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COVER: This distinctive sculpture outside Gare du Nord station is a beacon for salivating skate-ratatouilles in Paris’s 10th arrondissement, but the constant clog of commuters has all but put “Maison Fond” under permanent house arrest. Then one day, Louie Lopez came to town and Maison Fond became a fond-do for his surreal Smith grind. Photo: Jelle Keppens

Photos by Joey Shigeo

024 VOLCOM IN PARIS Photos by Jelle Keppens Words by Stuart Gomez

046 REESE SALKEN Photos by Bart Jones Words by Stuart Gomez

054 SKATOPIA Photos by Alexis Gross Words by Alexis Gross

062 SELECTIVE FOCUS Words by Joey Shigeo

078 AUBY TAYLOR Photos by Dave Swift

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CONTENTS: You need a lot of heart to pull off this don’t-lookdown frontside boardslide, and Truman Hooker has a heart of gold. Teetering on the brink in Riverside, California. Photo: Swift


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The Skateboard Mag

s Commencement ’ r e d r a o b e Spe kat Words by Stuart Gomez S ech A Class of 2017: Welcome to this year’s graduation ceremony! We’ll be giving much deserved kudos to everyone who have put in the work and will be moving on to their new careers, but I’d like to personally give a shout out to ten exceptional young men who met their skate destiny head-on. I’m speaking, of course, about “The Skateful Ten” (I coined that): Axel Cruysberghs, Toy Machine; Mason Silva, Element; Jamie Foy, Deathwish; Jordan Taylor, WKND; Chase Webb, Pizza; Milton Martinez, Creature; Yuri Facchini, Almost; Erick Winkowski, Santa Cruz; Ben Kadow, Hockey; and, last but not least, Nora Vasconcellos, now Pro for Welcome. These graduates all got the Pro bump in the past couple of months—the surprise parties started in June and continued through August—and each one of these previous amateurs is an inspiration to older guys like me. Especially me, though, since I was doing your tricks back when they were cool, and it tells me that with luck I could have been Pro, too. It feels good to know that! But let’s break down the significance of your special moment. What does it mean to “turn Pro”? In some ways, it’s just a title. As each of you future legends accumulates accolades, you’ll come to understand that being Pro is not much more than a term of respect; becoming Pro is about recognition. Sure, I’ll admit it: I’ve dreamt about being Pro since I was a kid. Is that shallow? Maybe. But I guess in some way, I’ve always thought of being Pro and having a board as tangible proof that, Yes, I’ve arrived. I’m a good skater; my hard work has paid off. All ten of you can admit that, like me, you’ve always wanted to be Pro. In fact, repeat after me: “I’ve always wanted to be Pro, I’ve always wanted to be Pro…” No? Okay, never mind. And being Pro is also much more than just a name on a board (let’s be honest, having your name on a board is a tad narcissistic anyway, that’s why I’m so happy that I never ended up being Pro. I tell myself that anyway);

it’s a seal of approval. Someone up there backs you. Besides, you deserve it. After untold hours of sweating it out in the van, enduring ritual hazing as the low man on the totem pole that seems to stretch on into infinity, you’ve finally passed the test. That’s a big deal. And believe you me, I KNOW how it feels to be a young buck on the come up. I mean, I’ve been on trips, too. The guys in my van used to say I was “funny,” and—after I landed the trick that my teammate had been working on for hours—a “try hard.” Pretty cool, right? It was obvious to all the homies that I was trying super hard. That’s important. What do all of you have in common? You’re all super good, of course. But you each individually have incredible output. Take Jamie, for example: when you’re not on the road stacking clips, you’re at home stacking clips. Why don’t you slow it down? You’re making us all look bad. Haha. Or Axel, in a modern skate relationship. Living the dream (must be nice). And Mr. Webb? Several parts full of the kinkiest rails and biggest gaps ever documented. Nice work. I used to be pretty good at rails and gaps, too. But nowadays I try to keep it mellow and concentrate on flatground. You know what they say: Don’t jump down anything that you can’t do a nose stall on. I don’t really have anything left to prove anyway—I’ve done it all. I just wasn’t obsessed with filming myself like all of you younger guys. Not that there’s anything wrong with filming yourself; I watch old footage of myself all the time. Like, a lot. The rest of you have been all over the place during the past few years, getting lots of coverage and cementing your place in skateboarding. You’ve given all of us inspiration and, for want of a better word, stoke. There’s no denying that you’ve earned your new station. I can’t wait to buy a board with your name on it! But don’t forget about the little people who paved the way for you, though. You know … just saying.

