Page 1

1 LD IE SH E TH 20 15 ER

2017

05 ,D EC EM B

E

ISS UE 14, AU GUS T

IS SU

Th W e WO ATE Shi eld RK R

E IN PL EO IL P RA

UE ISS

N ER TH OU ES TH

E PAG SEE

8

15 20 ST GU , AU 03

WIN

A FAMILY BREAK

N GIO RE

ER FOR THE PAP

2015 SPRING ISSUE 01,

PLE RAIL PEO

IN THE

ION RN REG SOUTHE

R FO ER KI INS AP Z BAG EP TOS ZONE TH : BARARY ARY CTU

I

14

/08

/20

17

15

Gre en ma n

:39

t bridge Super-fas ry-free job is inju over

PAG E8

O ma n-sit kes e su sen sta se inab

ilit

y

CTU SAN SAN ELL S THE SH ATE EL STR STE ON DEM

is fety me l fra of sa Stee height the

that ation was the complic for An added required hapstood for the road closure could only essor had thanks work to take placeam Hotspur were ITS predec a century. But contrac when Tottenhfrom their home more than work of rail , it took pen the road. away a mile up playing Region er to the smart Southern replacement ground, just over at Leicest playing tors in the a brief for this busy With Spurs Day, there was d over a in just 67 hours be installe without a sin- City on Boxing get the job done all to bridge to the next street, and opportunity sion before London incident. Tottensingle posses work gle safety next to South 100 a game. d in the The bridge,, was more than end home ues involve it was a chalthe d Colleag station that reache ham also and had The Shield satisfying… years old life. The new bridge t- told but hugely suppor 15 of its usefulthe need for six at con- lenging 3 >> 07/08/20 page removed s, which were by passed on Continu ing columnof being struck road. stant risk on the busy A10 ing traffic

e e Bridgblesom er trou wat SITE

Sti wit ckin hs g afe

wEm.sa 7 ty oilutth heweror nkss@ hine t lwd.cor okr.uail k.co.u

ON

7 PAGE

6

15:5

Seen and not hurt

A CLOSER LOOK AT PPE PAGE 6

An y

ww

st or ie s?

PAG E

.uk .co eil6 agra rk –op e?tw @nit lism hurkwork AND SHANE yo “It’swtoug w e oa freezing nth kilon E distraction d:a cold day” Eem REen FDriv sp?e ING EDGE EtoR rieS AT THE CUTT STsafe Eon the roadny sto POStay 5 k &o.u PAGE 7 e 4il.c SID pagkra A net–wor IN y site tidks@ NEED TO KNOW of awor ns the sigail ? Em en PAGE 6 ries Sev Any sto dd .in 17 Ju ne

d

1

WHEN it comes to getting everyone home safe every day, there’s a reason why we do things by the book or, to be precise, by the pack. Safe Work Packs play a vital role in making sure staff are properly briefed and fully aware of the risks, wherever they are working on the railway. The packs contain a huge amount of detailed information about the site and the task being worked on – the kind of detail that saves lives. Full story on page 4 >>

Handle with care

Bad vibrations

The day my life changed

PAGE 3

PAGE 7

PAGE 8

iel

d_

ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018 sh

e_

_th

eldS Shi 1 The d.indd TheShiel

.ind

test

erla

umm

5 11:02

05/03/201

1

PAG E3

Pro pro per tec ly ted

RE wa US he ys AB lp st LE ab An ing aff w Su le d, m at at wh pp s th of co ake BC er bo ile ly e ur it M’s tt m Ot wo Upgrteam se, a m Ba les ot he rk ion r ec in ad wo as we ore tter are Fu se o- g in e pr rkin ll su sea ju ll st ns fri th oj g as st co st or iti en e ec on be ai m on y on na ve dl wa t e lig y in rm to the ing gr bl poun of pa ht iti we stay Su ee e si d th ge s an at ss ne te ar e 4 d ra ive athe well ex r it . e >> in s on r. hy Po en dr we wa si at r te te ed r re in cy clud clin e g.

beure struct ce pie the new ing and ker er, a e’ is be pic . m m saf on rry che d on the ryZ ngha ere the worke make nctua at Effi t wh ing w, to led ‘Sa yed depo f. railNo cal plo the rkem ancethe roo of kitd. en ht on en wo ing s r sig wh use is be maint lacing rm ilia at It on rep tfo can fam gre cti are 4 >> rk pla – E a and Jun rkers wo kers page AR ork on EY wo ing pic rked TH y netw ight. vat rry wo nu ele che six he , wa at bile as Conti 2009 them. sed ing mo known Yet and ng re cautween ter . usi we 03 – betkillers en 20 while ths d be be twe killed se dea crushe Be re we of the being ers me tors MICK So era TO PLAN: GOING , STUART WAVELL op GLOVER by O’HARE

k

UES S S I 0 2 ATING SEE PAGE 6 CELEBR

PACK FOR GOOD

www.southernshield.co.uk

YOU WDININNER FOR

p1

THE PAPER FOR RAIL PEOPLE IN THE SOUTHERN REGION

AM R TE

2

iehled Shield h S T N E S T IC The O Z PAE N-TA NSTH

THE PAP ER FOR RA IL PEO PLE IN THE SOU THE RN REG ION

The Shield

GE E PA SE

OO RL TE KS WA OR W


2

THE SHIELD ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018

FIVE MINUTES THAT COULD SAVE A LIFE The Shield This paper is produced for:

TIME OUT Take Fives, the safety sessions introduced to assess and improve awareness of on-site hazards, have been made compulsory across the Southern region. The Southern Shield Safety Leadership Team (SLT) recognised that change was a recurring theme when many accidents occur. It was agreed that Time Out Take Fives would become a scheduled part of all tasks, taking place before start of work to assess or reassess the working environment. “Each company within Southern Shield decides how to continue to implement additional regular time outs after the start of work,” said Geoff Norman, Principal Health and Safety Manager and member of the Safety Leadership Team. “But this would be a good time for everyone to review and re-brief their Time Out Take Five procedure.”

