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THERIPPLES THE OFFICIAL STUDENT PUBLICATION OF LA CONSOLACION COLLEGE - BACOLOD

VOLUME III, NO. 1

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

LEGACY. Sr. Gavina Barrera, OSA, with Bacolod City Mayor Hon. Evelio “Bing” Leonardia and alumni benefactors unveils the relief sculpture at the Galo Entrance Lobby. Photo courtesy of LCCB.

LCCB reveals relief sculpture in honor of founding Augustinian sisters By Carah Mae Blanca

A commemorative bas relief sculpture of the arrival of the Augustinian sisters in Negros Island was unveiled at the Galo entrance lobby of La Consolacion College Bacolod (LCCB) during the Feast of Our Lady of Consolation, Sept. 4. NEWS Ambassador & Ambassadress of Goodwil 2018

The unveiling ceremony was led by School President Sr. Gavina Barrera, OSA, with the presence of alumnus and Bacolod City mayor, Hon. Evelio Leonardia, and LCCB Vice-President for External Affairs Dr. Ma. Mercedes AvesJoson, Ph.D., as well as the

alumni benefactors. Portraying the four sisters led by their prioress Sor Tomasa de la Sagrada Familia during their remarkable first arrival in Negros on March 12, 1919, the eight-by-ten feet piece was made by LCCB Fine Arts professor Jose “Buglas” Carreon.

According to Carreon, the sculpture was made of resin and epoxy then painted with gold to make it look like polished brass, and took over a year to finish, from research up to the actual process of making the piece. >>> PAGE 3

LCCian scout represents WV in Youth Forum By John Pierre Jarmonilla

>>> PAGE 2

BACOLOD CITY – An EDITORIAL eagle scout from La Consolacion College Bacolod (LCCB) became the official delegate of Western The Art of Misdirection Visayas in the 9th Asia-Pacific Regional Scout Youth Forum held at Tagaytay City, Oct. 9-12. >>> PAGE 4 John Dyrick Dormis, coming FEATURE from the Senior High School department, was chosen by the Of regional scouting director during Contrasts their Council Youth Forum held and Calculations last January. “The purpose of the youth >>> PAGE 6 forum is to tackle different issues,

SCOUT PRIDE. John Dyrick Dormis (second from right), along with other scout delegates, posed for a picture onstage. Photo courtesy of John Dyrick Dormis.

and to find possible solutions as scouts,” Dormis explained; “Scouting is not a choice of a lifetime, but rather it is your choice to make it your lifetime,” he added. According to Dormis,

in scouting, there is holistic learning wherein one is trained in their different aspects as a person – spiritual, mental, emotional, social, and moral aspects – and that scouting is >>> PAGE 3


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VOLUME III, NO. 1

NEWS

THE

RIPPLES

SHS, SARFAID bets walk as Ambassadors of Goodwill 2018

CORONATION. Rose Jeva Aburido of the Senior High School department and Jan Christian Jungco of the School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design crowned as Ambassadors of Goodwill 2018 and took their walk. Photo by Krizza Ledesma. By Ginelle Melocoton

Rose Jeva Aburido, of the Senior High School (SHS) and Jan Christian Jungco from the School of Architecture, Fine Arts and Interior Design (SARFAID) conquered the stage as they took home the crown for this year’s Search for LCCB Ambassador and Ambassadress of Goodwill, held at the Covered Quadrangle last Sept. 14. Jungco earned minor awards Best in Production Number, People’s Choice Award, Best in Environmental Advocacy,

Best in Elemental Themed Wear, Best in Environmental Awareness Speech and Best in Formal Wear; Aburido meanwhile won People’s Choice Award and Best in Environmental Awareness Speech. Josh Lee Philip Librodo and Camille Enriquez, both from the School of Hospitality and Tourism Manangement (SHTM) attained the first runners-up spot while the School of Sciences Liberal Arts and Teacher Education (SSLATE) bets, Jeruel Arendon and Xennith Joy Lumauag

ranked second runners-up. As for other minor awards, Enriquez obtained the Best in Production Number and Best in Formal Wear, Arendon and Lumauag however, achieved the Mr. and Ms. Photogenic award, and SARFAID’s female candidate, Rodgie Marie Abeto, won Best in Environmental Advocacy and Best in Elemental Themed Wear. “This year’s search for LCCB Ambassador and Ambassadress of Goodwill is very much different from the previous pageants because

this year, SSG incorporated different advocacies, especially focusing on the environmental protection and environmental awareness,” Supreme Student Government (SSG) Pres. Adryan Valiao said. Lastly, the newly crowned ambassador and ambassadress expressed their statements after their coronation, whereas Aburido stated, “It’s unusual because usually beauty pageants are only for exposing your beauty, your body and your brain but this time they have given us the chance to apply and voice out our advocacy, not only to the students of LCC but also to the people around here,” and Jungco added, “this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to be crowned on the same time with centennial year of our institution, this is not for me, this is for my ARFIEN family so I don’t claim it, I claim it for them.” The Search for Ambassador and Ambassadress of Goodwill was the highlight event of phase one of Centennialympics 2018; phase two would be held on March 2019.

SHTM emerges victorious in three competitions By Angelica Caceres

Garnering a total of 19 awards, the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) was triumphant in three regional culinary and tourism competitions held simultaneously in Negros and Cebu, Sept. 16, and 21-22. In the 18th Negros Occidental Tourism Week Celebration, Richmond Van Trinidad got the 2nd place spot for the Tour Guiding – Local Category; Angela King, 1st runner-up, and Nicole Arisgado, 2nd runner-up, Bacolod’s Young Chef Master; and Erika Kate Escaro, finalist for Tourism Quiz Bee. For the Cebu Goes Culinary: National Food Showdown 2018, Rongie Neil

Ong, Jane Kangleon and Miths Salon won gold in the On the Spot Table Setting Challenge; Chad Villafloress, gold, Coffee Concoction; Jose Brian Marfil, silver, Mocktail Mixing; John Oscar Du, John Micheal Cuadra and Jomar Francis Pelor, silver, Chef Wars; Edilberto Golez III, bronze, Cocktail Mixing; Ashlei Joie Rafols, Caryl Joy Bernadas and Angelica Jaruda, bronze, Creative Cake Decoration; Raphael Turbanos, Ailene Mae Palacios and Jaime Casugod Jr., bronze, Buffet Table Skirting with Centerpiece Making; and Ceejay De Los Santos, certificate, Flairtending. Moreover, in the National Skills Competition 2018 organized by Council of Hotel and Restaurant Educators of

POWERHOUSE. School of Hospitality and Tourism Management students, accompanied by their teachers, are awarded onstage during the National Skills Competition 2018 in Dumaguete City. Photo courtesy of SHTM Council.

the Philippines (COHREP), Pia Marie Belon won gold in Tour Guiding – Domestic Category, Ma. Jemela T. Fortaleza got gold in Napkin Folding, and Edraline Yu won silver in Tour Guiding – International Category. “We started the competition as a team, we also finished it as a

team making us true champions of what we work hard for.” Belon said. The events were participated by various universities and colleges across the country wherein for the previous years, LCCians never go home empty handed.

