and pick up work. We arrived at Zastron (height 1679m) at 06:15 on 28 September 1989. (204 m). We went on to explore Zastron for some breakfast as our train to Aliwal-North was only to depart at 08:00, also the train crew said they would not leave without us anyway. On returning to the station we found a large group of primary school children that were going to have a train trip to Rouxville. (For some the first in their lives). The Aliwal-North train is only a "TX" van booked onto the back of the daily goods train. “No problem” to the good old SAR, they simply uncoupled one of the 2nd class saloons from our Bloemfontein train onto the Aliwal-North train and off we went, although a little late. The driver was soon "kapping" it out and soon we were arriving at our halts ahead of time. Plenty of shunting was done along the way and after all the screaming kids detrained at Rouxville we had the whole coach to ourselves. Back then this section was still “Van Schoor”, so the assistant had to retrieve the token at every station. Aliwal-North (height 1355m) was reached at 11:45 {79 =m}. Here the train was re-marshalled and after a quick stroll through town we left for Zastron at 12:15. The return trip was fast with not much shunting, and we reached Zastron at 16:00 with the passenger train having it's coach returned. We relaxed at the station and did some exploring to pass the time. At about 19:00 the diesels were started up and afterwards the steam car. Departure from Zastron was at 20:00. The driver invited us (the only passengers on the train) onto the footplate to Rietdraai and it was spectacular to see the sealed beam light up the passing veld. Before retiring for the night we chatted to the conductor and he told us he had fired on 16E no. 857 which was then still standing in front of Bloemfontein station. Arrival time in Bloemfontein was a very chilly 03:32 on the 29th of September 1989. Here we waited on an overcrowded, freezing platform for the Amatola which would take us to Hennenman. At 04:00 we got onto a lovely warm Amatola and after 21


purchasing some Railway coffee we arrived at 06:23, platform 1. Then across the foot bridge to an already waiting Welkom "taxi" , next to platform 3, departing at 06:40. We arrived at Welkom station at 07:28 after a most successful rail journey. What a pity this has all gone to pass. Keep well. John & Jacque. Virginia to Glen Harmony with 15F 2996: Jacque Wepener Hi all. On 19 June 1989 we arrived at Virginia station at 06:45 on an icy Orange Free State winter's morning. After a short visit and chat to the Station Master we went on foot to the coaling stage and watering point at Virginia "loco". Here we found a grubby 15F no. 2996 having her fire cleaned. The fireman was struggling to keep boiler pressure as the loco was priming badly also having a hard time breaking clinkers. The mechanical stoker was going all the time and a pressure of 180 lbs was reached. Then we took water and were ready for the road. We chatted to the driver and shunters in the cabin, and then we got onto the footplate and proceeded to couple onto the load for Glen Harmony. We had a very slippery start and came to a sudden halt. We were told that although we had obtained the wooden staff the driver saw a shunting movement on the main line which we had to cross over in order to reach the Glen harmony branch line. A short while later the line was clear and we moved off. By now the fireman had managed to let the safety valves lift and a plume of steam and a loud hissing sound announced this. We rattled across the main lines, thundering past a very smelly piggery; luckily this smell was removed by the sweet smell of treated boiler water and coal smoke. Then 2996 lost her feet again on iced rails but the driver regained control, soon after this we clattered over a steel girder bridge at a deafening pace. We speeded along with wheel slipping and whistle blowing across various crossings. Plenty of cattle giving way as the steel beast charged through their peaceful and rural scene. The ever present mine headgears growing bigger as we neared the end of the branch. We passed through the derelict station at Glen Harmony (8 m) with only the sun and 22


rain faded name board reminding us of its existence. We slowed down and passed the mine diesel, then we stopped and uncoupled our load. Then we ran round to pick up empty goods wagons. Amazingly we watched the mine diesel departing with its load, including our guards van with screeching wheels! After frenzied shouting and hand signals from the shunters we managed to get our van back. We returned back to Virginia tender first plus our almost AWOL van. An uneventful return trip was had and we arrived back at Virginia with the smell of steam on our clothes and soot in the hair. See ya! John & Jacque

NG G13 Joubertina: Koot Swanepoel Koot Swanepoel lives in Joubertina and has sent us these pictures he took a few weeks ago. This is photograph of a Narrow Gauge Garratt locomotive and its Guards Van plinthed in Joubertina.