Planned or unscheduled

A Time Out Take Five is a pause in the work that is being undertaken to allow the team to reassess the working environment and any risks or hazards that are present. They can be planned into the works programme or be unscheduled and called by any member of the

New hazards? People changed? Confused?

Written and designed by:

www.beetroot.co.uk

FATALITY LEADS TO CHARTER CHANGE

team who has a concern and wants to take a step back from the task in hand. Time Outs can take as little or as long as needed to resolve any outstanding issues. The overarching objective is that if it can’t be done safely, don’t do it. “People often believe that delivery and performance take priority over safety,” added Geoff. “Particularly during possessions, they believe that the focus is on getting the job done as quickly as possible in order to hand back the railway on time or even

early. This can lead to short cuts being taken and safety being compromised. However as long as the task is delivered on time and no major safety incident has occurred, then there is often no comeback on the team or the methods that were used. This leads to the widespread perception that safety is less important than delivery.” “The Safety Leadership Team wants to change this perception and show that safety and performance can go together.”

TAKE A Task changed?

TIME OUT TAKE FIVE

Unexpected problem? Unsure of procedure?

Remember: A Time Out Take Five may be called by anyone at any time.

You can find out more about Time Out Take Five in The Charter section on southernshield.co.uk

EVERYONE HOME SAFE EVERY DAY

FOLLOWING an incident when a railway colleague was fatally injured in a fall from a step ladder at a station in Scotland, the Southern Shield Charter has been updated. The Charter already prohibits the use of alloy, fibreglass or timber pole ladders without the approval of a Construction Director or equivalent. This has now been extended to include step ladders. While being lightweight and extremely easy to move, step ladders can be made unstable easily and an even footing is required at all times. Before applying for approval to use a step ladder, a task-specific risk assessment must be carried out and it must be established that there is no other practical way of carrying out the task. This change is outlined in Appendix C of The Charter – the Working at Height Hierarchy. The complete Southern Shield Charter and appendices can be found at southernshield.co.uk

“Every aspect of life changed for me and my family.” Paul Blanchard recalls his fall from height. Read more on page 8.


ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018 THE SHIELD

3

IT’S A TROUGH JOB... Making manual handling easier – or reducing the need for it altogether – is a priority across the railway. The Shield went along to see one initiative in progress THIS new trackside troughing system in Felixstowe will help eliminate the risk of colleagues suffering injuries when laying cables. The new troughing, being installed by VolkerFitzpatrick, is made from recyclable glass reinforced polyester (GRP). It is much lighter than its concrete predecessors, with a six-metre length of troughing light enough to be handled by one person. “This mitigates risk when it comes to handling the troughs,” explained Project Manager Lee Clifton.“The older, concrete versions Lee Clifton led to people getting injured when lifting them and also caused hand injuries, particularly when workers were lifting the lids. Often they’d get their fingers trapped.” The new troughs are also raised and they’re better for maintenance. “We are installing a lightweight trough on a steep curve at Felixstowe,” said Lee. “It’s one metre off the ground, easy to install with posts every six metres and will be easier to maintain in the future.” The product is approved to be used on railway lines for the Felixstowe project, as a trial. Lee hopes that they will become commonplace across the industry. “There are design challenges when coming up with something that will ultimately stop injuries from happening, but we are working with Network Rail to implement improvements, and this new troughing is one example of that.”

Digging hole 600mm deep for the vertical support is the first step for installing the elevated trough.

Concrete-based old troughing system requires heavy lifting equipment for installation and maintenance.

HANDLE WITH CARE Always consider the risks from manual handling to the health and safety of you and your fellow workers.

New chemical solution expands to fill the hole and replaces the use of concrete mix, saving weight.

The Manual Handling Operations Regulations require employers to:

The finished trough.

l Avoid the need for hazardous manual handling, so far as is reasonably practicable l Assess the risk of injury from any hazardous manual handling that can’t be avoided l Reduce the risk of injury from hazardous manual handling, so far as is reasonably practicable.

Vertical support is put in place. Tightening the trough support bracket onto the post.

A manual handling leaflet is available from hse.gov.uk

want us to feature your team? get in touch at shield@networkrail.co.uk


4

THE SHIELD ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018

LEADER WITH “Everyone has to sign the pack and answer questions to confirm they’ve understood it. If they can’t, they are not allowed on the site. It’s as simple as that.” Safe Work Leader Michael Cox

Safe work leaders and the information-packed documents they use play a crucial role in keeping people fully aware of risks on site A LOT OF planning goes into getting people home safely everyday. Just ask Safe Work Leader Michael Cox. It’s his role to make sure his team has the best possible information to keep them aware of risks, and potential risks, where they are working. “The safe work leader is responsible for people’s safety across a site – not just on the track,” explains Michael, who works for Kier in the southern region. “Having one point of reference prevents any confusion. It gives the whole team on site absolute clarity about who is ultimately responsible for safety and for briefing them on procedures and hazards.” One of the key tools of Michael’s trade is the Safe Work Pack – a document containing all kinds of specific and detailed safety information about the site and the task being worked on. “Safe Work Packs play a vital role in making sure staff are properly briefed, up to speed on the details and any changes, and are fully aware of the risks – wherever they happen to be working,” says Michael.

