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TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

the roar

The Loveland High School Student Newspaper

Inside Editorials

Inside Photo from ineedmotivation.com

Read about Martin Luther King Jr. Day on page 2.

Sports

Photo courtesy of Patty Wozniak

Read about LHS’s own Rose Bowl star, Brian Wozniak, on page 4.

News

Photo by Madeline Vance

Read about the field trip LHS students took to the Rumpke recycling center on page 6.

Center

Photo by Regan Meinking

Read all about teen stress on pages 8 and 9.

Entertainment

Image from thechinabeat.com

Read about LHS’s own Gleeks on page 10.

Page Editor: Regan Meinking

Man’s best friend? Hers too By Becca Black

Editor-in-Chief

The room smells like shampoo as the competitors get ready. Hair is being washed, combed, and blow dried. Nails are clipped to perfection. The prep work takes hours. Beauty pageant? No. Dog show. Senior Kateland Koch (12) is a trainer who shows dogs. She shows all eight of her dogs competitively. She has competed and placed eighth for junior handling (chosen based on how well the dog is handled) in the prestigious Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show. And she also competed in the national championships. Kateland shows every dog from Whippets to Poodles to hounds. She tries to go to a competition two to three times a month. But it is not as easy as it may look. The whole process starts when the puppy is six months old, when training begins. The trainer conditions and grooms the dog until it is ready Photo courtesy of Kateland Koch Kateland Koch (12) showing a Whippet in a dog show. for showing. There is grooming before the show, and then the judging begins. The trainers are called in by num- dog. Another time, Kateland tripped and ing brings the girls closer together, as they bers. They take their dogs to the table and fell while showing at a competition, in show almost every weekend. Kateland enjoys working with animals; stand the dog. The judge inspects the dog. front of everyone, even the judges. It may it’s one of the reasons she shows so often. Then it is “gaited,” or run around the ring. be challenging at times, but she obviously “It’s a lot of work to train and groom Kateland goes through this process at ev- enjoys the sport, as she has been competthe dogs — get them ready to show — and ing since age 10. ery competition. it’s nice when all that hard work pays off,” Her love for the sport began when she “The hardest part is patience with the Kateland said. dogs. They sometimes misbehave while got her first dog, a Whippet. The breeder And it has paid off with her prestigious in the ring, and it’s hard to correct them in that she bought the dog from signed Katefinishes, as well as the reward of doing land and her sister, Lauren, up for a show. front of the judges,” Kateland said. what she loves. She fell in love with dog During one show, the leash broke that The two loved it. showing the second she stepped into the They must often compete against each Kateland was holding and the dog ran wild ring and has been competing ever since. around the ring, even going after another other, but they’re friendly rivals. Show-

Teen stress is an epidemic Upcoming By Regan Meinking

Light News Editor

In the movie It’s Kind of a Funny Story, the main character, Craig, personifies the stress shared by many of the people walking the halls of Loveland High School. After checking into a mental hospital, he expresses his fears about possibly not getting into a summer pre-college program, saying, “Then I wouldn’t be able to put it on my college application, which means I wouldn’t get into a good college. If I didn’t get into a good college, I wouldn’t have a good job. Which means I wouldn’t be able to afford a good lifestyle. So I wouldn’t be able to find a girlfriend, which means I’d probably get depressed, and I’d end up in a place like this for the rest of my life.” An answer like this may seem drastic, but according to professionals and teens, such stress is real and an epidemic. From freshmen to seniors, stress is everywhere. The Roar interviewed some psychological professionals about the stress teens feel and ways to deal with it. Dr. Marytena Hodges, a pediatrician based in Mason, says, “The amount of stress in teens is abnormally high.” She says the expectation to know it all at such a young age causes a lot of stress.

The Roar takes an in-depth look at stress – and how to avoid it – on pages 8 & 9. “Teens push (themselves) to know too much when it’s unrealistic to know everything,” says Dr. Hodges. Most seniors will tell you that they are asked at least once a day where they are going to college and what they will be studying. Teens are expected to know exactly what they want in their future and exactly how to get it. According to Dr. Hodges, this is something we can’t possibly know for sure at this age, which leads us to stress out over it. “People have to decide early on that they’re not going to be able to do it all,” says Dr. Hodges. LHS’s own psychologist, Mrs.Van Strien, sees stress coming from many different areas. “Students’ stress revolves around their jobs, relationships, and thoughts on their future,” she said. “There are so many environmental stressors out there.” She believes the stress people feel can

(See TEEN STRESS, page 8)

Events

Jan. 12 – Semester exams, blocks 1 and 2 Jan. 13 – Semester exams, blocks 4 and 3 Jan. 14 – No school; teacher in-service day Jan. 17 – No school; Martin Luther King Jr. Day Jan. 18 – First day of second semester Feb. 3-5 – Drama performance (Twelve Angry Jurors) Feb. 11 – LMS/LHS Showfest at LHS Please Recycle!


Editorials

2 TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Staff Policy

The Roar is the official student newspaper of Loveland High School. The Roar is produced by students in Journalism. Editorials reflect the staff’s opinion but do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the school administration or the Loveland City School District. The Roar is published monthly. For information regarding advertising in The Roar, call 697-3749. As an open forum for students, letters to the editor are welcome, but are subject to be edited for length, libel, and clarity. Letters to the editor may be dropped off in room 109. Contact Information The Roar Loveland High School 1 Tiger Trail Loveland, Ohio 45140 Editors-in-Chief Becca Black Emma Goetz Advertising Manager Alyssa Tipton Business Manager Matthew Worsham Section Editors Katie Henke, Entertainment Austin Stahl, Sports Regan Meinking, Light News Staff Writers Hailey Booth Steven Goodman Reagan Johnstone Ryann Lally Ellen Mack Danielle Meyer Jessica Miller Hannah Moloney Sabrina Newstead Ogonna Ononye Marie Policastro John Ross Kyle Sieg Megan Slabaugh Liz Sullivan Madeline Vance Elizabeth Worsham

Awards * International First Place Award, 2010 Awards for School News Media (Quill & Scroll Honorary Society) * International Honor Award, 2009 Awards for School News Media (Quill & Scroll) * Certificate of Merit, Editorial Page Design, Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 2010 Gold Circle Awards * Certificate of Merit, Page One Design, Columbia Scholastic Press Association’s 2009 Gold Circle Awards If you are interested in supporting The Roar but have no need to advertise, please contact us and we will thank you in this space as a sponsor.

Page Editor: Ellen Mack

Snow kidding: drive slowly

Follow these tips to drive carefully in winter weather It has been snowing all night, and now there is a frozen blanket of snow not only on the streets, but on your car as well. You must be careSabrina Newstead ful when you venture out onto these treacherous roads. What happens if your car slides on the ice? What happens if you press the brakes and your car doesn’t stop? These are just some of the scary situations that happen while driving in wintery weather. So what exactly are you supposed to do? For starters, drive slowly; ice can be invisible on the road, and if your tires speed right over it, there is no longer traction between your car and the road. Also, controlling the car while it’s going slow is easier than controlling a car that’s going fast. Keep in mind; you should leave at least three times the stopping distance than you usually would. When braking, slowly apply pressure to the pedal to prevent skidding. If your brakes lock up, then slowly ease off the brake. If your wheels skid, turn your wheel the direction you want the front wheels to go. Another thing to consider before venturing out on the icy roads is to heat up the car several minutes before leaving. This will

A near crash avoided in the parking lot. melt the ice on the windows and heat up the engine. Remember to clear all the snow from your car. Don’t just clear a little circle on the driver’s side of the windshield. This is ineffective and will just obscure your vision even more. Also, if you don’t wipe the snow off of your car, when you drive, it blows off behind you and obstructs other drivers’ vision of the road. This isn’t funny when that car runs into the back of you.

Photo by Katie Henke

Remember, you’re not the only person on the road. Some other things to keep in mind while driving through this treacherous weather: keep your gas tank at least half full to prevent gas lines from freezing, check your tires to make sure they’re appropriate for the trip, and drive with your lights on. Next time you have to drive in the snow, take it slow and be safe.

WikiLeaks: irresponsible journalism taken too far Journalists have a responsibility to provide their audience with factual, informative reports on the issues affecting their audience . Sometimes, that Matthew Worsham means breaking stories that will disrupt the status quo in order to right a wrong. For example, during the Watergate scandal, journalists played a crucial role in revealing the extent of corruption under the Nixon administration. This obligation ends, however, when the information given can put the lives of innocent people in danger and disrupt delicate foreign policy situations aimed at avoiding armed conflict with

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange

other nations. Julian Assange and his WikiLeaks compatriots violated this fundamental principal of ethics when they began releasing over 250,000 American diplomatic cables to the internet and various media outlets this winter. The term “cable” is intelligence jargon for a confidential text communication between diplomatic entities, such as embassies and consulates. It’s important that such communications remain secure so that officials can speak frankly about the political climate of other nations without fear of embarrassment or backlash. For example, some cables use lessthan-flattering terminology when referring to foreign heads of state, like when Russian President Dmitry Medvedev was characterized in a cable from the U.S. embassy in Moscow as the “Robin to (Vladimir) Putin’s Batman.” When

Photo from boiledpeanuts.podbean.com

this was said, it was assumed that the conversation would stay private, and this metaphor was important for conveying the relationship between these two public figures. Now, diplomats around the world are coming out to apologize for the way they described each other in cables, in fear that they might be released in future leaks. WikiLeaks also refused to conceal the identities of informants mentioned in the leaks, endangering the lives of some of our most important sources of information in the field. Leaks like these can have far-reaching consequences for the intelligence field. For example, many leaks provide evidence of the desire of many Middle Eastern countries for the United States bomb to Iran. (Don’t worry; it’s not going to happen.) Now the entire population of Iran has documentation of the extent to which its neighbors resent its influence, making it even more difficult to negotiate with its already radical government. Even worse, the threat of leaks will make government officials less willing to share information between offices. In a worst-case scenario, this could undo much of the hard work put into increasing transparency between security groups that was begun after 9/11. I used to be a fan of WikiLeaks. The work they did in the past to fight corporate corruption and human rights abuses around the globe was admirable at the very least. However, there comes a point when a journalism organization must decide if the information it plans to publish crosses the line between whistle-blowing and gossip that could damage international relations. Assange crossed that line when he allowed his organization to publish these leaks. Assange had no business disclosing information that could endanger so many nations’ foreign policy. Next time I hope he remembers that nobody likes a tattletale.


TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Editorials

I have a dream.....

3 Page Editor: Marie Policastro

Respect the history behind the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday Every year we get the third Monday of January off for Martin Luther Regan Meinking King Jr. Day. But do we honestly spend any time thinking about what this day is really about? We’re just all happy that we have at least a three-day weekend or, like this year, a four-day weekend. Yet Martin Luther King Jr. Day is so much more than just a long weekend. It took a lot for America to declare MLK Jr. Day a national paid holiday. It wasn’t common for a private citizen to be honored with a national holiday. When it was first

proposed in 1979, the bill failed by five votes in the House of Representatives. Even Ronald Reagan was against the holiday at first, because of the cost concerns of another national paid holiday, but after Congress passed it with an overwhelming veto-proof majority, Reagan signed the bill into a law. Martin Luther King Jr. is one of the most important people of the 20th century. Looking back at everything he did and accomplished, he truly changed America for the better. He led the non-violent activism in the civil rights movement. Thanks to him, American society’s playing field has been leveled for all races and people.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is celebrated every third Monday of January since it usually falls somewhere near his birthday, which is Jan. 15. It became a holiday in 1983, but many states resisted observing the holiday. It was first officially observed in all 50 states in 2000. It has taken a lot to make Martin Luther King Jr. Day a nationally observed holiday, just like it took him a lot to change society. Instead of just thinking of this as another day off school, try to think of it as what it is: the remembrance of a remarkable man and his impact on history. Spend a little time this Martin Luther King Jr. Day thinking about Dr. King and his courage.

