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THE SKATEBOARD MAG

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Contents: The arrival of next year’s long-awaited (five years and counting) Foundation full-length has FOSKCO devotees weak in the knees. Corey Glick is ready for his close-up with a nosegrind gap out. Orange County, California. Photo: Atiba

Printed In The U.S.A. Copyright 2017 By The Berrics, Llc, Los Angeles, Ca. The Skateboard Mag (Issn 1548-3975; February 2017; Issue #155) Is Published Monthly By The Berrics, Llc. 2535 E 12Th St. Unit A, Los Angeles, Ca 90021. Subscriptions In The U.s.a. Are $19.95 For 12 Issues. Periodical Postage Paid At Los Angeles, Ca, And At Additional Mailing Offices. Postmaster: Send Address Changes To The Skateboard Mag, P.o. Box 15355, North Hollywood, Ca, 91615.

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12 INITIAL REMARKS 16 CANTEEN 18 PRODUCT KIT 28 RADAR: DASHAWN JORDAN 40 THE SPOTHUNTER’S GUIDE TO ZHENGHOU 50 IN TRANSITION 72 DARKROOM 74 THE EDUCATION OF SIMON BANNEROT 82 SANTA CRUZ: KNOW YOUR RIGHT 96 RAVEBOURN 104 CROPS

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Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation.Publication Title: The Skateboard Mag. Publication Number: 022-855 Filing Date: 12-23-14. Issue Frequency: Monthly. Number of Issues Published Annually: 12. Annual Subscription Price: $19.95. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 2647 Gateway Rd Ste 105 PMB 517 Carlsbad, CA 92009. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher: 2535 E. 12th St Unit A Los Angeles, CA 90021. Publisher: The Berrics, LLC. Editorial Director: Dave Swift. Managing Editor: Joey Shigeo Muellner. Owner’s Full Name and Complete Address: The Berrics, LLC, 2535 E. 12th St Unit A Los Angeles, CA 90021.Known bondholders, mortgagees and other security holders owning or holding one percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None. Publication Title: The Skateboard Mag. Issue date for Circulation Data Below: December 2014.Extent and Nature of Circulation: The average number of copies printed per issue during the preceding 12 months was 21,880. For issue published nearest to filing date: 13,715. The average paid and/or requested mail subscriptions for the preceding 12 months was 5,500 and for the issue nearest to filing date: 4,841. The average sale of copies for the preceding 12 months was 5,192. For the issue nearest to filling date: 3,128. The average total paid and/or requested circulation for the preceding 12 months was 10,692. For the issue nearest to filing date: 7,969. The average number of copies distributed free outside the mail for the preceding 12 months was 4,865. For the issue nearest to filing date: 527. The average total distribution for the preceding 12 months was 15,557. For the issue nearest to filing date: 8,496. The average total of copies not distributed for the preceding 12 months was 6,323. For the issue nearest to filing date: 5,219. The average total circulation for the preceding 12 months was 21,880. For the issue nearest to filing date: 13,715. The average percent paid and or requested circulation for the preceding 12 months was 68.73%. For the issue nearest to filing date: 93.80%.I certify that all information furnished is true and complete. Joel Petersen, Publisher / General Manager

Cover: Dominick Walker zigs and zags on his recent trip to Spain filming for the upcoming Element video. Most of the country’s rails were a little too small and straightforward for Domo, but he eventually found one that was just right. Walker: Barcelona ranger. Photo: Darwen


BLAKE JOHNSON

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Initial Remarks

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This Neen Williams heelflip in Downtown LA is nothing to laugh at. Photo: Messex

Text: Stuart Gomez


They All Laughed I skate to work. Being able to commute via skateboard every day in sunny So Cal—a relatively flat two-anda-half miles—is a dream come true for an obsessed skater. But some days it’s a nightmare. This was one of those days. DOWNTOWN, HISTORIC CORE: My legs were creaky, my eyes were bleary, and my mouth was cotton-dry. No, it wasn’t a late night—I’m just old. That harsh early morning sunshine always seems to work against me when I take those first few pushes at the beginning of the day. Maybe I’m just superstitious, but I believe that those initial pushes always determine how my day will go. This morning was a doozy. I went to throw my board down, but I saw something shoot across the sidewalk out of the corner of my eye so I hesitated. That awkward stutter step threw me off balance and I never regained my rhythm. This is the section of downtown LA where the hoity-toity come to play. “Art Walk,” impromptu parades at midnight, flash mobs (yes, that’s still a thing), and nude bikers with boomboxes blaring commercial ‘70s disco. All of this—and more—is just a small part of the colorful tapestry that is life in downtown Los Angeles. I hear that ten years ago it wasn’t like this; it was virtually a wasteland. I guess I was ten years too late, because this bougie wonderland is driving me crazy and I can’t wait to just get to work already. I went to my corner coffee joint, “Bean There, Done That,” to get that first delicious cup o’ joe. The remnants of the previous night’s debauchery was being pressure-washed off of the sidewalks, as per usual, and I managed to soak up a little bit of that gooey detritus on my shoes. When I finally did get to jump on my board, I was slip-slidin’ away on a not-so-fantastic voyage and kinda rolled my ankle a little bit. I recovered quickly but my coffee went flying. I was a little embarrassed, but no one noticed. I just whistled and pretended that it didn’t happen. SKID ROW: I take a quick trip through “Skid Row” in the mornings (and again at night). It’s a bracing reminder that things could be worse. This area’s name is sometimes the butt of jokes. Like, when you’re “on the skids” it means that you’ve hit rock bottom. I had to re-up my coffee, so I stopped by the convenience store “Corner: The Market” for some slightly less rich java. My morning in Skid Row was nothing to laugh about. Coming around a corner, I saw that I was free and clear so I went for broke and just pushed to my heart’s content, enjoying how the early morning rays reflected off of the oily puddles and glinted off of the discarded syringes. I should’ve known better. Out of nowhere, a man pushed his caravan of shopping carts out of an alley and into the street. Like me, he probably saw that there was no traffic on the street. Or, even more likely, he didn’t look at all. I flew face first into a funky blanket. I was picking little bits of pink fur (or fiberglass) off of my skin the rest of the day. Looking at the engineer of this crazy train, I said, “What the hell, man?!” Casey Jr. was unfazed, and he kept on truckin’. I looked down and there was coffee all over my griptape. And I imagined that my power skid in Skid Row possibly left skid marks on my Ethikas. I am barely ten minutes away from home and I’ll be ten dollars in the hole for coffee by the time I get to work. I curse my luck and then move on to Little Tokyo. LITTLE TOKYO: Sushi, Hello Kitty, sneaker shops, poke bowls, and other things I can’t afford. Little Tokyo is the ultimate window-shopping destination for someone like me who will never find himself in

