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Lissie “Catching A Tiger” Columbia 4/5 Not so dizzy Lissie. She may be blonde, she may be cute but Lissie Maurus is certainly a woman to be taken seriously. Her debut album “Catching a Tiger” has the potential to be the soundtrack to the summer. Hearing Lissie’s voice is like being given a free road trip around America, the whiskey sipping cowboys, the Cadillac cars, listening to her voice is like watching a sepia drenched 1970’s American film. Her style is very US folk mixed with blues and country, she has been likened to Sheryl Crow and our very own Laura Marling, two artists with whom being compared to will do her no harm. It is apparent through her lyrics and vocal sound that Lissie is highly influenced by her American upbringing, coming from Rock Island Illinois and currently residing in a Californian farmhouse. This all Americana feel is never more apparent than on the track “Oh Mississippi”, which creates a slow and Noblesse Oblige “Malady” Repo Records 3.5/5 Formed in London in 2004, Noblesse Oblige are the critically acclaimed half-French (singer/songwriter Valerie Renay) and halfGerman (songwriter/producer Sebastian Lee Philipp) electro-punk duo. “Malady” marks their third album in six years and is a natural growth from their previous efforts. Renay’s chilling talk-singing is addictively appealing. Her simple delivery often breath taking. Whilst opener ‘Morning Docks’ kicks proceedSophie Hunger “1983” Two Gentlemen 5/5 Swiss born Sophie Hunger spent her youth moving around Europe with her parents, spending periods of her life living in London, Bern and Bonn before finally settling in Zurich. As a result, Hunger’s linguistic skills were always being challenge, with Hunger ending up fluent in English, Swiss Alemannic dialect and German - all of which are evident on “1983”, Hunger’s third solo record. Her father’s passion for jazz clearly rubbed off on the impressionable young Hunger, with “1983” effortlessly fusing her love of jazz with blues, rock, r’n’b and country. Opening with the haunting ‘Leave Me With The Monkeys’, Hunger’s rich writing and soothingly smooth vocal are enough to send chills down the spine. The haunting tone rears its head throughout “1983” but never more so than on

dreamy quality that easily conjures up images of the American terrain and way of life. It is also worth noting her sometimes gravelly voice that has a slight reminiscent air of the late and great Johnny Cash; hardly surprising given the subject matter, her command of the guitar and deep vocal range. I loved this album from start to finish; it really does feel like a physical and emotional journey with a flaxen-haired maiden as the tour guide. The highlights of the journey are “Record Collector” which I could easily listen to again and again. The track’s changing tempo with a building finale really sets the pace for the rest of the album. Another high point is “Worried About” which has a real country vibe to start with until the guitar kicks in and we get a glimpse of Lissie’s rock roots. So regardless of whether we actually get any warm weather this summer: crank the volume up, pour yourself a glass of something cool, Lissie is here and is going to be hot! Clare Coleman ings slowly into gear, the duo get their act together by ‘Back And Call’. Philipp’s harrowing echo builds into a stomp and the frenzy is soon uncontrollable. Equally frenetic is the winsome ‘Zanzibar’. Impossibly irrepressible, ‘Zanzibar’ insists that your toe taps from the get-go and I challenge you to remain still as it infectiously grows. “Malady” will not be to everyone’s taste. However, Renay and Phipp’s provide an exciting collection for anyone that gets excited by the offbeat. Jeremy Williams the tender “Headlights”, which begs unanswered questions. Though Hunger steers clear from the instant radio hit, she doesn’t fully avoid the pop song. Title song ‘1983’ is a bouncy slice of summer pop even with a stirring backdrop. Partnering her pop song with rousing, politically charged lyrics is a clever move and stands Hunger out from the crowds. The piano led “Breaking The Waves” shows a softer side to Hunger’s vocal. Almost airy in quality, Hunger floats out of the stereo and gets the shoulders shaking. “1983” is a consummate collection of charming recollection. Hunger is an artist unafraid to speak her mind. Her musical dexterity shines through from open to close and there is not one track that needs to be skipped. Jeremy Williams

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The Kaje - Issue 2 (June 2010)  

The Kaje is all about the arts - from the upcoming and underground through to the commercial mainstream. Issue 2 takes a look at: The Bang...

The Kaje - Issue 2 (June 2010)  

The Kaje is all about the arts - from the upcoming and underground through to the commercial mainstream. Issue 2 takes a look at: The Bang...

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