Mason Silva Nosegrind

Photo: Coulthard Los Angeles, California

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Mason Silva Nosegrind

Photo: Coulthard Los Angeles, California


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Photography: Zander Taketomo Š 2017 adidas AG.


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THE GRIPPIEST!

LOUIE LOPEZ


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NIKE SB Zoom Dunk High Elite University Red/Collegiate Navy-White NikeSB.com

RICTA WHEELS 52mm Kelvin Hoefler Pro Naturals 99a 52mm Tom Asta SC SLIX 99a RictaWheels.com

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C H E C K O U T A L L T H E F U L L C U T C O L O R S AT P R O T E C B R A N D . C O M


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Paris, the romance capital of the world—a city that is synonymous with rich sauces and floppy berets—was the setting for Volcom’s latest fantastic voyage. The city and the company share a special history: last summer’s top-shelf revamp of popular skatespot, Place de la République, has been a massive success; the company installed ledges, granite Volcom stone centerpiece, and banks, and held a contest at the famous plaza, cementing their Parisian legacy in the process. But the occasion for the team’s visit in June was a much more casual affair. The boys were already in Spain (attending La Kantera Pro), and decided to pop in next door and say “what’s up” to France (there are no borders in skateboarding). The crew is known worldwide by their nicknames—Axel Crusher, Louie Lo, Provider, Doobie, and Salmon—but in case you’ve been living under a stone, they are Axel Cruysberghs, Louie Lopez, Collin Provost, Victor Pellegrin, and Eniz Fazliov, respectively. The freedom to crisscross Europe would not have been possible without the incredibly capable team-wrangling chops of Jake Smith, a jake of all trades who enables the Volcom crew’s exploratory experimentalism (if you’ve seen True To This, then you already know what I’m talking about) by absorbing all of the—gulp—“planning” and headaches. Skateboarding thrives when rules are thrown out the window, but when the window is closed you need Jake. You’re the man, Mr. Smith. Documenting the trip were Lannie “Just Some Dude” Rhoades, Ant[hony] Travis, and Jelle Keppens. The Volcom aesthetic was in full effect, except for drone footage: in light of current events, the eye-in-the-sky was left in the hotel room (best to keep it low-key for this mission). The whole crew was guided by the voices of Vincent Auque and Vins Coupeau. A good guide can make the trip. In the regional parlance, it’s the difference between an amusebouche (small, bite-size clip) and a prix fixe menu (a feast for the eyes). Volcom’s weeklong jaunt in Paris is a perfect example of this dynamic: instead of piling in the van and driving from spot to spot, the crew opted to, you know, SKATE!

You see so much more at street level anyway. On your board, you’re trained to keep your eye on the road and your phone in your pocket. Undiscovered gems down this or that alley, or even the odd Franc or Euro fluttering near the gutter. And the girls—Paris is a place to see and be seen, leave the car in l’garage. Vincent and Vins were invaluable as they steered the boys in the right direction throughout their stay, but even the most seasoned guides couldn’t have anticipated Louie’s opportunistic Gare du Nord station Smith grind (as seen on the cover). Deemed an impossible spot to session, the station is one of the biggest transportation hubs in the capital. It was a cruel, sadistic twist (hey, Marquis de Sade: a hometown hero!) to place Leandro Erlich’s ultra-alluring transitioned sculpture, Maison Fond (or, Melting House), smack dab in the middle of a scrum of commuters. Somewhere, Marquis de Sade is laughing, among other things. Weather is sadistic by nature, and it really got its ya-yas out this week. The dudes became reverse storm chasers by necessity. Suddenly they were all amateur meteorologists, and everybody’s phone was clogged with the latest weather apps; routes were revised and clip quests were cut short in the interest of dryness. A top-down view of the crew’s travels on a typical day had the look of a Family Circus cartoon with little Billy doing figure-8s all over the neighborhood. When it comes to the forces of nature, skaters need to adapt or die tryin’. “We bought a squeegee and towels so we could just dry the spot real quick and get the trick,” Jake says. “Then we’d see the clouds coming in again. This happened every single day!” In these situations, the traveling skater has no other choice—it’s high time to visit the local brasserie for a couple of beers. It is a combination work/vacation trip, after all. It’s all a big waiting game, and it’s out of your control. So just throw a few back, scan your apps, and keep looking to the stars. Or try again tomorrow. C’est la vie.