“Ahead of any job I spend time with the planner discussing what’s required for the pack, which can include a site visit. The local knowledge of a safe work leader comes in very handy here. “Once the pack is put together I receive it at least 24 hours before the first shift, I go through the whole thing and confirm it’s correct. If there’s anything wrong it goes back to the planner to change.”

What’s in the pack?

Among the wealth of detail contained in the pack is a yardby-yard description of every potential hazard on the site. These can be anything from tripping hazards to dangerous substance handling (COSHH), hot works and even ecological hazards such as nesting bats or badgers. The packs also have information on line speed and directions, access arrangements and details of the Safe System of Work being used on the job. “There’s also play-by-play information about how to respond, and who to call, in an emergency,” says Michael. “The kind of

detail that will save lives if anything did go wrong. Only when the safe work leader is happy with the contents of the pack can they begin briefing the team. “The first thing we do each day is to look at any Close Calls from the previous night and hold a ‘Time out Take Five’ to make a visual check of the site. “Then I’ll introduce the Safe Work Pack and run through the contents. Everyone on site has to sign the pack and confirm they’ve understood it by answering a series of questions. If they don’t pass this, they are re-briefed. If they still can’t pass they are not allowed on the site. It’s as simple as that. “Having everything spelled out in black and white means everyone knows exactly what the rules and procedures are. It should completely rule out any excuse for complacency. One of the biggest risks is thinking ‘It’s OK, I’ve done this a thousand times’ – that’s the point when you’re in real danger. “The Safe Work Pack keeps people’s minds focused on the risks and refreshes that focus every day. Without question it saves lives.”


ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018 THE SHIELD

THE PACK 1

5

ALWAYS BE SURE THE REQUIRED PLANS AN D ARE IN PLACE, BEFORPERMITS START A JOB OR GO OE YOU NO NEAR THE LINE. R

The Safe Work Pack contains information to keep everyone safe.

2 Safe work leaders go through the pack to ensure everything is correct.

3 After a Time Out Take Five the safe work leader briefs the team using the pack.

PLANNERS’ ROLE 4 The pack helps people keep their knowledge and awareness fresh everyday.

A Safe Work Pack is only as good as the people who put it together, so the relationship between safe work leaders and planners is very important. Planners take some of the detail for the pack from Network Rail’s national hazard directory. Discussions with the safe work leader then confirm if there are any additional issues to note or updates required. “We stay in constant contact to make sure the pack is accurate and up to date,” says Michael. “Previously, site information would have been taken from centrally held lists without much input from people with local knowledge. This is where Safe Work Packs are a great improvement on the briefings we used to have.”


6

THE SHIELD ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018 Issue 07, APRIL

THE EYES HAVE IT

4 The ShIeLD Issue

The Shield

ISSUE 05, DECEMBER 2015

THE PAPER FOR RAIL PEOPLE IN THE SOUTHERN

THE SHIELD 1

SEE PAGE

2

WATERLOO WORKS

ChRIS BaKeR operator chris, who is a telehander site set-up, tried and assisted with the types of glasses out three different often don’t Chris thinks that people they are wear glasses becauseincident many an uncomfortable. He had an eye injury years ago when he suffered while grinding. cheap goggles he said: “I was wearing to enter one of my but grit still managed hospital to remove eyes and I had to go to

being one of despIte safety glasses ppe, there of the “must-wear” pieces damaging people are still too many railway. their eyes on the to the avon The Shield went along Christchproject in and Stour Viaduct from PPe expert an where urch, Dorset, spoke to staff about manufacturer UVeX products they different eye protection of them to road have. We asked some a few pairs and test) rail rather test (or to say… here’s what they had

ISSUE 14, AUGUST 2017

REGION

07, APRIL 2016

WAT ER WOR K

t, UVeX Ultrasonic Tested: UVeX Superfi goggle, UVeX Winner 6/10 Rating: 9/10, 9/10,

top teN tips: FALLING OBJECTS

injured and people are seriously which eaCh year many struck by an object even killed after being The dangers are obvious, has fallen from height.incidents continue to hapthat be avoided but the reality is from height cannot pen. When working place. When to put controls in s of then it is necessary ts, the seriousnes carrying out risk assessmen because it is ated be underestim the outcome can when somewhat will happen difficult to predict health and enviSafety, ground. the his top thing falls to Thompson gives us ronment advisor Barryobjects… ten tips about falling consider risk assessment and RISK – Complete a and how. who might be harmed examobjects in the air. For aVoID – Avoid taking at ground level. ple, assemble components in to prevent objects falling PReVeNT – Take steps fit brick guards to scafthe first place. For example, folds or use tool lanyards. from them prevent objects to SeCURe – Secure and lowering them. falling when raising reaching to stop an object a SToP – Take steps fitting catch nets or by fall it should ground level The avon and not scaffold fan. Stour project has as or tip objects from been without incident had two ChUTe – Never throw to dispose of waste. “We have chute Benjamin explains: height. Use a rubbish where both men were eye injury incidents at the time. one of exclusion zone at ground wearing safety glasses while the existing eXCLUDe – Create an and warnpast fencing walking suitable was up them level by putting timbers were being longitudinal rail bearer and a bit of dust blew ing signs. blockade it with removed over the on he was able to remove Provide information in his eye. Luckily, INFoRMaTIoN – But the other incident and what they some saline solution. going to hospital to the risks to those affected resulted in the operative from his should do to stay safe. grit was taken out make sure that the on how his eye with saline. training for workers eye after he washed TRaINING – Provide after he lifted provided. This incident happenedtubes onto to use any equipment some scaffolding his shoulder.” is used and worn correctly, PPe – Ensure PPE to help protect the head worn be should helmets from a falling object.