Japan, but who loves “Hibana Spark” (on Netflix, check it out). Li’l Tokes is typically empty this early in the morning, except for a few fish delivery trucks. This morning, I glanced ahead and saw that a new poke bowl spot is opening across the street from the other poke bowl spot. Pretty soon we’re gonna run out of tuna. I stop at “Café Joe Mama” for a nice, hot cup of joe. This will be the one. I skate along the sidewalk (as opposed to the street, because I like the little bumps and grooves that the expanding tree roots create), blowing on the lid of my coffee like a deranged flautist. I see two pretty Asian girls approaching and I instinctively go into what I think is a very cool Dogtown cruising stance, swerving around like I’m Eric Dressen dodging bullets in Venice Beach. Like the rest of downtown, the sidewalks of Little Tokyo aren’t the cleanest. You can typically find wellfed street rats scurrying from Yogurtland to Pinkberry, trading toppings with the lethargic pigeons. Now, with the copious raw tuna, the local rats have a veritable found feast to keep them busy every day. They’ve got a good thing going, and they don’t particularly seem to feel any fear or threat from the various humans who cross their paths on a day-to-day basis. Case in point: as I did my Z-Boy shtick for the girls, a bloated rodent came waddling out of the darkness like Fred Sanford after a pie-eating contest with Aunt Esther. I tried to swerve, but I hit a rock. Down goes the coffee. My loaded backpack does the rest, pulling me down face-to-face with one of the least shook vermin to ever scurry. Oh, rats. The girls seemed more scared than I was. Looking down the barrel of a loaded rat, I was resigned to accept my fate. That’s what I get for thinking that these girls would be impressed by an old man on a skateboard. Pathetic. Luckily, the rat had places to be so he just scampered off. So did the girls. And, eventually, once the color came back to my usually rosy cheeks, so did I. ARTS DISTRICT: By now I was half-thinking of taking an Uber. I’ve already wasted an exorbitant amount on coffee that was currently caffeinating the sidewalk. But I’m one of those guys who just won’t give up—even when it would make sense to do so—at least that’s what my wife tells me. I decided to stick it out and go for yet another cup of coffee. I needed the fuel now more than ever! The local jail is a few blocks away, and most of the cops go to “Five-O Grindz” (50 Alameda Place) for their regular fix. I’d never been there, so I thought that I’d check it out. Hell, if the coffee is good enough for the police then I’ll cop some of that, too. I take my first sip and I’m thinking, this coffee sucks. It figures that the cops like it so much. Every sip tasted like entrapment. And, since it’s in the Arts District, the only doughnuts they carry are vegan ones. It suddenly makes sense: the cops come here to keep an eye on the vegans. With all of the militant vegan propaganda popping up around downtown, this is like killing two birds (so to speak—killing birds is wrong). I’m already late, but at least I’ve got my coffee sorted. I dropped my board down and pushed right into the back of one the biggest policemen you ever did see. I spilled my overpriced “coffee” all over his back. My life flashed before my eyes. I remembered every single representation of prison life that I’d seen in popular culture—from “Barney Miller” (yes!) to “Oz” (ouch!)—and my heart skipped a beat when I thought, Who is going to take care of my dog? Half a dozen on-duty officers crowded towards me, looking me over with their right hands on their hips and their left hands reaching for their left shoulders. Once they had a moment to appraise the situation, their eyes darted from me to the soaking wet victim of my flying coffee. They exchanged glances with each other. Their expressions softened, and then they all laughed. It turns out that the big officer I accidentally assaulted was a rookie and this was just the latest in a long line of scheduled and unscheduled hazing for him. When I told them about my travails this morning on the way to work, they offered me a police escort. I said, “Really?!” They said, “No, not really,” then they all laughed again. Well at least buy me a coffee.