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WORDS: STUART GOMEZ PHOTOGRAPHY: BART JONES

When Reese Salken moved to California back in 2013, he was motivated by something other than breaking into the industry. Quitting college and relocating from Virginia is a drastic decision, but one that he looks back on as a moment of truth. Reese grew up in Yorktown, and has been skating for most of his life. At ten, he started following a crew of badass little kids around his neighborhood. “They all skated,” Reese says, “and I was like, That’s what’s up.” A natural born prankster, Reese would engage in hijinx to get a little thrill; classic stuff like wiping boogers and farting in a full, hot van. But at thirteen, he outdid himself by spreading his butt cheeks on his aunt’s lunch, a sandwich that she left unattended at her own peril. By this point in his life, Reese already knew that he needed footage, or it didn’t happen. So, he filmed it. When his aunt saw the clip of Reese’s buns on her sando, she laughed so hard she pissed her pants. “I was always doing little mischievous shit,” Reese says. “But looking back it’s like, Dude what are you doing?” Reese’s crew in Virginia, “Pseudo Visions,” was spearheaded by the filmer Grant Forbes. Grant was the driving force behind the group’s travels up and down the East Coast, getting an astonishing number of clips. Grant released the videos Midnight On The Run in 2010 and Shades Away in 2012, featuring footage of Reese in his mid-teens. In late 2012, Grant passed away. The shock of the news changed everything. Reese lived with Grant and was very close with him. “Grant was somebody who was really inspiring to me,“ Reese says. “He was always pushing me with skating; we would film all the time.” Having just lost his friend, and miserable in his first year of college, Reese got the much-needed push to make his life-altering move to California. Reese

decided that, in honor of Grant, he would come to Cali to pursue skating and try to make something positive out of a tragic situation. After initially moving to L.A. for a few months, Reese made the inevitable migration to Long Beach. (“It’s more laidback than L.A. but there’s still a lot of stuff going on,” he says.) He hooked up with Adam Mills, the Birdhouse TM, and last year Reese joined the team while recovering from knee surgery. For Reese, joining Birdhouse is basically like joining his friends who he’s already skating with on a daily basis. He says, “It’s been so sick. Just natural and fun; those are my dogs!” If you compare Reese’s footage from the Pseudo Visions days to his California move (and there’s a lot), you’ll notice an invigorating shift. Wild-eyed and animated, Reese’s Pseudo Visions skating has the air of a kid who is discovering the joys of learning tricks for the first time. The atmosphere of day-long skate seshes, giddily riding away from slightly sloppy makes; watching these videos are a time capsule of Reese at an important formative point. Then, once he touched down in California, his skating seemed to become more determined and aggressive. More grown up. Now 23 years old, you’ll occasionally catch a look in Reese’s eyes when he skates that communicates intensity, as if he’s motivated by something other than just getting the clip. Like he’s not just doing it for himself. But traces of that mischievous thirteen-year-old are still evident when speaking with him, whether he’s talking about how much he loves the process of filming or shooting a photo (“I really am too obsessed with it, I guess!”), or how he spent a private day with an action movie star’s daughter (“Yeah, that’s hijinx”). Reese is someone to look out for. And if you see him coming, hide your sandwich.


“EVERY ASPECT OF SHOOTING A PHOTO OR FILMING IS JUST THE COOLEST THING!”

Crooked grind. Tuscon, Arizona.

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Nosegrind. Los Angeles, California.

“IT’S MORE FUN S K AT E B O A R D I N G THAN NOT.”

Backside tailslide. Garden Grove, California.


“I JUST WANT TO STAY SKATING IN THE STREETS—THAT’S THE FUNNEST TO ME.” 052


Fast plant. Redondo Beach, California.