Letters to the editor: Take advice from a senior Dear editors, There are several things I wish I would have known when I was a wee little one, meaning my freshman through junior years. Looking back, I wish someone would have told me these: 1. Take your ACT and/or SAT tests ahead of time, and take them often. You will most likely increase your test score. These scores will not just help you get into a school, but they help so much with scholarships! 2. Join clubs! The more you have to put down on your college applications, the better. You meet so many people through these too. 3. VOLUNTEER. Again, it is so nice to put down on your college applications, and you’re giving back to the community. 4. Get enough sleep. At first it might seem okay to stay up until one in the morning a few times a week, but it catches up to

you quickly. 5. Don’t let other people’s opinion about you change the person YOU are. I’ve seen too many people get sucked into this. Stay true to yourself. You should not have to change yourself for someone else. 6. Do not ignore your friends when you get a boyfriend/girlfriend. It is so annoying when your best friend gets into a relationship and constantly blows you off. When that relationship is over, you will need someone to fall back on. So balance out the time! 7. Try new things. I missed out on so much because I was too afraid to do this. 8. Go out and support our athletics! Football games especially are a blast, even if we don’t score a touchdown … but not just football, every sport! I wish I could go back at times and do a redo, but obviously I can’t. Enjoy high school; don’t let it be a burden. Hopefully

you can look back like me and think of all the good times and how truly a blast it was! Remember these words (author unknown): “Moving on is simple. It’s what we leave behind that’s hard.” – Mackenzie Vizgirda, 12 Dear editors, I <3 two things: cross country and winter running. Oh, how I love winter running. People think we’re crazy (see story on page 5), but I’m writing to say we ain’t. I have run without a shirt in subfreezing weather, and I’m just fine. And I’ve only fallen through the ice twice! It’s fun! We have snowball fights and keep sleds in the back of our cars in case it snows. We also have Trail Blazin’ Tuesday. So reader, if you are bored after school, go to the Lost ’n Found, get some shorts, and meet us by the Senior Section doors of the cafeteria. – Pat Salay, 12

Making the Grade Dodgeball tourney: A+ Not to brag, but The Roar can put together one fun-filled school event. This annual event was yet again a success.

Three snow days: C Don’t get us wrong;we’re happy to have any days off at all. But why take away two days of fun?

Start of 2011: A New goals, new friends, and new memories. It’s fun thinking about everything this new year can bring. Make the best of it!

Exams: F Study, Study, Study. All we really want to be doing is sledding and sipping hot chocolate, not falling asleep reading text books.

Winter break: A+ We all enjoyed our Winter Break this year. Spending quality time with friends and family rejuvented us all and geared us up for the end of the first semester!

CONTRA

Roar staffers debate their wintry beverage of choice

Regan Meinking

You are walking down the snowcovered sidewalk gazing at all the beautiful Christmas lights, and what’s in your hands keeping you warm? A nice hot Starbucks

coffee, of course. Hot chocolate is good when you’re five, but we are young adults, so we should step up to a more sophisticated hot drink: Starbucks coffee. Yes, hot chocolate is fun with its mini marshmallows and powder-filled packets, but it sorta kinda tastes like muddy water and looks like it. Yeah, that’s not appetizing. Starbucks is oh so delicious and contain way more flavor. Instead of just a bland, plain chocolate taste, Starbucks has a gamut of flavors. There are flavors for every taste bud. You get your flavor-filled drink mere minutes after you order, and you don’t have to make it. Yes, you can order hot chocolate at Starbucks, but why, when you have so many other choices to pick from.?Most of the

time when you want hot chocolate, you have to make it and stir it and, hand-place the marshmallows on top and even the whipped cream, and come on, that’s really just no fun. I don’t want to have to work for my drink; I want it to be handed to me already made. The extra work is just unnecessary. Starbucks has awesome flavored drinks all year round, and I haven’t even gotten to the seasonal drinks. They have a drink for every season- fall, winter, summer, there’s a drink for each one. The peppermint mocha and peppermint white mocha are amazing during Christmas. It’s like Christmas in a cup. If you need to get some holiday spirit, a steaming peppermint mocha is just the way to do it. So honestly, when its crunch time and you are choosing what drink to get, Starbucks is the best way to go. There’s no question about it. So on the next miserably cold day (basically everyday), stop into the Starbucks on Loveland-Madeira road, or any one for that matter, and order one of their delicious gourmet drinks.

Coffee

When you are shivering with cold from playing out in the snow, dreaming of warmth, what drink do you turn to for refuge? Hot chocolate. Admit it, you were thinking of the drink the second I even mentioned snow. Yet some people, like my co-writer over there, have the delusion that coffee is better than hot chocolate. Imagine this: You see a girl walking on the street with a steaming cup of something. She is talking on her cell phone, saying things such as “OMG” and “like whatever.” She sips her drink and lets out a loud, attention-seeking laugh. Then you notice her cup is from Starbucks. Of course, she is drinking coffee. Now here’s another one for you: Another girl is walking down the street, wrapped in a wool sweater and scarf. She, too, has a steaming beverage in her mug. She is walking with a friend and talking. As she sticks out her tongue to catch a falling snowflake, she smiles. She is obviously a hot chocolate drinker. I get that many people have fallen into the coffee-craze. It’s the new “in style” thing to do, and some people need that

kind of reassurance from society. But we have all drunk hot chocolate since childhood. It is the unpretentious hot beverage. Nothing says comfort like a cup of hot chocolate Becca Black with a marshmallow floating and disintegrating on the froth. Even the wise ancient Mayans and Aztecs agree with me. They were the first to create the remarkable drink. It was the “drink of the gods” and was even used in rituals. That means that those of you that agree with me are basically gods. And those of you who don’t are just mortals with yellow teeth and bad breath. I have proven to you in countless ways how hot chocolate is better than coffee. Even you coffee drinkers know it; you just don’t want to admit it. I mean, what is a mocha drink but hot chocolate with coffee? They are just trying to cover up their love for the timeless drink. Hot chocolate is better. Point proven.

Hot Chocolate


Sports

4 TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Page Editor: Austin Stahl

Former Tigers loving their next-level success

Beachy powers Buckeyes to 1st Final Four

Wozniak part of Wisconsin’s dream season

By Austin Stahl

By Katie Henke

Beachy excelled as a defender, starting 13 games as a true freshman and then keeping her starting job for the rest of her colleSome former LHS athletes are expe- giate career. She has won OSU scholar-athriencing success at the college level only lete and Academic All-Big Ten awards, in dreamed about by most people. One is Lau- addition to multiple team-specific awards. ren Beachy, a former All-American high She even scored a goal, a rare feat for a school soccer player who starred in her se- defender, to help the Buckeyes put away nior year at Ohio State, helping lead them Georgetown 2-0 in the NCAA quarterfinals. It was last month to the one of her faFinal Four of the vorite memoNCAA Tournaries from the ment, known as tournament. the College Cup. “ScorBeachy and ing my first the Buckeyes figoal against nally fell to evenG e o rg e t o w n tual champions to get to the Notre Dame in Final Four and the semifinals seeing ‘Ohio by a score of State’ written 1-0, but not until in the field for after a recordthe Final Four breaking run. It were my fawas the farthest vorite tournaOhio State had ment memoever been in the ries,” said tournament, addBeachy. ing to their sucPhoto courtesy of Tyler Beachy Beachy cess after tying Lauren Beachy eludes an opponent. believes one of for first in the the keys to their success Big Ten. Beachy said, “It was a surreal experience being a was attitude. “Believing in ourselves and part of OSU history for women’s soccer. I having each player do their role for the team was key,” she said. feel very blessed.” Her success has also inspired her brothThe team exceeded expectations, considering it was ranked 17th before the ers, Matt (11) and Tyler Beachy (12). “I NCAAs. When discussing how the team taught her everything she knows,” claimed thought it would do, Beachy said, “For the Tyler, while Matt lovingly joked, “She’s a season, our goal was to win the Big Ten bully on and off the field.” Regardless of what her brothers say, championship. We got second last year, so we wanted to prove we could win it. For Lauren Beachy is a fantastic soccer player the tournament, we wanted to get farther and one of the most successful athletes ever to come out of Loveland. than we ever have before -- and we did!” Sports Editor

Loveland to leave FAVC for new league in ’12-13 By Austin Stahl

Sports Editor

Consider the Fort Ancient Valley Conference dead. Loveland, as well as many other members, will be leaving to form a new independent conference after next school year. Joining us will be Anderson, Glen Este, Kings, Milford, Turpin, and Walnut Hills. Ross, Talawanda, Edgewood, Northwest, Harrison, and Mount Healthy from the FAVC West also announced their intentions to form a separate league. Norwood left the FAVC for the Southern Buckeye Conference, and Wilmington has announced its intentions to leave the conference as well, leaving Little Miami and Winton Woods as the only schools left committed to the FAVC entering the 2012-13. Loveland’s new conference, recently named the Eastern Cincinnati Conference or ECC, is set to start with the 2012-13 school year. Only current freshmen and sophomores will be affected by the change. The conference is looking to add an eighth team that fits with the others, sharing a commitment to academics and the community. Our athletic director, Mr. Zidron, said, “While the FAVC has been very good to us, the lack of stability and the wide dispersion of school geography has reduced

the bonds between schools. We felt in reviewing the situation, the schools on the eastside were natural rivals with a sense of common academic and community purpose. Competitively, all schools in the new conference share the same depth of programs and commitment to field teams.” The ECC will look a lot like the current FAVC East, which includes all of these schools plus Little Miami and Wilmington. That lineup is the same for all sports except football, which currently retains the old Buckeye, Scarlet, and Cardinal divisions. Football is where some changes will occur. While LHS drops Winton Woods from within the conference, it will add strong programs in Turpin and Kings. However, Coach Marlatt plans on scheduling Winton Woods for a nonconference game anyway, archrival Kings is played every year, and Loveland has opened their season with Turpin for the past three years, so there will be no drastic changes here either. The only team that will likely not be played again is Harrison, due to the distance factor. Regardless, the team’s schedule will remain one of the toughest in Cincinnati, especially among public schools. The Eastern Cincinnati Conference makes sense for Loveland and should produce lasting, quality rivalries among eastside Cincinnati schools.

a better feeling. High school and college football are so different when it comes to Brian Wozniak was known in the Love- film study and reading techniques.” When land community as a touchdown-scoring, asked if it was hard to manage his studies and basket-making superstar. However, his football, he said, “If it was easy, everyone glory days didn’t end when he graduated would do it. But we do get a lot of help from from LHS in 2009. Wozniak has moved on our academic advisors, which helps balance everything.” to play football Wisconsin had for the Univera great year in the sity of WisconBig Ten, tying for sin. first with Ohio Wozniak was State and Michigan redshirted his State. They played first year, and Texas Christian in despite a shoulthe Rose Bowl on der injury this Jan.1. Wozniak year, he is now said, “Playing in playing on spethe Rose Bowl cial teams for was amazing. kickoffs. His The crowd never first game was a stopped yelling victory against and the stadium then-No. 1 was constantly Ohio State, flashing from all and on his very of the cameras.” first play as Although they a Badger, his Photo courtesy of Patty Wozniak were defeated by block sprung a teammate for Brian Wozniak after getting a Rose Bowl spot. the TCU Horned Frogs, it was still a kickoff return touchdown that sparked Wisconsin’s upset. major accomplishment in Wozniak’s career. Wozniak said, “It was a great way to start Patty Wozniak, his mom, said, “I grew up off my college career, and I couldn’t have watching the parade and game, and to have my son be a part of that tradition was amazcome up with a better way.” When asked to compare college and ing. We are very proud!” Wozniak has gone a long way since his high school, Wozniak said, “Playing college football is a ton of fun. Although the work days at LHS. He is living his dream and is is tough, after winning a game there isn’t on the path to success. On Wisconsin! Entertainment Editor


Sports TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

5 Page Editor: Matthew Worsham

Tough sports, tough sacrifices Wrestlers, swimmers dish on the pain for the gain By Austin Stahl

Sports Editor

Food or sleep? Those are two things that are very close to teenager’s hearts and that humans cannot live without. So if you had to give up one of them, which would it be? Some of Loveland’s own athletes find themselves making sacrifices in these areas. Wrestling and swimming are similar sports, not in the way they are played, but in the sense they are both winter sports and both require you to give up something. Wrestlers try to compete at their lightest weight possible, and have to constantly diet and exercise to stay light. (The state has regulations of how low of a weight and body-fat ratio each wrestler can have for his body type.) Methods other than dieting like excessive sweating, spitting, and dehydration are used before weigh-ins, although they are not encouraged.