1 2 3

Full story on page 4 >>

Green man

Sticking with safety

Properly protected PAGE 3

www.southernshield.co.uk

s@networkrail.co.uk Any stories? Email thework

the_shield_april16.indd

THE PAPER FOR RAIL

The Shield

ose is fit for its intended purp Always use equipment that the_shield_april16.indd

THE PAPER FOR

RAIL PEOPLE

STEEL SHELL SANCTUARY: BARTOSZ BAGINSKI DEMONSTRATES THE SANCTUAR YZONE

4

IN THE SOUTHE RN REGION

ERN PEOPLE IN THE SOUTH

REGION

was that An added complication for the the road closure required haponly work to take place could were pen when Tottenham Hotspurhome their playing away from up the road. ground, just over a mile Leicester With Spurs playing at was a brief City on Boxing Day, there done in job opportunity to get the the next before a single possession home game. the work Colleagues involved in was a chaltold The Shield that it lenging but hugely satisfying… Continued on page 3

“It’s tough work on a freezing cold day”

Driven to distraction Stay safe on the road NEED TO KNOW PAGE 6

>>

Seen and not hurt

05/03/2015 11:02

The Shield

BER 2015 THE

ISSUE 05, DECEM

N E IN THE SOUTHERN REGIO THE PAPER FOR RAIL PEOPL

t.indd 1

ON SITE PAGE 7

07/08/2015

8

THE SHIEL

D ISSUE 08,

JUNE 2016

RAIL LIVES

Awa’s more mobile thanks to safety conscious colleagues

UP AND AWAY

ISSUE 15, OCTOBER 2017 4

THE SHIE

LD ISSUE

ON SITE

08, JUNE

2016

GL ASS ACTS

HE ATH AND S AFET Y

ON SITE

MARK NICHOLS , CENTRE, RECEIVE S HIS AWARD

What do you th

Despite tight dead still has the heal lines and complex agreeme th and wellbein nts g of staff at the with neighbours, the Blac kheath substat top of the agen ion site da

KATH RELPH Most impor – SHE ADVISOR health and tant thing for munication. wellbeing: “Commake people It is important to ent health risks aware of the differBiggest improv out there.” ement to health ee assistance and wellbeing: “UKPN tors who work programme that is open S has an employto all the contrac something with us, so if anyone needs that to speak Biggest safetyis concerning them, they can.” about improv have been involved with ement: “This is the fi rst site I pressed with from the start. that staff stay the way this site was set I was very imup to make around the safe, including having pedestr sure site.” ian walkways

and falls.

4 >>

Maintaining a healthy mind

A POWERED wheelchair Jagne get around is helping L-R: SEAN Awa Wason DUNDON, AWA a bit easier, fundraising JAGNE AND Jr received thanks to efforts of her ALEX WASON JR Document colleagues. the to buy the powere an email about fundrai sing balacla d wheelchair, portunity not contractor Controller Awa is 17 and vas and then he saw CPMS at Stratfo only to help joined to sold them to a colleague, an op- site with the proceed months ago address a serious rd around the but also on s going towards staff on easier. “The safety issue. for Awa’s wheelc studies at a a part-time basis alongsi three Alex wheelchair has the fund local sixth form de her specifi had noticed some problem dom,” said This wasn’t hair. Awa has cerebra college. c Networ s with Awa. “I don’t given me more freeall Alex did. l palsy and helps get tired ies and hoods, k Rail PPE, particularly non- olition work He was doing was able to althoug at Hackney get around dem- ing me get around college easily now and it bean- numbe that pose a Wick in her manua h she chair, her line to safety “It be accompanied. where a huge is part of my r of yellow without havmanager Mat l wheeljob to ask staffrisk. bricks were It also anythin wanted to raise Baine no longer Westfield shopping centre lets me get around to remove needed. funds to buy and colleagues but I g that isn’t approved more shoppin easily, wheelchair “There by do her so Networ underst was I can do a powere g!” a pallet-full to help her k and that my of these bricks, Alex said: “It’s bit easier. colleagues are Rail spent my lunch to get around d trying to keep warm while break cleanin great to have so just was a said Alex. they are working When VolkerF able to sell g them up andI wish I could have “I wanted them done more. helped, I just itzpatrick Site ,” lovely girl Awa Supervisor Alex natives and then I to offer them some alter- add to the fund,” said on, which I was able to to help.” and I am just glad that is a really Alex. Thanks to Alex, Alex bought got to thinking about I was able Awa.” some Networ and Awa added: k Rail-approved money, Awa now has all those who have raised a new powere you to everyon “I just want to say a big that has made d wheelch e for thank her working and person air using their person going out of their way al life make and al a difference.” time to raise money to

7

n for the over, preparatio WITH summer now sites across is underway at colder weather the southern region. to Northumberland Park The Shield travelled team working on the of the ent to chat with some Capacity Improvem As winter. West Anglia Mainline they’re tackling they Project about how winter briefings, well as holding regularwearing the correct PPE, on trips have been focusing healthy and slips, winter driving, keeping

Peter McLellan Skanska

P EO P L E P OW E R

SEE PAGE

er weather Preparing for the wint

PAGE 3

Bridge over troublesome water Any stories? SpeEma ed: kno il thew w you orks limi @ne t?two – pag rkra eil.co 6 .uk