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Diagram of the Locomotive NG G13 80

Official SAR Diagrambook

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NG G13 80 Joubertina: Andre Kritzinger

Andre Kritzinger sent us the following photograph

Andre Kritzinger us the tells us that the old Railway Station is in Kritzinger Rd!

South African Class NG G13 2-6-2+2-6-2 – Andre Kritzinger From Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia (13 March 2011)

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NG G13 49 at Sandstone Estates, near Ficksburg, 9 April 2006 Power type

Steam

Designer

Hanomag South African Railways

Builder

Hanomag

Serial number

10598 (no 50), 10599 (no 49), 10549-10551 (no 58-60), 10629-10635 (no 77-83)[1]

Model

Class NG G13

Build date

1927-1928

Total production

12

Configuration

2-6-2+2-6-2 Garratt

Gauge

2 ft (610 mm)

Leading wheel diameter

21 in (530 mm)

Driver diameter

33 in (840 mm)

Trailing wheel diameter

21 in (530 mm)

Minimum curve

160 ft (48.768 m)

Wheelbase

42 ft 9 in (13.030 m)

Length

48 ft 5.25 in (14.764 m)

Height

10 ft 4 in (3.150 m)

Axle load

7.075 long tons (7.189 t) max on 1st driver

Weight on drivers

41.325 long tons (41.988 t)

Locomotive weight

61.675 long tons (62.665 t)

Fuel type

Coal

Fuel capacity

4 long tons (4.1 t)

Water capacity

Front 1,285 imp gal (5,840 l) Rear 540 imp gal (2,500 l)

Boiler

4 ft 7.75 in (1.416 m) inner dia

Boiler pressure

180 psi (1,200 kPa)

Fire grate area

19.5 sq ft (1.812 m2)

Heating surface: Tubes

839 sq ft (77.946 m2)

Heating surface: Tubes and flues

* 152 tubes 1.75 in (44 mm) dia * 15 tubes 5.5 in (140 mm) dia * 9 ft 3.625 in (2.835 m) between tube plates

Heating surface: Firebox

82.1 sq ft (7.627 m2)

Heating surface: Total

921.1 sq ft (85.573 m2) 26


Superheater area

149 sq ft (13.843 m2)

Cylinders

Four

Cylinder size

12 in (300 mm) bore 16 in (410 mm) stroke

Valve gear

Walschaerts

Tractive effort

Career

18,850 lbf (83.849 kN) at 75% boiler pressure[2]

South African Railways Sandstone Estates

Class

NG G13

Number in class

12

Number

49-50, 58-60, 77-83

Official name

Class NG G13

Delivered

1927-1928

First run

1927

Disposition

Retired from SAR

Between 1927 and 1928 the South African Railways (SAR), later renamed Spoornet and then Transnet Freight Rail (TFR), placed 12 Class NG G13 2-6-2+2-6-2 Garratt steam locomotives in service on the Langkloof and Natal 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge lines.[3][4] The challenges of Africa created the regular need for double-heading of steam locomotives on heavy trains. While West Africa found its solution in larger Pacific and Mikado locomotives at the turn of the century, the greater gradients and tighter curves in South Africa made a different solution necessary. That solution was found in 1914 when a narrow gauge Garratt locomotive, the Class NG G11, was first introduced on SAR narrow gauge lines. Many more were to follow.[5]

Manufacturer In 1927 Hannoversche Maschinenbau AG (Hanomag), in consultation with the SAR, designed an engine which was to become the standard 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge Garratt locomotive for the next forty years. It was greatly improved from the Class NG G11, having trailing wheels added to each engine unit, outside bar frames instead of plate frames, round top fireboxes instead of Belpaire fireboxes, and larger dimensions in most respects except the grate area.[4]

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The initial order was for three Class NG G13 locomotives, numbers 58 to 60 that were delivered and placed in service in 1927. Performance trials of the Class NG G13 proved it to be both powerful and free steaming, despite having a smaller grate area than the predecessor Class NG G11. This resulted in an immediate order for another two locomotives (numbers 49 and 50), and even before these were delivered, another seven (numbers 77 to 83). The second and third orders were both delivered in 1928.[3] These engines were superheated and sported an extremely compact arrangement of Walschaerts valve gear and outside bar frames. The pilot wheels were arranged as conventional pony trucks, while the inner carrying wheels were built to the Gölsdorf system that allowed the axle some lateral movement.[3]