“I wear lots of clothes and go hard all day, and chew gum and spit,” said Nick Shea (12), when discussing his methods of losing weight. “Gaming also keeps my mind off food.” Fellow senior Cam Adams said, “I eat healthy and sparingly, and I go for frequent jogs in Loveland.” Junior Andrew Karle does anything he can to sweat. Swimmers are faced with the challenge of jumping in a cold pool during the winter every school day at 5:15 in the morning. Many lose sleep, or force themselves to go to bed earlier to get their rest. Senior Austin Caldwell and sophomore Ryan Moss both claimed to get about five hours a night when having an early practice the next day. This loss of sleep can lead to other consequences. “I can’t watch Modern Family on Wednesday nights,” Ryan said. Laura Doppler (10) said, “Sometimes you have to give up weekends,” while Austin added, “I have trouble staying awake in class.”

Both sports require their sacrifices, and the athletes had biased opinions about which side is tougher. Austin said, “I think getting less sleep is harder because I already watch what I eat.” Wrestler Nick Shea is hungry; swimmer Laura Doppler is tired. Laura also added, “I would much rather give up sleepbacked him up in saying, “I would rather ing because I could sleep after school.” give up food, because I love sleep.” In the end it comes down to the person. On the flip side, Cam said, “I don’t sleep What do you think is tougher to go withanyways, so I’d rather give up sleep.” Nick out?

Wind chill, snowballs make winter running fun By Matthew Worsham Staff Writer

For most LHS students, the winter months mean days shut inside, watching the snow and ice cover the roads, and rarely venturing out into the cold. For one small group, however, winter means the beginning of a glorious new time to participate in the sport of cross country running. Meet Loveland High School’s winter runners - the “Polar Bear Club.” Winter running is less of an organized sport and more of a way of life. “It’s not an official club,” says runner Aidan Dolan (12), “just a bunch of dudes and gals who get together and run after school.” Most of these runners are on the cross country team, and they run in order to stay in shape for track in the spring. “It’s a good opportunity to keep training, and the cold air is good for your lungs,” says runner Hannah Burkhard (12). Oftentimes their coaches join them and exercise alongside the team. Winter runners have many reasons for going out into the snow to participate in the sport they love. Danny McManus (10) likes to run in the cold because “it gets you better conditioned for running in warmer weather.” David Osborne (9) likes “the casual, laid-back environment in which we can run and enjoy ourselves.” Some of the guys run to get the LICCB — the “LadyImpressing Cross Country Body,” as they like to say. These runners don’t stop for any kind of weather. Tyler Glenn (12) broke down the rules regarding temperature. “When it’s below 30 degrees, you have to wear a shirt and shorts,” he said. “Sub 20, you’re required to add a sweatshirt, hat and gloves.

Winter runners gearing up for a chilly December jog. Below 10, and you have to wear layers pants, jackets, whatever it takes.” He never said it was too cold to run. You can’t truly appreciate the work these students do until you’ve gone for a run with them. In December, I ventured into the cold

with the runners pictured here. The first quarter of a mile is cold, until your body warms you up from the activity. However, the winter presented a new problem as we entered the woods: mud. We slipped and slid all the way to the road on the other side

Photo by Matthew Worsham

of the woods, where we continued along the bridge over the frozen river. In total, we ran about four miles - a short run for these winter champs. If you get a chance, go for a run with these winter warriors. You won’t regret it.

Name Favorite thing Ian Jeffery Snowball fights Hannah Leeper Still being able to see everyone from cross country Danny McManus It’s chill Patrick Salay Snowball fights, stupid stunts on the ice Hannah Burkhard Snowball fights Tyler Glenn Running with my friends David Osborne Casual, laid-back environment Michael Scherpenberg Getting in shape Aidan Dolan Lady-impressing cross country body

Least favorite thing The cold Blinding snow Sometimes it’s too chill Freezing rain, slippery ice Running through the snow 10-degree wind in my face When you forget your gloves When your feet get wet Not being able to feel your mouth

about 10, so she has plenty of experience. She dove all through high school, and also currently dives for the University of Cincinnati, where she qualified to compete at the Big East Championships. Ryle says, “The team has made great strides this season. My main goal is to have everyone improve and hopefully have

Ryle is expecting big things from the team, and it is already showing. Their first dive meet against Milford was a big success, making major contributions to the final scores at the meet. The boys dominated, taking first, second, and third place against Milford. Hopefully the team will be able to keep going strong as the season continues.

Tiger diving team making splash with new coach By Hailey Booth

Staff Writer

As the winter sports season continues, the diving team has made a great new addition to their team: a new coach, Korey Ryle. Ryle has been diving since she was

at least one competitor at state.” With big contributors to the team such as Matt Swaine (11) and Lauren Blumberg (10), the team is looking strong. Matt says, “It is great to have a coach who has a lot of experience in the sport. Korey will definitely help all of the divers improve a ton this season.”


6 TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

News

Page Editor: Steven Goodman

Tiger Bites: POD contest underway

Recyclers meet Mt. Rumpke

By Madeline Vance Staff Writer

By Madeline Vance Staff Writer

The environmental science students who have developed LHS’s recycling program this year got to see waste management on a much larger scale. On Dec. 17, Ms. Burge and her environmental science students took a field trip to the Rumpke recycling center in Colerain Township. Rumpke sorts through the 750,000 pounds of trash every day. Sometimes there has been weird stuff found while sorting through the recycled piles, including strollers, deer carcasses, huge steel balls, and big chunks of concrete. Students were educated on the history of Rumpke, which began in 1932 when William F. Rumpke operated a junkyard business in Carthage, Ohio, which later included a hog farm. They collected and separated the trash they received from local residents. Items that could not be eaten were removed and recycled, and the rest was fed to the hogs. The company eventually shifted its focus exclusively to waste collection, recycling and disposal. Small groups of students put on their yellow hard-hats, safety glasses, and fluorescent vests before beginning their tour of the recycling facility. Sophomore Chelsea

LHS students at the Rumpke recycling center. Hotham said, “The recycling center was kind of scary, but was also very interesting. It is a way more complicated process than I thought.” LHS students observed the massive mounds of sorted and recycled material. They saw Rumpke workers on task, pulling anything out of the trash that was recyclable, while 26 tons of garbage sped past them on the conveyor belt every hour. While walking through the sorting facility, Tyler Cook (10) said, “It was an intriguing and mind-shattering experience. I couldn’t believe that 8,000 tons of trash gets sent to Rumpke every day.” Students were very interested and excited by the sorting process, taking pictures and posing next to 850-pound blocks of smashed Aluminum cans. Cody Gonzales (10) chimed in and added, “I loved going on this field trip. I found the angle rotator

Photo by Madeline Vance

thing super cool.” After leaving the Rumpke recycling center, the students ventured out to see what used to be a deep ravine, but is now the infamous mt. Rumpke, the highest point in Hamilton County. The bus drove around the grounds of the gigantic landfill covered in snow that stretched for several square miles. This public utility has recently cleared legal roadblocks to expansion. Students were astonished to see how much garbage had accumulated, and were disheartened to learn that 60 percent of what makes up that mountain could have been recycled. Overall, the environmental students had a wonderful and eye-opening experience. Many will take this experience and use it to help educate others of the importance of recycling in a world where garbage is overflowing.

How cool would it be if you were able to use cell phones or iPods in class? Loveland’s superintendent, Dr. Marschhausen, has designed a contest in order to seek creative opportunities for teachers to utilize PODs (personally owned devices) in the classroom for instructional purposes. A few teachers have designed power points about different ways to use technology in a classroom setting. The presentations will be judged by a committee that includes the superintendent and Mary Ellen Wilson, the assistant superintendent for teaching and learning. The teacher who wins will receive an iPad to pilot for teaching purposes. The teachers who entered the contest are Mrs. Hudson, Mrs. Rich, Mr. Conatser, Mr. Stephens, Mrs. Mason, Mrs. Aspenwall, Mr. Marchal, and Mrs. Carnahan. Mrs. Hudson made a proposal to implement the use of cell phones in her French class. Students will be able to text in their responses to a website called polleverywhere.com, where they can see where their results lie in comparison with their fellow classmates. She says, “Students are a lot more willing to participate in class, and it makes learning fun and interactive.” Mrs. Rich agrees and says, “Our goal is to be able to allow students to use their iPods while running the mile. It has been proven that students are more motivated and have faster times when they are allowed to listen to their music while running.” Dr. Moorhead says, “I’m very pleased with the teachers who took the initiative in the classroom to be creative with their use of technology.” She said she is looking forward to being able to use technology for educational purposes, adding, “I’m sure the students not only enjoyed their experience, but also benefited academically as well.” SNOW DECISIONS: Snow is on the ground, and students are hoping for a snow day. Will school be closed? This school year, the state allows school districts only three “free” calamity days; additional ones must be made up in June. Although this is the case, it does not make the district less willing to close school. Their top priority remains the safety of Loveland’s students and staff. The decision to close school includes many factors: *Loveland’s business manager drives the roads throughout the district. *The district receives information from local road maintenance crews. *Amount of snow and ice accumulated and if precipitation is continuing. *Temperature and wind chill, since some students walk to school and most wait outside for their bus While the school district values our safety, it also values our education. Ultimately, the superintendent makes the decision based on what he feels is best.


News TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

7 Page Editor: Danielle Meyer

District plans levy, eyes technology By Emma Goetz

where they are. At the meeting, I am going to show a template of the new Loveland website that will become more and more a part of Loveland Schools. In the future I want to allow the user to get info the way they want: the website, twitter, email, or Facebook. One of my challenges to all of our buildings is to make better use of technology tools, especially social technology. You can’t just use on way to reach people. We need to be able to present our messages in all of the ways our families need. Financially, we have a stagnant economy. Voters across the states have reluctance to pass tax issues. Therefore, we are presenting voters with the lowest possible millage. I don’t want to eliminate options for students, so we need to be more efficient and conservative in what we do while looking for new, innovative ways. Overall, the community thinks we are doing well. The approval rating is off-the-charts high. However, people feel that taxes are high. We need to leave no stone unturned.