NEWS 3 SHS bests colleges in Mardi Gras Night THE

RIPPLES

By Lea May Galimba

The Senior High School (SHS) department rejoiced as they were announced champion during the Mardi Gras Night, Sept. 11, at the La Consolacion College Bacolod covered quadrangle. Aside from the championship, SHS also bagged four minor awards – Best in Costume & Props, Best in Production, Best in Choreography & Creativity, and the Crowd Favorite award. Coming in first runner-up was the School of Sciences, Liberal Arts & Teacher Education (SSLATE), which

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

won the Best in Environmental Advocacy & Relevance minor award, followed by the School of Business & Information Technology (SBIT) in second runner-up, then the School of Architecture, Fine Arts & Interior Design (SARFAID), and for the fourth runnerup spot was the School of Hospitality & Tourism Management (SHTM). “In order to succeed you need to have the collective effort and support of all the SHS students, so to the next Senior High School Government (SHSG) officers [remember that] success is not

gained independently”, said John Dyrick Dormis, Senior High School Government (SHSG) president. For this year’s theme titled

“Elementia,” each department was required to come up with a performance that tackles issues with regards to nature.

CROWD FAVORITE. The Senior High School wows the audience with their ice-themed performance and eye-catching costume and props. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva.

SHS wins Intrams overall LCCB reveals relief... sports championship “I am humbled, honored, Municipality of Murcia, from page 1

By Jessa Fe Pagayonan

The Senior High School (SHS) raised their red and white flags with pride as they were proclaimed overall champion for sports during the Centennialympics 2018 closing ceremony, Sept. 14, at the covered quadrangle. SHS bested the other departments with a total of 53 golds; last year’s champion, the School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design (SARFAID), came in first runner-up with 40 golds. At second runner-up was

the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) with 27 golds, then the School of Business and Information Technology (SBIT) with 18 golds taking third runner-up, and the fourth runner-up was the School of Sciences, Liberal Arts, and Teacher Education (SSLATE) with 8 golds. The SHS department managed to take hold of the championship in the following events: Volleyball – men and women, Football – women, Badminton – women, 30m Breaststroke – women, 30m Butterfly – men, 4x30m Freestyle Relay – men, 100m Sprint – women, 200m Sprint – men and women, and 400m Run – men. The sports events is part of Centennialympics 2018 phase one; phase two will be the cultural events that will be held on March 2019 during the Centennial Week celebration. BIG SMILES. Dancers and officers of the Senior High School department flock the stage for a picture after being announced as champion. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva.

and grateful,” Carreon remarked, when asked what it felt like to be given the opportunity to contribute to LCCB’s powerful legacy; he also said in an article posted on the school’s official social media page that his art piece captures “the spirit of the journey” of the founding sisters. As he admits that sculpting was his first love, Carreon had brought various ideas into reality through his expertise that can be found all over the Philippines, particularly in the

and cities of Cebu and Bulacan. “Through this artwork, everyone will always remember the virtues of our founding sisters – unity, charity and truth – [which] we live up to this day,” Dr. Joson said during the unveiling ceremony. The unveiling ceremony was the highlight of the Feast of Our Lady of Consolation, and is in line with LCCB’s set of activities for its centennial year celebration which would be full swing on March 12, 2019.

LCCian scout represents... from page 1

not limited to developing skills as they have programs in line with the environment, peace, and inclusivity. Earlier this year, Dormis was given both the Gold and Silver Anahaw Award, and in 2017 was given the Bronze Anahaw Award; he was also among the Ten Outstanding Boy Scouts Regional Level of that same year, taking seventh place. Furthermore, Dormis is

currently the chairman of the Eagle Scouts Organization of the Philippines (ESOP) Bacolod, and the president of the Senior High School Goverment (SHSG). The Youth Forum is an avenue for young people to enhance their skills in decisionmaking at the institutional level of scouting, and is an ancillary event of the Asia-Pacific Regional Scout Conference.


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VOLUME III, NO. 1

NEWS

THE

RIPPLES

SHS, SARFAID bets walk as Ambassadors of Goodwill 2018

CORONATION. Rose Jeva Aburido of the Senior High School department and Jan Christian Jungco of the School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design crowned as Ambassadors of Goodwill 2018 and took their walk. Photo by Krizza Ledesma. By Ginelle Melocoton

Rose Jeva Aburido, of the Senior High School (SHS) and Jan Christian Jungco from the School of Architecture, Fine Arts and Interior Design (SARFAID) conquered the stage as they took home the crown for this year’s Search for LCCB Ambassador and Ambassadress of Goodwill, held at the Covered Quadrangle last Sept. 14. Jungco earned minor awards Best in Production Number, People’s Choice Award, Best in Environmental Advocacy,

Best in Elemental Themed Wear, Best in Environmental Awareness Speech and Best in Formal Wear; Aburido meanwhile won People’s Choice Award and Best in Environmental Awareness Speech. Josh Lee Philip Librodo and Camille Enriquez, both from the School of Hospitality and Tourism Manangement (SHTM) attained the first runners-up spot while the School of Sciences Liberal Arts and Teacher Education (SSLATE) bets, Jeruel Arendon and Xennith Joy Lumauag

ranked second runners-up. As for other minor awards, Enriquez obtained the Best in Production Number and Best in Formal Wear, Arendon and Lumauag however, achieved the Mr. and Ms. Photogenic award, and SARFAID’s female candidate, Rodgie Marie Abeto, won Best in Environmental Advocacy and Best in Elemental Themed Wear. “This year’s search for LCCB Ambassador and Ambassadress of Goodwill is very much different from the previous pageants because

this year, SSG incorporated different advocacies, especially focusing on the environmental protection and environmental awareness,” Supreme Student Government (SSG) Pres. Adryan Valiao said. Lastly, the newly crowned ambassador and ambassadress expressed their statements after their coronation, whereas Aburido stated, “It’s unusual because usually beauty pageants are only for exposing your beauty, your body and your brain but this time they have given us the chance to apply and voice out our advocacy, not only to the students of LCC but also to the people around here,” and Jungco added, “this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to be crowned on the same time with centennial year of our institution, this is not for me, this is for my ARFIEN family so I don’t claim it, I claim it for them.” The Search for Ambassador and Ambassadress of Goodwill was the highlight event of phase one of Centennialympics 2018; phase two would be held on March 2019.

