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S K A T E B O A R D I S S U E A U G U S T

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006 Printed in the U.S.A. Copyright 2017 by The Berrics, LLC, Los Angeles, CA. The Skateboard Mag (ISSN 1548-3975; August 2017; Issue #161) is published monthly by The Berrics, LLC. 2535 E 12th St. Unit A, Los Angeles, CA 90021. Subscriptions in the U.S.A. are $19.95 for 12 issues. PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID at Los Angeles, CA, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Skateboard Mag, P.O. Box 15355, North Hollywood, CA, 91615.


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CONTENTS 012 INTRO Words by Stuart Gomez 018 UTILITIES Photos by Joey Shigeo 030 WIND REVOLUTION Photos by Mike Blabac. Words by Stuart Gomez

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040 Hi Ho, Silva! Photos by Anthony Acosta. Words by Stuart Gomez 052 ARRIVALS: Yuto Horigome Photos by Brandon Alton. Words by Joey Shigeo 060 BEACH FOSSILS X HABITAT Photos by Jonathan Mehring. Words by Leland Ware 066 CURREN CAPLES Photos by Anthony Acosta 078 ARAMIS HUDSON Photos by Atiba Jefferson. Words by Ethan Singleton 084 CHANGE OF SCENERY Photos by Anthony Acosta. Words by Anthony Acosta 104 SESSIONS

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COVER: If you’re looking for a change of pace, you can’t really do better than Barcelona’s relaxed atmosphere. Daan Van Der Linden goes with the flow with this Spanish fly nollie over the rail. Photo: Acosta CONTENTS: “Tom Karangelov was here.” That’s what it says on the whiteboard here at The Mag office (along with a bubbly smiley face). It’s a comforting reminder that on any given day, Tom K might be just across the river in East LA taildrop crooked grinding his heart out. Photo: Acosta

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NIKESB.COM

SB BLAZER VAPOR AS WORN BY NYJAH HUSTON

ALWAYS FRESH


F R O N T S ID E H A L F C A B F L IP /// GUSTAV TØ N N ESEN IN LO N D O N


Photography: Zander Taketomo Š 2017 adidas AG.


Introducción “The rain in Spain stays mainly on the plain.” When this well-known vocal exercise appeared in My Fair Lady, heroine Eliza Doolittle managed to turn the tongue twister into a loaded comment on society. Devised to tame her rocky cockney twang, she bucked against properly enunciating the phrase like a wild bronco. Skaters react similarly. Nowadays when it rains in Spain, we go insane in the membrane. As a longtime skate destination, Spain has been playing host to skaters of all nationalities since the dawn of modern skate coverage. Returning travelers have nothing but good things to say about the vibe, the locals, and the spots. Like its native dish, paella, Spain is a mix of some of the best stuff. And when it’s done right, you always come back for seconds. In this issue, we visit some of Spain’s finest street spots with the Vans riders and spend a couple of days with Red Bull at two factories in Asturias responsible for supplying turbines to wind farms all over the world. (Yes, the Red Bull dudes do skate them.) It’s mildly surprising that such a geographically tiny country could play such a big role in skateboarding; even Eliza Doolittle would be impressed. Spain, it does a lot.

PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY ACOSTA

WORDS: STUART GOMEZ

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No Spain, no gain. Curren Caples comes through with a Barcelonely back three, as seen in his PUSH part.


I S S U E

N U M B E R

AKO JEFFERSON JOEY SHIGEO

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EDITORIAL DIRECTOR / ART DIRECTOR MANAGING EDITOR

STUART GOMEZ

STAFF WRITER

ERIC MCHENRY B E N K E L LY

PRODUCTION ARTIST / DESIGNER DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING

LANCE HAKKER

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS B R A N D O N A LT O N , M I K E B L A B A C , A L E X B R A Z A , R YA N F LY N N , AT I B A J E F F E R S O N PAULO MACEDO, FRANKIE MARTINEZ, JONATHAN MEHRING CONTRIBUTING WRITERS ETHAN SINGLETON, LELAND WARE THE BERRICS

MOON MORSE

PUBLISHER BOOKKEEPER

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS ANTHONY ACOSTA, ERIC “RODENT” CHESLAK, BART JONES, JACOB MESSEX, JOEY SHIGEO

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S17 TEE CAPSULE “Dimanche” “Rubber” “In Limbo” Made in Los Angeles, CA sovrn.la


WIND REVOLUTION

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RED BULL SKATES SPAIN’S WIND TURBINE FACTORIES WORDS: STUART GOMEZ

Alex Sorgente, frontside ollie.

