Page 1

The

Holidays

Page 8

The Gift of Giving Page 28

Seven Reasons to Study History Page 18

Make your own

Hand Gift Tags Page 36

November / December 2012 $6.50 USA/$15.50 INTL


Online Courses For Homeschooled Teens With

the availability of home computers, the number and variety of online courses available to homeschoolers is phenomenal. Online courses are offered in academic core subject areas such as English, math, history and others as well as electives such as SAT test prep, psychology, accounting, Constitutional law, archeology, architecture, music history, philosophy, marketing, and many, many more choices. The HSLDA Homeschooling Thru High School website provides a sampling of online courses options. http:// hslda.org/highschool/curriculum.asp#online

If your teen is looking for a challenging online course, consider an Advanced Placement course. One source for online Advanced Placement courses is Patrick Henry College Prep Academy, which offers courses taught from a Christian worldview. http://hslda.org/highschool/curriculum.asp#advanced_ placement Courses taken online may be offered in real time meaning that everyone taking the course is online together at the same time each week perhaps listening to the same lecture. However, in most cases online courses are set up so that students can access lectures and daily assignments, and also post completed work at whatever time fits their individual schedules. Depending on the structure of the online course you choose, some courses offer you flexibility in the time required to complete the course. Online courses vary in the amount of interaction between the student and teacher. Forums, where students post answers to discussion questions, submit a comment for others to debate, or ask questions, are an essential part of most online courses. Prior to enrolling in an online course, insure that your computer meets the instructor’s prerequisites as to adequate computer hardware, software, and computer connection www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

By Becky Cooke and Diane Kummer

capability. It is essential that everything is in working order throughout the duration of the course. Be well aware of the credentials of the person teaching the course. It is wise to provide supervision during initial forum postings or chat room discussions. Any inappropriate posting in a forum, for example, should immediately be brought to the attention of the course instructor who should welcome such comments from both students and parents. An advantage of online courses is that your student remains in your home while taking a broad variety of subjects from instructors who have usually devoted much time to developing the course. Also, having a few outside instructors evaluating your teen’s course work lends credibility in the eyes of admissions officers and others. Online courses are not for everyone. If your child lacks initiative and interest in applying himself, he may do better being personally engaged by a live instructor. On the HSLDA website we offer a link to questionnaires that others have put together that will help you assess whether your teen is ready for an online course. http://hslda.org/highschool/curriculum. asp#OC/DL

Because online learning is fast becoming the wave of the future, consider choosing an online course for your teen to tackle during the high school years in order to become familiar with how online courses operate. Try one course and then add others if your teen is well-suited to this learning option.

Becky Cooke and Diane Kummer are HSLDA High School Consultants and provide personal consultation to its members. They also travel and speak nationwide encouraging and equipping parents of teens to continue homeschooling during the high school years.

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

3


Publisher’s Letter

Brilliant Publishing LLC 9034 Joyce Lane, Hummelstown, PA 17036 Telephone: 717.571.9233 Fax: 717.566.5431

PUBLISHER / ADVERTISING Publisher

Maureen Williams maureen@thehomeschoolhandbook.com 717.608.5869

Account Executive Alex Chambers alex@thehomeschoolhandbook.com

EDITORIAL Editor In Chief

MaryAnne Morrill maryanne@thehomeschoolhandbook.com

Senior Editor

Michelle Donofry editor@thehomeschoolhandbook.com

The holidays are savored through a collection of moments and traditions that

bring families closer. It is that spirit of bringing families closer that is the focus of this issue…a ‘Holiday’ Handbook offering equal parts inspiration and information. As you settle into the beauty of the holiday season, sharing meaningful time with your families and friends celebrating your beliefs and traditions, we hope that this issue inspires you to make it a memorable time. We enjoyed putting this issue together; and while we look forward to the holidays, the New Year is right around the corner. Boy, do we have some surprises and treats heading your way in 2013! We could not close another year without a heartfelt “Thank you” to each and every one of you who inspire us and keep us going. We must also “Thank” our advertisers! This magazine simply would not be possible without the support of our advertisers, so please make sure you check their offerings out whenever you are thinking of adding anything to your homeschool. Even at this busy time of the year we look forward to your help in continuing to grow our community by following us on social media and joining in on the conversations. And, please keep those letters and emails coming as well! Wishing you the merriest Christmas and the happiest holiday! Remember always… Education Matters!

Maureen Williams, Publisher maureen@thehomeschoolhandbook.com 717-608-5869 Follow us on twitter:

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Become a Fan on Facebook: The Homeschool Handbook Magazine

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

Social Media/Asst. Editor

Molly Anika molly@thehomeschoolhandbook.com

Style / Asst. Editor Charity Plata

Subscription Service / Back Issues:

Circulation@thehomeschoolhandbook.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

The Container Store, Becky Cooke John De Gree, Robin Finley, Dr. Barton Goldsmith Carolyn Henderson, Sarita Holzmann The Homeschool Handbook Staff, Monica Irvine Diane Kummer, MaryAnne Morrill, Andrew Pudewa Dave Ribble, Amy Roskelley, Debbie Thompson Paige Timer, Donna Vail, Sandra Volchko

PRODUCTION / DESIGN Art Director

Jeremy Tingle art@thehomeschoolhandbook.com The Homeschool Handbook is published bi-monthly by Brilliant Publishing LLC, 9034 Joyce Lane, Hummelstown, PA 17036 Telephone: (717) 571-9233, Fax: (717) 566-5431. Postage paid at Michigan City, IN and additional offices. POSTMASTER please send address changes to The Homeschool Handbook, 9034 Joyce Lane, Hummelstown, PA 17036. Volume 3 Number 06. The Homeschool Handbook subscription rates: one-year $19.95 USD, Canadian $59.95 USD, Foreign $89.95 USD. All subscriptions are non-refundable. Copyright © 2012 Brilliant Publishing LLC. All rights reserved. the publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising or editorial material. Advertisers, and/or their agents, assume the responsibility for any claims against the publisher based on the advertisement. Editorial contributors assume responsibility for their published works and assume responsibility for any claims against the publisher based on published work. No part of this publication can be reproduced in any form or by electronic or mechanical means, including information storage and retrieval systems, without written permission from the publisher. All items submitted to The Homeschool Handbook become the sole property of Brilliant Publishing LLC. Editorial content does not reflect the views of the publisher. The imprints, logos, trademarks or trade names (collectively the “Marks”) displayed on the products featured in The Homeschool Handbook are for illustrative purposes only and are not available for sale. The Marks do not represent the implied or actual endorsement by the owners of the Marks of the product on which they appear. All of the Marks are the property of the respective owners and are not the property of either the advertisers using the Marks or The Homeschool Handbook. MEDICAL DISCLAIMER No warranty whatsoever is made by the publisher and there is absolutely no assurance that any statement contained or cited in any article touching on medical matters is true, correct, precise, or up-to-date. Even if a statement made about medicine is accurate, it may not apply to you or your symptoms. The medical information provided is, at best, of a general nature and cannot substitute for the advice of a medical professional (for instance, a qualified doctor/physician, nurse, pharmacist/chemist, and so on). None of the individual contributors, LLC members, subcontractors, advertisers, or anyone else connected to Brilliant Publishing LLC and The Homeschool Handbook can take any responsibility for the results or consequences of any attempt to use or adopt any of the information presented in this magazine. Nothing included, as a part of this publication should not be construed as an attempt to offer or render a medical opinion or otherwise engage in the practice of medicine.


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What’s in

Your resource, support & inspiration for a successful lifestyle 3 8 10 12

Online Courses for Homeschooled Teens The Holidays St. Nicholaus Day in Czech The Single Most Significant Thing I Do

solutions 14 16

Holiday Party Etiquette Online Testing

curriculum

18 Seven Reasons to Study History (Rather Than Social Studies)

20 22

6

inspiration

24 Mentor Your Children to Their Greatest Potential

26 28 29

Adding to the Beauty The Gift of Giving This Is Your Life

health and hearth

30 Christmas Pepper & Pea Potatoes 31 Apple Pie Christmas Ornament Pancakes

special feature 32

Gorgeous Gift Presentation

What? or That! Can Literature Be Taught Meaningfully?

Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


contents|2012

side

volume 03, issue 06

at home education & lifestyle. extra activities 36 37

Handprint Gift Bags and Tags Christmas Treat Jar

columns 38 40 41

Meet Mary Brodsky Educational Mobile Apps and Websites Product Spotlights

resources 42

Index/Resources List

Cover Model: Dianna Lucas Photograph by: Heartfelt Portraits Photographer: Michelle Losardo

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

7


lifestyle

By: MaryAnne Morrill

Oh the rush

and the tumble, the worry and the wait, the sparkle and the disappointment. These have almost always served to describe the holiday season for me. Yes, I’m not a holiday person. Is it the disappointing gifts…the year of the yellow socks…the dress that I would never wear…the broken brooch…or perhaps the chipped tea set? Or is it because I expect too much of myself…find and give the perfect gift…have the perfectly decorated house…prepare the perfect meal? Perhaps. But as I think back on all the holidays that have passed through my life, I do find a couple of special ones, memorable ones…dare I say perfect ones. The first was perhaps the most memorable; I recall it as the year of the holiday miracle. My husband and I were still teenagers; teenagers with an infant son and the year had been a difficult one. Being poor really wasn’t all that bad, after all we were young and it was us against the world… until the holidays arrived. There was no money for Christmas, baby’s first Christmas and not a dime to spare for a gift, a tree, a holiday dinner. And then it happened. We had been looking at the window decorations in stores decked out for the holidays and were crossing the huge crowded parking lot on our way home. Being someone who always looked down hoping to find a lucky penny, I saw it…a green plastic squeeze coin purse. My husband was in a hurry and said, “Come on…it’s just some little kid’s empty coin purse.” But I bent down and picked it up, there wasn’t a penny, a nickel or a dime in it…there were two folded up twenty-dollar bills in that little coin purse! There was no identification and no possible way of knowing who had lost that little purse. And whoever they were, I hope that somehow they know that their lose was our miracle at Christmas.

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

I bent down and picked it up, there wasn’t a penny, a nickel or a dime in it… there were two folded up twenty-dollar bills in that little coin purse!

www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


It was a Busy Box toy for the baby, a Christmas tree with an angel on top and the best holiday dinner ever! To this day every time, I remember that Christmas my eyes well up with tears…it was one of the best holidays ever…it was simple but it was perfect. Several years later it was the holiday of homemade gifts, things were a bit better, but funds were still limited what with two small children. So I started early making gifts, crocheted ponchos and hats for the children, an embroidered tablecloth set for the parents and in-laws, crocheted scarves for the aunts and uncles. The gifts took all of my spare time to make, but amazingly they seemed to be one of most every recipient’s favorite gifts that year. They may not have been exactly what each one wished for but they came from the heart and everyone seemed to feel the love worked into their gift. Hard to believe that it has been almost twenty years ago, but the last holiday memory is of a Christmas spent in England. My daughter had been studying abroad outside London and said she wasn’t coming home unless I came to get her…she loved Europe so much! So my son and I boarded an airplane to go get the other member of our family. She and an English friend met us at Gatwick airport and we went to stay at her friend’s home. It was a typical English home outside London and after just a day or so it felt like our home too. We had spent several days visiting well known and unknown English sites with my daughter’s friend. And now it was the day before Christmas. Instead of the usual weeks of searching for the perfect gifts and the mad rush that seems such a part of the holidays in the States, we just went to the nearby town and walked through the small local stores. Somehow in that little town I found the perfect single gift for my son, my daughter and her friend, all in one relaxing afternoon. On Christmas Day we went to a local pub and had a traditional family style English Christmas dinner complete with crowns and poppers. At the beginning of the meal we didn’t know the people at the tables, but by the end it felt like one big happy family enjoying a good meal with friends. Amazingly, that year the holiday wasn’t about the gifts at all, it was about the people.

www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

Thinking back on these special holidays, I believe there is a lesson in each of them. In the first it was the joy of believing that a miracle had occurred making a simple celebration possible for those you loved. The second was about the joy of giving from the heart instead of from the dollar value. Finally, the third was about the joy of simply enjoying a holiday with family and friends.

If you — like me — are not a holiday person, perhaps making this year a different kind of celebration could make it one of your special memories. Be a secret Santa for a less fortunate family, donate a toy or a meal. Enjoy time with those you love…remember to savor the moments and not the gifts, because your time is the one gift that only you can give.

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

9


lifestyle

St. Nicholaus Day

in Czech

It

is late evening, somewhere in Central Europe, and two seemingly incongruent beings are roaming the cities, villages, and mountain towns of this small Slavic land. One is dressed as a bishop from the fourth century, complete with white robe, white beard and mustache, a shepherd’s staff, and mitre (bishop’s hat). The other is wearing horns, dark make-up, black clothes, and a red cape. He is carrying and jangling a long and heavy chain and has a black bag he keeps opening up in a threatening manner towards children. The “bishop” is smiling gently and carrying a bag of goodies to hand out to good kids, while the “devil” is laughing wickedly, jangling his chains, and looking for kids to put in his bag. As the two visit homes and churches, children are brought to them. The bishop asks the children and parents if they

10

Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

By: John De Gree

had behaved well the previous year. Before the children can answer, the devil cackles loudly, menacingly jangles his chain, and says, “I know you’ve been a naughty child. You will come with me in my bag and I will take care of you forever.” At this moment, the child comes forth and sings a song, or recites a poem. Little “Jan” assures the bishop and devil that he has been a very good boy. The devil grimaces in pain, and says, “I thought for sure I would get this one.” Little Jan sighs in relief, receives either a piece of fruit or candy, and the older kids and the parents laugh. Every year, on the evening of December 5th in the Czech Republic, this play is acted out by thousands of “bishops” and “devils” and millions of families. The “bishop and devil” and parents are partners in teaching the children to be www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


good in a way that reminds them of the ramifications of their behavior on Earth.

Today, though, the kids get to escape the devil’s snares by reciting a poem or singing a song.

December 6th is the day set aside in the Roman Catholic Church to remember Saint Nicholaus (Svaty Mikulas in Czech). Saint Nicholaus was a fourth century bishop who lived on the Mediterranean Sea in the Roman Empire, in present-day Turkey. During Bishop Nicholaus’ lifetime, stories abounded of his generosity and of miraculous events associated with him. One story is how a poor family that was considering whether or not to sell their daughters into slavery received golden apples from a mysterious person they believed to be Nicholaus. Another story is how Nicholaus appeared to distressed sailors on the ocean and calmed the seas. Bishop Nicholaus was known by all to be incredibly generous to children.

Nearly all Czech families participate in this tradition, which often takes place in the middle of St. Nicholaus parties. Similar festivities on the eve or day of St. Nicholaus take place throughout Europe and in some parts of the United States. In many places, it has become a secular holiday, including the Czech Republic. Since the Communist rule of this land from 1948-1989, most Czechs are professed atheists. However, they all still partake in the Svaty Mikulas festivities, and it appears the children are strongly influenced by Bishop Nicholaus and the Devil to be good kids for at least one more year.

In the ninth century, Greek missionaries Cyril and Method converted the Slavic peoples to Christianity and created the various Slavic alphabets. Stories of Saint Nicholaus’ generosity spread throughout the Slavic lands. Sometime in the Medieval Ages, the tradition of the benevolent bishop and malevolent devil visiting families began. Originally, children were questioned on their knowledge of the Bible.

John De Gree is the Founder of The Classical Historian (www.ClassicalHistorian.com), an Author, a Teacher and the father of seven children. After working in education for 20+ years, John realized that there is a great lack of critical and independent thinking, when history is taught. The Classical Historian is his effort to promote these skills and to show teachers how to teach their children to search for the truth in history.