Text: Stuart Gomez

Photography: Joey Shigeo

This month, Eric Koston announced his latest endeavor. His brand, Numbers, makes a big splash with its collab colorway with Nike SB. Nike SB x Numbers Hyperfeel Koston 3 QS ($155.00) comes in a striking obsidian/black/copper flash colorway; some of us think that it resembles that last transcendent moment before the sun dips below the horizon beyond the Pacific Ocean. If you’re wondering what “obsidian” means: it’s a naturally occurring volcanic glass. So, yeah, basically a description of Koston’s style. The Hyperfeel Koston 3s are all designed to have a “locked in” feel. Every element from the Koston-approved tread to the breathable Flyknit collar and midfoot Flywire cables are planned to make the shoe just feel like an extension of your foot. The Nike SB x Numbers Hyperfeel Koston 3 QS is available exclusively at theberrics.com/canteen.

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MESSING UP YOUR ROOM FOR OVER 30 YEARS

THOUSANDS OF PRODUCTS. FREE SHIPPING. FREE RETURNS.* *SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS

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Text: Stuart Gomez Photography: Joey Shigeo

>PRODUCT KIT

Looking to come out of your shell this month? The Product Kit can help you with that. We’ve got collaborations, hats, and a reissue (that is certain to have an entire generation saying, “Swamp rat, super good”). We’ve got plenty of options to express yourself, head to toe. Choosing shoes might be the most important decision that a skater can make. You want performance and you want style. HUF’s Spring ’17 collection introduces the Hupper 2 Lo, in mustard/white, with that distinctive “H.” Regarding that obscure Hokus Pokus quote above: Etnies has reissued the SLB in green/white, honoring the one and only Sal “Just a vagrant, ma’am” Barbier. On the collaboration side of things, the partnership that lends itself well to a buddy-cop movie: adidas Skateboarding’s Snoop x Gonz capsule. A match made in heaven. Most people didn’t see it coming, but now that we’ve seen the shoes we can’t help but picture the two of these guys together—it just works. And another one of this month’s collabs take advantage of Chima Ferguson’s mutual sponsors: with his Vans x REAL Chima Pro in black/true blue, it’s share and share alike. Hats say a lot about a person. The choice of slogan with which you cover your dome can sometimes make or break a first encounter—it’s the ultimate social cue informing everyone around you of your state of mind. You’re basically saying: “These words are covering my brain. Wanna chat?” The three hats featured this month are a nice blend of statement (DQM’s straightforward “PUSHER” snapback); state of mind and a hopeful prediction (Old Friends “OF” Dad Hat in baby blue); stylishly textured workmanship setting you apart from the run-of-the-mill millinery (Official’s Janoski “Alamo” quilted strapback); and subtle, personality-driven design telling the world, “HEY! Check me out, or don’t.” (ABC Hat Co.’s “Parker” tie-dyed strapback); colorful still life embroidery with a fruitful design (Illegal Civ’s “Eat Your Fruit” hat). Let your feet (and head, obviously) do the talking for you this month.

1. DQM PUSHER Snapback Hat DQMNewYork.com

2. Illegal Civ Eat Your Fruit Hat IllegalCivilization.com

4. éS Footwear SLB Reissue Green / White eSSkateboarding.com

3. adidas Matchcourt Mid x Snoop x Gonz Chalk White / Light Blue / Gold Metallic Adidas.com

5. Old Friends OF Dad Hat Baby Blue OldFriendsandCo.com

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NIKE SB JANOSKI HYPERFEEL XT AS WORN BY STEFAN JANOSKI NIKESB.COM


6. HUF HUPPER 2 Lo Mustard HufWorldwide.com

7. Vans Chima Ferguson Pro X REAL Skateboards Collab Black / True Blue Vans.com

>PRODUCT KIT

9. Official Janoski Alamo TheOfficialBrand.com

8. ABC Parker 6 Panel Formless Strapback Tie Dye ABCHatCo.com

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COLLECTION TWO Available at sovrn.la


E R I C D R E S S E N . T H E S K AT E B O A R D M A G S U B S C R I B E R .

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024 Photo: Yoon


©2016 CASIO AMERICA, INC.


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DASHAWN JORDAN Being an Am these days is probably best described as a transitional phase. The path from flow to Am to Pro is murky; who gets the nod at each stage can seem largely subjective. RADAR, a new video project by The Berrics, is a three part documentary series which provides an opportunity for us to understand life as an Am. RADAR shows us what’s behind each Am’s drive and get a better idea of their unique perspective, culminating in a new full video part from each of the featured Ams. The first Am in the line up is none other than SOVRN’s Dashawn Jordan.

Text: Stuart Gomez

Portrait: Alexandre Souêtre


When Dashawn’s age was still in the single-digits, he was just an Arizona kid who was in love with anything on wheels. If it looked like fun, he’d try it. Energetic and extremely enthusiastic, Dashawn was a pint-sized daredevil: he gouged his head open and had to get stitches; once, his mother jumped into a pool with her clothes on to save him from drowning. He was even locked up (in his parents’ garage) in an effort to rein him in—he called the cops himself to let him out. Dashawn was a bad boy, but he was a good kid. He’s always been open to trying new things and when it came to skateboarding, he discovered that he just loved the feeling of learning the tricks. He went on to hook up with the Homicide Skateboards crew, venturing farther from his Chandler Skatepark home base; he entered contests and filmed street parts, gaining a reputation for his consistency and enthusiastic approach. Dashawn’s contest history—though not really a reliable indicator of someone’s skateboarding—is particularly notable. When asked about his mindset when it comes to contests, he has a typically down-to-earth response: “I just focus on the fun, not the contest itself.” He’s used to pressure, so he just looks for any little opening where he can enjoy himself; Dashawn’s approach to contests is pure skateboarding, and a few years ago people really started to take notice. In 2014, when he won Element’s Make It Count Finals, things started to really take off; this year’s Tampa Am win sealed the deal. This past summer, in The Skateboard Mag’s issue 149—the “Next New Wave” issue—we featured Dashawn as someone to watch. The Berrics followed this up with a new part from Dashawn. Now, with the RADAR series, the world will see Dashawn’s next full video part, in which Dashawn vows to “keep it new.“ “I’m going to put stuff in this part that nobody thought I could do,” he says. As a reminder of his hell-raising ways, Dashawn adds, “Switch it up and not be predictable.”