Editor-in-Chief

Last Tuesday, Superintendent Dr. Marschhausen addressed Loveland residents in his first State of the Schools meeting. The meeting was made up of three parts. The first was a look back at the districts accomplishments, the second was about the district’s finances, and the third section was a look ahead. The big news was the announcement that the Board of Education plans to place an operating levy on the May ballot, likely to be 3.5 mills. According to Loveland’s treasurer, Brett Griffith, 3.5 mills will cost taxpayers approximately an additional $107 annually per $100,000 of home valuation. He estimates that 3.5 mills will generate approximately $2.7 million a year for the district. The last operating levy passed in 2008 was a no-millage increase levy that the Board promised to last until 2012. If passed in May this levy will begin to be collected in January 2012, which is consistent with the Board’s commitment in 2008. In a recent survey via phone with more than 500 registered voters in the Loveland City School District, 82.8 percent said that they have a positive view of the district. “Overall, the community thinks we are doing well. The approval rating is off-thecharts high,” said Dr. Marschhausen. The Roar interviewed the superintendent before the meeting to discuss some key district issues, including the need for a tax levy. Q. What happens if the levy does not pass? A. We need to look at places that we need to reduce spending. We need to reduce $1.2 to 1.4 million in reductions in order to balance budget in next fiscal year. Look in areas that are not mandated by

Dr. Marschhausen addresses questions concerning LHS. state. There are not extra things that we can cut anymore. Sports, extracurricular, elementary specials (library, art, gym music) athletics, music arts. Those are areas I personally believe are part of a well-rounded education. They make Loveland so special. But we would be forced to look at ways to balance budget. Everyone should be (involved in) something, so we need to look at what makes kids come here. Q. How is Loveland school district financially? A. When we compare Loveland to other districts like Loveland, we are the most efficient district in our cohort group. We have very high student-to-teacher ratios. There are not a lot of administrators. Eighty-five

Photo by Mr. Schmidt

percent of the budget is spent on staff. We get a lot of bang for our buck with our teachers. We have limited resources. It mirrors our population. People are doing okay in Loveland, but there is not a lot of extra money. The Excellent with Distinction (rating) has to do with teachers, parents, and kids. We don’t have a lot of behavior problems. For the most part, our students want to come and learn. Q. What are some district goals and challenges? A. The two obvious ones are communication and financial. With regards to communication, we want to increase the communications within the community to meet the needs of the parents in the community

Per-pupil spending In terms of “bang for the buck,” Loveland compares favorably with neighboring districts that share an “Excellent With Distinction” or “Excellent” rating. Loveland Schools manages its top rating while staying under the state average of per-pupil expenditure.

Indian Hill Sycamore Madeira Mason Forest Hills* State average Loveland

$14,770 $13,522 $10,961 $10,528 $10,463 $10,255 $9,446

(*Turpin/Anderson)

Analysis: Congress could have rocky ride By Matthew Worsham Staff Writer

On Jan. 3, the 112th United States Congress met for the first time in Washington, D.C. This congress has its hands full of issues, including new House leadership, a damaged economy, and rebellious Tea Party freshmen. With the change of party majority in the House of Representatives this year, a new House leadership was selected. Former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-California) switched places with John

Boehner (R-Ohio) to become the new Minority Leader. The Democrats’ decision to elect Pelosi as the Minority Leader was controversial due to the animosity between the congresswoman and the Republican base. This decision seems to indicate a Democratic policy to hold their ground rather than compromise with Republicans on issues like tax cuts and health care reform. As the economy continues on its slow path to recovery, Congress may need to introduce legislation to ensure that the healing process goes smoothly. This could

be complicated by the fact that the two branches are no longer aligned according to party philosophy. For the last two years, both branches contained a Democratic majority. Now, with a Republican House and Democratic Senate, it will be more difficult for our government to function without lengthy debates and more compromise. A new presence in the House this year is the Tea Party. Many new congressmen and women were elected in November who follow the Tea Party philosophy of anti-incumbency and conservatism.

A similar situation occurred during the Clinton administration under then-speaker Newt Gingrich. These new representatives had a rebellious tendency and caused a deep schism in the Republican majority, leading to even less government cooperation. Speaker Boehner will need to find a way to control the new Tea Partiers in order to accomplish the goals of the Republican Party. It promises to be an interesting year in politics. The Roar will be here every step of the way to keep you informed on the workings of our government.

Say What? Check out the lighter side of the news By Ryann Lally

Staff Writer

After reading newspapers filled with dying economies, endless elections, gridlocked politics, and world disasters, it’s nice to take a break and read some news that makes you chuckle. Mr. Awesome John Doe, John Smith and Joe Shmoe are names infamous for their commonness. To spice up his similarly bland name, Douglas Allen Smith Jr. of Eugene, Ore., had it legally changed to Captain Awesome. The judge was skeptical of his seriousness, but after swearing his intent was harmless, Smith’s request was granted. The judge

also allowed Awesome to sign his name (non-legally) as a smiley face with inwardfacing arrows. (Source: msnbc.msn.com)

Look before you send A deputy prosecutor in Indiana was certainly surprised to receive a text offering him drugs. While intoxicated, the dealer had mistakenly sent the text to the wrong contact. The text advertised oxycodone and other prescription drugs, which were confiscated after police traced the text. (Source: msnbc.msn.com) Bearcat behind bars The Cincinnati-Pittsburgh college foot-

ball game on Dec. 4 was violent, but not on the field. The UC bearcat mascot was arrested. The mascot was throwing snowballs at security guards and did not stop after many warnings. Security guards pushed the mascot to the ground and put him in handcuffs. (Source: college-football.blogs. cbssports.com)

Frosty should have heard him holler “Stop” A Chicago bus driver resigned after receiving heat for the hit and run…of a snowman. A home video that went viral on the internet shows cars driving around a snowman built in the middle of the lane. The anonymous bus driver then deliberately

swerved into the other lane to demolish the snowman. Whether the act was committed as a reckless stunt or a public service of clearing the road remains a mystery. (Source: msnbc.msn.com) Not what they grow at the North Pole It looks like even kids on the naughty list got presents for Christmas. Wrapped in paper and ribbon with a note reading “To Jessie, From Santa,” more than 110 pounds of marijuana showed up on the front porch of a Connecticut home. An anonymous source had informed police, and they were at the scene upon delivery to confiscate the disguised drugs, valued at $400,000. (Source: msnbc.msn.com)


8

STRESSED

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

How is stress affecting you? Your toll may be more than simply mental By Sabrina Newstead

Staff Writer

We’ve all experienced it...that feeling you cannot escape, hiding in the classrooms of LHS, waiting to strike at any moment: stress. It seems to have become a way of life for most of us, and in small amounts it’s healthy. However, a lot of stress all the time isn’t healthy, and it causes a lot of problems in your body. Some long-term effects stress has on your body are chronic headaches, mood swings, heart attacks due to high blood pressure, sleeplessness, and acid reflux. Some other short-term effects stress has on your body: chest pain, breathlessness, stomach ulcers, loss of energy, and anxiety. Symptoms of stress can affect your body in disguise. You may think it’s an illness, but in reality, it’s stress build up. The biggest things Americans say they stress over are work and money. As one gets older, stress factors become more prevalent

and usually get worse. With more stress come more health issues. An American Psychological Association study found that 77 percent of Americans experience physical symptoms related to stress in a given month. Over time, stress can negatively affect the immune system, making your body at a higher risk of getting deadly diseases. For example, chronic stress can dramatically increase your chances of getting a heart attack. According to Slate magazine, studies of heart attack patients found that 15 percent to 30 percent of those admitted to a medical center had suffered from severe emotional stress. Within 10 minutes of a heart attack, the victim will die. Not only do older generations experience stress, but teenagers do as well. An early onset of stress in teens can lead to depression and an increase of other mental illnesses in the future. Practicing healthy ways of coping with stress can potentially save your life in the future.

We eat homewor

Loveland’s strongest scholars digest tex

Teen stress: experts warn of its dangers (continued from Page 1) lead to many more serious problems, such as depression, if it’s not managed. “Relieving stress is a matter of being strict with yourself,” said Mrs. Van Strien. “Stress tends to make people rundown, so people need to establish healthy eating and sleeping habits and use a physical outlet, such as running or lifting weights. Some people don’t have natural stress relievers, so finding someone they trust to let what they’re feeling out is always a good

idea. It’s a problem when people don’t use their resources to help alleviate stress.” Dr Hodges also stressed the need to find stress relievers. “Everything needs to be in good proportion,” She said. “The time we spend doing things for our spiritual, mental, and physical health needs to be balanced.” Ultimately, teenagers need to balance the stresses caused by expectations put on them, whether by themselves or others, with real-life strategies and give themselves permission to enjoy the present day and be a kid.

LHS grad shares stress story A real-life testament to the importance of mental health

From left: Patrick Kudo, Aidan Dolan, Peter Samyn and Jerry Thomas show off their

By Regan Meinking

By Alyssa Tipton Light News Editor

The Roar talked to recent LHS 2009 graduate Sydney Meinking, who shared her experience with stress. She was a high school student who seemed to have everything going for her. She was seen as a smart, kind girl with plenty of friends. She was even Homecoming queen, certainly not the kind of person one would expect to enlist the help of a mental health professional. Yet when she had to make the transition from high school to college at the University of Kentucky, her normally bearable stress level went way up. “I was stressed out about school, my family, and my future, or lack thereof,” Sydney says. “When you go to college, a lot more is put on your shoulders. You are on your own for the first time and have high expectations of how fantastic it is going to be. I knew I was not feeling as happy as I expected to in my new life as a college student. It can make you feel like something is wrong with you, and that causes even more stress. It was hard to talk about and admit that something was not quite right. I didn’t want to disappoint anyone. “I never thought I would see a therapist. It seemed weird and not necessary. But I would do it again in a heartbeat. I think mental health is just as important as physical health. You can’t be physically healthy if you’re not mentally healthy.

Staff Writer

Let’s face it: School is stressful. We all feel stressed out from time to time, but The Roar went looking for students who are entitled to feel completely and utterly stressed out, those with some of the school’s toughest schedules. Take Diana Reese (12), for instance. Diana is currently taking AP Chemistry, AP Calculus, AP English, and her hardest class, AP Physics for independent study. She said she spends about six to eight hours on homework every night. Diana does not take these classes for the benefit of a high GPA, but rather to follow her dreams of becoming an engineer. She dreams of making a difference in the world. Despite the majority of her schedule being devoted to school and homework, she is also a varsity swimmer for the school and takes taekwondo,

Photo courtesy of Regan Meinking

Sydney Meinking “Talking to a therapist is something I think can really help. It’s so nice to talk to someone who has no idea of your background or your family and can just listen to you, with no biased opinions or preconceived notions,” she says. “You’re not crazy. They can help you realize things about yourself and ways to cope with your stress based on your personality. I would really urge teenagers feeling stressed out to find someone to talk to other than your everyday friends and family.”

in which she is a secondary black belt. Not only is she a super genius with a non-stop schedule, but she is fluent in three languages: Spanish, Portuguese, and Chinese. How does she balance all her activities, you ask? “I bought myself a new planner that is big enough to allow me to balance and plan everything out,” she said. Aidan Dolan (12) is another example. He has taken seven AP classes in his years at Loveland, including U.S. History, Government, Probability and Statistics, Physics, Biology, Calculus, and German Independent Study. Despite his crazy classes, he is also involved in cross country in the fall, taekwondo twice a week, and multiple clubs outside of school. When asked why he keeps his schedule so full, he replies, “It impresses the ladies.”

Quiz time: see how By Katie Henke

Entertainment Editor

What is your stress level? Answer these simple yes-or-no questions to figure out just how much stress you have in your life. (Some questions were consolidated from various internet quizzes.) 1. Do you have difficulty relaxing? 2. Are you competitive and aggressive? 3. Do you often find yourself impatient with others? 4. Do you take on too much?