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

11


lifestyle

The Single Most By: Carolyn Henderson

Significant Thing

The

other day was one of those in which nothing ever quite worked out the way it was supposed to, schedules were disrupted, the computer acted up, and everybody was hungry but no one had any inspiration, or time, to make dinner — you’ve seen this before, haven’t you? I was waiting around for a particular project to be finished so that I could send the results on, and it occurred to me, “This is the single most significant thing I have to do this day. If I get nothing done more than this, then I have succeeded.” Well, I succeeded, but since I’d had so much time to think while I was waiting, I thought, and I remembered back to the progeny’s younger years when they asked questions like, “What is your FAVORITE food of all? What color do you like BEST? What is the ONE movie you adore?” as if life could be compartmentalized into a rigid inventory composed of

12

Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

I Do

cheesecake, cobalt blue, and The Lord of the Rings. Another day, I tried to explain to childish minds, the answers could be medium rare steak, hot pink, and Runaway Bride, but they insisted upon one answer to each question. Eventually they grew up, and the questions in question no longer arose, but the spirit of those demands lives strong not only in their minds, but mine, and maybe yours as well: certain things we do in life are MOST IMPORTANT, and other things aren’t. Like this: A person who holds a powerful job and makes lots of money is successful, and everything he or she does is important. Another person — a young mom I know who chose to stay home with her newborn baby comes to mind — does nothing more than change diapers, wash dishes, and prattle

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with a six-month-old. Anybody can do this, it’s menial, and it’s not particularly important. Do we really believe this? Deep down, I think that the answer is “yes,” and “no.” We believe it because we admire and talk about those movers and shakers — they’re smart, they’re savvy, they’re energetic, they’re unlike us . . . unabashedly successful — basing our conclusions on the lifestyle they lead because of the money they make, not questioning whether they leave a tip for the cleaning staff at the $500 per night hotel room, or apologize to a subordinate in the office because they were wrong and they’re big enough to admit it, or stop everything they’re doing and truly focus on the person in front of them who is talking. Maybe they do all of these things, maybe they don’t — but the point is, we don’t take these factors into consideration when we define “success.” This last week, I have received a number of phone calls from people who wanted, and needed, to talk, and it was strongly impressed upon me that the most important, significant thing I could do was listen. And so I adjusted my schedule accordingly.

Another time, the Toddler became my sole responsibility for the afternoon, and because my schedule was flexible enough I chose to defer certain projects in favor of lying down beside her, reading books with pictures of flying cows, and unexpectedly — because we were exhausted — both falling asleep. We awoke with our arms around one another. She looked at me with those deep baby blues and smiled, then snuggled closer. At that moment it struck me between the eyes: “I have a lot of important projects waiting and they will get done.” “But this is the single most significant thing I have done today.”   Carolyn Henderson is an 18-year veteran of homeschooling and the manager of Steve Henderson Fine Art, the online and studio gallery she operates with her husband, artist Steve Henderson (www.stevehendersonfineart.com). More of her writing may be found at her Middle Aged Plague site, www.middleagedplague.areavoices.com.

Funny, Family Friendly, Encouraging Mom of four, homeschooler, business person, wife of the Norwegian Artist — Carolyn Henderson writes short, upbeat essays about modern life’s oddities and ends. The 30 essays in each book are accompanied by the beautiful paintings of Steve Henderson. E-book compatible with your Kindle, iPad, iPod, Droid phone, and downloadable on your computer with a free app from Amazon. $2.99 at Amazon.com Search — Life Is a Gift and The Jane Austen Driving School by Carolyn Henderson www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

13


solutions

It’s

time to review some basic etiquette skills for the sake of your reputation and professional future. Trust me when I say I have experience with this (not providing any further details).  As we go over party etiquette, please think of how you can apply these skills to both your company holiday parties as well as family “get-to-gathers.”  Obviously, there would be some adjustment and some irrelevant information for one or the other, but generally, the same principles apply.  Here we go:

Everything in moderation Remember, a lady and a gentleman, never draw attention to themselves. This would include overindulging in our dress, eating, drinking, dancing, flirting or any other behavior that we can become the “center of attention.”  Think “CLASS,” think “HONOR,” think “DO I WANT TO BE THE STORY TOMORROW?”  With these things in mind, I think you’ll be fine.

Dress appropriate for the occasion - The way we dress sends a message to those in attendance; how we feel about the occasion and how we value our time there. Consider what message you want to send to your family, co-workers or even your boss.

Never ask if you can bring someone to the party unless the host included “...and guest,” on the invitation or personally told you to please feel free to bring along a friend with you. This is a big NO, NO!!!!

Make sure we honor the host by being on time and leaving on time - First rule of etiquette...BE ON TIME!

Be sure to thank the host who coordinated the party -

Holiday Party Etiquette

By: Monica Irvine

14

Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

For family gatherings, it is very polite to take a gift to the host: a plant, a book, a candle, a cookbook, etc.  Just something small, but something that shows the host you were thinking of them and appreciate their generosity in hosting the event.

If you’re the host, a few things to remember to make your guests feel comfortable are: •• Send invitations at least 3 weeks ahead of time (6 weeks if going to “out of town” guest). •• Include directions in the invitation. •• Include the “dress” if a company gathering. •• Inform guest if it is OK to bring a guest. •• Be aware of community events that might affect attendance (LIKE THE TENNESSEE/FLORIDA GAME--HELLO!!!). www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


•• It is the host’s responsibility to make sure that all your guests make it home safely. Meaning, if a guest has had too much alcohol to drink, make arrangements to get them home.

Remember CONVERSATION ETIQUETTE OK People, now listen. I’m not sure why this is an issue that we must discuss on a regular basis, but...I feel obligated for the sake of all our sensitive ears.  A few things to remember when speaking to others, especially at holiday functions (remember, The Happy Times), are: •• Keep the conversation positive. •• No, they don’t want to hear about your latest Hernia. •• Don’t speak unkindly of others, ESPECIALLY YOUR FAMILY (ETIQUETTE RULE BREAKER NUMBER 336). •• Don’t tell a story that lasts longer than 5 minutes… Period! •• Yes, it’s OK to tell a few things about your children’s accomplishments this year; however, this should only take a couple of minutes.  You’re family is not writing an essay on the life and success of your little 2 year old Brewster. •• Ask questions.  Great conversation happens when both parties make inquiries about the other person. 

This shows your care and concern for those you speak with. It sends the message, “I am interested in you and your life.” •• Be gracious.  Please no foul language, no vulgar or racist jokes (it’s not funny), no human noises (I’m talking to you DAD), and no teasing others.  Teasing is actually a big deal.  You know that uncle who always wanted to know how many boys you kissed this past year.  UGH!!!  This is not cool, and more importantly, not polite. •• Never say or do anything that would embarrass another person at the party. •• Compliment others. •• And finally, Remember...what’s happening today, is what’s happening tomorrow on FACEBOOK.  Beware!! Have a great Holiday Season.  Monica Irvine, a certified Etiquette Instructor, owns and operates The Etiquette Factory. A master motivator and dedicated instructor, She is the author of several books on etiquette and also operates Etiquette Summer Camps.  As a home school mom herself, Monica is passionate about giving parents the tools they need to successfully teach proper etiquette in the home. For more information please visit www.theetiquettefactory.com.

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12/1/12 9:18:32 PM November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

15


solutions

Online Testing

By: Debbie Thompson

Advances in computer technology have made it

possible to take many different types of tests online. These tests are usually given in a testing center on computers with lock-down browsers, which prevent the student from searching the web or using any other programs on the computer while taking the test. Scoring is often automatic. Each state sets its own laws on testing for homeschoolers. Homeschoolers in many states have to have a nationally standardized achievement test done each year. Many homeschool parents would also like to know if their student could qualify for gifted programs or what their cognitive or learning style strengths and weaknesses are. Other parents desire help to better understand their student’s best career possibilities and use an assessment to help them counsel their children. Savvy parents might also help their students gain college credit and certificate credentials by using test instruments, which show proficiency.