PHOTOGRAPHY: MIKE BLABAC


Ryan Sheckler, crooked grind.

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WIND REVOLUTION If you’ve spent any time driving on the I-10 around Palm Springs, you’ve likely spotted the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm. Row after row of wind turbines spinning their blades is a mesmerizing sight. The Red Bull team—Ryan Sheckler, Alex Sorgente, Danny León, and Zion Wright—recently visited two factories in Spain to see how this type of massive wind turbine is manufactured, from start to finish. Spain’s Danny León regularly catches glimpses of these perfectly round turbine pipes on his trips to Principado de Asturias. Like any other skater, Danny can’t help but fantasize about a centrifugal sesh in one of these bad boys, and he got his wish in the form of a two-day shoot in the towns of Avilés and Gijón—the factories Dacero and Windar Renovables, respectively—in Asturias. Dacero is responsible for manufacturing the steel sheets; Windar Renovables adds the curves and other finishing touches that make these pipes so appealing to skaters. Measuring up to 26 feet wide in diameter, each tube should have enough circumference to keep the Red Bull dudes busy. But the skaters essentially had their run of both places, utilizing any number of industrial machinery and enlisting the help of the workers to situate each tube before it’s eventually shipped off to one of many global wind farms (the world’s largest wind farm, in Tehachapi, California, has an astonishing 586 turbines in various sizes). Skateboarding isn’t exactly the most eco-friendly activity; producing any one of the components in a typical complete setup takes a toll on the environment. This doesn’t mean that skaters don’t care about Mother Earth. To the contrary, many skaters have an enormous connection with their environments (after all, we need somewhere to skate). And modern advances in renewable energy are changing the face of industry in general: the factories that press the planks, the machines that squeeze out the urethane, and the foundries that molt the metal are increasingly powered by wind and the sun. Thanks to the workers at these Asturias factories, using renewable energy and reducing our carbon footprint today is no longer a pipe dream.


Zion Wright, Madonna.

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Ryan Sheckler, ollie.


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Zion Wright, frontside ollie.


WORDS: STUART GOMEZ

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PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY ACOSTA


Smith grind. Los Angeles, California.

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You’ve got to hand it Mason Silva—he sure knows how to hit the ground running. Upon graduation in 2015, he left his high school days in the dust and became a full-fledged Element team rider. The newly free Mason was liberated to crisscross the globe and stack clips beside his teammates; he was eating, breathing, and very-little-sleeping that Element life. “I signed the contract that June,” Silva says. “God damn, that seems like forever ago!” While he had always been involved in trips with the team when he was still in school, from the point Silva crossed that threshold and was “Welcomed to the Family” (Element’s favored term of introduction) he became irreversibly bound by the team’s familial vibes. Element’s terminology is the skate world’s variation on the Olive Garden slogan, but Element’s motto isn’t disingenuous; with Element, you’re family wherever you are.


Kickflip frontside lipslide. Los Angeles, California. Photo: Flynn

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Still, Silva doesn’t take his position within this legendary

This year, Element is celebrating a quarter century in

company’s legacy for granted. Reflecting on long stretches on

skateboarding. How’s that for longevity? (For perspective,

tour, Silva says, “It’s still a little bit of a shock to go to a signing

consider that Silva turns 25 in 2022.) It’s marking the oc-

and be with everyone. Being next to Evan, next to Nyjah, I’m

casion with a highly anticipated full-length, which Silva is

like, ‘Oh shit. I’m actually on this team!’”

working hard to film for. “I feel like I’ve been putting stuff

He just returned from a five-day trip, hitting Minnesota and Idaho and all points in between—activities included demos,

aside for a long time,” Silva says, “and I think this video is one that I’ll be able to put all my best stuff into.”

signings, and renting out a bowling alley in Boise. For Silva,

Silva was The Skateboard Mag’s “Year’s Best Am” in

there was no “Phew, I’m glad to be back.” You can tell that he

2015. We knew he had something special then, but what

feels at home with his sponsor, and this is partly why he cranks

we didn’t realize was that he was just getting started. Hi

out such amazing footage (like his bitch slap of an opening part

Ho, Silva. Away!

in last year’s Zygote, for example); Silva loves the company he works for. It’s like he’s just on a trip with his friends, but taking care of business at the same time.