5. Do you have problems sleeping? 6. Do you often feel overwhelmed by the social pressures of fitting in? 7. Do you often feel like you can do nothing right? 8. Are you more likely to cry out of frustration or anger than out of sadness? 9. Do you have the need to always be in control? 10. Do you often seek unrealistic goals? 11. Are you easily irritated?


9

D OUT?!?

Page Editor: John Ross

ork for breakfast Stress relief tips Start with these activities: yoga, naps, walking, yelling

xtbooks ... and beat the stress

By Liz Sullivan

Staff Writer

Being a teenager can be stressful sometimes. There are some tricks to help you get rid of stress though. Many doctors recommend different activities that can reduce stress, and let your body and mind relax. Yoga is a simple way to help “de-stress.” Doing yoga for 15 minutes before you go to school can help you feel more awake and refreshed. If you’re feeling pressure, then other things you can do are take a walk, listen to music, or meditate. All of these are helpful and let your mind drift. Taking a nap can also be helpful. It lets you feel rested while also giving you a burst of energy. Who doesn’t love a good power nap? Journaling can also be helpful because you can reflect on different situations. There are also some unusual things that can do the trick and give yourself a break. One idea is to yell. It helps you let out pentup energy. But make sure you are alone. You

Photo from davidbmclaughlin.com

Someone is ready for a nap.

don’t want to freak out your mom. Another thing you can do is start a garden. Buy a few flowerpots and seeds, plant them, and watch those beautiful blooms unfold. It will be rewarding and relaxing. Also, petting a dog or cat can relieve stress. It’s a social interaction without the pressure to impress anyone. Stress can also be relieved by star gazing. Wrap yourself in a blanket, get some cocoa, and stare up at the heavens. By looking at the huge sky, it’ll make your problems seem much smaller. The stars are beautiful to look at too.

Munch these relaxing treats By Reagan Johnstone

hefty book stacks. Homework doesn’t stop another student, Patrick Kudo (12). He has taken six AP classes total, and has at least two hours of homework a night. “It’s a good way to prepare myself for college,” he says. Also tied into his schedule are music lessons once a week and involvement in the Community Orchestra every Sunday. Peter Samyn (12) loves the challenge of stress. He has taken five AP classes. “I strive to overcome mediocrity,” he says. Besides having two to three hours of homework a night, he lifts for football three times a week, runs twice a week, and spends about three hours practicing his bass on the weekends. Zana Percy (11) is a leading lady of the junior class. She has taken four AP classes: U.S. History, Probability and Statistics, Government, and Biology. Zana leaves school

Photo taken by Alyssa Tipton

every day at 11:30 in order to further her studies at the University of Cincinnati’s Raymond Walters College. “I am taking 21 credits at Raymond Walters so I can get a jumpstart on college and challenge myself,” she said. As if her schedule wasn’t crazy enough, she also works at the Indian Hill Winter Club 15 hours a week. Jerry Thomas (11) is yet another student who challenges himself on a daily basis. His schedule this semester is AP Physics, AP French, Honors Trig/Pre-Calc, Honors English, and AP Government. Last year, he took two other AP classes, U.S. History and Probability and Statistics. To complete all of his homework on time, he plans early and makes sure not to procrastinate. “If I procrastinate, I won’t have time for my friends and family,” he says. Jerry is also a varsity swimmer for the school.

stressed you are 12. Do you frequently put things off until later? 13. Do you use sweets as a distraction from anger? 14. Do you ever scream for no reason? 15. Are you taking this quiz because you think you are stressed? Calculate the number of times you said yes. 1-3 times = You have little stress in your life, maybe too little. Try to take on more

responsibilities and work harder. 4-9 times = You have a good balance of stress. You may get a little over stressed at times, but that’s healthy. A moderate level of stress can help you do good things, like strive to achieve at work and work to make relationships stronger. Keep up the good work! 10-15 times = Danger zone. You are stressed out to the max. Take deep breaths, relax, and enjoy life. Everything is going to be all right.

Staff Writer

If your stress isn’t severe enough to require clinical attention, you can try some at-home remedies. What you put into your body really affects how you will feel both physically and mentally. One specific food that can be consumed to help reduce stress is blueberries. Blueberries contain vitamin C, which helps lower stress levels. They also contain lots of fiber to regulate blood sugar levels; a major contributor to stress. An essential drink to help decrease your stress is water. Water helps regulate your body in many ways, and even just the slightest bit of dehydration can stress your body, so keep yourself well-hydrated. Whole grains such as brown rice help supply serotonin, which produces carbohydrates to keep your blood sugar at a safe level. If your blood sugar is at an unhealthy level, you could experience the effects of stress. Sweet potatoes are loaded with carbohydrates, which satisfy the cravings one can get for unhealthy foods such as donuts. Sweet potatoes also contain fiber to help with stress.

Image from imagesfrom.us

Eat blueberries to relax.

Foods rich in vitamins, like soy products, help keep your body and mind in good condition. Soy products such as tofu and soymilk contain magnesium, protein, and vitamin B, which are all essential for your health. Green vegetables like broccoli contain many different vitamins to repair your body, and they also contain potassium to help calm nerves. Finally, turkey contains an amino acid called L-Tryptophan, which helps release serotonin, a brain chemical to help keep you calm and feeling good. All of these common foods will keep your mind and body at its best. What you eat will influence how you feel and act in the long run, so keep your diet healthy and full of beneficial vitamins with foods like these.

Turn on some stressless tunes By Marie Policastro

Staff Writer

With AP classes, extra-curricular activities, and, well, everything else we go through as high school students, we get stressed. So, from The Roar’s iPod to yours, here’s a playlist we ensure will de-stress your life. “Skinny Love”- Bon Iver “First Day of My Life”- Bright Eyes “Abbie Martin”- Joshua James “A Beautiful Mess”- Jason Mraz “Tied Down”- Colbie Caillat “My Little Girl”- Jack Johnson “You and Me”- Dave Matthews Band “I’d Rather Be With You”- Joshua Radin

Photo from examiner.com

Jason Mraz will chill you to sleep.

“The Great Estates”- Freelance Whales “Aubrey Debauchery”- Drew Danbury “Sing”- She & Him “Come On Get Higher”- Matt Nathanson


Entertainment

10

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Page Editor: Madeline Vance

Gleeks: Show choir quite unlike Glee By Marie Policastro

Staff Writer

What do you do during third block? Balance chemical equations with Ms. Weill? Conjugate French verbs with Mr. Stephens? Pythagorate with Ms. Evans? Well, our lovely friends in By Request, Loveland’s very own show choir, hone their singing and dancing skills. “A lot of students are unaware that we even have a show choir at the high school,” says By Request dance captain Elizabeth Orsinelli (12). Not only do we have a show choir, we have a really good one. Last year they even travelled down to Nashville for Show Choir Nationals. This year they will be taking part in nine competitions, including one in Chicago ,and Show Fest, the competition they host at Loveland High School. Most people’s only view into the world of show choir comes from the hit TV series Glee, which, according to the majority of By Request members, is entertaining but not an accurate representation of what show choir truly is. Sam Hoffman (10) bluntly states, “Glee is terrible, inaccurate, and unrealistic.” Glee is a good first look into show choir for those who have never been introduced, but there is so much more that goes into

show choir that the Glee fan base doesn’t get to see. In Glee, the vocals are obviously a bigger emphasis than the dancing. “The choreography that we have for By Request is so much more intense than what they do on Glee,” says Kate Altieri (11). Another big difference between Glee and By Request is that on Glee, they perform a new song every week. By Request spends the entirety of a year working on their three shows: their fall show, their Christmas show, and then their competition show. “Unlike the characters on Glee, we can’t just pick up a piece of music, glance at it, and then be able to belt it. We spend a lot more time working on perfecting our music so it’s competitionready,” says Micky Henskens (12). Luckily, there isn’t as much drama in By Request as in Glee. “We may argue with each other from time to time, but we still love each other. We’re such a dysfunctional family,” says Becca Pearson (11). Even though Glee may not show all that a show choir goes through, Glee and By Request are similar in the way they both find joy in singing and dancing, and ultimately, that’s why we have show choirs: to share their gifts with us and to bring joy to those of us who lack their special talents. Fellow students, let us differ from Glee’s student body. Praise our “Gleeks.” Don’t “slushie.”

Show choir students shows off their Glee spirit. We asked By Request members what characters they thought were most similar to on Glee. Here are their responses: Chloe Smith (11): Britney Tom Schickel (11): Artie Caleb Redslob (12): Finn Kate Altieri (11): Rachel Eddy Stecki (12): Puck Nick Johnson (10): Kurt Meghan Tegtmeier (10): Tina Matt Swaine (11): Mike Micky Henskens (12): Mercedes

Photo by Marie Policastro

Caleb Redslob

Finn

Kate Altieri

Rachel

Ogonna gets a picture with the band.

Photo by Alyssa Tipton

Boy band bliss: a date with Allstar Weekend By Alyssa Tipton and Ogonna Ononye Staff Writers

“Hey now you’re an All Star, get your game on, go play. Hey now you’re a Rock Star, get the show on, get paid.” Famous lyrics to the oh-so-familiar tune of “All Star” by the memorable rock band Smash Mouth. For many of us, these lyrics may seem like just another catchy song to jam out to in our rooms — an unattainable dream in musical form. But Zach Porter, Nathan Darmody, Cameron Quiseng and Michael Martinez have defined this standard like no others. Together, they form the teen pop-rock sensation, Allstar Weekend. In fact, it’s this popular song that inspired the rising band’s name. Being Allstar Weekend fanatics already, we were beyond ecstatic when given the opportunity to attend their concert as well as get an exclusive interview when they came to Covington on Dec. 2. We started squealing the moment we stepped through the doors of the Mad Hatter. Following a series of anxious giggles and candid photos, the time had come for us, along with a few other teen journalists, to meet the band. We first got our pictures taken with the heartthrobs, and as if that wasn’t enough, our interview directly followed. Though tongue-tied and hyperactive, we tried our best to stay calm, cool and collected throughout the interview, which was a challenge considering we were the first group to ask questions. We found there was more to the group than just their fun-loving charisma, heart-stopping vocals, and crush-worthy appeal. Although they promote these factors, these boys also work hard for their success. “It gets really tiring sometimes when you’re working on the road seven days a week, but once we hit the stage and look out at all our singing fans, we realize this is the best job we could have ever asked for,” said Zach. We asked the boys what they would

be doing if they weren’t Allstar Weekend. “I would love to be a teacher,” said Cameron, aka Alyssa’s future husband. Nathan, Ogonna’s love, said that he would still want to be performing, because as stressful as touring life can be at times, it’s always very rewarding. “You get to travel to a ton of cool places, and you learn a lot about yourself along the way, too.” The band got their start about two years ago, simply passing out promotional flyers at the premiere of Jonas Brothers: The 3D Concert Experience in Los Angeles. They were lucky enough to have handed one out to a casting director at Radio Disney, so they were entered into the Next Big Thing competition. Although they lost the contest, the Disney Channel began showcasing the band’s music. But these fun-loving cuties are quickly becoming more than just music video features between reruns of Hannah Montana and Sonny With a Chance. In the summer of last year, Allstar Weekend sold out several venues during their debut headlining tour and were even more successful with their fall tour. Their dominant stage presence during the concert was made apparent as soon as “I love you, Nathan!” was shouted at the first glimpse of the guitarist’s dreadlocks. We were pushed forward with the crowd as every fan reached for Zach’s hand while he bopped to the beat of Mikey’s drums, and we have the bruises to prove it. Winks from Cameron were enough to make the already-screaming girls even crazier. They may not be of A-list status yet, but obviously these four shooting stars have already been breaking the mold. Their unique musical style showcases their talent in combining romantic lyrics and modern pop. With tunes like “Hey Princess” and “A Different Side of Me,” Allstar Weekend will melt your heart while you “Dance Forever.”