Achievement Testing Many nationally standardized achievement and ability tests are in various stages of becoming available online. The online editions of the Iowa Test and TerraNova (formerly CAT – California Achievement Test) are in beta testing. The Stanford 10 is available online. The score report is

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generated immediately following the testing and the report looks very similar to the report generated from the bubble sheet method. It is not timed – as long as the student is progressing. It is recommended that students at least be in the Spring of their 3rd grade and comfortable with computer navigation to take the Stanford 10 Online. We have students that were extremely favorable with taking the Stanford 10 online. They reported that they finished the test quicker than if they had done it by paper. They also found the computer navigation to be very easy. The Stanford 10 Online is still multiple-choice in format. It generally takes 2 days to complete the test. It contains each area that the paper edition contains. The report is generated immediately after testing. The BASI test (Basic Achievement Skills Inventory) is also recommended for 3rd grade and up. It takes 2 hours to complete, is multiple choice in format, and a two-page report is generated immediately afterwards. For an example of the Stanford 10 Online score report visit http://education.pearsonassessments. com/NR/rdonlyres/F7CF58F2-B5B2-4868-94C323E9D15355AB/0/Stanford10_Online_StudentReport_ SRC.pdf and a BASI online test report can be viewed at http://www.triangleeducationassessments.com/basi.pdf. www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


The GED (Graduate Equivalent Diploma) is going to be offered as a computerized test by January 2014.

centers for all of these tests can be found on the tests’ websites under the “find test center” function.

Cognitive Ability Testing

Testing for Certification

Cognitive Ability testing is used to ascertain how a student learns and processes information and their learning potential (not what they know). Many schools and programs use cognitive tests to measure potential for gifted programs or to obtain and intellectual quotient (IQ). The CogAT online test is in beta testing. The OLSAT 8 Online just became available September 2012. The CogAT and OLSAT are not true IQ tests but are used for accelerated class or gifted program inclusion. The CogAT and OLSAT are also used to help parents better understand their child’s learning style and how to teach to their child’s strengths and weaknesses.

Some public and private schools teach computer courses or other skills which can lead to certification, and college credit at some colleges. The most common certificates testing homeschoolers get is to evidence proficiency for MSOffice programs (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access and SharePoint). Certiport Tests are a great choice to use to exhibit proficiency in MSOffice programs, plus Intuit QuickBooks, Autodesk, Adobe, CompTIA® Strata™ to show accomplishment in the fundamentals of internet technology, IC3: Internet and Computing Core, and as a Microsoft® Technology Associate. Candidates can give potential employers or colleges access to their scores on the Certiport website for added verification. Certiport tests are delivered on computers in testing centers and a locator service is on the Certiport website. If a student interns or does an apprenticeship, there could be a certificate level examination that they might be able to take to show their level of expertise. These certificates can aid students with future college admission or employment opportunities by adding a special level of professionalism to their transcripts and resume´s. Happy Testing!

Career Testing Popular assessments that use online testing and immediate reporting to yield information on a student’s best career fits include, the Strong, Myers Briggs Personality Inventory, The Call and Career Direct. Many companies allow you to purchase various length reports for each of these tests, so the prices vary. Most sites, which sell codes to these career tests also give access to national career forecasting websites, resume templates and tips on how to interview.

College Credit Testing College bound students can earn college credits early and at a fraction of the cost by taking credit-by-examination tests. CLEP, DSST, and UExcel tests take about 90 minutes and are delivered on a computer at a testing center. Students can send scores to colleges at the time of the testing, or for an additional fee, they can request a transcript to be sent to the college of their choice at a later date. The credits can range from 3 to 12. Not all colleges accept all of these tests so check with your college first. The credits earned do not usually expire.

Debbie Thompson is Director of Triangle Education Assessments, LLC, (www.TriangleEd.com), which helps thousands of homeschoolers and adults each year with their achievement, cognitive, career, practice, certificate and licensure test needs.

Graduate and Foreign Language Proficiency Testing Some students might also need to consider taking the GRE (Graduate Record Examination), TOEFL (Tests of English as a Foreign Language), MET (Michigan English Test), and MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), and the MAT (Miller Analogy Test). These tests are used by employers or graduate programs. Testing www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

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curriculum

Seven Reasons to Study History

By: Sarita Holzmann

(Rather Than Social Studies)

When

I was in school, we learned about the world in seemingly unrelated snippets. My teachers called the subject Social Studies. We might start the year studying Chinese culture. Then we’d study the Pilgrims because it was getting close to Thanksgiving. Then we’d take a break to study the Plains Indians and build miniature teepees. Social Studies remains a core subject in many educational systems today. I think schools often do Social Studies because it’s a unit and you can just pop it into places when you have time. It’s expedient. But I don’t think it’s a very effective way to learn. I believe children need to study History. Why? History provides the framework we need to make sense of our world

 With Social Studies, I never learned the big-picture of history and how the world works. But a history-based curriculum (like Sonlight) gives your children the framework of knowledge they need. As you move through time you give them a cohesive map of knowledge they will build on their entire lives. As they learn new information (like details of the current strife in Myanmar), they can “place” that knowledge in the appropriate place in their mental map.

History helps us understand other cultures

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

In Social Studies, we might study cultural facts about a specific Chinese dynasty. But when we study the span of China’s 3,000 years of recorded history, we get a much better sense of who they are. We see how Confucius, who lived around 500 BC, influenced Chinese culture at each point of their development. We see how his emphasis on honoring superiors still governs Chinese culture.

History helps us honor other cultures

 Sometimes we can think our culture is the only group who has done it right; we’re the only ones who have it all figured out. But when we do that, we dishonor all the people who have lived before us and achieved great things. Think about it—in 3,000 years of recorded history, for example, the Chinese people have had some pretty remarkable achievements!

Studying history teaches discernment
 As we study history we read a variety of texts. You can’t very well study it any other way. I believe that teaches us to discern right from wrong. It helps us learn not to swallow everything we read or see on TV. Consider the legacy of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (the President during the Great Depression and WWII). Many biographers paint a rosy picture of his work, whereas others present a more critical www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


perspective. As students read and study history from different perspectives, they learn how to weigh different opinions and come to their own conclusions. In the case of FDR, they’ll likely conclude that he made bad decisions in some areas, did some things OK, and did other things quite well. I don’t think any other discipline teaches this discernment skill as well as history does.

and instead study History. (Of course, since I believe this is so important, you can rest assured that Sonlight takes the History approach.) Let’s learn from history — as history helps us live with wisdom and make sense of our world.

History helps us make wise decisions 
Did you know that the pilgrims attempted socialism? As we study history, we see they created a common storehouse and asked everyone to bring the food in; they were going to share all things. These pilgrims all shared the same cultural background, worshiped in the same way, and believed in a common cause. But after one season, they decided that socialism didn’t work. They discovered that if people didn’t have rewards, they didn’t work hard enough. As we study history, we can learn helpful lessons for our world today — we can learn from history.

Sarita Holzmann is the co-founder and president of Sonlight Curriculum (www.sonlight. com). She cherishes a legacy of family-centered, literature-rich home education and seeks to provide families with the rich resources they need to raise life-long learners.

History inspires us
 As you look at Sonlight’s history selections, you’ll see a lot of biographies. We do that on purpose. We want our kids to read about those who have just been ordinary people like them, and who went out and did amazing things. These historical figures can inspire us to think bigger thoughts, to be people of purpose, to be people who desire to make a difference. We regularly pray that our students will be people who stand up and say, “I want to make a difference in our world.”