TheShieldSummerlates

SHIELD 1

W IN T E R WA R N E R S

Hot topic

FREE POSTER INSIDE

REMEMBER, IF THERE’S SOMETHING YOU THINK WE SHOULD BE COVERING GET IN TOUCH AT SHIELD@NETWORKRAIL.CO.UK

5 4 &o.uk krail.c – page siteetwor rks@n of a tidy signs thewo s? Email Seven Any storie

Full story on page

THEY ARE a familiar sight on the way network and great when rail- the cherry picker and the structure ing at height. work- ing worked beon. Yet mobile elevating Now, to make them work platform – better known safer, a new s of kit called as cherry pickers ‘SanctuaryZone’ piece be killers. – can used. is being Between 2003 It is being employe ers were killed and 2009, six work- Junction d at while maintenance Effingham Some of these using them. deaths were caused workers are replacing depot where by operators the roof. being crushed between Continue d on page 4 >>

A CLOSER LOOK AT PPE PAGE 6

AT THE CUTTING EDGE PAGE 7

TheShield.indd 1

AVTAR KUNDI SUPERVISOR – CRANE LIFT Most import and wellbe ant thing for health ing: tor Blu-3 and “I work for contracI make sure the crane operati that I look ve in the we start work. I won’t work eye before son with that perBiggest improvif I don’t think they are fit for work.” ement to health are very well and looked after the warm weathe on this site. wellbeing: “We Particularly r is here, we dehydration now are regular and it is great ly briefed about around the to have sunbloc site. k available all Biggest safety” improv seen for a while ement is the cut-out : “The best thing I is even the have button on smallest of problems, you the crane. If there ton and the machine will can press the munication is also importastop completely. I think butteam.” comnt, and working together as a shield.indb

ANDY SMITH SUPERVISOR– SITE /COSS/ALO COORDINATOR Most import and wellbe ant thing for health nies, the guysing: “In some compa raise any concerstill worry that if they ns they will ished. On be very differen this site, and at UKPNS punt and they , it is come forward are encouraged Biggest improv with any concer to ns. “I have a weekly ement to health ” any problem meeting with our staff and wellbeing: s and to the manag to me. I then go on to report they can voice difference to ement anonymously, which their concerns the makes a huge Biggest safety wellbeing of staff.” improv small cards which remind ement: “We have distribu cy numbers staff of the and hazards, emergeted pen. They are a grid reference should nthe worse them on every so easy to make and I would love hapsite.” to see

8

In each issue a pair of Bolléwe hand over to colleagues safety glasses who have made an outsta contribution nding to safety. THE Southe COSS Mark rn Shield has Nichols containing a brand lowing an inciden received his glasses a wealth of fol- a positive information new website, t where an ambula to date and required to to keep get outcome. nce was April’s attend when As well as you home safe every day. you up another membe of staff fell ill. edition of The This was reported in the latest safety r Shield. Talks and details Andrew De Silva, bulletin Mark and his NWR colleague Josh an online version of upcoming events s, Toolbox Construction ager, ISSU the emerge attende contact , you’ll find ManE 08, d and was ncy of The Shield southernshiel impres munications services and kept the ed McNicholas showedJUNE 2016 newspa sedTHE d.co.uk and that SHIE com- the between the their see for yourse per. Visit apprec LD 5 guys ambulance lf. staff clear and casualty and the training on the ground and how iation to precise ensurin important is g ing sure to keep the railway safe and all employees get home safe.mak-

ink? Get in tou

SHIELD ONLIN

www.souther nshield.co.uk

numbers

09/06/201

6 10:03

Know You Numbers hear assessmentslth took place across the Southern Region, of thos surveyed …* e

25%

were obese or extremely obes e according to BMI measurements

GRAEME DURDE N – PROJE ENGINEER CT Most import and wellbe ant thing for health ing: one is ignored “Inclusiveness. No ions are taken at this site, all opininto accoun clude people t. If ing into conside then we take their we inwellbecan affect progres ration, if they are ignored Biggest improv s, health and safety it and beyond ement to health ing sunbloc .” and k on tection is taken site is one of the best wellbeing: “Havthings – skin Biggest safety seriously.” proeveryone wears improvement: “The PPE that we on site. There hazards, and insist there is an accepta are so many potent nobody even ial nce that PPE questions it. will be worn, ”

Bend and stretch

40%

had warning levels of cholestero l

11%

PAGE 8

PAGE 6

were referred to their GP beca use of their high level s of cholesterol

rail.c k o.uk nshield.co.u Any stori www.souther orks@network es? Email thew

shield.ind

b 4

aLWAYS BE SURE

Sean Hebden Kier

WORKERS from UKPNS tors have been Holman. “Althou and their excavating and on site since Decem subcontrac- cence agreem gh we have a numbe station by road building a new 33KV ber last year ber of lorries ents in place, includin r of strict li- evening traction subThis is part access. working hourswe can bring to site g the num- were s, as well as the bad each day, our more likely weather, acciden and noise ment Programof the Kent Power Supply built to ts me to allow Enhance- whichup a strong working restrictions, we have where needed, our happen. We ensure and more frequen for longer 12-car d that, relation staff trains done. allows us to get along ship with them spotlights and had safe were working under “As the railway t trains to run along the site. By respec and get our walking routes can only access lines are in perman the line. work they have made ting them and involvin around “Similarly, now ent from use, the road in negotiations we the warmer As the discussour jobs a lot easier.” g them, us, we have with our neighband we have been weathe work,” said Networ ions on the went licence agreem around the bottles of sunblock and r is upon k Rail Projectours to make this at on longer than expecte site the substat Manager Simon d, work didn’t ents from a weekly to protect our staff. sun lotion ion This came start where meetin Simon added: until December. they raise any g that our operatives up “With the darker have concerns they mornings and which I think makes a massive differenmay have, wellbeing of our staff.” ce to the