SHTM emerges victorious in three competitions By Angelica Caceres

Garnering a total of 19 awards, the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) was triumphant in three regional culinary and tourism competitions held simultaneously in Negros and Cebu, Sept. 16, and 21-22. In the 18th Negros Occidental Tourism Week Celebration, Richmond Van Trinidad got the 2nd place spot for the Tour Guiding – Local Category; Angela King, 1st runner-up, and Nicole Arisgado, 2nd runner-up, Bacolod’s Young Chef Master; and Erika Kate Escaro, finalist for Tourism Quiz Bee. For the Cebu Goes Culinary: National Food Showdown 2018, Rongie Neil

Ong, Jane Kangleon and Miths Salon won gold in the On the Spot Table Setting Challenge; Chad Villafloress, gold, Coffee Concoction; Jose Brian Marfil, silver, Mocktail Mixing; John Oscar Du, John Micheal Cuadra and Jomar Francis Pelor, silver, Chef Wars; Edilberto Golez III, bronze, Cocktail Mixing; Ashlei Joie Rafols, Caryl Joy Bernadas and Angelica Jaruda, bronze, Creative Cake Decoration; Raphael Turbanos, Ailene Mae Palacios and Jaime Casugod Jr., bronze, Buffet Table Skirting with Centerpiece Making; and Ceejay De Los Santos, certificate, Flairtending. Moreover, in the National Skills Competition 2018 organized by Council of Hotel and Restaurant Educators of

POWERHOUSE. School of Hospitality and Tourism Management students, accompanied by their teachers, are awarded onstage during the National Skills Competition 2018 in Dumaguete City. Photo courtesy of SHTM Council.

the Philippines (COHREP), Pia Marie Belon won gold in Tour Guiding – Domestic Category, Ma. Jemela T. Fortaleza got gold in Napkin Folding, and Edraline Yu won silver in Tour Guiding – International Category. “We started the competition as a team, we also finished it as a

team making us true champions of what we work hard for.” Belon said. The events were participated by various universities and colleges across the country wherein for the previous years, LCCians never go home empty handed.

NEWS 3 SHS bests colleges in Mardi Gras Night THE

RIPPLES

By Lea May Galimba

The Senior High School (SHS) department rejoiced as they were announced champion during the Mardi Gras Night, Sept. 11, at the La Consolacion College Bacolod covered quadrangle. Aside from the championship, SHS also bagged four minor awards – Best in Costume & Props, Best in Production, Best in Choreography & Creativity, and the Crowd Favorite award. Coming in first runner-up was the School of Sciences, Liberal Arts & Teacher Education (SSLATE), which

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

won the Best in Environmental Advocacy & Relevance minor award, followed by the School of Business & Information Technology (SBIT) in second runner-up, then the School of Architecture, Fine Arts & Interior Design (SARFAID), and for the fourth runnerup spot was the School of Hospitality & Tourism Management (SHTM). “In order to succeed you need to have the collective effort and support of all the SHS students, so to the next Senior High School Government (SHSG) officers [remember that] success is not

gained independently”, said John Dyrick Dormis, Senior High School Government (SHSG) president. For this year’s theme titled

“Elementia,” each department was required to come up with a performance that tackles issues with regards to nature.

CROWD FAVORITE. The Senior High School wows the audience with their ice-themed performance and eye-catching costume and props. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva.

SHS wins Intrams overall LCCB reveals relief... sports championship “I am humbled, honored, Municipality of Murcia, from page 1

By Jessa Fe Pagayonan

The Senior High School (SHS) raised their red and white flags with pride as they were proclaimed overall champion for sports during the Centennialympics 2018 closing ceremony, Sept. 14, at the covered quadrangle. SHS bested the other departments with a total of 53 golds; last year’s champion, the School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design (SARFAID), came in first runner-up with 40 golds. At second runner-up was

the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) with 27 golds, then the School of Business and Information Technology (SBIT) with 18 golds taking third runner-up, and the fourth runner-up was the School of Sciences, Liberal Arts, and Teacher Education (SSLATE) with 8 golds. The SHS department managed to take hold of the championship in the following events: Volleyball – men and women, Football – women, Badminton – women, 30m Breaststroke – women, 30m Butterfly – men, 4x30m Freestyle Relay – men, 100m Sprint – women, 200m Sprint – men and women, and 400m Run – men. The sports events is part of Centennialympics 2018 phase one; phase two will be the cultural events that will be held on March 2019 during the Centennial Week celebration. BIG SMILES. Dancers and officers of the Senior High School department flock the stage for a picture after being announced as champion. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva.

and grateful,” Carreon remarked, when asked what it felt like to be given the opportunity to contribute to LCCB’s powerful legacy; he also said in an article posted on the school’s official social media page that his art piece captures “the spirit of the journey” of the founding sisters. As he admits that sculpting was his first love, Carreon had brought various ideas into reality through his expertise that can be found all over the Philippines, particularly in the

and cities of Cebu and Bulacan. “Through this artwork, everyone will always remember the virtues of our founding sisters – unity, charity and truth – [which] we live up to this day,” Dr. Joson said during the unveiling ceremony. The unveiling ceremony was the highlight of the Feast of Our Lady of Consolation, and is in line with LCCB’s set of activities for its centennial year celebration which would be full swing on March 12, 2019.

LCCian scout represents... from page 1

not limited to developing skills as they have programs in line with the environment, peace, and inclusivity. Earlier this year, Dormis was given both the Gold and Silver Anahaw Award, and in 2017 was given the Bronze Anahaw Award; he was also among the Ten Outstanding Boy Scouts Regional Level of that same year, taking seventh place. Furthermore, Dormis is

currently the chairman of the Eagle Scouts Organization of the Philippines (ESOP) Bacolod, and the president of the Senior High School Goverment (SHSG). The Youth Forum is an avenue for young people to enhance their skills in decisionmaking at the institutional level of scouting, and is an ancillary event of the Asia-Pacific Regional Scout Conference.


4

VOLUME III, NO. 1

THERIPPLES

OPINION

THE

RIPPLES

Room 309, Mother Rita Barcelo Building, La Consolacion College-Bacolod, Galo St, Bacolod City facebook.com/TheRipplesLCCB officialripples.lccb@gmail.com issuu.com/the_ripples John Pierre N. Jarmonilla Lindsy Marie L. Villanueva Maria Veronica S. Ogapong Ginelle B. Melocoton Angelica B. Caceres Divine M. Anas CG Therese O. Saludares Glend Marie Joy E. Pajes Chia A. Tolentino Adrian D. Cordero John Paul S. Clemente Ziarene Marie T. Talamillo

Anne Kiara A. Dawa Carah Mae C. Blanca Haydn P. Lagunay Jesse Fe D. Pagayonan Lea May Q. Galimba News Writers Gracella R. Nangan Lance Christian M. Torres Leyanne Dean B. Ortega Louise Anne V. Juncia Mark Kenneth B. Ledesma Rachel A. Lamayo Rafael Dominic G. Mabaquiao Feature Writers Curtney V. Rebullante Cynthnie Mari B. Encabo Graphic Artists Krizza May S. Ledesma Kenth John F. Dondoyano Ma. Joven D. Icogo Photojournalists Johnel C. Dimco Layout Artist Adrian Daniel Alvarado Brandon Kent D. Braza Francene Blythe H. Dano Gerla Grace F. Perez Jose Miguel V. Supeña Kaeza Maree G. Braca Nikki Joy B. Biasong Rahima J. Pineda Chrisherm K. Maravilla Ira Eunice L. Castandiello John Martin M. Seva Zyndie Love T. Montuya Ilustrators Melona Q. Guitche Publication Adviser THERIPPLES is the official student publication of La Consolacion College Bacolod. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission from the publication. All contributions become THERIPPLES property and the Editor-inChief reserves the right to edit submited articles to the publication. Copyright 2018. Ad majorem Dei gloriam.