Service Brass number plate on “NG/G13” 49

Brass number plate on ”NGG” 80

The first five engines (49-50 and 58-60) were used almost exclusively on the narrow gauge lines in Natal. Some of these routes had curves of 45 metres and gradients of up to 3 in 100, but the Garratts were well suited to hauling the diverse freight traffic of pulpwood, sugar beet and bananas. The 122 kilometre route from Port Shepstone to Paddock via Izotsha was eventually privatised as the Port Shepstone and Alfred County Railway (ACR) when the SAR ceased operations there in 1986. The ACR conducted freight and tourist passenger operations, the tourist train becoming known as the Banana Express.[6] The third order of seven locomotives (77-83) initially all went to the Avontuur line where they remained for their entire service lives, except for numbers 77 and 78 that were exchanged for two Class NG G11 engines (no 54 and 55) from the Natal system in 1965. These engines ended their service lives working out of Loerie, either hauling limestone trains to Van Stadens or doing duty on the Patensie branch line.[3]

The boiler plate of Class NG G13 no 80 28


The 283 kilometre Avontuur line stretches from Port Elizabeth to Avontuur through the Langkloof. The narrow gauge track enabled the trains to pick up fruit virtually directly from the Langkloof fruit farms and ship it directly, without reloading, to the ripening warehouses, distributors and ships at Port Elizabeth. The route became known as the Apple Express after the main crop it transported. The line also carried pulpwood, as well as limestone to supply the cement factories which were located on the route.[6] When the lower section of the Avontuur line was dieselised with the arrival of the Class 91000 in 1973, the Class NG G13 engines were all withdrawn from service. Beginning at about the same time, the Natal engines were also progressively withdrawn from service.[3]

Preservation Since withdrawal from SAR service, some engines were sold into private hands, while others ended up in various degrees of preservation ranging across the spectrum from storage to total abandonment. One known ex SAR Class NG G13 Garratt, no 49 serving at the Sandstone Estates near Ficksburg, is being kept in excellent running order. Two were plinthed, no 80 at Joubertina station and no 81 at Patensie station. The fate of all the Class NG G13 locomotives are shown in the table.[7] South African Class NG G13 2-6-2+2-6-2 diaspora, circa 2009

Gallery Main picture: NG G13 49 at Sandstone Estates, near Ficksburg, 9 April 2006

NG G13 58, derelict at the South African National

Railway

and

Steam

Museum

(SANRASM), 17 May 2009 NG G13 80 plinthed at Joubertina station in the Langkloof, 18 October 2009

NG G13 81 plinthed at Patensie station, 8 April 1985

References 1.

^ The Garratt Locomotive 29


2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9.

^ South African Railways and Harbours Locomotive Diagram Book, 2’0” & 3’6” Gauge Steam Locomotives, 15 August 1941, as amended ^ a b c d e Locomotives of the South African Railways - A concise Guide (Leith Paxton & David Bourne, 1985), pp10-11, 107, ISBN 0 86977 211 2 ^ a b Twilight of South African Steam (A E Durrant, 1989), p124, ISBN 0 7153 8638 7 ^ Sandstone Steam Railroad ^ a b "South Africa Rail Offering". The New York Times. 1988-03-28. http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DEEDC1130F93BA15750C0A96E 948260. Retrieved 2010-05-23. ^ Railways of Southern Africa Locomotive Guide, 2002 Edition, (Compiled by John N. Middleton), p31, as amended by Combined Amendment List 4, January 2009 ^ Exmoor Steam Railway and its history ^ "Humewood Road in Port Elizabeth". Steam Locomotives South Africa. 2009-08-23. http://steam-locomotives-south-africa.blogspot.com/2009/09/humewoodport-elizabeth-locomotive.html. Retrieved 2010-06-14.

NG G13: From my Scrapbook - HBH After corresponding with Andre Kritzinger I pushed my laziness aside and went to dig in my scrapbooks and files – the following ‘gems’ were idly snoozing in the files:

I believe this comes from a c1959 Die Brandwag SAR Photo-series

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When I was a little boy my Uncle, Mr DE Malan, sent me this picture of their “bus” – as he called it. This photo was taken in Southern Natal. He was a stoker, the son of a farmer, who also suffered from this madness called the “love of steam!”

(Little

interested Period.

in

boys steam

are trains.

And not in dates or

places where the photographs were taken!)