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Backside 180 nosegrind. Madrid, Spain. Photo: Taylor


Frontside bluntslide transfer. Chicago, Illinois. Photo: Rodent

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Frontside 270 backside lipslide. San Fernando Valley, California. Photo: Taylor

“WHEN HE WAS LITTLE HE ALWAYS WANTED SOMEONE TO WATCH HIM DO A TRICK. HE’D ALWAYS BE LIKE, ‘LOOK, LOOK, LOOK!’” —Andrew Nicolaus (childhood friend)


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Crooked grind to fakie. La Mirada. California. Photo: Macedo


Backside bigspin. Los Angeles, California. Photos: Atiba

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“HE’S ALWAYS BEEN GOOFY, WITTY, ALWAYS TALKING. I COULDN’T GET HIM TO SHUT UP.” —Dashawn’s barber

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360 flip. Albuquerque, New Mexico. Photo: Souêtre


Kayle Lawson, backside nosegrind.

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在我正常生活中的人总是问我为什么我继续 消失在中国。我通常说一些关于大理石比中 国人便宜的东西比胶合板(事实我已经听到 几次,但不能确认),然后迅速改变主题。 但事实是,中国允许你生存你最疯狂的滑板 幻想:路人谁完全忽视你或以一种礼貌的 迷恋对待你;友好,鼓励保安;和大理石的城 市,无休止地蔓延。这些都不是对过去十年 一直关注滑板的任何人的突破性启示;到中 国的滑冰旅行已从循环从异乎寻常的冒险到 疲倦的陈词滥调。但是没有充分记录的是, 有少数中国大都市从未被滑板手探索过。 杰克达尔文和我经常参与各种各样的信息与 一个旋转的演员,试图填充两到三个中国出 租车与我们的朋友探索一些我们从来没有听 说过的城市,为了漫游寻找东西骑我们的滑 板上。大多数时候,这些旅行在他们出生之 前死亡,但是今年4月,星星对齐,我们发 现自己下降到郑州的不舒服的乡村外围,这 是中国中部一个新兴的交通枢纽。

T H E S P O T H U N T E R ‘ S

G U I D E T O

Z H E N G Z H O U

Text: Paul Battlay

Photography: Jake Darwen

People in my normal life are always asking me why I keep disappearing to China. I usually mumble something about marble being cheaper for the Chinese than plywood (a fact I have heard several times but cannot confirm) and then quickly change the subject. But the truth is that China allows you to live out your wildest skateboarding fantasies: passers-by who completely ignore you or treat you with a kind of polite fascination; friendly, encouraging security guards; and cities of marble, sprawling endlessly. None of these are groundbreaking revelations for anyone who has been paying attention to skateboarding in the last ten years; skating trips to China have cycled from being exotic adventures to tired clichés. But what is less well-documented is that there are handfuls of Chinese metropolises that have never been explored by skateboarders. Jake Darwen and I are constantly involved in all kinds of DMs with a revolving cast, trying to fill two to three Chinese taxis with our friends to explore some city we’ve never heard of in order to wander around looking for things to ride our skateboards on. Most of the time these trips die before they’re born, but this past April the stars aligned and we found ourselves descending over the uncomfortably rural-looking outskirts of Zhengzhou, an emerging transport hub in central China.


此次旅行最大的挑战就是要把计划都提 前,我们要在早上就找到能去的地方,这 样我们就不会在白天浪费时间来找spot, 这通常也意味着在结束了一整天的滑板后 回到酒店,又要开始寻找spot的任务了。 我们经常空手而归,但是有一次我们就偶 然发现了市中心的这根杆子,Max也是在 第二天很快就征服了它。 D O W N T O W N Z H E N G Z H O U

MAX COULING. 50-50 TRANSFER. The biggest challenge on this trip was staying ahead of ourselves, trying to always have somewhere to go in the morning so we didn’t waste daylight hours looking for spots. This usually meant arriving back at the hotel after skating all day then heading back out on spot hunting missions. We usually returned empty handed, but on one mission we chanced upon this downtown rail, which Max made quick work of the following day.

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在郑州庞大的大学城里花了整整一天的 时间无果后,我们聚集了大约有30名 学生,他们看起来也没什么事做只是跟 着我们到处逛逛。太阳快下山了,我们 也打算打道回府了,这时有一名学生走 过来说他们学校的图书馆有很多台阶。 我们很急切地跟着她去了另外一个学 校,那里有一个非常棒的广场被巨大的 图书馆所环绕,我们在接下来的两天就 有的忙了。

H E N A N U N I V E R S I T Y

PAUL BATTLAY, FRONTSIDE NOSESLIDE. After spending an entire fruitless day trawling through Zhengzhou’s massive university precinct we had amassed an entourage of around thirty students with seemingly nothing better to do than follow us around. As the sun was setting, and we were about to throw in the towel, one of the students approached us with a spot offering: “Our library has many stairs.” Desperate, we followed her to another campus with an incredible plaza surrounding a massive library that kept us busy for the next two days.