RIPPLES

EDITORIAL

THE OFFICIAL STUDENT PUBLICATION OF LA CONSOLACION COLLEGE - BACOLOD

Editor-in-Chief Associate Editor Managing Editor Asst. Managing Editor News & Sports Editor Feature Editor Asst. Feature Editor Literary Editor Online Editor Layout Editor Head Cartoonist Head Photojournalist

THE

The Art of Misdirection Two years ago, 16.6 million people voted for our current president, with the hopes that he can deliver “genuine change” to the country. The president has been very vocal of his plans, even disregarding decency with his foul language and hasty pinpointing, which lands him headlines on a regular basis. Did his view of “change” meet halfway with what the people expected, or are we again swayed by empty promises and misleading statements? We were expecting a progressive country right from the start – a society alleviated from poverty, and an avenue of opportunities for all with no discrimination. Yet here we are bombarded with increasing prices of basic commodities, a declining peso-dollar exchange rate, plus the onslaught of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion (TRAIN) Law at a bad timing. Unfortunately, it is the poorest of the poor who are highly affected. Everyone is tired of politicians who keep on promising platforms that they don’t intend to fulfill, but what makes PRRD different from the rest was his conviction. Now, people are uncertain whether he is serious with his statements or not, because if it makes the headlines, it’s simply dismissed as “a joke,” or “a metaphor.” The promise of a better future is far from what is happening today, when taxes for the working class are abolished, yet the latter is the increasing prices. Sure, the middle class can afford it, but how about those below the national poverty line? While the problem with poverty is still relevant, more and more issues disrupt our society that puts it aside from the public eye. First, the war on drugs, when blood of

alleged drug users and pushers are spilled on the streets, then the territory dispute with China, where they have already taken advantage of Scarborough Shoal despite the ruling given to us; the list just goes on and on. Aside from the insults our dear president give during his speeches, it seems he’s also sending his critics out of his government: Sen. Leila De Lima, Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno, and Sen. Antonio Trillanes IV, among those who are known. Adding salt to the wound is Vice President Leni Robredo ousted from the Cabinet, the hero’s burial of Dictator Ferdinand Marcos, and former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo as new House Speaker. As citizens of the Philippines, we must be wary of the real problem out there. We are often blinded by sugarcoating that we are easily swayed by new issues, leaving the rest without proper resolutions. Where is the promise of a better community when we are afraid to get out of the streets for fear of being mistaken for a drug user? Where is the promise of fighting for territory when our shoal is already being used as a military stronghold by China? How would the working class use their salary free from tax when prices are increasing? Even transportation fares are increasing. In this situation, critical thinking is needed for us to be vigilant of every move the government resorts to. Let us not be easily carried away by empty promises. We should know how to assess things deeper than what is on the surface, as the surface is always not real, but rather the opposite. The art of misdirection is a tricky one, so pay attention closely.

2019 Senatorial Elections is creeping right outside our doors. It is the season whereas the candidates put aside flaws and flaunts their so-called love for humankind. October 11 signaled the commencement for the senatorial hopefuls to file their Certificate of Candidacies and with only twelve names to put unto our ballots, it sure does require a whole lot of critical pondering as to who deserves a shot as a lawmaker of the country. This pondering involves a lot consideration, as well, as to what the candidates have done and are capable of for the betterment of our motherland. However, it’s not always the butterflies and the sweet angles we should look after. A little peak on their darker sides should be helpful too. Three of our current senators have been alleged with

OPINION Think Things Over Carah-pat Dapat Carah Mae Blanca carahmb@gmail.com

plunder, for instance. Juan “JPE” Ponce Enrile, Ramon “Bong” Revilla Jr, and Jose “Jinggoy” Estrada are facing a non-bailable offense just this June, yet this doesn’t stop them from filing a COC for next year’s election. What’s more disappointing about this is that there are and could be many more from the list who encounter way worse issues. Note the irony that these people are after a lawmaker’s position, but they are also the ones alledged to have broken the rules. As citizens, it is our responsibility to see to it that the people we choose deserve a seat, and this doesn’t only apply to the senatorial aspirants, but to other positions in the govern-

ment as well. Actually, 2016 data from Commission on Elections (COMELEC) shows that 97.11% of the voters aged 1865 and above are literate. Which is, in fact, a good thing for this implies that Filipino voters are capable enough to distinguish one thing from another – those deserving from those who are not. Furthermore, this can also mean that we are knowledgeable enough to understand that the money those hypocrites offer should never be equal to our human right to vote. It never was, and never will be. We are all smart, but this time, let us be smarter in times we should be. Imagine being blinded by a few number of shiny coins,

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

and wrote the wrong names. Imagine our birth soil being led by those wrong, undeserving people while we are enslaved by them - our own fellowmen. Imagine how miserable we’re going to be. I do hope it is miserable enough for you to understand it all starts the moment you decide whose names you choose. In the end, who’s at fault we’re suffering? Is it really them who we voted for? Or is it us? It is more than just the money they offer, how strong their connections are, or how famous they are. The right to vote that was given to us is a chance for us to speak our voices louder, and the Philippines hope we don’t take that for granted. The people whose names you scribble on those ballots are given the trust to lead us. Before you land that pen on the paper, ask yourself: Are they really worthy of it?

Tama na nga Plastikanay

Qiqil si Aq Haydn Lagunay

haydnlagunay@gmail.com

People always have that mindset of starting something and not finishing it. In some cases, this attitude often leads to a worsening problem, which is supposed to be suppressed by the action. Now, the question is: can we be proud of continuously doing this? Thirty youth-led organizations from Bacolod City called for action regarding the plastic pollution, urging the City for the strict implementation of the City Ordinance #562, also known as the Plastic Bag Regulation Ordinance. Authored and passed by Councilor Em L. Ang, the ordinance aims to address the mindless consumption of single-use plastic bags and invite the citizenry in practices that

promote a clean and sustainable environment by prohibiting business establishments from providing plastic bags. It has been six years since the implementation of the ordinance and it still didn’t reach its purpose. It has only been observed on its first years but after that, establishments have switched to back to plastics because of the loose implementation of the city. Now, we can see the evident pollution in our clogged canals, creeks, rivers, and waterways causing floods during rainy season; all caused by an accidental invention that changed the world for the worse – plastic. We need to stay true to what we did or passed because

we already had once become a model of other cities; as a matter of fact, San Carlos City even asked us for a copy and used it as a basis for them to implement it on their city. Just this September, San Carlos was awarded as one of the Top 100 Sustainable Destinations for 2018 by Green Destinations, an international non-profit organization for sustainable tourism. Bacolod, the main author of the ordinance, was not. It is not truly about whose original idea it is but on how effective the implementation is. We need to push for the strict implementation of the ordinance but in order to do so, amendments must first be made. Plastics of any sort should be phased out at all, for manufacturers and establishments have found a way not to get penalized while using plastics by labeling them as “biodegradable plastics”

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which is stated as one of the exemptions of CO #562. Paper bags, Eco bags, bayongs, and a lot more reusable bags have been in the market for so long but we still kept on choosing plastic bags for convenience while knowing the repercussions that the environment may suffer, that we, the inhabitants of this environment may suffer. We keep on using it, because it is readily offered to us and that’s why we need to regulate its use and its availability while it’s not too late. We, the youth, more than anyone else, must be the persons to put pressure on the people who are responsible in ensuring that the environment of our future would be at its best for we would be the one to suffer its outcome if not. But in the end, it’s the matter of how committed we are in letting ourselves walk the talk.