God values history
 This was a new thought for me recently. I believe God honors history. Think of the Bible: it’s divided into 66 books, and many of them are direct history. They tell the story of what happened to specific people, in a specific place, at a specific time. And there’s a lot of history in the other books as well. God wants us to read this history and learn from it. So even God thinks history is something worth spending time thinking about and reasoning on. I’ve heard that the Bible (and, of course, the Torah) may be the only Holy Book that includes history. Just something to ruminate on! So my challenge to homeschoolers is to skip the scattered Social Studies approach www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

19


curriculum By: Andrew Pudewa

What? Or That! Reflections on Reports In

sixth grade or thereabouts, you had to write A REPORT. Searching for a subject that seemed moderately interesting, such as Japan or Betsy Ross, you went to the encyclopedia and began to browse. Typically, your finished report had to be three to four pages, plus illustrations, which seemed like a lot—really a lot. Japan beat out Betsy Ross, simply because there was more information available. In the back of your mind, you knew it wouldn’t be quite “kosher” to copy verbatim from the big book, but the unanswered question was: How could you get information out of the encyclopedia and into your report without copying it? With a jolt of inspiration (or perhaps a whiff of common sense), you arrived at the natural conclusion, which was to copy the really good sentences, changing a few words here and there. It was important to strike a balance. If the report blatantly sounded like you copied from an encyclopedia, the teacher might be suspicious. Conversely, if your paper didn’t seem somewhat organized and intelligent, with a reasonable sprinkling of sophisticated words, you might not get an A. The struggle was in trying to predict what the teacher would think when she read your report. Perhaps you even felt the temptation to misspell, purposely, an occasional long word, with the hope that it might add to the authenticity of your pseudo-plagiarism. Spell checkers didn’t exist then, and most reports in sixth grade were handwritten. Later, in eighth or ninth grade, objectivity and analysis became the major thing. The literature-loving language teacher, with genuine sincerity and enthusiasm, determined to extract from you a character analysis paper, or perhaps a compare- and-contrast essay. Burdened with new and unpleasant vocabulary words such as “foreshadowing,” “metaphor” and “sub-plot,” you wondered what kind of person would actually ever choose to ruin a good book by having to talk and write about it ad nauseam. After somehow struggling to squeeze out your five pages (this time typed, double-spaced), you received the paper back with marvelously helpful red ink margin comments similar to: “This doesn’t work,” or “Needs smoother transition,” or perhaps “Topic unclear,” or worst of all, “Develop this.” “If I had any idea how to implement these suggestions,” you mutter, “I would have done it in the first place!” Fortunately, the semester was soon over, and you weren’t thinking about having to write another literary analysis paper...ever.

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

Now you’re all grown up and trying to teach writing yourself. You believe your students should write reports and do literary analysis essays like you did, but being a compassionate person, you’d like their experience to be less stressful than yours. How can you help? More importantly, though, you should ask yourself, why? Why ask kids to write reports and essays? What should they learn from the exercise? What did you learn? Unfortunately, we bring to teaching all the experiences we had as students ourselves, some of which are perhaps less than ideal. So we should occasionally take a moment and rethink the purpose of the assignments we give. First of all, let’s define what we mean by “report” and “essay.” A report is basically the collection and presentation of existing facts. In police work, journalism or administration, to “report” on something means to state the necessary facts clearly and concisely. Similarly, children’s “reports” serve much the same purpose, and give a student opportunity to learn and practice several basic skills: How to locate sources of information, get an overview of a subject and choose possible topics. How to limit the number of topics for the report, and select from available references a limited number of facts pertaining to those topics. How to organize those facts, and present them in an engaging, understandable way. The term “essay” implies something more than just reporting facts; by definition, it includes the opinions or thoughts of the writer. By expanding a simple report into an essay by adding an introduction and conclusion, we teach children how to “frame” the topics, and, especially in the concluding paragraph, how to comment on the relative importance or underlying significance of the facts presented in the body. As essays become more sophisticated, commentary is smoothly integrated with factual information inside the topic paragraphs themselves, and in persuasive writing, topics and facts are selected and presented in such a way as to cause a strengthening of, or a shift in, the opinion or attitude of the reader. Because essays are built on facts, effective essay writing develops from a foundation of good report writing. In writing a short 2–3 page report on a subject such as Japan, or Benjamin Franklin, or the French Revolution, the www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


first task of any student is to determine the topics. Generally, the number of topics will be based on the assignment length. (At the Jr. High level, a paragraph with a topic sentence, 5–6 details or facts and a clincher sentence will average approx. 90–130 words.) Next, the student must find and choose specific facts about the topic. Let us say he or she has chosen the subject Benjamin Franklin and four topics: Franklin as a child, Franklin the author, Franklin the scientist, and Franklin the statesman. As there is a lot of information available about these topics, no one would imagine that you could tell everything there is to tell about Franklin in three pages, or even ten pages, and perhaps the subject (Franklin) should be narrowed. But let us assume the student proceeds with these topics. Now, several good things happen in the process of tackling this. Of course, the child will undoubtedly learn a few things about Mr. Franklin. Secondly, he will have to exercise his discriminative faculty and make some decisions—choices about which facts among the hundreds available he will use in his report. How will he choose? There are two basic methods: choosing what is important, and choosing what is interesting. If the child feels he needs to choose what is most important, he will read the reference looking for facts that seem to have the most significance. But how does a child determine what is most important? Without a breadth of cultural literacy and life experience, it’s hard for him to know which facts truly carry more weight than others. In many cases he’s primarily trying to find the facts that he thinks the teacher will consider the most important. On the other hand, when a child feels free to choose what is most interesting, what will he be doing? Searching for the things that best capture his attention or imagination, he is engaged. He gets excited. He enjoys the process. Now, perhaps you are the type of teacher who feels that what is important is more important than what is interesting. Or possibly you are the type of teacher who thinks that what is interesting is more interesting than what’s important. Although a good report will have a balance between the two, which teaching approach will encourage the best writing? And more vitally, which approach will teach the skill that the child most needs? If a student selects his facts based on what he thinks you want him to choose, is he really making a choice? Is he exercising his independence, his will, his intellect? Or is he simply trying to make you happy? Consider this teaching approach: “Hands on structure and style; hands off content.” As long as a child presents his facts according to the model and checklist for the assignment, does it really matter what facts he chooses to write about? Is it not more valuable for a child to practice the act of choosing than to always be trying to second-guess a teacher? Let the child decide what they want to write and run with it. Even if the facts they choose aren’t, in your opinion, the most important or significant things about Japan, or Florence Nightingale or the Apollo Missions, the very fact that they made a choice is www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

what teaches them to think, to be bold, to write. “What they choose” is not nearly as important in the long run as “that they make a choice,” even if in their childlike simplicity their choices aren’t the “best” ones. As they grow and mature, their sensibility and choices will improve, while the freedom to make choices in report writing will have strengthened their fundamental ability to think. This year, as you assign reports to your students, let them know that what you are really looking for is not “what” facts they choose, but “that” they do choose facts and put those facts on paper with structure and style. Andrew Pudewa is the Director of the Institute for Excellence in Writing and a homeschooling father of seven. Presenting throughout North America, he addresses issues relating to teaching, writing, thinking, spelling, and music with clarity and insight, practical experience and humor. His seminars for parents, students, and teachers have helped transform many a reluctant writer and have equipped educators with powerful tools to dramatically improve students’ skills. He and his beautiful, heroic wife, Robin, currently teach their three youngest children at home in Locust Grove, Oklahoma. For more information please visit www.excellenceinwriting.com.

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curriculum

Can Literature Be Taught Meaningfully? By: Robin Finley

Are you teaching literature now? Are you contemplating

that task in the next year or so? Do you love to read but often wonder why we’re supposed to read all the “classics”? These are questions with which I have dealt most of my adult life. As an English major in college, I wondered what the point of all that reading ultimately was. As an English teacher for 34 years, I struggled with how to make the literature I taught more meaningful and how to take our classroom discussions beyond “here’s what the book is about” and “did I like it or not.” What really is the point of literature in the grand scheme of things? As this issue of the Homeschool Handbook goes to print, we will be placing my new book, The Eternal Argument, online for pre-sale at eternalargument.com. I consider this book to be why the Lord has kept me around all these years, despite some recent health scares. I feel passionately that I have some tools to share with you, which will help you, answer those questions for yourself and for your children. Like it or not, our kids will one day be stepping out into a highly polarized world. So many of them go off to college