THE REQUIRED PLA

NS AND PERMITS

09/06/2016

10:03

ARE IN PLACE

Tips to redu ce BMI Reduce your calorie intak e

Reduce suga r and processe d foods in your diet Eat fresh, whol e foods *Health assessm ents were offered over 2,000 to just people, of which up the opportu 66% took nity.

shield.ind

b 5

09/06/2016

10:03

ISSUE 16, DECEMB

ER 2017 THE SHIELD

PLANS AND PACKS

We visited Meridian Water, where work is well underway on a major track upgrade between Stratfor d and Angel Road, to talk about Planned Delivery of Safe Work (PDSW) and Standard 019 NETWORK RAIL STANDARD 019 Standard 019 defines the process to keep people safe for work activities on or near the line and of work through the productionthe development of a safe system and issuing of a Safe Work Pack.

Shaun Cooper Siemens

PETER JAWORSKI, CABLE WATCHER “We already had COSSs, so it doesn’t feel too different. It’s more complicated for the Safe Work Leaders as it requires more planning. But it’s good for our sites and “I feel comfortable going our industry. to a Safe Work Leader with any issues. They’ve had a full briefing before work begins and can pass that knowledge on should there be any problems. “In future, I’d like to see the thought into the work being Person in Charge putting more done as a whole, so people briefed as thoroughly as can be possible before it begins. ” ALEX UNGUREANU, ALO COORDINATOR “I am a Safe Work Leader myself. liant idea which has absolutely I think it’s a brilmade a difference to the way we work. “There’s now one person giving all the instructions. It’s clear who that can be delivered concisely. is and means information “Compared to the previous system, you get more mation. You receive your pack and have a few days inforit and comment. It ensures to read you’re absolutely clear needs doing that week. on what ”

Find out more about the SLT at southernshield.co.uk

TONY BROWN, SAFE WORK LEADER “I brief all task leaders on the and have overall responsibilitySafe Work Packs for the site. “PDSW works. I wouldn’t didn’t.Without a good plan, champion it if it sticking to it and delivering we might deviate. By with confidence, we’ll have a safe site. “At Meridian, we have 12 zones, and the Safe Work tell you which zones you’re Pack covered for. We have Safe will Leaders working across Work all the zones, and their pack will tell them exactly what’s going on in each zone. “The changes encourage everyone to have a voice. comes to us with concerns If anyone and we think work needs again, we can stop and call planning a Time Out Take Five.”

SANDIP SINGH, SITE SUPERVISOR “With PDSW, tasks are always well-planned, which makes been taking a lot of deliveries life much easier. For example, we’ve recently and we know exactly to do when the vehicles what arrive “It’s great to have a Person on site. in Charge too, as it means can be communicated any issues quickly and clearly to a single person. “The implementation has Pack in particular is a great been smooth so far. The Safe Work be accessed through one idea, as it means any information can convenient document.”

MATTHEW AKANJI, ALO COORDINATOR “PDSW is a good initiative its early stages and therebut it’s in are still improvements “One issue a few of us have to be made. is tool used to check and issue that Proscient,our electronic permits,has not been perfected yet. Some of the paperwork also still needs fine-tuning. “Having someone you can with different communicatio go to rather than dealing n channels is a good idea. It has streamlined work and made it higher quality more efficient.” and

The introduction of Planned Delivery of Safe including Work on 23 September information on operational, has task and site on site, number of changes to the brought with it a risks, and welfare facilities. who has been involved way work is planned from the very and delivered. beginning, improving communicatio Craig Lightheart,Programme “There was some scepticism at first,”continued n. Rail, said: “We want colleaguesManager,Network Craig. “But A Person in Charge appointed “In the responsible for Leaders southern region, we have Safe Work adapted sites such as Meridian Water have accountable for safely delivering by a manager is delivering work involved on all of our sites which well.We’ve had a lot of at the planning stage. work.They work PDSW alongside a Planner before line. In worksites, they have are on or near the on the concept, so it’s now positive feedback gives every Person in Charge work begins to identify about refining it. safety critical roles on every site reporting andcontrolriskssotheycan confidence that the plan “Over the next year, one in to them, responsible is correct and suitable beeffectivelymanaged. thing we want to for identifying improve before work begins. and managing task risks The two create a Safe Work is the technology side of on site. Pack, a document things. We are also organising working “It means one person is The initiative has been a success groups to discuss ideas responsible for safety so far,but Craig and will believes there is more work be holding lessons learned to be done. sessions so we can continue to improve the system.”

RAIL LIVES– page 8

want us to feature your team?

Shield_Dec2017v4.indb

Get in touch – shield@netw

orkrail.co.uk

7

30/11/2017 17:55

See it, fix it, raise a Close Call

E

ch – shiel Sad@ fetnet y inworkrail.co .uk

PROJECT BRIE F

Paul Futter Network Rail

8

Steel frame is the height of safety

In that time, we’ve covered all kinds of topics from the importance of keeping sites tidy to submersible plant and even how to avoid painful bee stings. We’ve highlighted some great safety innovations but also drawn attention to some of the serious implications of poor practice. There have also been views and opinions from across the Southern Shield and a wealth of top tips on how to stay safe and well at work. There have even been some special spin-offs, such as the Lifesaving Rules poster and animation. Thank you for everyone who’s taken part and helped get everyone home safe every day. Here are some of our favourite features…

Gareth White BAM Nuttall

GOING TO PLAN: MICK GLOVER , STUART WAVELL AND SHANE O’HARE

Steve Walters Network Rail

SEE PAG E

ISSUE 03, AUG UST

I N T H E ZO N E

THIS issue of The Shield is the 20th since its launch in 2015.