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VOLUME III, NO. 1

THERIPPLES

OPINION

THE

RIPPLES

Room 309, Mother Rita Barcelo Building, La Consolacion College-Bacolod, Galo St, Bacolod City facebook.com/TheRipplesLCCB officialripples.lccb@gmail.com issuu.com/the_ripples John Pierre N. Jarmonilla Lindsy Marie L. Villanueva Maria Veronica S. Ogapong Ginelle B. Melocoton Angelica B. Caceres Divine M. Anas CG Therese O. Saludares Glend Marie Joy E. Pajes Chia A. Tolentino Adrian D. Cordero John Paul S. Clemente Ziarene Marie T. Talamillo

Anne Kiara A. Dawa Carah Mae C. Blanca Haydn P. Lagunay Jesse Fe D. Pagayonan Lea May Q. Galimba News Writers Gracella R. Nangan Lance Christian M. Torres Leyanne Dean B. Ortega Louise Anne V. Juncia Mark Kenneth B. Ledesma Rachel A. Lamayo Rafael Dominic G. Mabaquiao Feature Writers Curtney V. Rebullante Cynthnie Mari B. Encabo Graphic Artists Krizza May S. Ledesma Kenth John F. Dondoyano Ma. Joven D. Icogo Photojournalists Johnel C. Dimco Layout Artist Adrian Daniel Alvarado Brandon Kent D. Braza Francene Blythe H. Dano Gerla Grace F. Perez Jose Miguel V. Supeña Kaeza Maree G. Braca Nikki Joy B. Biasong Rahima J. Pineda Chrisherm K. Maravilla Ira Eunice L. Castandiello John Martin M. Seva Zyndie Love T. Montuya Ilustrators Melona Q. Guitche Publication Adviser THERIPPLES is the official student publication of La Consolacion College Bacolod. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission from the publication. All contributions become THERIPPLES property and the Editor-inChief reserves the right to edit submited articles to the publication. Copyright 2018. Ad majorem Dei gloriam.

RIPPLES

EDITORIAL

THE OFFICIAL STUDENT PUBLICATION OF LA CONSOLACION COLLEGE - BACOLOD

Editor-in-Chief Associate Editor Managing Editor Asst. Managing Editor News & Sports Editor Feature Editor Asst. Feature Editor Literary Editor Online Editor Layout Editor Head Cartoonist Head Photojournalist

THE

The Art of Misdirection Two years ago, 16.6 million people voted for our current president, with the hopes that he can deliver “genuine change” to the country. The president has been very vocal of his plans, even disregarding decency with his foul language and hasty pinpointing, which lands him headlines on a regular basis. Did his view of “change” meet halfway with what the people expected, or are we again swayed by empty promises and misleading statements? We were expecting a progressive country right from the start – a society alleviated from poverty, and an avenue of opportunities for all with no discrimination. Yet here we are bombarded with increasing prices of basic commodities, a declining peso-dollar exchange rate, plus the onslaught of the Tax Reform for Acceleration and Inclusion (TRAIN) Law at a bad timing. Unfortunately, it is the poorest of the poor who are highly affected. Everyone is tired of politicians who keep on promising platforms that they don’t intend to fulfill, but what makes PRRD different from the rest was his conviction. Now, people are uncertain whether he is serious with his statements or not, because if it makes the headlines, it’s simply dismissed as “a joke,” or “a metaphor.” The promise of a better future is far from what is happening today, when taxes for the working class are abolished, yet the latter is the increasing prices. Sure, the middle class can afford it, but how about those below the national poverty line? While the problem with poverty is still relevant, more and more issues disrupt our society that puts it aside from the public eye. First, the war on drugs, when blood of

alleged drug users and pushers are spilled on the streets, then the territory dispute with China, where they have already taken advantage of Scarborough Shoal despite the ruling given to us; the list just goes on and on. Aside from the insults our dear president give during his speeches, it seems he’s also sending his critics out of his government: Sen. Leila De Lima, Chief Justice Maria Lourdes Sereno, and Sen. Antonio Trillanes IV, among those who are known. Adding salt to the wound is Vice President Leni Robredo ousted from the Cabinet, the hero’s burial of Dictator Ferdinand Marcos, and former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo as new House Speaker. As citizens of the Philippines, we must be wary of the real problem out there. We are often blinded by sugarcoating that we are easily swayed by new issues, leaving the rest without proper resolutions. Where is the promise of a better community when we are afraid to get out of the streets for fear of being mistaken for a drug user? Where is the promise of fighting for territory when our shoal is already being used as a military stronghold by China? How would the working class use their salary free from tax when prices are increasing? Even transportation fares are increasing. In this situation, critical thinking is needed for us to be vigilant of every move the government resorts to. Let us not be easily carried away by empty promises. We should know how to assess things deeper than what is on the surface, as the surface is always not real, but rather the opposite. The art of misdirection is a tricky one, so pay attention closely.

2019 Senatorial Elections is creeping right outside our doors. It is the season whereas the candidates put aside flaws and flaunts their so-called love for humankind. October 11 signaled the commencement for the senatorial hopefuls to file their Certificate of Candidacies and with only twelve names to put unto our ballots, it sure does require a whole lot of critical pondering as to who deserves a shot as a lawmaker of the country. This pondering involves a lot consideration, as well, as to what the candidates have done and are capable of for the betterment of our motherland. However, it’s not always the butterflies and the sweet angles we should look after. A little peak on their darker sides should be helpful too. Three of our current senators have been alleged with

OPINION Think Things Over Carah-pat Dapat Carah Mae Blanca carahmb@gmail.com

plunder, for instance. Juan “JPE” Ponce Enrile, Ramon “Bong” Revilla Jr, and Jose “Jinggoy” Estrada are facing a non-bailable offense just this June, yet this doesn’t stop them from filing a COC for next year’s election. What’s more disappointing about this is that there are and could be many more from the list who encounter way worse issues. Note the irony that these people are after a lawmaker’s position, but they are also the ones alledged to have broken the rules. As citizens, it is our responsibility to see to it that the people we choose deserve a seat, and this doesn’t only apply to the senatorial aspirants, but to other positions in the govern-

ment as well. Actually, 2016 data from Commission on Elections (COMELEC) shows that 97.11% of the voters aged 1865 and above are literate. Which is, in fact, a good thing for this implies that Filipino voters are capable enough to distinguish one thing from another – those deserving from those who are not. Furthermore, this can also mean that we are knowledgeable enough to understand that the money those hypocrites offer should never be equal to our human right to vote. It never was, and never will be. We are all smart, but this time, let us be smarter in times we should be. Imagine being blinded by a few number of shiny coins,

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

and wrote the wrong names. Imagine our birth soil being led by those wrong, undeserving people while we are enslaved by them - our own fellowmen. Imagine how miserable we’re going to be. I do hope it is miserable enough for you to understand it all starts the moment you decide whose names you choose. In the end, who’s at fault we’re suffering? Is it really them who we voted for? Or is it us? It is more than just the money they offer, how strong their connections are, or how famous they are. The right to vote that was given to us is a chance for us to speak our voices louder, and the Philippines hope we don’t take that for granted. The people whose names you scribble on those ballots are given the trust to lead us. Before you land that pen on the paper, ask yourself: Are they really worthy of it?