Herman Snyman, a retired journalist and steam lover, wanted to write and publish a book on South African steam engines plinthed at various places in South Africa. Then his publisher decided not to publish his book and I bought the photographs 31


and the notes he wrote. Here are his cryptic notes on NG G13 plinthed at Joubertina. Schalk Burger and Andre Bekker took the photographs for Herman.

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1940 Accident: De Doorns Gawie Botha

WP Live Steam Society: Shaun Carl le Roux

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Scrapbook on “Blackie” – HBH One tends to think that it all started with “Blackie” which today is plinthed at the Cape Town Railway Station and does duty as a National Monument.1 Here is a scan from a thick book on SAR Standard Gauge (and a few Cape and Natal 4’ 8 1/2 “locomotives.) Please excuse the quality of the scan but is one of the few diagrams I have seen on “Blackie” which dates back from 1859 – making her now 152 yrs old!

1

On my recent visit to Cape Town I could not find “Blackie”. Does anybody know where she is?

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Photograph: Personality via SAR & H (The by-line is incorrect – Durban was fist!)

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WP Steam Society made me look at what I had in my collection on “Blackie”. Photos by HBH.

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SD 70 MAC for Transnet: Rudi Venter Good evening Guys Yesterday when I worked the Anaconda from Durban (King’s Rest) while waiting to enter King’s Rest I was invited on to the test coach2 by one of the locomotive test inspectors. He showed me on his laptop that Transnet has bought a 100 x SD 70 MAC locomotives from EMD, that is almost new. The first 15 are arriving in Durban harbour in the first week of April and will be stored at Wentworth diesel depot till they go up to Rustenburg. He showed me the Transnet drivers training manual for them on his laptop. He couldn't tell me as what class they will work on Transnet, but they are massive monsters in U.S.A When I ask him about new 3000kv locomotives he told me that the 18E are the last in their class and type, Transnet are moving over to Diesel motive power due to overhead theft and cost for the future Please remind me when you guys see one of them in S.A. for a photo's in Transnet colours; I'll keep an eye out for them Attach are photo's how the look in U.S.A. Greetings Rudi Venter

2

Rudi how about a few pictures of the Test Coach?

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Railways and Genealogy: Kelvin Naylor Hi Hennie, My Name is Kelvin Naylor (Spyker to the Boerkies). My Great Grandfather, Daniel Naylor arrived in SA some time just before 1890, we think, as he Married Emily Jane Jones, nee Carnell in that year, she was listed as being from Taung. Her parents and siblings were established in Kimberly then as they had worked on the railways construction to Kimberly. I think Daniel was working for Pauling, Sir Charles Metcalfe or Rhodes at the time, possibly on the Vryburg line. It has also been said that he worked In India as well as having something to do with the construction of park station, not sure which one though. I have anecdotal and documented evidence that Danile was known as a Railways contractor (Mainly Ships Passenger lists and then What the Family has told me). I am desperate to find out who exactly he worked for and if he had a business partner as is alleged. Daniel died in 1940 in East London Please point me in the right direction. Very best Regards Spyker

Train accident : Paardevlei 20-05-1946 We received the following e-mail: Dear Mr Heymans I have had a look at your Railway Gazette’s and they are really interesting. I am hoping that you may be able to assist me: On 20 May 1946, my great uncle died in a train accident in the Paardevlei area. I was wondering if you have come across any reports of this accident in any of your research.

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My uncle’s name was Marthinus “Tiennie” Wilhelmus Burger – on his death notice he was listed as a “spoorweg-vakleerling”. I have attached the only picture that I have of the train that he died on. I am currently doing research on my family history and any information would be greatly appreciated. Kind Regards Cherece du Plessis

The train that Martinus Burger died in

The matter was referred to SAR-L and we received the following interesting replies: Hi Hennie & all, The number plate shows number 3286 which was a class 23 based at Bloemfontein if I remember correctly. I hope that this helps in some way. Regards, Les S.

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Hi again Hennie, I presume that the area referred to as the Paardevlei area is the one in the Western Cape? Regards, Les S.

Hi Les, Hennie and all Could it be 3285? 3286 ended her days not too long ago in Millsite and I have seen a photo of her hauling the State President's train. She was at one stage a SAR prestige loco. From the looks of the loco on the attached photo either SAR did a great job in restoring her back to service or she is actually 3285 and ended up scrapped on site. Regards Carlos

Hi Carlos, Hennie & all, On second thoughts the last digit does look like 5. I think I need a stronger magnifying glass! Regards, Les. S.