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Adam Ottenberg. Italian Alps, Italy. Photo: CAMERON MARKIN 062


There is some crazy statistic where it’s estimated about 1.4 trillion photos will be taken in 2017. That’s right: trillion, with a “t”. Even within skateboarding it seems as if every damn second is being documented and posted on social media as a running narrative of every insignificant sliver of time. Navigating through the sheer quantity of photographic noise can be mind-numbing. So we’re now going to focus your attention span on eight photographers from across the globe who are capturing moments of worth and interest. Give these dudes a follow.—Joey Shigeo


[

] SEAN MICHON

Pages 068-069: Jordan Maxham, feeble transfer. Pasadena. California.

[

First time I met Sean it was in 2011, he was only 19 years old and was about to open Headway skate shop with his brother Kevan! I believe his mother Teri was pretty involved as well. Sean and his family are epic people. Headway was the first skate shop to carry my brand All I Need. It meant a lot to me and I’m forever grateful for that. After spending sometime shredding with Sean at his skate jams that he would put on for Headway, I soon realized he had an eye for shooting skate photos! I started to invite Sean to come shoot. We worked together to create epic photos and get them published which helped all of us involved and, again, it meant the world to me! Sean is a passionate person who never lets his inner fire be put out. His photos always catch my eyes and get me stoked to skate! Thanks again Sean for helping grow All I Need. —Anthony Shetler

] CAMERON MARKIN

Pages 062-063: Adam Ottenberg. Italian Alps, Italy. Pages 066-067: Ben James, fakie ollie. Sydney, Australia. I’ve known Cam a few years now. He started out emailing me photos asking for advice. His work was good from the start so there was never too much to pull him up on and I mainly just tried to be encouraging cause I know how valuable that can be when you’re cutting your teeth. Now this guy has a full set of molars and I’m lucky if I get one of those emails so I can see what the hell is really going on in the modern world of skate photography. Cam is in the streets every day with a gang of shredders, pushing himself with his craft as hard as his bros are shredding. And speaking of shredding, Cam gets down too. I don’t just mean he can do a 360 flip and tailslide a curb like most of us, he can really fuck shit up! It’s probably why he’s so good at shooting skate photos: You gotta be a Lion to capture a Lion! —Dave Chami

Name: Sean Michon Insta: @seanmichon Hometown: Southern Colorado, born and raised Website: MichonPhotos.com First camera: 35mm Canon Rebel Ti. First skate photo shot: That’s a tough one, probably my best friend growing up, Gordy Woolfrey, doing a front tail on a little ledge on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. That was shot on that Canon 35mm. Camera Gear: Always changing and upgrading when the finances allow it; at the moment, I’m shooting on a Nikon D600, Canon AE-1 35mm with a 50mm lens, a few Alien Bee B800’s, Tokina 100mm, Nikon 50mm, Sigma 24-70 and anything else I rent or borrow from friends of mine for whatever I may need something for. I could go on, to keep it short—light stands and other various light modifiers. MacBook Pro and most of my post is done in Lightroom and Photoshop.  Favorite subject: People (all kinds of portraiture), or skateboarding. I’m torn between the two, and always trying to expand but shooting skateboarding will always be my true love. Favorite trick to shoot: a good kickflip is always a sight for sore eyes. Favorite photographer: Anthony Acosta was a huge inspiration of mine growing up looking at skate photos. Zander Taketomo’s photo of Ishod switch flipping the love gap was another one that really, really got me hyped to keep shooting. 

Name: Cameron Markin Insta: @itsapirateslife Hometown: Numeralla, Australia Website: CameronMarkin.com First camera: As a wee youngin’ I’d always have disposable cameras thanks to my parents. At 13, I hijacked my dad’s Fujifilm Finepix m603 (look them up; they’re hilarious). First skate photo shot: In 2011, I bought my first DSLR, had some shitty speedlights on the ground, etc. It was of some kid ollieing off a roof who later went on to steal my girlfriend at the time. A year later, in November 2012, Charley Fester lipslid this crazy roller coaster rail which wound up being my first in print. Camera Gear: Bunch of stuff, but it’s all about the 50mm.  Favorite subject: My friends. Favorite trick to shoot: Backside noseblunts (on anything) are the Animal Chin of trick selection. Favorite photographer: Dave Chami, the wizard of all things creative.

[ [

] MAC SHAFER

Page 071: Justin Henry, kickflip backside 50-50. Brooklyn, New York.