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

and “lose their way.” I have read estimates of this loss of faith as high as 80% for Christian kids, for example. We have two choices when it comes to protecting them: we can quarantine them or we can inoculate them. To quarantine them, we’d make absolutely sure that every book, movie, television program, etc. reinforces our worldview. We’d be certain to send them to a college or university, which agrees with that worldview. But, unless we completely retreat from the life of the country and time in which we’re living, someday our children will have to deal with that other side and, if they’ve been quarantined, they’ll have no defense against the ideas coming at them from that world. We can give our kids the tools they’ll need to deal with society as it is, by inoculating them in their study of literature and history, and this is what my book is about. An inoculation works because a person facing potential infection is given a small dose of the actual disease, in a carefully controlled setting, so that he can build up immunity to it. He will then be able to fight off the disease when it comes his way. www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


So what is this disease of which I am speaking? It’s not an illness; it’s a way of looking at God and mankind and their relationship to each other. From each side’s perspective, the other side is completely antithetical to its worldview. When it comes to teaching literature, the question is – do we want simply to avoid certain books or do we think our kids need to know about them? If we decide that our kids need to know about these writings, how do we teach them so they don’t become confused? The Eternal Argument sets forth the thesis that - in Western literature and in Western culture – there is a unifying thread. We’ve been arguing about the same thing for thousands of years. Individual books, plays, poems, etc., sometimes express one extreme side or the other of the argument, but more often there are elements of both positions to be found in literature. I believe this is the case because, in my opinion, human beings are themselves the battleground for this dispute. In other words, each of us individually struggles with this argument, which has raged throughout the ages. Since books are written by real people, they reflect this inner struggle and the way it plays out in outward events in history and thought. So what if I told you I could give you information and tools, which would enable you and your student to explore literary works from both sides of the Eternal Argument – and in between? You’d then be giving them a small dose of the opposite side. The controlled setting would be your loving family talking about these books, using the tools, which my book will give you. There are big ideas in The Eternal Argument, but this book is purposely written to be “an easy read.” Please keep in mind that I made my living by explaining things to large

K-3

Robin Finley is a veteran middle and high school language arts teacher. She began writing her course in grammar, punctuation, and usage in 1981 when her Language Arts department refused to purchase any grammar book for her classes, grammar having been deemed “useless” in the improvement of their writing!  She lives in Raleigh, NC, with her daughter Erin Karl, the other half of the AG team, Erin’s amazing husband Rob, and Maddie and Tripp, her two beautiful grandchildren (and her pride and joy!).  Robin enjoys nothing more than sharing her materials and her teaching techniques and skills with home teachers in her workshops.

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groups of 8th graders! Just as I did with my students, I like to engage my readers with a lot of humor. I always find that, once we’re all laughing together, I can share a great deal of substantive information. My purpose is to present my ideas clearly, giving examples and using charts and graphic images to facilitate understanding. Eighteen different books are highlighted and discussed in The Eternal Argument, but what about all the other books you want to read with your kids? What about wonderful new books, which haven’t been written yet? We plan to create a forum on our website for users of The Eternal Argument approach to come together to exchange ideas, offer suggestions for discussion questions, written responses, and projects, and ask for help from each other. We can foresee book clubs for people of all ages to read books and examine them through the Eternal Argument lens. Find our ad in this magazine and use the coupon code during our pre-sale to receive 10% off and free shipping. Once the pre-sale is over, your code will still get you 10% savings through the end of December.

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

23


inspiration

Mentor Your Children to Their Greatest Potential By: Donna Vail

The

majority of people who made the greatest contributions that impacted life as we know it today were self-educators. The likes of Benjamin Franklin, Michael Faraday, Abraham Lincoln, Nathaniel Bowditch, Thomas Edison, Herman Melville, Rabindranath Tagore and Leonardo da Vinci to name a few. Then we have those selfeducating geniuses who live among us today such as Nobel Prize Winner Sir John Gurdon. Self-education was not the only thing these greats shared in common, they also had great mentors. What is a mentor? A mentor is someone who sets the stage for transformation and who better to do this first in a child’s life than the parent. While other mentors will come into your child’s experience, you as their primary mentor will set the standard for continual success propelling them in the direction of their individual life purposes. What if you don’t consider yourself mentor material? Being a mentor should come naturally to you; as you parent and create an inspiring learning environment, you foster rich learning opportunities. These learning opportunities are not limited to the home. As you mentor your children, they become self-learners equipped with the skills and a love for

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

learning adapting to any experience. As a parent mentor, this will often require of you doing whatever it takes; always being there for your kids during support and challenge. It’s a drawing out of the student’s inner genius. As you and your children work together, you will be reaching the highest levels of learning based on a strong parent partnership. Mentoring takes the learning to deeper levels, whereas teaching is to help others gain knowledge or skill. While skill and knowledge is definitely needed in the learning process, mentoring takes you to greater depth and meaning, using well developed thinking skills, bringing together all learning and experiences to fulfill life purpose. Instead of skimming over the top, memorizing and testing, mentoring goes into how to think, carrying on transformational discussions and integrating highest values. Everything is done for more engagement that is specific to purpose. The mentored education becomes customized instead of generalized. Having a parent as a mentor is a great blessing to the child and the entire family, because you are always learning and relating. It’s not only for the “school years,” it’s for life. Imagine if you knew how to help your child relate to his knowledge and skill connected to his genius, his calling in www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


life and guide him to the ability to see all the opportunity that surrounds him. A family living together in this way becomes more loving, developing a bond that will be passed on for generations to come. Homeschooling is just as much for the parents as it is for the children. In my early years of homeschooling I quickly realized that if I’m going to give my children an excellent education and guide them to be their best, I have to step it up for myself and be fully charged, connected and ready to inspire. This means that I have to first and foremost be clear on my mindset, and be a generator of positive energy if you will. There’s no time for victimhood or waiting on others. You must be the generator and strengthen your mind in order to strengthen theirs. Children learn what they live so what you are living and modeling becomes their learning. As you strengthen your mindset, the children are naturally influenced by your actions. This is the absolute most effective way to learn, by modeling. You can be a generator with a strong mentor mindset by implementing this 7-step practice, which includes: •• Be in the moment

• Be future oriented

•• Seek challenges

• Seek to connect

•• Be self-reliant

• Express creativity

•• Make it meaningful Let’s look a little closer at what it means to seek challenges. This can be applied to academics by trying something new in life such as a sport or rock climbing. While at first glance it may only seem like a physical challenge, it will also challenge the mental faculties that translate over to academics. Both rock climbing and mathematics will require one to be willing to do what it takes even during the moments when it’s not fun or easy. Staying physical will help build mental agility as well. Always look to seek challenges. We experience our greatest growth on the border of support and challenge. This is where learning occurs. If we don’t seek challenges that are aligned with our highest values and life’s purpose, we are limiting ourselves from experiencing a rich and fulfilling life. Look into the eyes of your children. They are depending on you to mentor and guide them to their future, unlocking their true potential. As parents we must ask ourselves if the quality of our education matches their potential. Begin implementing the 7 practices to generate a strong mentor mindset and mentor your children to greater learning. Parent’s Inspired to Action: Choose one of the 7 practices to implement first. Do this for at least 27 consecutive days to create the habit before implementing the next practice. Do this in partnership with your children and observe how it all relates to current studies and purposeful living. Children Inspired to Action: Observe your children and look for areas where they can naturally perform the 7 practices. Then notice how you can link their needs to a specific practice and implement it either individually or as a family. Donna Vail is the Founder of An Inspired Education, a company devoted to empowering families around the world to a lifestyle of true freedom through homeschooling, inspiration and entrepreneurship. Donna and her husband have homeschooled their six children for the past 16 years and now help today’s homeschoolers find their way. For more about her company, visit http://www.aninspirededucation.com.

www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

Frustrated trying to teach literature

MEANINGFULLY? So you read a book together, maybe give a quiz or two, and perhaps assign a book report. Is that it? Do we just check that box and move on? If so, why?

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25


inspiration

By: Paige Timer

Adding to the Beauty A few

years ago, an emotionally disturbed woman made her way into our church fellowship. She was consistently dirty and smelled strongly of cat urine. For reasons beyond my understanding, the Lord put this woman heavily on my heart and I was compelled to build a relationship with her. It quickly became clear that my new friend had some pretty intense issues. Our family, along with others in our church, sought to try and assist with her physical needs as much as possible. However, it was evident that Miss Hattie* needed more help than we were able to provide.