3285 was Henschel built, 3286 Berliner built, so the plate below the running number may offer the answer.

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Regards, Andre H Kritzinger, Cape Town.

Hi Carlos, Hennie & all, On second thoughts the last digit does look like 5. I think I need a stronger magnifying glass! Regards, Les. S.

Hello, Hennie, Andre & All, If this clarifies things at all, I photographed 3286 when she was plinthed outside Bloemfontein Loco back in July 1978. The photo is in the "Miscellaneous" album. Interestingly, there doesn't seem to be any evidence in my photo that the manufacturer's plate was attached below the running number plate. Maybe the wrecked loco in the Paardevlei photo is indeed 3285 (it certainly looks like a "5" to my eye). Best, David Werbeloff

By the way (excuse my apparent ignorance!!) - Where is/was Paardevlei - I can't couple it to any current railway map... Ashley Hi Sorry I don't know - I am also trying to find out. Regards Hennie Heymans

The only Paardevlei there is on Google Earth is some property between Somerset West and Strand across the road from the Somerset Mall. The line between Firgrove and Somerset West runs about 1.5 km away. Could the accident have happened there? Because the line in those days presumably ran over the farm with that name. 41


While I agree with Les that the number looks more like a 5, the works plate underneath looks more like a Schwartzkopff (Berliner). Take a look at http://www.lokschilder.info/Galeriebilder/Fabrikschilder/Lokschild_Galerie_Fabriks childer_ABCD.htm#BMAG and scroll down to 10724 and 11912 which are both about the same era as 3286 (BMAG 11001/39). Henschel plates of the same era were somewhat longer (look on the same site). Martin Murray

I would say it was highly unlikely that a Class 23 would have been barrelling along the line to Somerset West! Regards Ashley

There is a Perdevlei not far north of De Aar - would the 23's have worked there? Trevor.

Ashley and all, Perdevlei is 7 miles north of De Aar on the main line from Kimberley; surely the most likely candidate? Robert.

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This is what the Cherece du Plessis says: "I would assume that it is in the Cape area – he lived in de Aar, so it would be somewhere in that region, will try and look on one of my old maps"

Of course - I'd forgotten that there was a Perdevlei just outside De Aar! My wall map of SAR stations no longer shows it! Thanks for that. Ashley • Thanks for all the information! • Any further information is welcome!

Makkadas (“Make a dash!”) We normally conduct all our correspondence and articles in English for the benefit of our readers in other parts of the globe. The following is short little story about a cat and the “Makkadas”. The train, called “Makkadas” in the local vernacular did not wait for the cat and the poor cat followed the train. Some gangers found her the next day and brought her home! She was a well-known cat from the area. Makkadas was the train in the Ladismith (Cape) to Touws River area – Makkadas is an Afrikaans word from the English: “Make a dash!” So please forgive a little Afrikaansrailwayana-culture! Thanks to J & J Wepener for passing it on!

Makkadas hol vir kat weg: Petra Müller – Sent in by J Wepener Heerengracht 40 Kaapstad 8001 1 Maart 1993 Ek is nie 'n Makkadaslander nie glad nie. Maar Maria Verreyne is, en dis by haar dat ek in my kleintyd die storie gehoor het van die kat, wat nou hier vertel moet word as deel van die Makkadassage. Maria Koorts was destyds - ons praat nou hier van 1930 - 'n standerdsesdogter op die plaas Lebora, 'n kwartiertjie se stap van Bloutoringhalte, waar Makkadas in die middel van die Maandagoggend stilgehou het op sy pad na Ladismith, so 'n twee uur nadat hy uit Touwsrivier vertrek het.