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我们是在坐出租车去其他地方的时候看到这个广场 的,但是我们的中文都不太好,不知道怎么让司机 掉头停在两层楼高的爱因斯坦雕像边上。相反,我 们只能通过在路过的时候拍的Iphone照片里的GPS 位置标签重新返回这里。雕像上的公式体现的也不 是爱因斯坦的科学,而是他的哲学:”如果说A代表成 功的话,那么A就需要X+Y+Z,而X是工作,Y是游 戏,Z是保持缄默。

N O R T H W E S T Z H E N G Z H O U

MAX COULING, SWITCH BACKSIDE BLUNTSLIDE POP OUT. We saw this plaza while in a taxi heading somewhere else, but no one knew enough Chinese to ask the driver to do a U-turn and park at the two-story-tall bust of Albert Einstein. Instead, we had to navigate back here using GPS geotags embedded in the blurry iPhone photos we snapped as we sped past. The formula on the statue is a reference not to Einstein’s science, but his philosophy: “If A is success in life, then A equals X plus Y plus Z. Work is X, Y is play, and Z is keeping your mouth shut.”


对我们来说,把郑州作为目的地是因为它的郊区,人工湖畔那一块区域曾被喻为 鬼城。我们第一个去到的地方就是郑东新区,那里很安静,但又不会荒无人烟, 但是那里到处都是非常棒的大理石广场,这也是新中国发展的一个特点。

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KAYLE LAWSON, NOLLIE FLIP. For us, one of Zhengzhou’s selling points as a destination was the reputed ghost city on the outskirts of town, on the shores of a man-made lake. One of the first places we checked out, “Zhengdong New Area,” was quiet, but not entirely deserted.  It was, however, full of the amazing marble plazas that are characteristic of new Chinese developments.

Z H E N G D O N G N E W A R E A


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IN TRANSITION -

Text: Dave Swift

Opener Photo: Bart Jones


IN TRANSITION

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What is In Transition? It’s a contest, but it is not your average

The third season’s cast of characters runs the gamut of

event—it’s all about choice. The way this contest works is

tranny skaters at a wide variety of spots, from Kentucky to

ten skaters decide on a single location where they want to

the UK. Experienced dudes like Kevin Kowalski, Sam Beckett,

skate—as long as it’s transitional terrain, anything goes—and

Ben Nordberg, Charlie Blair, and Jack Fardell; youthfully

they film a part there that will be featured on The Berrics.

enthusiastic guys like Tristan Rennie, Trey Wood, Willy

The endgame is to develop a kind of psychic bond with

Lara, and CJ Collins; and the ageless, always enjoyable,

the filmer and just get creative on every curved surface of their park of choice. A winner is decided by YOU with an online vote.

Louie Barletta. These guys all spent three to seven days of solid skate time at their chosen locations and gave it all they had. In the end there will only be one winner, so choose wisely—it ain’t gonna be easy.

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Bowl to bowl transfer. Photos: Swift

TREY WOOD

P R I N C E PA R K

OCEANSIDE, CA

I PICKED THIS PARK BECAUSE I’VE SKATED IT QUITE A BIT AND IT’S A SUPER FUN PARK. IT’S PRETTY MUCH ALL TRANNY—THERE’S A LOT OF OPTIONS TO SKATE.

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JACK FARDELL B E LV E D E R E PA R K EAST LOS ANGELES, CA Nosegrind tailgrab. Photos: Acosta

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L O U I E B A R L E T TA THE BONE AIR RAMP SAN JOSE, CA 056

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M E , T R Y

I

I N T O H AV E

J U S T T H I S K E P T

S K AT I N G T H E

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C O P Y I N G

T I M E .

M O R P H S

G O I N G .

W O N D E R

R A M P

I

T H E

B Y

P I A N O ,

‘ J U S T

R O L L

I S

T R Y

AWAY ! ’


Noseblunt pick. Photos: Camarillo


F I L M I N G M A K E S A B L E .

AT

M E I ’ M

H AV I N G

A

T H E F E E L

F U L L E R T O N M O R E

A R O U N D G O O D

C O M F O R T -

M Y

T I M E

PA R K

H O M I E S ,

A N D

S H I T.

Kickflip over the fence Photo: Swift

058


CHARLIE BLAIR F U L L E RT O N S K AT E PA R K FULLERTON, CA -


I

C H O S E

O R C A S

E N D L E S S T H AT A L L

H E R E .

Y O U

P O O L

C A U S E

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B E C A U S E T H E

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K O WA L S K I

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M EMO RI A L

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I S LAN D ,

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060

I S


Backside 360. Photos: Swift


Kickflip backside lipslide. Photos: Leung

062


BEN NORDBERG B R A D L E Y S T O K E S K AT E PA R K BRISTOL, UK -

I

G O T

I N T O

G O I N G T H E Y

T R A N S I T I O N

D O W N

H A D .