046


Hurricane. Alhambra, California.


Backside heelflip. Alhambra, California.

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Crooked grind. Redondo Beach, California. Photo: Atiba

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WORDS: JOEY SHIGEO PHOTOGRAPHY: BRANDON ALTON

Japan is a country known for sensory overload and the newest in future tech—the same can be said for the country’s recent import, Yuto Horigome. Yuto first arrived in LA a little over a year ago, and with little more than hand gestures and head nods he put down two hammers in a day that punctuated his breakout Next New Wave part for The Mag. His learning curve for stacking clips in America may have been minimal, but the language barrier upon arrival was a different story. As Blind’s Bill Weiss recalls, “I had to go to the airport, find him, bring him home with me and basically use flash cards so we can communicate: I’d have a burrito card, a hamburger, a bathroom card, etcetera.” Thankfully, actions speak louder than words. “We hit the ground running pretty hard—I think the first thing we did was that twenty-stair rail for the five-0, then that big gap,” Weiss said. “Then the next day we wanted to get a vert photo since I heard he skated vert, which is something no one really knew about.” Oh yeah, and he can skate vert too. He’s part of that next generation of skater who’s extremely versatile and has advanced technical ability (it’s no wonder why Shane O’Neill is one of his favorites). This year, Yuto has been quietly killing the contest scene. Not only did he qualify for Street League, but he also nabbed a podium spot in three international pro contests behind household name superpros like Nyjah and Shane. Which leads one to ask, What’s next for this “Am” from Japan? As Weiss puts it, “He definitely seems like he’s got a clear path the way things are going, so….” You don’t need a flash card to see that Yuto has arrived.

052


What are your thoughts on the 2020 Olympics being in Japan? Has the country started giving you money to build your own Olympic training facility?  Yeah, I mean it’s fine, but it is making it harder to skate street in Japan because in the eyes of the public it’s still property damage, so all the news media is kind of blowing it up. I don’t think the government’s funding park building yet, but I wish they’d make a park in Japan like The Berrics.  How did you get so good at contests? Have you been doing contests for a long time? Actually, at the beginning I never used to win. I’d get all bummed that I lost and it’d make me want to practice more and get better. Then I started entering just any and every contest I could and got more used to competing.   Do you get nervous in contests?   Yeah, dude. I get super nervous and my legs start shaking. Dude, I can even like hear how loud my heart is pounding [laughs].   How did you feel about getting into Street League? Was that a goal of yours to get in there?  How old are you and where are you from?

It was a goal and a dream, for sure dude! I’m so hyped!

Eighteen and from Tokyo.

Do you feel like skating is getting bigger in Japan these days?

How old were you when you first started skating? When I was six; my dad was a skater so he used to take me

Yeah, it’s getting much bigger.  

out when he’d go skating.

When was your first trip to the United States, and was it

  Where did you grow up skating and did you mostly skate parks, street, ramps, or little bit of everything?

hard not being able to speak English? My first time in the States was about four years ago when I

When I first started, there was this park called SSP that was

visited with my mom, but it was pretty boring. She made me go

like ten minutes away from my house. That’s where my dad

to Disneyland and do touristy stuff [laughs]. And, as for English,

and his friends first started skating and I’d go there with him.  

I still can’t really speak it so it’s pretty tough.

Did you have a lot of friends who skated with you? 

How have you been learning English? Do you use your

Yeah, I have some friends from school that I always go out with. My homie, Matsumoto, has been skating for five years, but he’s getting pretty good!

phone for help? I hang a lot with Micky [Papa], Richie [Valdez], and TJ [Rogers], so they teach me a lot [laughs]. “Fuck 12. Where da hoes at?! You know what it is!!”

