Page 18

Words: Jeremy Williams “It was not a decision, it was just the way it sort of happened. I was fed up with making rap music and started experimenting with other genres.” When Elliot John Gleave (better known as Example) first hit the music scene in 2007, with his debut album “What We Made”, he was immediately hailed as “the new Mike Skinner or the new Eminem. I am not the new anything. I am just me. My music is as electro as it is hip hop, but a song isn’t just about a beat. It is about lyrics and the mood. I just want people to take my music for what it is.” Despite his critical labelling, “What We Made” sunk without trace. Thus, when three years later, Example returned with the poppier “Won’t Go Quietly”, many critics were surprised at his new pop sound. But Example is adamant that he is far from selling out. “I think the way it works, I did my first album which was a hip hop album. But I was still trying to get on Radio 1 with it and have hits with it. They were all still pretty catchy, even though they were hip hop. So that didn’t really get anywhere, so when the label ended, I started experimenting with dance music. I started working with people like Chase & Status and MJ Cole.”

“I just want people to take my music for what it is.” By changing his collaborators, Example underwent a musical re-examination. Far from trying to change genre, the 28 year old was simply trying grow as an artist. “The more you write, the more choruses you write, the better you get at songwriting. You end up coming from an underground place to a really good place. If you spend all your time rapping then you become a really good rapper. I stopped rapping and spent all my time writing choruses. The result is coming up with big choruses, like “Kick Starts”, which I wrote all by myself. There are lots of rappers in the Top 10 but pretty much all of them don’t write their own choruses. So I guess that is what separates me. Then obviously you mix it to a certain standard and level to ensure it breaks the pop market. “ “I never wanted to be underground, hip hop or urban. I just wanted to play big stages to big audiences and get my song on the radio.” Unlike many of his contemporaries, Example freely admits that he wanted to be a commercial success. “It is about entertainment. A lot of artists make music and say it is all about the personal, that it is not to make money or entertain. That it is deep and artistic. That is fine but if you have to remember if you aren’t trying to get music heard by anyone else then you shouldn’t be making music for people. As soon as you play a song to someone else it becomes theirs, they relate to it in their 18

The Kaje

Profile for The Kaje

The Kaje (September Issue)  

The Kaje is all about the arts - from the upcoming and underground through to the commercial mainstream. Issue 5 takes a look at: Stornoway,...

The Kaje (September Issue)  

The Kaje is all about the arts - from the upcoming and underground through to the commercial mainstream. Issue 5 takes a look at: Stornoway,...

Profile for the_kaje
Advertisement