ISSUE 01, SPRING 2015

stood for ITS predecessor had But thanks more than a century. rail contracto the smart work of it took tors in the Southern Region, just 67 hours for this replacement over a busy bridge to be installed a sinLondon street, and all without gle safety incident. TottenSouth to next bridge, The than 100 ham station, was more the end years old and had reached bridge also of its useful life. The new six supportremoved the need for at coning columns, which were passby stant risk of being struck road. A10 ing traffic on the busy

Simon Morgan Network Rail

WIN

DINNER FOR YOUR TEAM

12/04/2016 16:56

5

READ ALL ABOUT IT

Super-fast bridge job is injury-free

Shane O’Halloran BCM

8

9 10

1 p1_the_shield_June17.indd

The Shield SPAN-TASTIC

Paul Devoy Network Rail

steam up. Astrospec model he said: “I wore the so they while I was doing woodwork But it is not very were good for that. painting because practical when I was then tried to I got paint on it and JaMeS GaRTSIDe the astrospec whenit with a cleaning solvent the antipainter James tested wipe was removed.” lens. clear 4c plus mist from the glass never had an eye Although James has knows just how astrospec 4C plus clear UVeX incident at work, he Tested: safety glasses important it is to wear lens he knows exactly at all times – and Rating: 7/10 should he need where to find a pair

14/08/2017 15:39

WIN

Peter Walsh Murphy

6 7

agree with his them. He does however people don’t wear colleagues that some as they can often them while working

have anti-mist so so much. They also ” they don’t steam up. don’t wear “I think sometimes people cheaper the safety glasses because can’t see up and ones tend to mist Workers have to where they are going. and put them take them off RUSSeLL RoSeNaU continually russell them away from osborne site supervisor winner back on again. It takes UveX are doing as they was pleased with the to try out. the task that they which can be a big glasses he was given cannot concentrate, to all the safeso comfortable to he said: “They are problem. I have access keep a stock in seem like you are wear that it doesn’t ty glasses I need. We is good when you plenty of spares.” wearing them, which the filing cabinet with a long time. They are out on site for I wear my safety also sit nicely when Tested: UVeX Winner arms of the glass9/10 helmet because the Rating: don’t press down es are thinner so they

12/04/2016 16:56

A FAMILY BREAK

John Cox VolkerFitzpatrick

4 5

PAGE 8

PAGE 7

Each member has made a personal commitment to improve safety.

John Dowsett Osborne

whereas wearing the UVEX Sportstyle,the UVEX wear before I would regularly Winner style glasses. ors “I think that some subcontractpair compliant will buy the cheapest do have antipossible. A lot of them you clean the coating, but when BeNJaMIN LeNG site manager mist to take off the osborne assistant two varieties glasses, you manage to mist up again. tested begin Leng they and Benjamin coating the anti-mist of safety glasses. With the UVEX glasses, the lenses, UVEX Skyguard is impregnated into he said: “I tried the coating as many times medium between which was a happy so you can clean them anti-misting They offer great goggles and glasses. and splashes as you want and the glasses wont protection against dust but would properties of the clunky – they are slightly c situations. diminish. experienced the discomfort “I have be perfect for task-specifi before, where recommend the pain of an eye injury However, I would glasses for and scratched the UVEX Sportstyle safetyon a day-to- a piece of grit or dust I was putting in all operatives to wear lens of my eye while a lenses. This caused contact day basis. my hospital banding along ulcer that required “They have rubber and this would corneal I appreciate the the top of the glasses debris from treatment therefore eye injuries.” certainly help to prevent wraparound importance of preventing Their getting in the eyes. of UVeX level the Skyguard, design also improves objects. The Tested: UVeX protection from foreign and very Superfit, Sportstyle 10/10 light are 10/10, 8/10, Sportstyle Rating: and I now prefer comfortable to wear

just one of the REUSABLE water bottles are compound are ways staff at BCM’s Battersea site. helping make it a more sustainable greener it enAnd, of course, as well as being Sussex Power ables the team working on the well hydrated Supply Upgrade project to stay while working in the warm weather. site include Other eco-friendly initiatives on water recycling. motion sensitive lights and rain

The Southern Shield Safety Leadership Team are responsible for reviewing and agreeing changes that can be made across the southern region to increase safety.

Andy Duffin Network Rail

5

more protected if I it. I would have been goggles. had been wearing better were really “The UVEX Superfit glasses They were so light comfortable to wear. that I was wearing I didn’t even notice to have the them. It’s quite important if you know right safety glasses otherwise they can quite be you have them on UVEX Winner more irritating. I found the quite heavy. I also uncomfortable and goggles which tried the UVEX Ultrasonic c tasks such specifi were great while doing as angle grinding.”

On-site sustainability makes sense

MEET THE SLT

2016 The ShIeLD

7

15:56

2015


ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018 THE SHIELD

HAVS NOT BAM Nuttall has committed to ban certain vibrating tools which can cause crippling injury. Here’s why it’s an important step for the industry

GENERAL Foreman Gareth John has worked in the construction industry for 42 years. For the majority of his early career, he was a tunneller and his work required him to use German jiggers, hand scabblers and grinders.