] JON CAMPBELL

When Mac was in high school he interned in the art department of the Alien Workshop. I got to know him a little and invited him to a party at my house thinking he’d probably not show. Around 9pm, he shows up with a homemade pumpkin pie. Good thing, because we were drunk and hungry. My point here is that Mac may be the nicest, most well-mannered guy you’ll meet. At a time when images are becoming disposable, it’s nice to see a young person out there striving to take interesting photos. —Chad Bowers

Page 070: Zachary “Ducky” Kovacs, feeble pop out. Covina, California. I met Jon Campbell, “Bird,” two years ago in Oceanside while filming for our friend’s video, Stand By Fire. We would go out the night before we would skate, and Jon would forget to charge his camera and wouldn’t want to buy batteries. He would just not take his camera out that day; and just film clips for his part. With two full-length parts under his belt, he finally got it together and started shooting at every spot. He›s been nailing photos of all our homies ever since. —Zachary “Ducky” Kovacs

Name: Mac Shafer Insta: @mac_shafer

Name: Jon Campbell

Hometown: Dayton, Ohio

Insta: @b._rd

Website: MacShafer.com

Hometown: Oceanside,CA

Camera Gear: Canon 6D, Canon 7D, Canon 24-70, Canon 85mm, 1.4 telephoto

Website: coming soon

converter, Flashpoint 360s, Neewer Speedlight.

Camera Gear: Nikon D800, Nikon 70-210mm, Nikon 35-105mm, Nikon 28mm, Tokina

Favorite subject: Faces.

10-17mm, Canon 540EZ speedlite, Neewer TT560 speedlite, Yongnuo RF605N wireless

Favorite trick to shoot: Anything tweaked out, fisheye, with a nice sky.

triggers, Nikon SC-17 flash cable, and a couple of cheap tripods.

Favorite photographer: Henry Horenstein.

Favorite subject: I like shooting action as well as lifestyle.

First camera: Pentax K1000 that Chad Bowers let me borrow.

Favorite trick to shoot: Back Smith on transition or a good Ducky slam.

First skate photo shot: I randomly shot a sick photo of Tony Hawk doing a frontside air

Favorite photographer: Grant Brittain.

on that camera. I was 16 (2007) and Grant got me on the deck of a demo at the YMCA.

First camera: Canon 20D.

I think I lost the negative but I have one fading print. My first published photo was of

First skate photo shot: High school friend, 2011, Oceanside, CA.

Walker Ryan doing a nollie flip into Governor’s Island (NYC) for a Thunder ad (2016).

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[

] DAKOTA MULLINS

[

] CLÉMENT LE GALL

Pages 072-073: Zac Coyne, backside tailslide. Los Angeles, California.

Pages 074-075: Alex Richard, kickflip. Dunkirk, France.

I haven’t known Dakota all that long, but the first thing I noticed about him was his calm, collected demeanor. Now, that may not sound like an important trait to many, but over the years I’ve learned that photography is a lot about how you react when things take an unexpected turn. Do you panic and blow the opportunity, or do you use the challenge as a way to make the photo better? Dakota doesn’t seem like he knows how to panic. He has a wealth of knowledge about skateboarding and photography and an eagerness to learn, and that seems like a recipe for success. Keep ‘em coming Dakota! —Sam Muller

Clement is from Bretagne, which, in case you didn’t know, is the French region with the most alcoholics (next to le Nord-Pas-De-Calais of course), and I wouldn’t say this reflects much about Clem. But it’s also no accident either. Clem will be your best nightmare for multiple reasons, one being that he’s always down to grab “une mousse” (a cold one), no matter the conditions, even at 3 o’ clock in the morning in the middle of bumfuck nowhere, where you’ll hear him repeat more than 30 times that he’s getting “touché” (tipsy), aka his funniest state. Then after a few more he eventually reaches what he calls “auto-pilot mode,” where anything can happen, but what usually just makes for the best stories of the night. Apart from that, besides being a talented skate photographer, he’s also one of the most determined skateboarders that I know, and watch out because he’ll definitely be way more hell-bent than you to land a trick! Do not let him try anything himself before shooting your photo, otherwise you’ll be watching him trying until the sun goes down, pants ripped and on the verge of a crisis, and you’ll have no choice but to have a trip to the bar afterwards to celebrate the trick or console the failure. And you know how that story ends! —Joseph Biais

Name: Dakota Mullins Insta: @duhcota Hometown: Columbus, Ohio Website: DakotaMullins.com First camera: 35mm Pentax P3. First skate photo shot: Justin Henry, nollie over a rail into a bank, Columbus, Ohio. Camera Gear: Canon 6D, Lumopro Flashes, assorted standard lenses. Favorite subject: Skating, but recently have been getting into portraits more. Favorite trick to shoot: Backside Smith. Favorite photographer: Greg Hunt. 