Tama na nga Plastikanay

Qiqil si Aq Haydn Lagunay

haydnlagunay@gmail.com

People always have that mindset of starting something and not finishing it. In some cases, this attitude often leads to a worsening problem, which is supposed to be suppressed by the action. Now, the question is: can we be proud of continuously doing this? Thirty youth-led organizations from Bacolod City called for action regarding the plastic pollution, urging the City for the strict implementation of the City Ordinance #562, also known as the Plastic Bag Regulation Ordinance. Authored and passed by Councilor Em L. Ang, the ordinance aims to address the mindless consumption of single-use plastic bags and invite the citizenry in practices that

promote a clean and sustainable environment by prohibiting business establishments from providing plastic bags. It has been six years since the implementation of the ordinance and it still didn’t reach its purpose. It has only been observed on its first years but after that, establishments have switched to back to plastics because of the loose implementation of the city. Now, we can see the evident pollution in our clogged canals, creeks, rivers, and waterways causing floods during rainy season; all caused by an accidental invention that changed the world for the worse – plastic. We need to stay true to what we did or passed because

we already had once become a model of other cities; as a matter of fact, San Carlos City even asked us for a copy and used it as a basis for them to implement it on their city. Just this September, San Carlos was awarded as one of the Top 100 Sustainable Destinations for 2018 by Green Destinations, an international non-profit organization for sustainable tourism. Bacolod, the main author of the ordinance, was not. It is not truly about whose original idea it is but on how effective the implementation is. We need to push for the strict implementation of the ordinance but in order to do so, amendments must first be made. Plastics of any sort should be phased out at all, for manufacturers and establishments have found a way not to get penalized while using plastics by labeling them as “biodegradable plastics”

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which is stated as one of the exemptions of CO #562. Paper bags, Eco bags, bayongs, and a lot more reusable bags have been in the market for so long but we still kept on choosing plastic bags for convenience while knowing the repercussions that the environment may suffer, that we, the inhabitants of this environment may suffer. We keep on using it, because it is readily offered to us and that’s why we need to regulate its use and its availability while it’s not too late. We, the youth, more than anyone else, must be the persons to put pressure on the people who are responsible in ensuring that the environment of our future would be at its best for we would be the one to suffer its outcome if not. But in the end, it’s the matter of how committed we are in letting ourselves walk the talk.


FEATURE

RIPPLES

RIPPLES

Of Contrasts and Calculations By CG Saludares

Who would have thought, that you could profoundly combine the pigments of your imagination, with a sturdy spectrum of mathematical equations? Never in our wildest dreams that we’d imagine that, that a silent and skinny kid from our school would be working in one of the most interactive professions. The sudden tilt of ideas may sound randomly confusing, but these are the gleaming pieces of one’s identity. So, here I give you, Mr. Wilfredo Lumagbas Jr. an Engineer, slash mathematics professor, slash award-winning photographer. Mr. Lumagbas Jr. is the youngest and only son of the AAB (Art Association of Bacolod – Negros) cofounder, Mr. Wilfredo “Nunoy” Lumagbas. One of the greatest inspiration of our mathematical artisan. Sir Lumagbas, as now, called by his students is the perfect example of a talent that is yet behold in his younger days. The high school graduate of La Consolacion College Bacolod (LCCB) was known as isolating and lonesome. The walls of our alma mater are the witnesses of this well-shifted persona. This shy personality is then carried

until his college days, wherein he graduated as a civil engineering student of University of Negros Occidental –Recoletos (UNO-R). Despite his introverted personality, after he passed the 1995 Civil Engineering board exam, Mr. Lumagbas was then employed into numerous occupations. First of which, was a freelance structural designer and a former employee of the Weesama Drafting PH. After a year, he took off and worked as a CAD operator in Chiyoda PH in Manila. Another year passed, he had decided to return back to Negros, and was believed to be one of his best moves, for there in one of his structural projects in Bais, Negros Oriental, he met his wife Mrs. Josephine Lumagbas. Mrs. Lumagbas was eventually entrusted as a school nurse in LCCB. Meanwhile, Mr. Lumagbas stayed as a freelance structural designer. Halfway his sturdy job, his colleague asked if he would be interested in tutoring Differential Calculus to an engineering board examiner. That was the beginning that enlightened Mr. Lumagbas for his passion in teaching. Disregarding his weakness in

talking in front of a crowd, for the sake of sharing his mathematical intelligence to his students, he accepted the pending offer, being a SARFAID (School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design) Mathematics professor. Based on the student’s semestral evaluation, he was awarded with “Outstanding Performance” for three consecutive years. On the field of photography however, Mr. Lumagbas ventured late. His father did introduced photography to him on his late high school years yet his time behind the lens wasn’t perfectly captivated until the year 2011, wherein he bought his first digital camera. There he started to join unto different online photography contests, his first online juncture victors as first place. Late 2011, he purchased his first entry level Nikon D3100 and unleashes his style all throughout our country. Sticking to his personal style which is vibrancy of colors and festive compositions, his first adventure was in IloIlo city wherein he was honorably mentioned in the Dinagyang Photo Contest. This success bought him further into photography. Year 2013, his photo that was entitled, “Save Mother Earth” was recognized by National Geographic. “As a photographer, being featured in National

Photo by Wilfredo Lumagbas Jr.

Geographic is the fulfillment of one’s career and I am lucky enough to be one of the few. I felt how my world stopped, for I am blessed without asking,” said Mr. Lumagbas. 2013 is considerably the highest peak of his photography career. June the same year, he was featured in a Europe-based Nikon Magazine, a worldwide contest exclusive for loyal Nikon photographers. Afterwards, he was once again features in a Nikon Magazine, the Lens Mag, this time is US-based. His photo was also chosen by a Chinese phone company, where the shot was taken as one of the default background for their product. And the highlight of that year, may as well be the highlight of Mr. Lumagbas’ career, was his photo “The Devil’s Look” featured by Vogue Magazine. From 2014 until the present time, he is being featured and is winning countless international and local photography contests. Mr. Lumagbas with a wellmanaged time is currently juggling his profession as a Mathematics college instructor, a freelance structural designer, photographer and a father of two. “The only way to success is not giving up, give yourself some time to develop, you would encounter criticisms along the way but believe that your talent is yet discovered.” – Wilfredo Lumagbas Jr.