T O

T H I S

T H E P L A C E

W H E N

I

WA S

S K AT E PA R K I S N ’ T

A N D

T O O

FA R

Y O U N G E R . T H AT F R O M

WA S

I

J U S T

P R E T T Y

W H E R E

I

S TA RT E D M U C H

G R E W

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A L L I N

ENGLAND, THE SCOOTER THING IS OUT OF CONTROL HERE: IT’S NOT A C T U A L LY -

A

S K AT E PA R K ,

I T ’ S

A

‘ S C O O T

PA R K . ’


WILLY LARA

-

-

-

P O I N D E X T E R PA R K

I

M O O R PA R K , C A -

G R E W

M Y

U P

H E R E

F R I E N D S

A R E

I N

M O O R PA R K .

H E R E ,

I T ’ S

A

A L L

S M A L L

TOWN BUT IT’S ALL GOOD. THE TRANN Y

AT

T H E

GOOD—THE

S K AT E PA R K BOWL

AND

H E R E THE

I S

S U P E R

POOL

ARE

M Y T W O FAV O R I T E S . E V E R Y B O D Y L O V E S T H I S

S K AT E PA R K

H E R E !

-

064

O N C E

T H E Y

C O M E


Noseblunt. Photo: Swift


Kickflip melon to fakie. Photos: Jones

066


F I L M I N G ’ S

G O N E

WE

H AV E N ’ T

A S

W E

J U S T

G O O D .

HAD

AS

MUCH

T H O U G H T

W E

W O U L D ,

RAINED B O W L

R E A L LY

A

I S

COUPLE M A S S I V E

R U N N I N G

OF

D AY S ,

A S

O U T

TIME

W E L L , O F

I T

THE S O

S T U F F

AND SLAMMING HAS TAKEN A LOT O U T I N G

O F I T

M E . T O

B E

I

WA S N ’ T Q U I T E

S O

E X P E C T H E C T I C .

-

SAM BECKETT L O U I S V I L L E S K AT E PA R K LOUISVILLE, KY -


I ’ V E I

B E E N

WA S

S K AT I N G

F I V E .

I T ’ S

T R A N S I T I O N

N O T

L I K E

E V E R

S K AT I N G

S I N C E S TA I R S

WHERE YOU’RE JUMPING OFF SOMETHING. YOU J U S T

D O

F U N

A N D

A

B U N C H

O F

T R I C K S

A N D

J U S T

S K AT E .

-

-

T R I S TA N R E N N I E -

F O N TA N A S K AT E PA R K N O RT H -

F O N TA N A , C A -

068

H AV E


Over vert tap out. Photos: Swift


I

G R E W

U P

I N

F U L L E R T O N , S K AT I N G L O V E

G E T T I N G

A N D

F O R

W I T H B I G

O R A N G E

I T.

J U S T

F U N

I S

S TA R T E D

A N D

G O I N G

A I R

C O U N T Y,

F E L L

FA S T

J U S T

S O

I N

A N D F U N !

-

070


CJ COLLINS G O O D Y E A R PA R K GOODYEAR, AZ -

Frontside flip. Photos: Swift


The photo darkroom equipment sat for years in a dark corner of my garage covered in dust, cobwebs, and brushfire ashes. Originally, it had been located at the TWS offices where I had first set it up in 1986. Man, if enlargers and trays could talk! To think of all of those great images that had come out of that small room over the years! That darkroom had pumped out some of the most famous skate photos of the most famous skaters, shot by the most famous photographers and printed by some of the most talented darkroom printers. That 5’ X 12’ room, with the stinky air and chemical-stained floors, was a key part of the magazine back in the “film days”—before computers and the digital invasion. A few years after I had left TWS, a friend there called me and let me know that they were closing the darkroom and that they were going to give its innards away to a thrift store. I couldn’t let that happen. I took the gear and it sat for years in my garage with no home for it. The great thing about darkrooms is that all you need is a dark room and a water source; an extra bathroom fits the bill perfectly. I am a

member of “TAO”—The Artist Odyssey studio—and an unused bathroom was available, so a friend and I installed a small temporary darkroom in its already stinky confines. In today’s “Instant-Gratification-I-Want-It-Now-On-Screen” world, shooting film and “making” photographic prints is a slow, tedious, unnecessary process not many want to pursue. We have computers to do that. Let’s speed it up, Ansel! Some practitioners crave it: they love rolling up their sleeves, turning on some tunes, and creating images from negatives under the red Safe Lite glow. There is a craft to it. It’s meditative; time slows down in the dark and the final product has an added artistic value to it because time and skill are put into it. Enough of this “Zen of Darkroom Nerdiness.” Recently I re-printed a negative that I shot of Tod Swank back in 1987 that I hadn’t actually printed in the darkroom in over 25 years. It took me about eight tries to get a decent print, but battling a negative now and then is all part of the process and one feels a sense of victory when it is finished—kind of like making a skate trick.

Text and Photography: Grant Brittain

072


TH E

E

AT I O C U D N OF

SIMON BANNEROT

Text: Stuart Gomez

Photography: Atiba

074


Smith grind. Los Angeles, California


G I R L C A M E TO S E AT TL E L A S T YE A R A N D I T W A S A F U N TI M E! I D I D N ’T E V E N TH I N K TH AT I WA S G O O D E N O U G H

U S L O O KI N G O

T

AN

IE

FO

COMP

R M E.