You are very diverse in that you can skate tech ledges, big

stuff, and tranny. If you only had one thing to skate for the

You five-0’d that big rail in LA. Did you get used to skating

rest of your life what would it be, and why?

big rails and gaps in Japan? I never thought Japan was too

It’d have to be a ledge. You can skate a ledge no matter how old you get.

well known for big obstacles. I had never done one that big but I had been doing pretty

big ones since I was back in Japan.

Who has been the biggest influence on your skateboarding? I watch all kinds of parts and they’ve all influenced me in

What do you think of Mike Sinclair, and does he ever tease you? 

one way or another.  

He’s such a nice dude! And he’s hilarious!

Which skateboarder has your favorite style of all time?

Shane O’Neill.

Have you witnessed Bill Weiss do a naked McTwist in

person yet?

What’s your favorite video part?

[Laughs] Haven’t seen it live yet but I’m waiting for the

Shane O’Neill in Not Another TransWorld Video [2011].

chance.  

How did you get sponsored?

Do you want to eventually move to the U.S. and live here

Well, my first sponsor was Instant Skateshop. I had been going there since I started skating so they were down once I

permanently? Hell yeah! As soon as possible!  

started getting better.

Besides skating what other things do you do for fun?

Are your parents supportive of you someday being a professional skateboarder? 

Going out with chicks or playing video games at the arcade [laughs].

Yeah, they’ve always supported me.  

—Translation by Nino Moscardi

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Nollie heelflip crooked grind. Los Angeles, California.


Indy grab. Huntington Beach, California.

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Switch flip. Irvine, California.


Nollie backside 180 fakie front crook fakie flip out. Lake Forest, California.

058


Switch frontside hurricane. Lake Forest, California.


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BEACH FOSSILS

CREATIVELY CONNECTED PHOTOGRAPHY: JONATHAN MEHRING

WORDS: LELAND WARE

Beach Fossils is an indie rock band from Brooklyn consisting of Dustin Payseur, Jack Doyle Smith, and Tommy Davidson. Formed in 2009, the band has released three albums over the past eight years including their latest, Somersault. For their video for Somersault’s “Sugar,” Beach Fossils teamed up with Habitat videographer Brennan Conroy to produce the visuals that include cameos from Josh Matthews and Kevin Lowry. Habitat will also be releasing a limited-edition Beach Fossils deck collaboration. As it turns out, the band has deep roots in skating as Jack Doyle Smith explains below. “As a kid I got into all kinds of activities but playing music and skateboarding were by far the ones I liked the most. I grew up in Seattle and I’ve been skating since the age of 13. I used to bring an old Sony Handycam everywhere I went. I was always making ridiculous edits of my friends and I skating around the city. And now, I feel very blessed that I get to spend almost all of my time playing music. A couple of the other guys in Beach Fossils also grew up skating, so we always talked about the idea of doing some sort of custom deck. That’s why it was awesome to be able to collaborate with Habitat.  “Music and skateboarding are obviously very different from each other, but go hand-in-hand. I always love seeing how music fits into skate videos. They are both so expressive, so it’s always interesting to see a person’s style synced up with a song.”


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Tommy Davidson.

Jack Doyle Smith and Dustin Payseur.


“IT WAS AWESOME TO BE ABLE TO COLLABORATE WITH HABITAT.” —JACK DOYLE SMITH

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Tommy Davidson, Dustin Payseur, and Josh Matthews, frontside boardslide.


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PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY ACOSTA

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WORDS: ETHAN SINGLETON

Aramis Hudson Compton, Skateboarding, and Destiny

A few weeks ago I caught up with Aramis Hudson in Compton—a

temperament said quite the contrary. His energy was confident,

city which at one point was infamous for being the ground

dynamic and radiating of optimism—just like his skateboarding.

zero of gang activity in California. We met at Wilson Park, and

Aramis is a humble dude, and not just because he’s been

by the time I had pulled up Aramis had already gotten himself

through a lot. As he recounted his already ten-year experience

comfortable. When he caught me walking over, he stood up,

as a skateboarder, he talked about his roots in Compton; a few

opened his arms and, with the fervor of a diplomat, said, “This

of his biggest supporters; and his earliest days of skating in Los

is where I stay! Compton!”