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

Miss Hattie found a counseling group of Christians who agreed to try and help her work through some of her more troubling concerns, but the group was located in a town 40 miles away. Miss Hattie didn’t have a car and the ministry operated during business hours. For about six months, every Tuesday, the kids and I would pack up our school things, drive to Miss Hattie’s and pick her up, and drive the 40 miles to the counseling center. We dropped her off and then headed to the local library to do school. We had lunch together after and then drove home.

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Giving our love, our time, our finances is hard‌and messy. We may be criticized for the way we attempt to show our love. I wish I could say that Miss Hattie was fully healed during that time and her life changed dramatically but it didn’t. My family was just one in a long line of people that reached out to help. Though Miss Hattie may still be in need today, we will always treasure our time with her. What is the point, Paige? Often times the people who need us most are right in front of us – waiting to be seen, waiting to be heard, waiting to be loved – but we won’t always get to see the end result of love’s work. Still, we must work. Sometimes I think we in the West have Hero-itis. We want to jump in and save the day, earning the title of Savior. (Too many action movies, perhaps?) When we can’t see the change, the end, the fulfillment, we throw up our hands and say, “It’s not worth it.â€? Jesus’ life proved that He thought otherwise. Giving our love, our time, our finances is hard‌and messy. We may be criticized for the way we attempt to show our love. In the case of Miss Hattie, I was told by more than one (loving, mature Christian) person that I should give up, walk away, and stop trying. As a homeschooling mom, I recognize that I am training up a couple of individuals that I hope will add to the beauty of the Kingdom in their own communities one day. Their training and discipleship is my primary calling. Don’t I want my children to also witness their father and me reaching beyond our four walls? Isn’t that witness part of their training? As we do life and ministry with the children we are homeschooling, our model should be that of those who “do not grow weary in doing good.â€? Whomever God brings across our path can be impacted by Christ through us, but we mustn’t trust in our own limited vision for their future. We put our trust in the boundless grace and mercy of the One who seeks and searches for all, hoping that none will perish. The Lord of the Harvest needs workers who will faithfully sow love. We must persevere! I encourage you to look for small, practical ways to reach out in your community and love your neighbors. It will cost you time, energy, and money. You will get dirty. You may get hurt – emotionally and possibly physically. But people are the point. They were always the point. And they are worth every moment, every dime, every pain. A tapestry is being woven with threads of purest gold. As we persevere in love, we add to that beauty and teach our children to do the same.

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Paige Timer, the daughter of a pastor and lover of music and theater, is passionate about building relationships and strives to lead others to engage and invest in the lives of those around them. A self-titled free spirit, Paige is an encourager who loves helping parents discover tools for leading their families toward success. She and her husband, Josh, have been homeschooling their two children for the past eight years. They now work for My Father’s World, where Paige is a curriculum consultant and speaker.

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

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inspiration

The Gift of Giving

By: The Homeschool Handbook Staff

How often during the holidays do we think of gifting instead of giving? What gift do we want, what gift does your child want, your family member, etc. want. Where will we find that perfect gift? We often hear the lament that the holidays are too commercialized; perhaps we are all to blame because we have forgotten that this is the season of giving not gifting. According to a phone survey by Harris Interactive and World Vision, 83 percent of Americans say they would prefer to receive a meaningful gift that would help someone else instead of a traditional gift like clothing or electronics. However, the percentage of people willing to give a charitable gift as a present has fallen. Last year, 51 percent of U.S. adults said they would be “more likely” to give a charitable gift as a holiday present. This year, that percentage dropped to 45 percent. If we truly want to reverse this trend, where do we start? As with so many things, the habits of a lifetime can often best be created in childhood. So where do we start…with our children. Starting a tradition of giving with your child really isn’t as difficult as it may sound. Following are a few ways you can instill the spirit of giving rather than gifting in our future generations: •• Participate with one of GivingTuesday’s 2,106 partners listed on the movement’s website, including corporations, nonprofits, schools and religious groups. One of those partners is Soles4Souls (www.soles4souls.org), which donates shoes to people living in over 125 countries by collecting new shoes to give relief to the victims of abject suffering and collecting used shoes to support micro-business efforts to eradicate poverty. •• Bring stamped letters to Santa to Macy’s “Believe” campaign, and for each letter received, Macy’s will donate $1 to the Make-A-Wish Foundation, up to $1 million (over the first 4 years Macy’s has donated nearly $5 million). •• Start an “Angel Tree” at your local business or church. Needy children in your community complete a card with one gift that they are wishing for, an ‘angel’ selects their card and makes their wish come true by placing the gift with their name on it under the “Angel Tree” in time for Christmas. •• Inspire your child to get involved with a children’s charity organization like Free the Children (www.freethechildren.com), started 17 years ago by a 12-year old boy who wanted to make a difference. •• Have your child donate one toy on their Christmas list to Toys for Tots (www.toysfortots.org). Let them know that while it will be one less thing that they receive; it may be the only thing another child will receive. When children are blessed with so much, it is difficult for them to appreciate that there are others with so little. The future belongs to our children, make it a future of giving not gifting and they will live in a better world.

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inspiration

This Is Your Life Your

life is what it is because of you. Your choices and decisions have made you what you are today. The really great news is that if you’re not happy with where you are, you have the power within yourself to change it. Believing that you have the ability to change your life (and the lives of those you care for) is very empowering. Being able to cast off the shackles of the past and seeing the future as an opportunity rather than a burden is a great tool and, even if you have never done it before, it is something you can learn. We are not the victims of our past unless we choose to be. Ideally, when things don’t go well or right, we find a different direction and continue to move forward. I know this is easier said than done, but without taking positive steps, you can become stuck in the negative, and you could stay there for quite a while. Dealing with issues as they come up, not ignoring or hiding them, will give you more strength to get things where you want them to be. Even if you are afraid of rocking the boat with whatever is bothering you, if you don’t talk it out or take care of it in some way, you could capsize. Think about what it is that you want for your life and for those you care about. From there, it is about small acts of progress. If you’ve lost your job, allow yourself a brief vacation and then get back on the hunt. If you’re looking to rekindle your relationship with your partner, a romantic gesture or evening out may be a good place to start. Even something as simple as to-do lists can help propel you out of a pit and into your next project, job, or relationship. I also think that visualizing a positive outcome is helpful to achieving a successful end result. If you are unsure of your strengths, ask someone who knows you well. Remembering the positive things that others have said about your talents and abilities can be very helpful. You can also make a written inventory of what you think your strengths are and then add to the list as you discover more. If you are stuck or simply feeling bored with your life, know that you have the ability to change it for the better. Sometimes anxiety or depression can keep you from gathering the energy you need. We all go www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

By: Dr. Barton Goldsmith

through periods when our moods get low. Usually these times are temporary, but they can sap your energy and scare you. If that’s the case, you may be able to put yourself on the right path with just a little help and perhaps the support of a caring person. Never feel that it’s too difficult or too late to make yourself happy. Once you’ve identified what’s holding you back, conceive of a way to change or eliminate it. Promise yourself that happiness and satisfaction are just around the bend.

For more than two decades Fortune 500 companies, educational institutions, and government organizations worldwide have relied on Dr. Barton Goldsmith to help them develop creative and balanced leadership. His columns appear in over 500 publications. He may be contacted through his web site www.BartonGoldsmith.com .

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

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health & hearth

Christmas Pepper & Pea Potatoes My mother in law just got back from Idaho and brought us some potatoes straight from the ground. No middlemen, and no sitting in cold storage for an unordinary amount of time. So, we’ve been eating those up and they are almost gone.  We made what we called “Christmas Potatoes” that gave our potatoes the best flavor you could imagine!  I love this, because it can be for breakfast or dinner!  And although we call it a “side dish”, our veggie side dishes come in equal portions to our “main dish”, helping us to have a balanced meal!