Upcoming Concerts: Rascal Flatts is top pick By Danielle Meyer

Staff Writer

The holidays are over and school has begun again. The weeks may seem to loom ahead of you until the next day off, and you just can’t seem to find anything to entertain you. But wait! There’s plenty to do during the months of January and February. Once exam week is over and you have a day off,

check out these upcoming concerts. Pop/R&B: Mary Wilson, a founding member of the Motown group The Supremes, will be at Cincinnati Music Hall on Jan. 15. Classical: The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra will be performing at Cincinnati Music Hall on Jan. 21. Rock: On Jan. 29, Avenged Sevenfold

with Stone Sour and Hollywood Undead will be at the U.S. Bank Arena. Country: Rascal Flatts will continue their Nothing Like This tour at the Nutter Center in Dayton on Jan. 28. Hip hop/ rap: Bogart’s will be hosting Wiz Khalifa on Jan. 18. Contemporary/ new age: Jim Brickman will be at the Aronoff Center’s Proctor

and Gamble Hall on Feb. 14. The Roar’s pick: Rascal Flatts at the Nutter Center. This country band has had 11 No. 1 singles on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart since the release of their debut album in 2000. They even have roots in Ohio, coming from Columbus. The drive to Dayton may be long, but once you’re jamming out, it will all be worth it.


Entertainment Exam cram ... with a plan, man

Page Editor: Katie Henke

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Stressing? Rest, food, strategic preparation can help you attain good grades By Elizabeth Worsham Staff Writer

As the end of the semester nears, that number becomes more and more ominous… maybe 20%, maybe 10%, but either way, that final exam is going to be a big part of your grade. It seems like a make-itor-break-it moment. The A you’ve worked so hard for could drop to a B with just one slip up on a test. Never fear, The Roar is here to help you get the best grade you can with these easy steps: 1. Study, study, study: The procrastination plague will hit you hard around exam time, but don’t let it get you down. Start studying at least a week in advance by going over a little of the material every night. Ask your friends to quiz you on the information, and use notecards and bullet-pointed notes to get the general ideas. Use websites like flashcardmachine.com to save paper. Ask your teacher what the format of the exam will be so you can practice. 2. Get a good night’s sleep: Take a good last look over all the material the night before the test, but don’t stay up too late. You’ll just end up falling asleep during the test, or you’ll be unable to focus and get a bad grade. 3. Eat a filling breakfast: Instead of grabbing an energy bar or eating nothing at all, fill yourself with essential nutrients and

11

good fats and proteins that will stay with you all through the test. Take a pack of gum to settle any nasty hunger pangs that may strike towards the end of the day. 4. Take advantage of break times: Students are given 15 minutes of break time between exams for a reason. You aren’t allowed to leave the classroom during the exam period, so use the restroom, get a drink, or look over your notes one final time. 5. Don’t get tripped up on multiple choice: Use process of elimination and always go with your gut. Be careful when you start to second guess yourself, because your first answer is probably right. When you are finished with your work, do a quick double check that everything is in order, and turn in your test. 6. Prepare a quiet activity: When the test is over, you may have some down time before the exam period ends. This is a great time to catch up on your reading, lay down your head and gather up some energy, or use as more study time. 7. Go home early: Don’t forget to bring that handy little note from your parents so you can leave when your exams are done. Use those few hours to relax. Take a nap, go out to lunch with friends, or crash on the couch and watch TV. Forget about everything before you have to start cramming for the next day.

Soak up study strategies from smart seniors By Ryann Lally Staff Writer

Nervous about exams? Here’s advice from some seniors who’ve been through this six times and live to tell the tale. “Make your own study guide. If you’re the one writing it, you’ll remember it so much better.” –Shelby Copenhaver “Teach it to someone else. That way, you know if you really understand it or not.” – Nathan Robbins “Notecards, notecards, notecards.” –

Alex Schmidt “Relax. Stay Calm. Don’t stress out.” –Joe Bota “When you study, say facts aloud to yourself. It’ll stick in your head.” –Leah Slyder “Get sleep. Even if you have to stop studying, remember, you’ll do better if you’re awake.” –Anna Worcester “Don’t panic the morning before— you’ll just psyche yourself out. It’s better to say, ‘I’ve done all I can and I’ll do my best!’” –Andrea Dubell

Photo taken by Ryann Lally

Katelyn Tracy (12)and Lindsey Watson (12) cram for exams.

Ross Review: Hyped movies that ended up being duds By John Ross

Staff Writer

Every once in a while a movie preview comes around, blows your mind, makes you tell all of your friends about how great it will be, look up all the information about it, and count down the days until its release. Then the movie comes out… and it breaks your poor little heart. This Ross Review isn’t necessarily about bad movies, just movies that disappoint. They lift your spirits and then turn out to be mediocre.

1. I Am Legend- This movie looked so awesome. I mean, Will Smith in a city filled with nothing but vampires and his dog? Yes, please! (Yes, they’re vampires, not zombies; I’ll fight you if you say they’re zombies.) However, the movie had a lackluster plot and a very poor ending. Still good, but it didn’t live up to its potential. 2. Hancock- Another movie with unfulfilled potential from Smith, Hancock had some good action in it but had a very confusing plot twist combined with a weak

plot in general that brought it down to mediocrity. 3. Book of Eli- Eli was a cool movie; it followed Denzel Washington across a postapocalyptic America as he tried to deliver a book. However, like many movies on this list, it suffered from a weak storyline and one of the worst twists/endings I’ve seen in a long time. 4. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull- I was easily tricked into being excited for the fourth Indiana Jones.

Unfortunately, the movie turned out to be one of the worst movies I’ve seen. Crystal Skull had plot holes bigger than the Grand Canyon and one heck of an awful ending. 5. The Incredible Hulk- Just to clarify, The Incredible Hulk is the reboot of the movie franchise (aka the one with Edward Norton in it). Unfortunately, the creators forgot the point of making a reboot of a failed movie in that they didn’t make the new one that much better. This movie looked good in previews but was just average on the big screen.

never fail to please. But when comparing, NCIS stands out as the winner. While both are entertaining and keep us guessing, NCIS is more realistic and has better story lines. The characters in NCIS are what make the show so good. Their humorous and personal connections are what keeps us intrigued. CSI seems to kill off all of its good characters just when we’ve dubbed

them our favorite. While CSI’s creativity is appreciated, sometimes it seems a little repetitive. You can only watch so many deaths in a casino. However, CSI does show us more of the science in investigations than NCIS. The science in NCIS is presented to us by the forensic scientist, Abby, who is a very charismatic character, once again proving

NCIS has superior characters. The investigations (the questioning and detective work) on NCIS are better than on CSI. On NCIS, the investigation has more twists, and it seems harder to catch the bad guy than on CSI, where the criminal is easier to figure out. Although CSI is a great show and deserves to be watched, NCIS wins 21-13.

Face-off: NCIS vs. CSI in favorite crime show contest By Jessica Miller Staff Writer

You’ve just figured out a possible motive for the victim’s husband. Everything seems to fall into place as a light bulb flicks on ...you’ve figured out who did it. This moment comes when one watches one of the numerous crime shows on TV. NCIS and CSI are two such shows that

NCIS

Categories Creativity Science Investigation Story Line Characters

CSI


Entertainment Exam cram ... with a plan, man

Page Editor: Katie Henke

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Stressing? Rest, food, strategic preparation can help you attain good grades By Elizabeth Worsham Staff Writer

As the end of the semester nears, that number becomes more and more ominous… maybe 20%, maybe 10%, but either way, that final exam is going to be a big part of your grade. It seems like a make-itor-break-it moment. The A you’ve worked so hard for could drop to a B with just one slip up on a test. Never fear, The Roar is here to help you get the best grade you can with these easy steps: 1. Study, study, study: The procrastination plague will hit you hard around exam time, but don’t let it get you down. Start studying at least a week in advance by going over a little of the material every night. Ask your friends to quiz you on the information, and use notecards and bullet-pointed notes to get the general ideas. Use websites like flashcardmachine.com to save paper. Ask your teacher what the format of the exam will be so you can practice. 2. Get a good night’s sleep: Take a good last look over all the material the night before the test, but don’t stay up too late. You’ll just end up falling asleep during the test, or you’ll be unable to focus and get a bad grade. 3. Eat a filling breakfast: Instead of grabbing an energy bar or eating nothing at all, fill yourself with essential nutrients and

11

good fats and proteins that will stay with you all through the test. Take a pack of gum to settle any nasty hunger pangs that may strike towards the end of the day. 4. Take advantage of break times: Students are given 15 minutes of break time between exams for a reason. You aren’t allowed to leave the classroom during the exam period, so use the restroom, get a drink, or look over your notes one final time. 5. Don’t get tripped up on multiple choice: Use process of elimination and always go with your gut. Be careful when you start to second guess yourself, because your first answer is probably right. When you are finished with your work, do a quick double check that everything is in order, and turn in your test. 6. Prepare a quiet activity: When the test is over, you may have some down time before the exam period ends. This is a great time to catch up on your reading, lay down your head and gather up some energy, or use as more study time. 7. Go home early: Don’t forget to bring that handy little note from your parents so you can leave when your exams are done. Use those few hours to relax. Take a nap, go out to lunch with friends, or crash on the couch and watch TV. Forget about everything before you have to start cramming for the next day.

Soak up study strategies from smart seniors By Ryann Lally Staff Writer

Nervous about exams? Here’s advice from some seniors who’ve been through this six times and live to tell the tale. “Make your own study guide. If you’re the one writing it, you’ll remember it so much better.” –Shelby Copenhaver “Teach it to someone else. That way, you know if you really understand it or not.” – Nathan Robbins “Notecards, notecards, notecards.” –

Alex Schmidt “Relax. Stay Calm. Don’t stress out.” –Joe Bota “When you study, say facts aloud to yourself. It’ll stick in your head.” –Leah Slyder “Get sleep. Even if you have to stop studying, remember, you’ll do better if you’re awake.” –Anna Worcester “Don’t panic the morning before— you’ll just psyche yourself out. It’s better to say, ‘I’ve done all I can and I’ll do my best!’” –Andrea Dubell

Photo taken by Ryann Lally

Katelyn Tracy (12)and Lindsey Watson (12) cram for exams.

Ross Review: Hyped movies that ended up being duds By John Ross

Staff Writer

Every once in a while a movie preview comes around, blows your mind, makes you tell all of your friends about how great it will be, look up all the information about it, and count down the days until its release. Then the movie comes out… and it breaks your poor little heart. This Ross Review isn’t necessarily about bad movies, just movies that disappoint. They lift your spirits and then turn out to be mediocre.

1. I Am Legend- This movie looked so awesome. I mean, Will Smith in a city filled with nothing but vampires and his dog? Yes, please! (Yes, they’re vampires, not zombies; I’ll fight you if you say they’re zombies.) However, the movie had a lackluster plot and a very poor ending. Still good, but it didn’t live up to its potential. 2. Hancock- Another movie with unfulfilled potential from Smith, Hancock had some good action in it but had a very confusing plot twist combined with a weak

plot in general that brought it down to mediocrity. 3. Book of Eli- Eli was a cool movie; it followed Denzel Washington across a postapocalyptic America as he tried to deliver a book. However, like many movies on this list, it suffered from a weak storyline and one of the worst twists/endings I’ve seen in a long time. 4. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull- I was easily tricked into being excited for the fourth Indiana Jones.