Angeles. He expresses that while he can never forget his roots,

It was the day before Father’s Day, and Aramis, a twenty-

he’ll also never lose sight of what is possible. He proclaimed,

year-old kid who’d lost his father to cancer only two years

“One day, I’m gonna give back to this city, bro.” And in describing

prior, expressed no true signs of pain. As a matter of fact, his

what’s kept him driven for so long, he said, “It’s God, bro. Destiny.”

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PORTRAIT: ATIBA


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“I’m definitely giving

back to my city when I get a chance.”

Aramis Hudson

Half-Cab heelflip. San Pedro, California. Photo: Macedo


“I just fell into the right path— I don’t know

what happened!”

Aramis Hudson

Frontside noseblunt slide. Inland Empire, California. Photo: Atiba

082


Bigspin heelflip. Los Angeles, California. Photos: Atiba


084


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN CHANGE OF SCENERY

PHOTOGRAPHY

ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN. SUMMER IN

SPAIN

WORDS & PHOTOGRAPHY: ANTHONY ACOSTA

fired up to skate!

and motivating to get out of the comfort zone for a bit and get

city and its offering of spots. Most importantly, it was awesome

most talented skateboarders in the world take advantage of the

and once again I had an amazing trip.  I witnessed some of the

how many times I’ve been here, too many times to remember

city was designed with skateboarding in mind. I don’t even know

are spots literally everywhere you look and it seems as though the

of the laid back lifestyle and it’s never ending list of spots. There

Barcelona has always been a top destination for skaters because

inspiration and a much needed change of scenery.

few of the reasons to pack my bags and hit the road to find some

over, and seeing so many spots getting skate stopped are just a

hopping fences into school yards just to get kicked out over and

times a refresh is necessary to keep the fire lit. Things like traffic,

Living in LA, the daily routine can get a little redundant and some-

c HA N GE oF s C E N E RY


Daan Van Der Linden, hurricane.

086


SEVENTEEN

TWO THOUSAND ANTHONY ACOSTA

PHOTOGRAPHY

CHANGE OF SCENERY

BCN.

SPAIN

SUMMER IN

dV.


Chris Pfanner, frontside 180.

088

TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY

ANTHONY ACOSTA

PHOTOGRAPHY

BCN. SUMMER IN SPAIN

cP.


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN.

eB.

SUMMER IN SPAIN

090


Elijah Berle, backside air.


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN.

SUMMER IN SPAIN

092

k W.


Kyle Walker, frontside 50-50.


Curren Caples, frontside bluntslide transfer.

094


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN. SUMMER IN SPAIN

cC .


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN.

17 .

SUMMER IN SPAIN

096


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN.

SUMMER IN SPAIN

098

gR .


Geoff Rowley, frontside wallride.


100

SEVENTEEN

TWO THOUSAND CHANGE OF SCENERY

ANTHONY ACOSTA

PHOTOGRAPHY

BCN. SUMMER IN SPAIN

eB.


Elijah Berle, 50-50 across and down.


Daan Van Der Linden, backside wallride.

102


TWO THOUSAND

SEVENTEEN

CHANGE OF SCENERY PHOTOGRAPHY ANTHONY ACOSTA

BCN.

SUMMER IN SPAIN

dV.


SESSIONS 104


GRANT TAYLOR FRONTSIDE GRIND ATLANTA, GEORGIA PHOTO: RODENT


DONOVON PISCOPO OLLIE BACKSIDE WALLRIDE LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: MARTINEZ

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AXEL CRUYSBERGHS FRONTSIDE 180 FAKIE FIVE-0 BARCELONA, SPAIN PHOTO: ACOSTA

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ADRIEN BULARD BIGGERFLIP HIPPIE JUMP GRANADA HILLS, CALIFORNIA PHOTOS: BRAZA


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SAMMY MONTANO BACKSIDE SMITH FULLERTON, CALIFORNIA PHOTO: ACOSTA


JOHN FITZGERALD FIVE-0 FRONTSIDE GRAB LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA P H OTO : F LY N N

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ANTONIO DURAO SWITCH FRONTSIDE FLIP BURLINGTON, VERMONT PHOTO: JONES

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The Skateboard Mag 161  

Welcome to Spain… home of wine, women, and wind turbines. Issue #161 of The Skateboard Mag takes you to the flyest Spanish spots in Barcelon...

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