For the

By Ginelle Melocoton

FEATURE

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

7

GREEN THUMBS

A group of students who are committed in helping the environment answered nature’s cry for help, LEC (La Consolacion College Bacolod Environmentalist Community), a former organization of the school back in the 1990’s, was reintroduced to students in order to raise awareness about the present state of the environment and to get involved in all environmental activities of the school and the communities. The world offers infinite chances on how humans can choose to live their lives, unfortunately, the resources are only limited while humans took nature for granted. The environment can be one of the most cliché out of all the advocacies, but being able to preserve and take good care of the

environment should be everyone’s business, in and outside the school campus. One of the attributes of an LCCian is to be “Active Ecological Stewards” wherein LCCB is awarded with various environmental awards, but being able to notice students who are unruly with their actions and don’t know how to segregate properly can be ironic, which urged the group to do better in spreading awareness. LEC aims to save the world, to be part of the solution and not the pollution. With their slogan “LET US DO OUR SHARE,” they started their campaign to ban the single use of plastics in LCCB by initiating a signature campaign to replace plastics with biodegradable wrapping like banana leaf that can degrade naturally,

for a simple action can make a statement. Together with LCCB Red Cross Youth and CHAMBER Volunteer Fire Brigade, LEC also participated in the “Tanum Kahoy, Hindi Kaakig” activity, an outreach and tree growing program at Sitio Campuestuhan headed by Rekta Larga Philippines last Sept. 29-30 to help rehabilitate our natural parks. LEC Pres. Todd Rustee Noel Decendario added

Photo courtesy of LEC.

VOLUME III, NO. 1

THE

“Don’t hate but educate” for ignorance is not and will never be the answer since the responsibility falls in the hands of those who inhabit Mother Earth. The said organization also entices everyone in joining environmentalist groups and has planned on conducting room to room sessions of Basic Ecology and issues in Negros workshops not just for LCCians but also to the community. Photo courtesy of LEC.

6

THE


FEATURE

RIPPLES

RIPPLES

Of Contrasts and Calculations By CG Saludares

Who would have thought, that you could profoundly combine the pigments of your imagination, with a sturdy spectrum of mathematical equations? Never in our wildest dreams that we’d imagine that, that a silent and skinny kid from our school would be working in one of the most interactive professions. The sudden tilt of ideas may sound randomly confusing, but these are the gleaming pieces of one’s identity. So, here I give you, Mr. Wilfredo Lumagbas Jr. an Engineer, slash mathematics professor, slash award-winning photographer. Mr. Lumagbas Jr. is the youngest and only son of the AAB (Art Association of Bacolod – Negros) cofounder, Mr. Wilfredo “Nunoy” Lumagbas. One of the greatest inspiration of our mathematical artisan. Sir Lumagbas, as now, called by his students is the perfect example of a talent that is yet behold in his younger days. The high school graduate of La Consolacion College Bacolod (LCCB) was known as isolating and lonesome. The walls of our alma mater are the witnesses of this well-shifted persona. This shy personality is then carried

until his college days, wherein he graduated as a civil engineering student of University of Negros Occidental –Recoletos (UNO-R). Despite his introverted personality, after he passed the 1995 Civil Engineering board exam, Mr. Lumagbas was then employed into numerous occupations. First of which, was a freelance structural designer and a former employee of the Weesama Drafting PH. After a year, he took off and worked as a CAD operator in Chiyoda PH in Manila. Another year passed, he had decided to return back to Negros, and was believed to be one of his best moves, for there in one of his structural projects in Bais, Negros Oriental, he met his wife Mrs. Josephine Lumagbas. Mrs. Lumagbas was eventually entrusted as a school nurse in LCCB. Meanwhile, Mr. Lumagbas stayed as a freelance structural designer. Halfway his sturdy job, his colleague asked if he would be interested in tutoring Differential Calculus to an engineering board examiner. That was the beginning that enlightened Mr. Lumagbas for his passion in teaching. Disregarding his weakness in

talking in front of a crowd, for the sake of sharing his mathematical intelligence to his students, he accepted the pending offer, being a SARFAID (School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design) Mathematics professor. Based on the student’s semestral evaluation, he was awarded with “Outstanding Performance” for three consecutive years. On the field of photography however, Mr. Lumagbas ventured late. His father did introduced photography to him on his late high school years yet his time behind the lens wasn’t perfectly captivated until the year 2011, wherein he bought his first digital camera. There he started to join unto different online photography contests, his first online juncture victors as first place. Late 2011, he purchased his first entry level Nikon D3100 and unleashes his style all throughout our country. Sticking to his personal style which is vibrancy of colors and festive compositions, his first adventure was in IloIlo city wherein he was honorably mentioned in the Dinagyang Photo Contest. This success bought him further into photography. Year 2013, his photo that was entitled, “Save Mother Earth” was recognized by National Geographic. “As a photographer, being featured in National

Photo by Wilfredo Lumagbas Jr.

Geographic is the fulfillment of one’s career and I am lucky enough to be one of the few. I felt how my world stopped, for I am blessed without asking,” said Mr. Lumagbas. 2013 is considerably the highest peak of his photography career. June the same year, he was featured in a Europe-based Nikon Magazine, a worldwide contest exclusive for loyal Nikon photographers. Afterwards, he was once again features in a Nikon Magazine, the Lens Mag, this time is US-based. His photo was also chosen by a Chinese phone company, where the shot was taken as one of the default background for their product. And the highlight of that year, may as well be the highlight of Mr. Lumagbas’ career, was his photo “The Devil’s Look” featured by Vogue Magazine. From 2014 until the present time, he is being featured and is winning countless international and local photography contests. Mr. Lumagbas with a wellmanaged time is currently juggling his profession as a Mathematics college instructor, a freelance structural designer, photographer and a father of two. “The only way to success is not giving up, give yourself some time to develop, you would encounter criticisms along the way but believe that your talent is yet discovered.” – Wilfredo Lumagbas Jr.

For the

By Ginelle Melocoton

FEATURE

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

7

GREEN THUMBS

A group of students who are committed in helping the environment answered nature’s cry for help, LEC (La Consolacion College Bacolod Environmentalist Community), a former organization of the school back in the 1990’s, was reintroduced to students in order to raise awareness about the present state of the environment and to get involved in all environmental activities of the school and the communities. The world offers infinite chances on how humans can choose to live their lives, unfortunately, the resources are only limited while humans took nature for granted. The environment can be one of the most cliché out of all the advocacies, but being able to preserve and take good care of the

environment should be everyone’s business, in and outside the school campus. One of the attributes of an LCCian is to be “Active Ecological Stewards” wherein LCCB is awarded with various environmental awards, but being able to notice students who are unruly with their actions and don’t know how to segregate properly can be ironic, which urged the group to do better in spreading awareness. LEC aims to save the world, to be part of the solution and not the pollution. With their slogan “LET US DO OUR SHARE,” they started their campaign to ban the single use of plastics in LCCB by initiating a signature campaign to replace plastics with biodegradable wrapping like banana leaf that can degrade naturally,

for a simple action can make a statement. Together with LCCB Red Cross Youth and CHAMBER Volunteer Fire Brigade, LEC also participated in the “Tanum Kahoy, Hindi Kaakig” activity, an outreach and tree growing program at Sitio Campuestuhan headed by Rekta Larga Philippines last Sept. 29-30 to help rehabilitate our natural parks. LEC Pres. Todd Rustee Noel Decendario added

Photo courtesy of LEC.