TO H AV E

Kickflip. Los Angeles, California

076


SI MON BAN N E ROT

“I’m less out in the boonies now… but I am in the boonies,” Washington’s Simon Bannerot said. In a recent chat with the Enumclaw (45 minutes southeast of Seattle) native, he says that he hasn’t been spending much time at home lately. Since he’s gotten a car and is free to go out to the greater Seattle area, most people in Enumclaw might not even realize that he still lives there anymore. Simon is fine with that, he’s got enough on his plate. With graduation and the deadline for the new Lakai full-length looming, sightings of Simon have now dwindled to a Bigfoot-level frequency. Simon first started skating at four years old—a hyperactive kid. “I could not sit still,” Simon says, “I’d have to go and do a backflip or something!” He would tag along with his sisters as they traveled to gymnastics meets all over the state. It was only a matter of time until he saw what was going down at the local skateparks, then the backflipping Bannerot’s interest was piqued and the rest is history. Once he started skating, he was on every single out-of-town gymnastics trip with his family, hitting park after park along the way. With some help from the “35th Ave” shop in Federal Way, the seventeen-year-old Am was picked up by Girl and Lakai after a couple of impromptu tryouts (Sam Smyth and company personally called him: “What’s up? We’re in town, do you wanna skate?”). His Girl Am announcement meant that he was officially joining the team of his local hero, Cory Kennedy. “Everyone from Seattle, that’s like the dude that everyone worships,” Simon says. “Meeting Cory was crazy! I was thinking, ‘I’ve watched your video parts but I cannot freak out right now!’” Simon is poised to graduate high school this year with his AA degree (thanks to a Running Start program), something that his Girl and Lakai mentors have urged him to follow through with—even if he is over it. He’d rather be out there getting it, but he’s sticking to the plan and taking short breaks to film in Boardslide. Los Angeles, California.

LA for the video instead. “Hopefully I’ll graduate and I’ll be stoked,” Simon says. “But if I’m not stoked when I’m done, then I’m gonna be so bummed!”


I ’V E G O T T E N A L O T O F I N S P I R ATI O N A L TA L KS I N T H E PA ST

H

CH

FINIS

IN

OOL.

YEAR ABO UT

G HIGH S

SIMON

078


Backside 50-50. Los Angeles, California.


SIMON

BAN N E R OT

080


S K ATI N G WA S A LWAY S MY M A I N F O C U S B UT I T D E F I N ITE LY

PA

RE

FO

MY

CU S!

WA S N’T

NTS’ MAI N

Backside lipslide. Los Angeles, California.


082


SANTA CRUZ VIDEOS Text: Dave Swift

Photography: Eric Palozzolo


Emmanuel Guzman, backside flip. San Francisco, California.

084


As skateboarders we all know that the best and most influential marketing tool a brand has is its team of sponsored and professional skateboarders. Putting these guys in front of a camera and letting them do their thing and making a video has been selling skateboards for the last thirty something years. When Santa Cruz skateboards released its second full length video Streets On Fire in 1989 it helped propel the brand as a worldwide top seller. Everywhere you looked you’d see Jason Jessee, Corey O’Brien, Jeff Kendall, and Natas Kaupas decks—shit, I remember working at a shop at the time and selling Natas Panther decks five-to-one over any other deck on the wall. Since Streets, Santa Cruz has released nine more full-length videos but none since 2005’s Guarte—it’s been a long wait to say the least. The release of Right To Exist in December 2016 marks a return to form, paying tribute to the brand’s long legacy while still showcasing the rise of “The Cruz”’s young and highly talented cast of diverse skateboarders. For the last couple years SCS has been revamping their team with solid names like Tom Asta and Tom Remillard; giving the Pro nod to Blake Johnson and Josh Borden; realizing the progressive Am talent of Erick Winkowski, Dylan Williams, Kevin Braun, Mikey Curtis, and Tristan Rennie; and never forgetting the veteran presence of longtime riders Jason Jessee, Eric Dressen, Tom Knox, Steve Alba, and Emmanuel Guzman. It was evident that the time had come to make a full-length and Right To Exist has blessed us with its unveiling. All hail the Dot!

“IT’S GOOD THAT PEOPLE KNOW OF IT AND KNOW A LITTLE BIT MORE ABOUT ITS ROOTS AND STORY.”


086


“WHEN I FIRST STARTED WORKING HERE, IT WAS A GOAL OF MINE—ALMOST A DREAM—TO MAKE A SANTA CRUZ SKATEBOARD VIDEO... A FULL LENGTH VIDEO. THIS IS SUCH A PINNACLE FOR ME TO BE ABLE TO BE PART OF SOMETHING LIKE THIS, WITH A BRAND THAT HAS A HISTORY LIKE SANTA CRUZ.”

Eric Dressen, frontside grind nose grab. Sacramento, California.

Erick Winkowski, invert. San Francisco, California.


Josh Borden, no comply tailslide. Louisville, Kentucky.

088


Jason Jessee, alley oop backside air. Santa Cruz, California.

“WHEN YOU THINK OF SANTA CRUZ YOU THINK OF ALL THE OLD VIDEOS AND JUST HOW DIVERSE THE TEAM IS…”


Blake Johnson, Smith grind. Venice, California.

“WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE SANTA CRUZ LOGO, IT’S JUST GOT A VIBE TO IT… IT’S SKATEBOARDING.”