Name: Clément LE GALL Insta: @legallout Hometown: LANNION (Côtes d’Armor, France) Website: Clg-Photos.Tumblr.com First camera: Canon Eos 33V. First skate photo shot: Dany Hamard, backside tailslide on a ledge in Rennes Camera Gear: Canon 7D mark II, Canon 70-200mm 4, 50mm 1.4, Sigma Art 35mm 1.4, Canon fisheye 8-15mm, Elinchrom Quadra Hybrid, Quantum Q-Flash, Canon Speedlite 580ex II Favorite subject: Jérôme Chevallier or Hugo Maillard. Favorite trick to shoot: An ollie one foot, well stretched.  Favorite photographer: Brian Gaberman, Sem Rubio, Jake Darwen, Cameron Strand, Grant Brittain.

[

] FABIAN REICHENBACH

Pages 078-079: Evan Smith, switch kickflip. Berlin, Germany.

[

] JAKE WICKERSHAM

Pages 076-077: Keelin Austin, roll-on grind. Kansas City, Missouri. I first met Jake when he was 17, staying on my couch in LA. He had all the wide-eyed youth that you’d expect from a young photographer in LA for his first time, but he also had respect. And I’ve been a fan of his ever since. At the time, he was capable of shooting a great photo here or there and now that’s all he does. Jake’s still in Kansas City and what impresses me more than the caliber of his images is his ability to elevate the perception of the skate scene over there. He makes the skateboarding look better, and in my opinion, that’s a skate photographer’s primary role! —Lance Hakker Name: Jake Wickersham Insta: @wickerslam

Fabian Reichenbach hails from a fairly small city called Landau, located in the beautiful southwest of Germany. I can´t really recall when, but all of a sudden seeing photos shot by this guy made me kind of jealous. Even though he never lived in a big city with tons of great and well known skateboarders to shoot, he established some great skill and something important I might be lacking here and there—creativity. Plus, he manages to light up his photos with two flashes only, something I will never be able to understand. Even though he well is pretty picky about how he wants things to turn out, he never seems to be in a rush either whilst shooting. Damn, I sometimes am lacking that as well! Actually, I have to come to the conclusion I am lacking everything which makes Fabian a great photographer and all those features of him will definitely get him somewhere big—if it hasn’t already happened! —Thomas Gentsch Name: Fabian Reichenbach Insta: @fabianreichenbach Hometown: Small city near the East French border in Germany called Landau.

Hometown: Kansas City, Missouri

Website: ReichenbachPhoto.com

Website: JakeWickersham.com

Camera Gear: Nikon D3s, FM2,Olympus Mju, Fuji x100, Nikkor 10.5 2.8 Fisheye, Nikkor

Camera Gear: Nikon D700, 16mm, 24mm, 50mm, 85mm, Neewer AD-360 flashes,

16mm Fish, Nikkor 50mm 1.4 D, Nikkor 24-70 2.8 AF ED G, Nikkor 85mm 1.8 AF D, a

Nikon speedlights.

couple of flashes, CF-cards and rolls of film

Favorite subject: Being from the Midwest, I’ve always had a major appreciation for the country and nature. Whenever I’m not shooting skating, you can find me in the middle of nowhere shooting the landscapes. Favorite trick to shoot: Love me some wallrides! Favorite photographer: I’m inspired by so many photographers; Gaberman and Jonathan Mehring are two huge inspirations for sure. First Camera: Nikon D200.

Favorite subject: Having a camera during a party can be pretty fun! Favorite trick to shoot: Hard to say, many actually, but I’m always stoked about getting a nice kickflip moment! Favorite photographer: There are a few out there, but for the skateboarding part I’d say Fred Mortagne influenced me, pretty much. And Jelle Keppens is also a photog who’s pretty good at what he’s doing! First camera: A couple of other small digital ones for years but the first actual camera was a Nikon D40.

