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Clash Of The Titans (12) Warner Home Video 1/5 “Clash of the Titans”, directed by Loius Leterrier, retells the heroic tale of Perseus, half God half Man, out for revenge over the murder of his family. Unfortunately, we are presented with a remarkably normal and wholly underwhelming attempt, at what should have been a smash hit. Despite the rather stunning visual effects, which were this film’s stand out feature, the other areas fell a little short. This recreation is rather similar to the 1981 original. However, there are some remarkable differences. Project originator Basil Iwanyk shows the darker side of Perseus and his feud with Olympian Gods, the Gorgon Medusa and the malevolent Titans. This production is rather entertaining, in a somewhat silly fun kind of way. But it does not live up to its predecessor’s reputation and social impact. The original “Clash of the Titans” is definitely a childhood favourite. The 2010 recreation gives us a stylistic and somewhat innovative presence that was originally missing. However, Perseus, played by Sam Worthington, is a rather two dimensional character – he has the emotional depth of a paddling pool and the acting range of school student; he fails to remember that shouting is not the only volume at which one can converse. He is obviously a token character, his purpose being to arouse women and make men feel inadequate concerning their The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (18) Momentum Pictures Home Entertainment 4/5 I’m always apprehensive about seeing an adaptation of a book that I really liked. The film is just never the book, the imagination proving such a powerful tool that a real image never has the same impact. For example, the Bourne films which have nothing in common with the books except the names Jason Bourne and David Webb. Contrary to the above example, this film is one of the most faithful adaptations I have seen. As the film progresses it is like turning the pages of the book on screen, although this does make for a long and slightly self indulgent film. Mikael Blomkvist, after being convicted of Libel, accepts a commission to locate the niece of Henrik Vanger and acquires an unlikely assistant, Lisbeth Salander, along his journey. “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” masquerades as a detective story but in reality is a comment on the nature and politics of journalism, an examination of different women; how they experience violence and abuse and how as a consequence they respond to it.

physical stature. The more positive performances arguably came from Liam Neeson who brings a much needed gravitas to his character. The role of the Gods is somewhat overlooked, we all remember the amazing Maggie Smith in the original – this character, for some odd reason, has sadly been cut in this edition. We see Neeson is his Excalibur-esque shinning suit of armour and we are automatically entranced; isn’t this the same reaction very young children have to shinny objects, are we really that shallow? There were many ‘good’ performances, however this is in relation to the other performances found in the film. If one compared it to the original plot and acting range, it fails to live up to any expectation. It seems to be more of a Hollywood thriller than an attempt to create good film. If you want to see a good thriller with some very well choreographed fight scenes and equally as terrifying monsters then this a good film to watch. However, if you have seen the original and know something about Greek tragedy then perhaps stay away from this interpretation. The director has taken far too many liberties when tampering with the story line and has forgotten to make his actors act. It is ultimately a sorry attempt to create Hollywood fodder, the world does not need another one of these films. Alex Wolverson The performances are compelling. Noomi Rapace finds the vulnerability of Lisbeth Salander as well as the sociopath tendencies. For a character who says little, she’s the one you want to watch on screen. Michael Nyqist holds his own as the charismatic protagonist who knows that he is morally right but resigned to his fate. Ironically the violence in the book is faithfully adhered to but Mikael Blomkvist sleeps with a lot less women in the film than in the book, evidence of some trimming. If you liked the book, see this film. As is inevitable with any popular book, a big budget version of “The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo” is apparently in the pipeline. My biggest fear being that big budget brings big changes. My advice here would be simple; don’t wait for the Hollywood version to be made! Rachel Jacobs

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The Kaje - Issue 3 (July 2010)  

The Kaje is all about the arts - from the upcoming and underground through to the commercial mainstream. Issue 3 takes a look at: Ballet Boy...

The Kaje - Issue 3 (July 2010)  

The Kaje is all about the arts - from the upcoming and underground through to the commercial mainstream. Issue 3 takes a look at: Ballet Boy...

Profile for the_kaje