VOLUME III, NO. 1

THE

“Don’t hate but educate” for ignorance is not and will never be the answer since the responsibility falls in the hands of those who inhabit Mother Earth. The said organization also entices everyone in joining environmentalist groups and has planned on conducting room to room sessions of Basic Ecology and issues in Negros workshops not just for LCCians but also to the community. Photo courtesy of LEC.

6

THE


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VOLUME III, NO. 1

INFOGRAPHICS

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RIPPLES

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RIPPLES

SPORTS

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

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SHS dominates volleyball championship By Glend Pajes

CELEBRATION. SARFAID volleyball team rejoices after a long rally landed them a point. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva.

Senior High School (SHS) swept the overall volleyball championship for both men and women last Sept. 14, at the covered quadrangle. The women’s volleyball match between SHS versus the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) rounded up in two sets, 2521, 25-20, while for the men’s event, SHS against the School of Architecture, Fine Arts and Interior Design (SARFAID) also ended the same, 25-23, 25-17. When asked about the strength of the teams, Sir Louie John Oceja said, “Well,

I think it has something to do with the relationship of the players. Still wise, both teams were even, it’s just that they had longer practices together, so they knew the moves of one another which made our teams intact and brought us to the championship.” The ranking for men’s category started with SHS, second is SARFAID, third is SHTM, fourth comes SSLATE, and lastly SBIT; for the women’s category, first came SHS, second rank’s SHTM, next is SBIT, then SARFAID, and last is SSLATE.

HUDDLE. Senior High School volleyball team gather around after the game to celebrate their win. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva

SARFAID men, SHS women triumph in Football championship By Angelica Caceres

School of Architecture Fine Arts and Interior Design (SARFAID) men and Senior High School (SHS) women lifted the silverware in the football championship matches, Sept. 14, at the Central District Football Field. The SARFAID men didn’t gave SHS any chance to land a goal with keeper Louis Garcia guarding their post, and instead kicked their way to take the championship, 3-0. According to SARFAID player Khaizzer Elle Batano, “Teamwork, consideration and understanding each other’s shortcomings – that is probably why we go smoothly together as a team.”

Meanwhile, SHS took revenge and blanked SARFAID in the women’s category, 3-0. “We feel blessed because last year we just won as first runner up but now we’re the champion.” said Jazsmin Coronel, one of the players of the SHS women team. “Probably why we won [was] because of the teamwork and communication during the game,” she added. The results were far from what was last year, with the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) dominating the men’s category while the SARFAID women’s team took home the gold.

CAMARADERIE. SHS and SARFAID women’s football teams pose together for a picture after the game. Photo by Veronica Ogapong.

TEAMWORK. SARFAID men’s football team does their team chant right before the start of the second half. Photo by Veronica Ogapong.


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VOLUME III, NO. 1

INFOGRAPHICS

THE

RIPPLES

THE

RIPPLES

SPORTS

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

9

SHS dominates volleyball championship By Glend Pajes

CELEBRATION. SARFAID volleyball team rejoices after a long rally landed them a point. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva.

Senior High School (SHS) swept the overall volleyball championship for both men and women last Sept. 14, at the covered quadrangle. The women’s volleyball match between SHS versus the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) rounded up in two sets, 2521, 25-20, while for the men’s event, SHS against the School of Architecture, Fine Arts and Interior Design (SARFAID) also ended the same, 25-23, 25-17. When asked about the strength of the teams, Sir Louie John Oceja said, “Well,

I think it has something to do with the relationship of the players. Still wise, both teams were even, it’s just that they had longer practices together, so they knew the moves of one another which made our teams intact and brought us to the championship.” The ranking for men’s category started with SHS, second is SARFAID, third is SHTM, fourth comes SSLATE, and lastly SBIT; for the women’s category, first came SHS, second rank’s SHTM, next is SBIT, then SARFAID, and last is SSLATE.

HUDDLE. Senior High School volleyball team gather around after the game to celebrate their win. Photo by Lindsy Marie Villanueva

SARFAID men, SHS women triumph in Football championship By Angelica Caceres

School of Architecture Fine Arts and Interior Design (SARFAID) men and Senior High School (SHS) women lifted the silverware in the football championship matches, Sept. 14, at the Central District Football Field. The SARFAID men didn’t gave SHS any chance to land a goal with keeper Louis Garcia guarding their post, and instead kicked their way to take the championship, 3-0. According to SARFAID player Khaizzer Elle Batano, “Teamwork, consideration and understanding each other’s shortcomings – that is probably why we go smoothly together as a team.”

Meanwhile, SHS took revenge and blanked SARFAID in the women’s category, 3-0. “We feel blessed because last year we just won as first runner up but now we’re the champion.” said Jazsmin Coronel, one of the players of the SHS women team. “Probably why we won [was] because of the teamwork and communication during the game,” she added. The results were far from what was last year, with the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management (SHTM) dominating the men’s category while the SARFAID women’s team took home the gold.

CAMARADERIE. SHS and SARFAID women’s football teams pose together for a picture after the game. Photo by Veronica Ogapong.

TEAMWORK. SARFAID men’s football team does their team chant right before the start of the second half. Photo by Veronica Ogapong.


SP RTS THERIPPLES

VOLUME III, NO. 1

AUGUST - NOVEMBER 2018

VICTORY. SBIT basketball team gathers after the game for a photo. Photo by Krizza Ledesma.

SBIT dethrones SARFAID in Intrams Basketball championship, 84-79 By Haydn Lagunay

School of Business and Information Technology (SBIT) ousted last year’s basketball champion, School of Architecture, Fine Arts, and Interior Design (SARFAID), in a heated championship game, 84-79, held on Sept. 14, at La Consolacion College Bacolod’s covered quadrangle. Mel Paglumutan emerged as top scorer with 29 points followed by Matthew Delearna with 23 points, both from SBIT. On the first quarter, SBIT’s Delearna scored the first shot which was recovered by SARFAID’s Joseph Dumancas III; SBIT took possession and had a head to head battle with SARFAID but managed to take control of the game, 19-18. SBIT continued to reign over SARFAID on the following quarters as SBIT’s Paglumotan executed a spin move on the second quarter which gained

them two points, and Delearna who delivered a three point shot on the last ten seconds of the third quarter, ending each quarter all in favor of SBIT, 4131, 62-50. On the final quarter, SARFAID tried to turn the tables to their advantage as they struggled to shoot a series of three pointers to tie the scores but SBIT’s Arana shot two free throws gaining them a one-point advantage which lead them uphill until the last seconds of the game, making them this year’s basketball champion, 84-79. “Our game plan is to anticipate our three points, tighten our defense, and have teamwork.” SBIT wingman Matthew Delearna said. SBIT’s victory broke SARFAID’s two-year streak as basketball champions, in which the department consecutively won in 2016 and 2017.

JUMP BALL. SARFAID center Joseph Dumancas and SBIT’s Neco Toreña reach hard to take possession of the ball. Photo by Krizza Ledesma.

The Ripples E-Newsletter (August-November 2018)  
The Ripples E-Newsletter (August-November 2018)  
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