First skate photo shot: My first skate photo that I ever shot had to have been of my

First skate photo shot: First skate photo I just found is a back tail on a curb by Jakob

dear friend, Jordan Ferraguti, ollieing over the nine-stair rail at my old middle school.

Dohse, 2013 in Karlsruhe. He is centered in the frame, shot with the Nikon D40, straight

The year was 2009. Oh, the nostalgia.

flashed and the 18-55 Kit-Lens at 18mm. Pretty awful, haha.


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CAMERON MARKIN Ben James, fakie ollie. Sydney, Australia.


SEAN MICHON Jordan Maxham, feeble transfer. Pasadena, California. 068


JON CAMPBELL Zachary “Ducky” Kovacs, feeble pop out. Covina, California. 070


MAC SCAFER Justin Henry, kickflip backside 50-50. Brooklyn, New York.


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DAKOTA MULLINS Zac Coyne, backside tailslide. Los Angeles, California.


CLÉMENT LE GALL Alex Richard, kickflip. Dunkirk, France.

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JAKE WICKERSHAM Keelin Austin, roll-on grind. Kansas City, Missouri.


FABIAN REICHENBACH Evan Smith, switch kickflip. Munich, Germany. 078


Polerizer. San Diego, California.

080


WORDS: SWIFT RAPHY: SWIFT

PHOTOG

My whole life I’ve always rooted for the underdog. I mean, I’m cool with the superstars who are out there day in and day out killing it on all levels and can just seem to do no wrong. But to me it’s just so much more exciting to see someone work their ass off and get positive results when the chips are stacked against them. Auby Taylor is one of those underdogs. Coming from a small town in Texas the odds were against him when he moved out to California to find the dream skateboard scenario. Jumping from one company to another over the years has been tough on Auby but he found a home with Black Label and he’s loving the freedom to be Auby. Not sure if any of you know this but before Auby got on The Label he had released a video part entitled Auby’s World in October 2014, and at the time it was one of the gnarliest street parts ever—considering Auby was merely a flow rider. Since that part came out Auby has undertaken a transformation into that of an ‘80s era vert pro and in just two years he’s done a fucking pretty good job at that. Watching him skate now throws me back into my youth when I got to see all the Texas skaters like Jeff Phillips, Dan Wilkes, Craig Johnson, and John Gibson in their heydays. He might be channeling some Jeff Phillips energy out of the atmosphere. Did I mention I dig the underdog?


Fakie-finger. Encinitas, California.

082


Method air. Pala Pool, California.


084

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Smith vert. Hemet, California.

086


Indy to fakie. Encinitas, California.


Fastplant to fakie. Long Beach, California.

088


090


TYSON PETERSON FRONTSIDE FEEBLE FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: ACOSTA

SESSIONS


PATRICK RYAN BONELESS OCEANSIDE, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: SWIFT

SESSIONS

092


DA LTO N D E R N SMITH GRIND FRESNO, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: SWIFT

SESSIONS

094


096


LOUIE LOPEZ WALLRIDE NOLLIE BIGSPIN MANHATTAN BEACH, CALIFORNIA PHOTOS: ACOSTA

SESSIONS


NA-KEL SMITH OLLIE LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: ACOSTA

SESSIONS

098


100


TRISTAN RENNIE OLLIE SAN BERNARDINO, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: SWIFT

SESSIONS


102


KYLE WALKER & DOMINICK WALKER KICKFLIPS LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: ACOSTA

SESSIONS


104


PAUL HART NOLLIE BACKSIDE TAILSLIDE FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: ACOSTA

SESSIONS


SHAUN ROSS FRONTSIDE FAST PLANT SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: SWIFT

SESSIONS

106


108


KIRBY LIPSLIDE CARLSBAD, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: SWIFT

SESSIONS


NEW BALANCE NUMERIC PROUDLY WELCOMES


BRANDON WESTGATE | KICKFLIP


INSANE-A-THANE INSANELY TOUGH URETHANE BY OJ WHEELS

Milton Martinez, kickflp wallride.


The Skateboard Mag 162  

Join us for a trip to the romance capital of the world with Louie Lo, Axel Crusher, "The Provider" Collin Provost, as Volcom explores Paris....