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By die halte het Makkadas die possak afgelaai wat deur Lebora se mense gehou is. En dit was dikwels Maria (haar huisnaam was Bybie) se werk om die possak te gaan haal. 'n Lekker werk ook, want die buurt se mense kom wag die possak by die plaashuis in, en dan's daar groot gesels. Dan stap die witswart wolkat Beauty saam halte toe; want Maria is katmal, destyds soos vandag. Die Koortse was boere én spoorwegmense. Maria se pa, Koos Koorts, was een van die mense wat in 1925 gehelp het om Makkadas se spoorlyn te bou; ook daarna het hy sy lewe as spoorwegman gemaak. En aan stap was almal daar gewoond. Maria, wat met Ouma Koorts op Lebora gewoon het (haar eie moeder was oorlede) het elke dag drie myl heen en drie myl terug gestap na die skoolplaas by die De Kocks. Maar daarheen stap die kat nie saam nie. Toe Maria in 1931 hoërskool moet kry, word sy Riversdal se hoër skool toe gestuur, en sy ry aan die begin van elke kwartaal met Makkadas daar weg. Beauty kom dit agter. Aljimmer wil sy saam as die Koortse afstap halte toe met die koffer. Sy word dus op solder opgesluit. Maar dié dag spring sy af, en toe die Koortse vir Bybie by die halte op Makkadas afsien dit was net skemeraand is Beauty by. Tante Koorts gryp die kat vas, maar toe Makkadas wegtrek, wring sy haar met soveel geweld los dat die tante haar laat los. En toe Makkadas uitstoom, sien Bybie hier kom haar kat witpoot agterna. Gejammer en geskreeu, maar Makkadas kan nie stop nie. En by die eerste draaitjie is Beauty buite sig. Die gesin het nog tot donker langs die spoor rondgespook, en toe maar huis toe gegaan. Die vólgende dag kom Thys Botes-hulle op die pomptrollie van Ladismith se kant af met die lyn aan. Dertien myl duskant die halte sien hulle 'n kat stryksaam langs die spoorlyn aankom. Stop, skreeu hy, dis mos Bybie Koorts se kat dié! ``Beauty!'' roep hy. En voetseer, honger maar punt-in-die wind kom die kat na hulle toe aan oor die spoor. Sy laat haar gewillig saamvat op die pomptrollie, want haar gô was uit. Thys laai haar by tussenmense af, wat haar die volgende naweek op Lebora besorg. 'n Boodskap is deurgestuur na Maria, wat op Riversdal sit en sakdoek kou. End van katstorie. Liefdesverhaal. Maar ek wil hier op 'n syspoor van Makkadas af, en sonder hul verlof, nog die romanse van Piet en Maria Verreyne ook vertel want 'n mens hoor nie deesdae meer baie sulke mooi stories nie. Op daardie stappad skool toe, daar waar die voetpaadjie tussen die rivier en die hoë krans deurloop, kom Maria Koorts die eerste skooldag van 1930 deurgestap. Sy en Ouma het toe net op Lebora ingetrek. Sy's twaalf, sy't groot bruin oë, 'n wit vel en blink gladde hare. En daar kom by haar verbygery op 'n fiets 'n bakoorseun van sestien Piet Verreyne. Toe hy haar sien, is hy verlief. Hy't ses 44


jaar lank versigtig by haar aangelê, toe kom slaan Kerneels (Gogga) Human van Swellendam sy hand in die as. Maria trou met hom en gaan woon op Swellendam: vyftig jaar en etlike weke gelukkig getroud. En Piet trou met Engela van der Vyver: vyf-en-veertig jaar lank, ook gelukkig. Toe verloor hulle hul lewensmaats, amper in dieselfde jaar. Mettertyd vat Piet se kar sy eie koers na Bakkeleysdrift waar Maria nou alleen in die plaashuis woon. En wat kan die einde van die storie wees? Hulle woon gelukkig saam in die dorpshuis in Piet Retiefstraat, Montagu. As jy na hulle kyk, sal jy dink hulle is weer twaalf en sestien, al trek hulle albei reeds op die lang vlak tussen sewentig en tagtig. Wat is tyd? 'n Makkadaslander steur hom nie daaraan nie. • The Train and the Postbag? It also brings many memories back to me. As a young Constable in the SA Police at King’s Rest on the Bluff in Durban during the 1960’s it was one of my duties to fetch the post bag every morning from the guard on the Durban – Wests suburban train. The bag had a copper plate on: “SA Police, King’s Rest, King’s Rest Halt”. Off great importance to me was the Mercury and yesterday’s Daily News. Later we got a Post Box at Fynnlands Post Office and I have often wondered what happened to the copper address tag – HBH.

1930 Maydon Wharf: Durban

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Mervyn Emms: Collector Extraordinary Former Capetonian and now a Pretorian, Mervyn Emms is 87 yrs old and an amazing “young fellow”. He is an avid collector of antiques, books, photographs and has more than a 200 different collections alone! e-Railway Gazette visited this remarkable man the other day and we would like to share with you some of the photographs taken in his museum from some of his collections:

Our genial host Mervyn “The Collector” Emms – also President of the Africana Society The ever caring Elsmarie and Merv –“ just going to fix something!” Like old Johnny Walker , ‘Ol Merv is always on the go!