In the late 1990s, Gareth began to feel a numbness in his right hand. He’d developed Hand Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAVS) – or White Finger as it is also known – and his hand would never be the same again. “My whole hand feels like it has pins and needles,” said Gareth. “It’s more prevalent in the winter. I feel it more when it’s cold. After I’ve been driving, I sometimes have to keep my right hand down at my side for a while in order to get blood to flow back into it. It goes cold and numb.” HAVS had an impact on Gareth’s career. “I had to come off the tools,” he said. “I had to become a manager, which is a role I was working towards anyway, but it meant that I had to progress quicker than I’d planned.”

Dexterity checks BAM Nuttall has sent Gareth for dexterity checks in order to help him get feeling back in his hand. These check the strength of his dexterity, but there’s no treatment available that will completely cure the numbness in his hand.

FACTS HAND ARM VIBRATION SYNDROME (HAVS) IS ONE OF THE MOST SERIOUS OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH RISKS THAT RAILWAY AND CONSTRUCTION COLLEAGUES CAN ENCOUNTER. YET, BECAUSE IT DEVELOPS OVER A LONG PERIOD, THE CONDITION CAN BE HARD TO SPOT.

Decades ago, White Finger was considered old man’s disease and among tunnellers it was sometimes regarded as a badge of honour. The industry is now cracking down on tools that cause HAVS. BAM Nuttall Operations Manager Gareth White said that progress is being made to ban these tools by 1 December 2018. “At the moment, tools that create HAVS are already under permit use only to allow sites to get alternative equipment in place before the ban begins. “We have to protect our workforce and this ban is one step in the right direction. We know that there is technology available for us to find alternative tools, and this is why we are confident we can ban dangerous tools without making it difficult to do the job. I hope that the rest of the industry follows suit on this matter.”

Gareth White

Gareth John

THE MAIN SYMPTOMS OF HAND ARM VIBRATION SYNDROME Loss of sensitivity Numbness or tingling of fingers

Fingers may go white especially in cold weather

HAVS IS CAUSED BY THE REPEATED USE OF VIBRATING TOOLS OVER TIME, CAUSING IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGE TO A PERSON’S HANDS. IT CAN BE SEVERELY DISABLING. IN ITS EARLY STAGES HAVS SYMPTOMS CAN FADE AWAY, WITH THE WORKER THINKING IT’S JUST A TEMPORARY PROBLEM. BUT WITH CONTINUED LONGERTERM EXPOSURE, MORE DEBILITATING PROBLEMS CAN DEVELOP – HAVING A SERIOUS IMPACT ON AN INDIVIDUAL’S LONG-TERM HEALTH.

Loss of strength in hands

Always use equipment that is fit for its intended purpose

Pains in hands or wrists

7


8

THE SHIELD ISSUE 20, SEPTEMBER 2018

RAIL LIVES

HIGH RISK

ALWAYS USE A S A F E T Y H A R N ESS W H WORKING AT HEIGHT, EN UN OTHER PROTECTIONLESS IS IN PLACE

Paul Blanchard’s story reminds us why working at height is covered by one of our Lifesaving Rules AT 55 YEARS old, Paul Blanchard owned his own successful construction business and was extremely fit and active. But early one Sunday morning, a perfect storm of health and safety failures led to an accident which changed his life forever. It was 18 July 2010, Paul’s business was doing well despite the fact it was at the height of the recession in the property market. He had a good reputation and wasn’t short of work. In fact, he was, in his own words, very busy. Paul went over to a barn conversion he had previously worked on to get a head start on some of the skylights in the roof. “The site was a bit of a warehouse, but I went on my own. It was wet, I didn’t have the right scaffolding and I hadn’t really done the right sort of risk assessment,” he admitted. “I took my eye off the ball that day,” he said. It was then that Paul, who wasn’t wearing harness, slipped and fell through the roof. He dropped

a total of 12ft, hitting a railing as he landed. “I was out cold. I was airlifted to a hospital in Lincoln and then admitted to intensive care at a hospital in Sheffield,” he said. Paul woke up from a three-month medically induced coma to find that he was paralysed from the chest down.

The aftermath

“There’s a lot you don’t think about when you are not paraplegic,” Paul said. “I can no longer clean the windows of my house or cut the grass in the garden. Little tasks like that become impossible.” Paul’s family also had to adapt to the monumental changes that the accident had brought on. Paul and his wife had to move into a bungalow, and special adaptations had to be made to the bathroom before he could move in. “There is the financial situation too,” said Paul.

“Every aspect of life changed for me and my family.” Paul is now a public speaker on health and safety issues, and he’s been doing it for about five years. He recently spoke to railway staff at one of our sites about the dangers of complacency. His talks begin with his background in construction – how he started in 1970 – and he also speaks about his family and his hobbies. They are informative, moving and serve as a stark reminder that this kind of accident can happen to anyone.

Paul’s advice

“Complacency is the biggest danger to people in the industry,” he said. “A scaffolder might be a bit nervous the first time they are up at a height, but after about six weeks they are usually walking round like they’ve done it all their life.” Paul’s point is simple. Once complacency sets in, it “removes any fear” and thoughts of risk go out the window. This is when health and safety procedures begin to slip. “I’m living proof of this – one lapse in safety protocol can have consequences that last a lifetime,” said Paul.

“It was wet, I didn’t have the right scaffolding and I hadn’t really done the right sort of risk assessment” Paul Blanchard

What do you think? Get in touch – shield@networkrail.co.uk

The Shield September 2018  
The Shield September 2018  
Advertisement