090


Kevin Braun, switch frontside flip. The Bronx, New York.


092


“I’M PSYCHED TO BE IN A VIDEO WITH A WHOLE NEW CREW OF DUDES THAT RIP AND SHOW MY SKATING IN A FULL LENGTH UP AGAINST OTHER PEOPLE… THE BRAND IS SO GNARLY. IT’S A HUGE DEAL, IT’S REALLY SICK.”

Tom Knox, frontside wallride. Visalia, California.

Tom Asta, switch heel backside tailslide. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.


Tom Remillard, melon grab to wallride. Glory Hole, California.

094


“SANTA CRUZ CAME INTO SKATEBOARDING IN ITS FETAL STAGE, RIGHT? WHEN SKATEBOARDING WAS SUPER YOUNG… THEY’RE GONNA SEE EVERYTHING THAT HAPPENS SO THAT’S WHY THEIR LONGEVITY IS SO GOOD.”


096


It’s widely believed that when Billy Idol sang about “dancing with himself” he was making a reference to a private and possibly lewd act of self pleasure. It’s been confirmed that the Bruce Springsteen song “Dancing In The Dark” was about his frustration with writing a hit song. And it is an undisputed fact that the song “Sandstorm” by Darude is just awesome. If you took these three songs, balled them up, packed them into a cannon with Ben Raybourn and launched them all out onto a vert ramp it would look something like this. After being frustrated by a lack of skating, due to a very wet winter in the Pacific Northwest, Benny took matters into his own hands. A quick call to D-Block Skatepark—where they conveniently house a sick vert ramp and a disco ball in the same room—and the stage was set for an epic solo performance. We raided the CCS warehouse for anything that would glow and once we had enough things filled with green goo we made our way to the spot. After turning out all the lights besides the disco ball, a few party lasers, and anything that was glowing, Ben was dancing by himself in the dark, and the party was on.

Te xt

an d

Ph

ot og ra ph y

:P ric e


098


100


102


M A G : M I N U T E J O S H

D O U G L A S

M : M

Keegan Palmer Trick: Eggplant Location: San Bernardino, California Photo: Swift

104


Guy Mariano Trick: Backside Tailslide Big Flip Location: Los Angeles, California Photos: Atiba

106


108


Mason Silva Trick: Frontside Flip Location: Orange County, California Photo: Acosta


110


Sean Malto Trick: Switch Backside 50-50 Location: Orange County, California Photo: Atiba


Nick Matthews Trick: Backside Flip Location: Los Angeles, California Photo: Messex

112


Joey Ragali Trick: 360 Flip Lipslide Location: Los Angeles, California Photos: Atiba


114


Cole Wilson Trick: Smith Grind Location: Inland Empire, California Photo: Atiba


116


Cody Lockwood Trick: Kickflip Backside Noseblunt Location: Hollywood, California Photos: Swift


118


Antonio Durao Trick: Hardflip Location: Los Angeles, California Photo: Macedo


120


David Reyes Trick: Smith Grind Location: Inland Empire, California Photo: Atiba


Nolan Johnson Trick: Backside Boneless In Location: Seattle, Washington Photo: Swift

122


FRANKY VILLANI | WALLRIDE

NBNUMERIC.COM PJ LADD | ARTO SAARI | LEVI BROWN | TOM KARANGELOV | TYLER SURREY | JORDAN TRAHAN | JORDAN TAYLOR TOM KNOX | MARQUISE HENRY | JACK CURTIN | MARIUS SYVANEN | JAKE HAYES | ANTHONY SCHULTZ AXEL CRUYSBERGHS | ANTOINE ASSELIN | FLO MIRTAIN | CHAD TIM TIM | FRANKY VILLANI


THE 213 BLACKTOP AVAILABLE NOW


Simon Bannerot girlskateboards.com/ams


THE SKATEBOARD MAG No.155 DAVE SWIFT JOEY SHIGEO J. GRANT BRITTAIN ATIBA JEFFERSON AKO JEFFERSON STUART GOMEZ BEN KELLY LANCE HAKKER

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR MANAGING EDITOR

PHOTO EDITOR / PRODUCTION MANAGER

PHOTO ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR STAFF WRITER

DIRECTOR OF SALES AND MARKETING

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

ANTHONY ACOSTA, GRANT BRITTAIN, ERIC “RODENT” CHESLAK, ATIBA JEFFERSON, BART JONES, JACOB MESSEX, MATT PRICE, JOEY SHIGEO, DAVE SWIFT

STAFF FILMER JOSH “PEACOCK” HENDERSON CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

KYLE CAMARILLO, JAKE DARWEN, REECE LEUNG, PAULO MACEDO, ERIC PALOZZOLO, ALEX SOUETRE, YOON SUL, MIKEY TAYLOR

CONTRIBUTING WRITER PAUL BATTLAY MASTHEAD DESIGN MIKAL HOWARD THE BERRICS MATT RODRIGUEZ ERIC MCHENRY MOON MORSE

PUBLISHER CREATIVE DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION ARTIST / GRAPHIC DESIGNER

BOOKKEEPER

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128


T HE E VA N S M I TH

WITH

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EVAN SMITH \ B/S CRAILSLIDE \ BLABAC PHOTO

The Skateboard Mag 155  

Before you ask about the septuple-set Barcelona rail on the cover: yes, Dominick Walker grinded the whole thing. This kinked monstrosity set...

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