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A NGR Station Bell

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We don’t know whether this item is railway related. Any comments will be welcome!

Model ships for Africa – some models are built in bottles

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Note the small telephone and next to it is a ship in a bottle.

Made in Baviaanspoort Internment Camp during WW2 by Capt E Hamann (?)

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Ships in a light bulb

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Below a “New Year’s Letter from Mervyn setting out his plans for the future iro his collections and memoirs!

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What is this? This is not a quiz. Does anybody know what this is?

On inspection it looked like a locomotive plate – my guess is GSWA or GEA.

Old Map of Durban When one looks at an old city map of Durban one sees before the railway line was built along the Esplanade the line went through Durban station to the Point. Once the line along the Victoria Embankment was built, the line from Durban to Point was lifted. Another interesting line is the line from Durban to Wests and then from Wests around the Bluff to a Magazine Depot. During my young days in Durban I regularly watched the SAR move the whales from Wests to the Union Whaling Co – along the “south coast” from the south pier. 53


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North Coast line

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1. Note line from Bluff Coaling Wharf to Magazine way south of the Whaling Station – I was a policeman on the Bluff and never saw a train passing the Whaling Station. It was my patrolling area. The only train I saw was from the Whale slip to the Whaling Station. 2.Note line from St Paul’s Wharf to Durban through the Point area.

One can see the location of Congella railway station – Umbilo railway station was further south.

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Note the NGR railway lines.

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Photo: Eric Conradie of the old SAR Museum Whale slip on Bluff – whales on “S”-trucks.

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A Whaling story A 1924 Whaling story that appeared in the SAR Magazine by Tromp van Diggelen – one of South Africa’s strong men. The SAR & Harbours made a quite a profitable business through the whaling industry.

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The NGR had started this operation – note the special “S”-type trucks to convey the whales.

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The whale slipway on the Bluff. The railway line went into the sea and the whales were pulled onto the trucks. If the whales lied to long in the harbour the sharks would nibble on the carcases.

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Elephants and the old SAR To-day we live in a different world! Time is money and everybody is in a hurry to make more money. In days of old the good old SAR even conveyed circus elephants should the need arise! They took then by train and by RMT. A former driver Johan Voordewind once told me he drove a train and while the train went over a set of points a circus elephant changed its position in the truck and the truck derailed! I heard an interesting story the other day about Circus Trains: The man telling the story told that when the circus came to town it was cheaper to send the trains away on a meaningless journey because the if the trucks stood idle at the station they had to pay a fee – the fee was higher than an actual journey. Below an Asian elephant doing shunting during 1908 in Bloemfontein!

Ollie climbing on a SAR RMT truck.

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NG SWA: Two elephants on a NG truck at Usakos

Carlos’ Junction From the UK Carlos Vieira sent us the following pictures: 66


NZASM 30 Tonner

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NZASM 1st and 2nd Class coaches

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Pretoria station during the Anglo-Boer War – note Defence HQ in Potgieter Street

Watervalboven station

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Watervalboven roundhouse

A rack locomotive •

Thank you, Carlos. We are eagerly waiting to see what you can share with us next month!

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Research Tour to Cape Town – HBH Please have a look at the Shosholoza Meyl’s program from Krugersdorp to Cape Town and the ticket one way costs a mere R320-00! On both ways we had green Dining & Kitchen cars 404/405. The air conditioning did not work in the Dining Car! It was hot and uncomfortable without the air conditioning. On the way down one could not buy Brandy unless one bought a “nip”. The coffee on the down trip was also soon finished! However, the staff made it all up! The Staff were most friendly! Mr Cupido was in charge on the way down to Cape Town and Mr January was in charge from Cape Town to Krugersdorp! One serious problem is the windows – these ‘new’ small windows do not allow one to take pictures from the train.

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This is a bargain – more than a 1000 miles for R320-00 (approx £30-00). I must add I used my OAP status and got 25% off the normal price!

Here are some railway related pictures which I took on the trip: Below: While waiting for the “Trans-Karoo” the Premier Classe from Cape Town arrived at Krugersdorp.

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Krugersdorp’s shunter

Above left: Mr Cupido the train manager. Above right: We were four ‘old’ men in the compartment. This friendly staff member arraigned with Mr Cupido for two of us to sleep in an empty compartment on the lower bunks.

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This old block house dating from the Anglo-Boer War is losing its roof!