Unfortunately, the movie turned out to be one of the worst movies I’ve seen. Crystal Skull had plot holes bigger than the Grand Canyon and one heck of an awful ending. 5. The Incredible Hulk- Just to clarify, The Incredible Hulk is the reboot of the movie franchise (aka the one with Edward Norton in it). Unfortunately, the creators forgot the point of making a reboot of a failed movie in that they didn’t make the new one that much better. This movie looked good in previews but was just average on the big screen.

never fail to please. But when comparing, NCIS stands out as the winner. While both are entertaining and keep us guessing, NCIS is more realistic and has better story lines. The characters in NCIS are what make the show so good. Their humorous and personal connections are what keeps us intrigued. CSI seems to kill off all of its good characters just when we’ve dubbed

them our favorite. While CSI’s creativity is appreciated, sometimes it seems a little repetitive. You can only watch so many deaths in a casino. However, CSI does show us more of the science in investigations than NCIS. The science in NCIS is presented to us by the forensic scientist, Abby, who is a very charismatic character, once again proving

NCIS has superior characters. The investigations (the questioning and detective work) on NCIS are better than on CSI. On NCIS, the investigation has more twists, and it seems harder to catch the bad guy than on CSI, where the criminal is easier to figure out. Although CSI is a great show and deserves to be watched, NCIS wins 21-13.

Face-off: NCIS vs. CSI in favorite crime show contest By Jessica Miller Staff Writer

You’ve just figured out a possible motive for the victim’s husband. Everything seems to fall into place as a light bulb flicks on ...you’ve figured out who did it. This moment comes when one watches one of the numerous crime shows on TV. NCIS and CSI are two such shows that

NCIS

Categories Creativity Science Investigation Story Line Characters

CSI


Entertainment

12

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Page Editor: Ogonna Ononye

Teachers: They were young once, too By Alyssa Tipton and Liz Sullivan Staff Writers

You spend an hour and a half daily staring intently at your teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; smiling faces. Think you could recognize them even as a child? Compare their photos here and make a guess, then check the answers upside-down at the bottom of the page.

Teachers

Photo by Alyssa Tipton

Mr. Bowdler, the algebra teacher at LHS, looks just as inquisitive as a baby as he does now.

Photo by Alyssa Tipton

Lilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Teachers

Photo by Alyssa Tipton

Mrs. Scherman is a science teacher at LHS who is as out-going now as she was as a child.

Tyke A

Tyke B

Tyke C

Tyke D

Tyke E

Tyke F

Photo by Hannah Moloney

Mrs. Koch, the spanish teacher, has Mr. Hutzel, the english teacher, has always radiated her smile, whether always had a way with words, from walking through the hallways of his childhood years up until now. LHS or grinning as a toddler.

Mrs. Rich is always on the run: as a gym instructor and even when she was a toddler.

Answers:

Mr. Geiger was making history long before he became a history teacher here at Loveland.

Photo by Alyssa Tipton

Tike A: Mr. Geiger Tike B: Mr. Hutzel Tike C: Mrs. Rich Tike D: Mrs. Scherman Tike E: Mrs. Koch Tike F: Mr. Bowdler

Photo by Alyssa Tipton


Entertainment

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

13

Page Editor: Elizabeth Worsham

Playing a game of telephone Winter brings frozen fiascos and melted mishaps By Ogonna Ononye Staff Writer

Angelina Misyukovetz (12) works as a telemarketer. By Ellen Mack Staff Writer

This is the third in a series of monthly features about students with interesting jobs. “Welcome to McDonald’s, can I take your order?” can get old pretty fast. But when you have a job like senior Angelina Misyukovetz, the hours of labor are anything but boring. Angelina is a telemarketer selling the Discover More credit card, and the job never fails to surprise her. She works Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Saturday every single week, usually for five hours at a time. She makes her calls from a building in Milford, and has been doing so for about seven months now. “An average day is a race for sales,” says Angelina. She has to call a set list of

Photo by Ellen Mack

numbers to try to sell the credit card. Her team has to compete with top producers of different credit card companies, and all they can use to make their sales is the phone. The people she calls are not always the friendliest, though. “A lot of people get mad and yell,” she said. They get bothered that people are calling their home. Despite the yelling, Angelina says that she likes her job, especially all the people that she works with. The funniest moment during a call was when a guy tried to ask her out on a date. “He kept me on the phone for about 15 minutes,” she said. He must have been pretty intrigued by the sound of her voice. Next time a telemarketer calls your house, remember to be nice. It might be Angelina or one of her co-workers just doing his or her job.

Get your sled on in Loveland By Kyle Sieg Staff Writer

It has been a rough winter already, and we’re only in January. While many people dread this time of the year, The Roar thinks you should make the most of the cold, snowy opportunity by doing the favorite of all winter pastimes: sledding. Here’s a countdown of the top five sledding destinations in Loveland. 5. The Oasis- There is more than one decently sized hill that is fun to go down. 4. LHS- The hill in front of the school is always a fun place to slide down, especially if you live within walking distance, which many students do. 3. Miami Trails- One of the best hills

in Loveland located where Miami Woods Drive hits Miami Ridge Court, and with so many LHS students living in the neighborhood; you’re bound to see some of your classmates. 2. Symmes Park- With a huge hill in the back, it’s a great place to go sledding. There are always plenty of other people, so you’ll probably see someone you know to make a sled train with. The staircase is a thrill if you want to be adventurous, but be safe. 1. Miami Riverview Park- It’s the biggest hill in Loveland and easily the most intense. Everyone knows the famous slope in the back of the park that makes people scream. Miami Riverview separates the average sledder from the true daredevil.

Snow ... whether one is cuddling up by the toasty fire and admiring the view of that soft, white blanket from afar, or simply waiting to get the call for a snow day, everyone has taken advantage of the snowy season in one way or another. Sometimes, though, it’s not all that enjoyable. Here are some icy incidents that LHS students have experienced: Hannah Bisig (12): “When I was younger, and my sister and I went sledding, she was sitting in the front of the sled, and I accidentally ran her into the tree in our backyard.” Maggie Stancliff (11): “Clarissa Weyman (11) saved my life! We were out driving on a really slick road and started swerving off the street. She hit the brakes just in time to save us both from slipping off completely.” Jon Hoge (12): “I built a 16-foot-tall snow castle!” Zach Perry (10): “I was hunting while it was snowing outside and accidentally put my eye too close to the rifle. It ended up rebounding and hitting me in the face.” Chelsie Pippa (10): “I was walking into

the school on a really icy day, slipped on a piece of ice and ripped my pants.” Sadie Wilson (11): “When I was really little, I used to pretend to be an ice skater and slid around on the icy ground. But one time I slipped, fell on my back and slid into a tree. It hurt.” Michael Louis (11): “When I was 10 I stood on a seemingly-frozen pond and fell through the ice. It was cold.” Taylor Cindric (9): “I was snow-tubing down a hill and accidentally ran into a kid and toppled him over. I felt so bad!” Peter Samyn (12): “I was standing on a frozen pond that started cracking and fell through. I was half a mile away from my house, so I had to run home in the freezing cold.” Lindsey Miller (9): “My mom broke her tailbone sledding down a really big hill.” Joe Bota (12): “During the snow storm of sophomore year, Sam Murphy (11) and I got snowed in at Burger King” Kelsie Jamison (11): “There were giant icicles frozen onto our gutters, and my dad told me to chop them off with a golf club. But when I chopped down the biggest icicle, it landed on his face and split his chin open. He had to get 12 stitches.”

Horoscopes: fate is in the stars This is your horoscope guide to this month, based on the stars and the wisdom of The Roar. It is completely true, but take the advice with a grain of salt. Aries (March 21-April 19): A tough decision will be made in the near future. Go with your gut; do what makes you happy. Taurus (April 20-May 20): A close friend is going to need good advice in the next couple of days. Don’t get irritated with them or you will soon regret it. Gemini (May 21-June 20): Watch your back this month. Remember that little white lie you told last week? Well, its coming back to haunt you. Cancer (June 21-July 22): Ever heard that opposites attract? The moon will be pulling the Capricorn of your dreams your way. Keep those eyes open. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): When you walk through the door, all eyes are on you. Your

outgoing and bubbly personality is nothing but loveable; keep it up. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Saturday, a crazy opportunity will arise. Take it; you only live once. Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): January is your month. Set new goals; 2011 is going to bring you only the best. Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov.21): The stars say you’re falling. But don’t be discouraged; the 20th will lift your spirits. Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Stay away from the ice. Clumsy is your new middle name. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Watch the sky closely; a shooting star is coming your way. Wish big, for this will determine where you’re headed in life. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Be prepared for a crazy ride. These next few weeks will cause some serious chaos. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Your relationship status is looking quite good. Go after the one you love. We guarantee they are secretly waiting for you.

anything clothing-related on this website, but it is especially great for finding shoes. Anything you purchase usually ships in a day, and there is no fee for shipping. 5. Target: Some of you may take this store for granted, but if I ever need a place to shop, this is my first destination. It has so many cute clothes, accessories, and electronics. 4. Arrested Development: This series is no longer on TV, but if you ever have a chance, you need to watch it somehow. With young Michael Cera, Will Arnett, and Jason Bateman, this show is hilarious. It follows a dysfunctional family in California. The Bluth family and their banana stand is unforgettable. 3. The Hunger Games: This book, which came out in 2008 and was written

by Suzanne Collins, is one of my all-time favorites. The reason I recommend it is because anyone can read it and it is wildly entertaining. I could not put it down; the storyline keeps you going with all the action and suspense. 2. Circus peanuts: Don’t knock this strange candy until you try it. It looks like a peanut, but it is orange and foamy. The consistency makes you keep going back for more. Some even say they taste like bananas. It is delicious. 1. Hanson: You may recognize Hanson from their hit “MMMBop” back in 1997. However, since then they have come out with many more albums, the most recent being Shout it Out in June 2010. The songs are super-catchy and fun to sing along to. Give ’em a try.

By Megan Slabaugh Staff Writer

Top 10 list: Don’t miss out on these spectacular things By Ellen Mack

Staff Writer

(The Roar will feature a top 10 list each issue. It’s up to the author, determined randomly, what he or she wants to count down.) While I adore many things, there are some that I am so enamored with that I want to share them with the world. They are things that l personally love and things that are just fun or exciting. I feel these things should be known by all of LHS in hope that you, too, will delight in them. Here are my top 10 favorite things to share with you. 10. That Thing You Do!: Featuring 1960s pop music and actors like Tom Hanks and Liv Tyler, this movie gets two thumbs up. It never seems to get old. It in-

volves a band making it big during the 60s and the whirlwind of events that occur due to their new-found fame. 9. Kyoto: If you haven’t tried sushi, you need to now! This restaurant is the perfect place to go for this delicacy. Sushi may be an acquired taste, but it has a unique flavor you just might love. 8. Board games: What ever happened to sitting down and playing board games with your friends? Games like Scattergories, Apples to Apples, and Catch Phrase always have excitement and competition that brings out the kid in us all. 7. Spearmint Stride: Coming from an avid gum-chewer, this flavor is the top of the line. It is delicious and satisfies your addiction. 6. Zappos.com: You can literally find


Buzz

14

Page Editor: Hannah Moloney

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Where’s Patrick ? Try to be the first to find senior Patrick Kudo (12) in the photo at right.

Photo by Katie Henke Photo by Hannah Moloney

What do you want to be? Roar around the school By Elizabeth Worsham

Juan Hall (9) – A Drug Enforcement Administration officer. Miranda Wernke (10) – A veterinarian. Andrew DeMillia (10) – A video game designer. Eric Nedeljko (12) – A firefighter. Austin Hopkins (11) – A pharmacist or occupational therapist. Alex Robinson (12) – A space cowboy. Sabrina Newstead Eric Nedeljko (12) would love to (11) – A heart surhave this job and put out fires. geon.