“Wear Wool” (Dra Wol) Laingsburg

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Railworks at Laingsburg

Autumn wine yards!

We stop at Worcester and we can take some pictures of the train.

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Arrival in Cape Town. With the high petrol price and high toll fess this is value for money! (The bed costs R40-00 and a cup of coffee is a mere R5-00). The train was completely safe – we had members of the SA Police Service and Security Guards on the train. Like my forbearers, I took ‘padkos’ – lovely cold meats (meat balls aka “frikkadelle”, sausage, boiled eggs and sandwiches, fruit, cheese and sweets.)

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On the way back we stopped at Worcester. Our train had 23 coaches and I was at the back – I had hardly time to take this picture of our units:

Thank you Shosholoza Meyl!!!

Wepener's Wayside Wanderings & Peregrinations: J & J Wepener Hi all. We got Spoornet maroon 34 067 returning from Friedesheim with empty timber trucks near Welkom. The stolen lines at Friedesheim are having there sleepers uplifted for use elsewhere. Near Bloemhof we missed a Southbound load of coal behind 4x 10E's of various liveries. The station and silo area were full of mielie trucks. There are also three rail bolsters standing staged here. A while later blue E 18 066, TFR E 18 523 and blue E 18 xxx headed South with a load of mielies3.

3

To our non-South Africans: mealies = maize.

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Near Grasslands Northbound blue E 18 350, TFR E 18 616, blue E 18 xxx, blue E 18 xxx and TFR E 18 xxx sped past with a load of fine coal. At Kingswood the signals were set up for the loop. A Southbound container train slowly came past behind orange E 1310 and orange E xxxx, plenty of refrigerated containers in the load. At Drie Ruiters we found the catenary guys busy on the overheads. Hence the occupation and the load on the loop at Kingswood. Here we got another Southbound load creeping by slowly. This was a load of iron ore wagons behind blue E 10 024 "Newcastle", blue E 10 041, blue E 10 xxx & orange E 10 021. The signals were green again in a few minutes and then yet another Southbound load of containers crept past. This time behind orange E 1588 & orange E 1xx6. Just before Makwassie Spoornet maroon E 1307, SAR Maroon E xxxx, orange E xxxx, orange E xxxx & Spoornet maroon E xxxx sped past at an incredible lick on a Southbound load of coal trucks. Friendly hoots, wave and greetings from all the crews. Plenty of mielie trucks at all the silos in our area but we keep on missing the trains. Blue 34 093 & blue 34 406 were staged in Welkom station with a long load of mielies, crews time up. All the ore haulages were seen, Sheltam, RRL and Harmony surface rail. Greetings. J & J.

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Thanks J & J! We are looking forward to next week’s report – HBH.

E-mails / Vonkpos Hi Hennie I have just had a first sight of your railway gazette and found it very interesting please how can we get more of this? Please let us know. Thank you Bruce Campbell Superintendent (LMI & High Voltage Examining Officer) Dear Bruce Here is the standard reply: Here is the procedure to view the Railway Gazette: Please click on the following link: http://issuu.com/hennieheymans/docs There has been a couple of Railway Gazette’s so far: Double click on any Railway Gazette and once it is open, in the right hand corner, at the bottom of the page, is a facility to subscribe to the Railway Magazine. It is free to subscribe. I post good pictures etc which makes the issue rather “heavy” to send by e-mail. I then “post” the Railway Gazette on ISSUU.

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ISSUU will inform you as a subscriber of all new issues of the Railway Gazette. Many service providers won’t accept the Railway Gazette because of the high amount of bytes involved. So it is better for all concerned to subscribe and then I don’t have to send the Gazette out by e-mail. I only “post” the Railway Gazette” on ISSUU and they do the rest! It is as simple as that. Please let me know if you have problems and I will try and send it by e-mail. Anybody is welcome to send in their photographs, stories or comments. Kind regards Hennie Heymans Dear Hennie, Could you please include me in your mailing of your excellent 'Railway Gazette'. Thank you and regards, Leith Paxton Good day Hennie I received a copy of the above Gazette and as I rail lover I like it very much, very NICE job! So please be so kind to advised how in further I can get a copy when its available? Many thanks, Train regards, Shaun le Roux

Conclusion / Slot Next issue sometime in April 2011. Greetings! Groete! Hennie Heymans – Pretoria, ZA. © 2011 heymanshb@gmail.com

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Ulolwe Vol 2 Issue 3A