Staff Writer

With our high school years slipping away (though some still have some time), it’s time to start thinking about where your future is going. It’s a lot to think about now, but here are some of the dream careers of a few LHS students: Shelby Copenhaver (12) – A lawyer who argues cases before the Supreme Court. Mary Bell (11) – A journalist. Tyler Cook (10) – A chef.

How about that dodgeball tournament? Everyone had a ton of fun, right? And it was all for a good cause: this paper! Exams are tomorrow and the next day, so study hard, LHS students … except we seniors who opt out due to 90/90. (Whoop whoop!) If you need any stress-relieving tips while you study, check out pages 8, 9 and 11. Student Council is sponsoring a Health Fair on Jan. 20. Booths will be set up during all three lunches for us to enjoy. There will be representatives to teach us and give us coupons on things from health foods to healthy activities. So be sure to get up from your cafeteria chair and see what there is to offer. This Friday, there is no school due to the teacher in-service day. Students get the day off to relax while teachers have to work

tirelessly all day. And then next Monday is a day off for Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Four-day weekend! The Loveland Drama Department is putting on a new performance Feb. 3-5. It is called Twelve Angry Jurors, and is a true drama. It is about a son is on trial for killing his father, and the “twelve angry jurors” are trying to decide if he should receive the death penalty. NHS is looking for ideas for proposed possible murals to be painted around LHS. Any submissions can be given to any NHS officer. The officers are Hannah Leeper, Hannah Burkhard, Megan Hadley, Hannah Bisig, Brian Derrick, and Shelby Copenhaver. From your stressed out editors-in-chief, Becca Black and Emma Goetz

WHAT is she wearing? By Becca Black

up.”

Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Becca Black

Nicole Chan (11) struts her stuff in leopard leggings.

Walking through the sea of sweatshirts, sweat pants, and tacky T-shirts, you might notice a few individuals who stand out. Some people could care less what they put on in the morning, blindly picking up the nearest item of semi-clean clothing off the floor (which might explain some of the odd combinations we see). Yet here and there you see someone with style, someone who cares what she puts on her body in the morning: a fashionista. Nicole Chan (11) is one such fashionista. Her style: “I don’t have a particular style. Sometimes I like to pull on something preppy, sometimes funky, sometimes just casual and comfy.” Dream outfit: She would love to have a Burberry trench coat. Where she shops: She has shopped in Hong Kong, Korea, and Japan, but she mostly shops at Forever 21, H&M, and Zara, where she can find fashionable clothing at low prices. Fashion idol: She uses Japanese and high fashion magazines such as Vogue for reference. Accessories: “Earrings. They’re the most eye-catching piece of jewelry a girl can wear, especially when you tie your hair

Secret to success: “Don’t be afraid to wear crazy stuff. Experiment and see what suits you best.” Previous fashion mishap: “Nothing in particular, but fashion is always changing without being noticed, and I kind of flow with it. So sometimes I look at old pictures and think, ‘Why was I wearing something like that?’” Necessities: “A onepiece dress and ballet flats — they’re just easy.” What others think of Nicole’s look: “Unique and stylish. She brings a new spice to fashion.” – Trevor Henderson (11) “She is very creative in her wardrobe.” – Joe Moran (11) “She always looks Photo by Becca Black adorable. Her clothes make her stand out in our Nicole Chan (11) looks cute wearing a high-waisted school.” – Jessica Miller skirt. (11)


People

15

TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Page Editor: Jessica Miller

Facebook is a fun way to get to know others. Each month, The Roar will pick two students at random (hitting names on a dartboard) to help introduce you to new faces, Facebook style.

Look-alikes

Jacob Alten “Hoping to play football in college.”

The monthly special of two strikingly similar-looking human beings caught on camera!

Grade: Junior. Interests: All types of sports. School activities: Football, wrestling, track. Photo by Steven Goodman

Birthday: November 11, 1993

Movies: I Am Legend, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I. Favorite music: Rock and rap.

Photo by Hannah Moloney

Clarissa Weyman (11)

Favorite class: Fantasy/Sci-Fi. Hero: “My grandpa.” Can’t live without: Football. Pet peeve: When people don’t keep their promises.

Ryan Altman

Charlie Heyob

Tara Spencer

Nicolette Hayes

Bryan Callahan

Amy Simone

Fun fact: “My wrestling nickname is ‘Big Carrington,’ because my teammates think I look like a senior from last year.” Photo by Hannah Moloney

Grace Dolan (10) Jake Howell “I like school.”

Grade: Senior. Interests: Hockey, hunting, trucks, and lawn mowers. School activity: Hockey. Photo by Becca Black

TV show: Cop Gear. Favorite music: Country.

Birthday: June 11, 1992

Favorite class: Lunch. Hero: Keith Smith. Can’t live without: “My lawn mower.”

Jake Schultz

Josh Bertke

Keith Smith

E.S. Lawrence

David Rankin

Pet peeve: “Horrible drivers.” Fun fact: “I have my own landscaping/lawn mowing company.”

Do you remember?

Heinz used to offer foodies a tasty twist on traditional tomato ketchup

By Hailey Booth

Staff Writer

Your mom placed your dinner on the table. It was a hamburger and fries. But what was that you saw underneath the bun? Your mom replied, “It’s purple ketchup.” Some people cringed when they first saw the Funky Purple and Blastin’ Green ketchup. Ketchup should be red, and that’s it. However, the colored ketchup attracted many people. The colorful ketchup was a fun way to spice up your lunch and dinner, and even to freak out your grandparents if they had never seen it. Heinz created the first colorful ketchup, Blastin’ Green, and it hit the shelves in October of 2000. After selling 25 million bottles of the ketchup, they continued to add to the color palate of ketchup. By 2003, Heinz had created green, purple, pink, teal, orange, and blue ketchup. They also made a mystery bottle, when you didn’t know what color you would get until you squirted it out of the bottle. Sadly, in 2006 Heinz discontinued their colorful ketchup, ending a fun way to pep up your dinner. Colorful ketchup was an odd invention, one that some people loved and others chose to stay away from.

Zach Galifianakis

Colorful ketchup.

Image from flickr.com


Caboose

16 TUESDAY, January 11, 2011

Page Editor: Hailey Booth

The top 10 of 2010

Tigers share resolutions By Hannah Moloney Staff Writer

These stars really rocked it last year, on the stage and the field By Liz Sullivan Staff Writer

Some people automatically come to mind when 2010 is mentioned. They have really shown in the celebrity spotlight. This is The Roar’s list of the top 10 people of 2010. 1. Taylor Swift: This incredible young singer had a fabulous year. She released her album Speak Now, which sold a million copies within the first week. She won four Grammy awards in early 2010. She also won the Country Music Award’s Entertainer of the Year honor, which is a very prestigious award. She has grown up into

a mature and beautiful woman. 2. Justin Bieber: Although many people are not a fan of this handsome young man, you Photo from Boston.com cannot deny that he Drew Brees was a star on the football field last year. had a very successful year. His sophodoubt continue to be successful in 2011. more album was released. Justin won four 3. Katy Perry: Katy had a very controVideo Music Awards and is nominated for versial year when she released her newest two Grammy’s. Justin released a book and album, Teenage Dream, because some of has been on his My World Tour since June, the songs were dubbed risqué. She also and it is now going worldwide. He has cap- found her dream man, Russell Brand, tured the hearts of millions girls and will no and they got married. Sorry boys, Katy is taken. 4. Eminem: Marshall Mathers has been one of the greatest rappers of our lifetime. He came out with his seventh album, titled Recovery. He recently received 10 Grammy nominations for 2011. 5. Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert Grint: Harry, Hermione, and Ron thrilled us again when they came out with the seventh Harry Potter movie. They never seem to disappoint. 6. Nicki Minaj: Nicki has proved herself as a female rapper last year. Her career exploded when she recently released her album Pink Friday. 7. Ke$ha: She always seems to be wearing something new and unusual. Also, her music has taken over the radio. 8. Joey Votto: The Cincinnati Reds star won the National League MVP award this year.

Taylor Swift came out with a hit album in 2010.

photo from nyusong.com

9. Beyoncé: Beyoncé didn’t come out with much new last year. But what year isn’t a good year for Beyoncé? She danced inside a pyramid, for crying out loud. The woman is incredible. 10. Drew Brees: Brees is the quarterback for the Saints who won the Superbowl. He was also Sports Illustrated’s Sportsman of the Year.

When the new year is upon us, we all start to consider New Year’s resolutions. They can be serious, or some can be goofy and silly. The Roar asked LHS students what their resolutions were. Brad Vanover (12) wants to game more and have way less of a social life. Clarissa Weyman (11) wants to become better friends with John Ross (12). Matt Wallisa (12) and Nathan Boucher (12) both want to gain 20 pounds. Trent Lively (9) wants to help Matt Wallisa (12) gain 20 pounds or more. Jenna Myklebust (10) wants to try to give Leah Wood (11) a hug every day. MK Fisher (11) wants to get buff. Maggie Stancliff (11) wants to grow a pumpkin patch. Emilie Triot (12) wants to get hip hop abs. Jay Pigott (12) wants to tandem across America with KJ Lawler (12). Caleb Cloud (11) wants to marry Mackenzie Vizgirda (12). Thomas McCarty (11) wants to train a puppy. Bridget Landis (10) wants to meet her true love, Justin Bieber. Ekene Okafor (11), Chelsie Pippa (10) and Samra Eskender (10) all want to find their soul mates. Lauren Thomas (9) wants to marry Logan Walls (11). Jake Pickens (11) wants to catch ’em all. Hannah Bisig (12) wants to be able to give up cake completely for the year. Jordan McNally (11) wants to get healthier and lose weight. Anthony LaMacchia (11) wants to be better friends with Hannah Moloney (11). Nick Shea (12) wants to kill a vampire. Charlie Schickel (9) wants to stay true to Dani Lawler (11). Michael Wagner (10) is going to try to not pick on his 8-year-old sister as much. Leigh Ellexson (12) wants to spend her year traveling to different places and go on many adventures with her very own piglet.

Review the highlights of a busy, memorable year By Kyle Sieg

leased last year. * The Winter Olympics in February Staff Writer was a huge international event. It was highlighted by the USA’s overtime loss to It’s hard to believe that world power Cana2010 is already over. It was da in the gold medone of the most eventful al hockey game. years in recent memory, and * In March, here’s a list of the top news President Obama stories from the year that signed the very was. controversial * The Haiti Earthquake health care bill in January was one of the into law. The bill biggest natural disasters in ensures almost a long time. It killed over all Americans are 200,000 people and left covered by health over one million people insurance. homeless. * The Gulf oil * The iPad was released spill in April was by Apple in January, and the all over the news Image from rumors.com rest is history. It was one of for most of the sumThe iPad was a big hit last year. the most popular gadgets remer. The explosion

photo from blogspot.com

The World Cup attracted nearly everyone this summer. that caused the spill on a BP oil liner killed 11 people and spilled 185 million gallons of oil. * The death of Gary Coleman happened

in late May after he suffered an intracranial hemorrhage that left him in a coma and on life support. A day later, his family decided to take him off life support. * The World Cup was a huge sporting event that caught the attention of the entire world. This huge event had everybody watching from June 11 to July 11. * On July 8, LeBron James had millions of viewers tuned in to watch The Decision. This special hour-long show raised $ 2.5 million for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America but also broke millions of Cavaliers fans’ hearts. * Thirty-three Chilean minors were rescued in October after being trapped 2,000 feet underground for 69 days. The miners were pulled up through a 28-inchdiameter hole. * The midterm elections in November were dominated by the Republicans, including a record 680 seats gained in State Legislatures.


January 2011 Issue