By: Amy Roskelley

It seems like some people in the diet world want to demonize the potato! What a bummer! We certainly aren’t afraid of potatoes in our house. In fact, potatoes are great to include in a balanced diet!  The trouble comes when kids only know potatoes in the form of potato chips and french fries. But there are so many other amazing ways to prepare potatoes! Plus, potatoes are a good source of: •• Vitamin C and B6 (Vital for building brain cells in kids!) •• Folic Acid! •• Copper •• Potassium •• Manganese •• Tryptophan  (which is being shown to calm anxious kids!) (Source: WH Foods- best book ever!)

Recipe Ingredients 2 cup, diced............ Potatoes, red 1 cup, chopped...... Red Bell Pepper 1 cup...................... Green Peas, frozen 1 tablespoon.......... Olive Oil 1 dash.................... Salt 1 dash.................... Black Pepper

Instructions - Add 1 TBL of olive oil to a skillet and heat. - Add chopped potatoes and chopped red pepper.   - Cook until mostly tender about 4-5 minutes.   - Add 1 cup of frozen peas and cook until heated through.   - Season with salt and pepper. Yield 4 Cups

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health & hearth

Apple Pie

By: Amy Roskelley

Christmas Ornament

Pancakes

My kids loved making these Christmas ornament pancakes. I like to say they would have turned out simply beautiful if I didn’t have their help, but then I’d be lying.  I’m no artist, and these pancakes actually turned out better having my kids do the painting, than if I would have tried.

Recipe Ingredients: 2 cups ................... whole wheat flour 1 TBL .................... baking powder 1 TSP .................... apple pie spice 1/2 TSP ................. salt

In separate bowl mix: 2 cups ................... low fat milk 2 ............................ eggs 2 TBL .................... honey 1 TBL .................... canola oil 1 grated . ............... apple

Mix all ingredients together and cook on griddle. For painting, take a small amount of the pancake batter and add food coloring to it. Use a clean paint brush to brush colored batter onto pancake during cooking.  Flip pancake and cook the painted side until pancake is cooked through. This actually would be easier with regular thin pancakes.  The grated apple chunks kind of got in the way of painting smoothly. The possibilities are endless here. I saw in a magazine where they painted faces on the pancakes. They were adorable of course. They must have had an artist help them. The recipe was inspired by (Mostly) Healthy Mom. www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

31


special features

Gorgeous Gift

By: The Container Store

Presentation Basic Bow

The Right Tools

1.

Choosing a Wrap

2.

It’s best to use double-sided tape when wrapping gifts for a clean, professional presentation – no tape will be visible. Rolling scissors are another must-have tool…push them gently across the paper for a clean, safe cut. They eliminate the squeezing action of conventional scissors that can lead to hand fatigue.

Typically, small patterned wraps work best for small boxes. Wraps with larger designs work well on bigger boxes so that the entire pattern may be seen. It’s always a nice touch to select a wrap that speaks to the personality or tastes of the recipient.

The Finishing Touch

loop.

Cross the right loop over the left

3.

Knot the loops by pushing the right loop beneath the left, then pull the loop under and through the hole.

4.

Pull the knot tight and adjust the loops and tails until they are the same size. Use scissors to trim the ends of ribbon. Attach the bow to the package with double-sided tape.

Add a Ribbon

For a complete presentation, it’s ideal to wrap ribbon around all four sides of the box before adding a bow. If shipping gifts, use wire-edged ribbon, tulle, yarn or cording to avoid crushed or damaged bows. Wire-edged ribbon is very forgiving and can be fluffed once the package reaches its destination.

Cut ribbon to the desired length of the finished bow. Form into two equal loops. Hint: Double-faced ribbon works the best. Wireedge ribbon is also great for this bow.

Add one of the handmade bows described for a personal finishing touch.

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Florist Bow

1.

Measure the desired tail length. Twist the ribbon to keep the right side out. Wrap the ribbon loosely around your thumb to form a center loop. Hold the ribbon between your thumb and forefinger, and twist. Make the first loop to the desired length on one side of your hand, holding the ribbon between your thumb and forefinger. Give the ribbon a half twist.

Basic Pom-Pom Bow

1.

Form a loop about 4� in diameter and wind the ribbon around 12 to 15 times. Flatten and crease the loop so the inside end of the ribbon is at the top. Notch all four corners of the folded loop by cutting each corner at a steep angle. Be careful not to cut all the way through.

2.

Make the second loop on the other side of your hand. Returning it to your thumb and forefinger, hold the loop and make another half twist. Continue making a loop and then a half twist, alternating sides until you have the desired number of loops.

2.

Push the notched ends of the loops together in the middle. Firmly tie the notched center with wire or ribbon using a double knot. Trim the outside edge of the tie.

3.

Measure the second tail length and cut the ribbon. To secure the loops, insert a wire around the center loops. Fold the wire in half, bring the wire ends to the back, pinch the ends together and twist.

3.

Holding one side of the loop with one hand, pull the innermost loop out to the right, then pull it toward you with a half twist. Repeat with the next loop, but twist it away from you. Repeat, until all loops from the same end are pulled out. Turn the bow around, and repeat alternate twisting on the opposite end, starting with innermost loop.

4.

Leave ample wire for attaching the bow to a gift, wreath, etc. Trim the tails of the bow. Use the wire to attach the bow to the ribbon around the package.

4.

Occasionally, cut ends will protrude from bow. Twist them into the bow and cut at an angle for a finished look. Hold the bow at the center and shake it to fluff. Use ties to attach the finished bow to the ribbon around the package.

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

33


special features

Pom-Pom Bow

Variations Aster Bow

Poinsettia Bow Before pulling the loops out as shown in step 3 on the previous page, cut the ends of the loop to form a pointed petal shape. Cut the loops completely through the ribbon so that each petal is separate. Pull out the bottom petals from left to right, twisting at the base where tied. Arrange top petals the same way – no twisting is needed. Knot a ribbon of a different color in the center to form the center of the flower.

Before proceeding with step 3, make an angled cut on one side of theloop (working from the tie inward), to form a short pointed tip that sticks out. Turn the bow around and repeat this cut on the other loop. Continue with steps 3 & 4.

Carnation Bow

Chrysanthemum Bow

Complete steps 1 through 3. Squeeze the bow tightly and cut off all loop ends using a curve cut. Fan out and shake the bow, then attach it to the ribbon around the package.

Before proceeding with step 3, cut three evenly spaced slits from the top of the loop toward the center. Repeat for the other loops, then continue with steps 3 & 4.

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Get Creative! Thinking Outside the Box (or Bag) You can find many interesting alternatives to the traditional wrapped gift or gift tote at The Container Store – just use your creativity! Look for a container that goes with the theme of your gift, add a ribbon and bow, and presto! You’ve created a one of a kind gift presentation, and a gift within a gift!

Gift-Giving On-the-Go Gift totes are a quick, easy and fun solution for gift-giving…a great idea if you’re pressed for time. They’re also ideal when traveling by airplane because they offer visibility when going through security. When placing gifts inside a gift tote, wrap each item separately in coordinating tissue. Add additional sheets of tissue or paper shreds on top to completely disguise the contents.

Keep It Organized!

Guess Who? Don’t keep the recipients guessing…let them know who it’s from with a gift tag attached to the box or bow. Choose a coordinating or complementary gift tag to add interest to your package. (Editor’s Note: See the hand gift tag craft for a child’s special tag idea.)

Keep all of your wrapping supplies neat, accessible and protected with one of our many gift packaging storage solutions. Depending on how much space you have, you can find solutions at The Container Store for storing these materials on a shelf, under a bed or in a spare closet. It’s a good idea to have separate organizers for the holidays and your everyday giftwrap supplies. Our elfa® Mesh Gift Wrap Cart is ideal for keeping rolls of gift wrap, totes, tissue, ribbon and accessories organized. Casters make it easily accessible when you need it – roll it out of the way when you don’t. Ask us for details! For Complete Gorgeous Gift Presentation please visit: http://images.containerstore.com/medialibrary/pdf/tips/ gorgeousGiftPresentation.pdf

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

35


extra activities

Handprint Gift Bags and Tags

By: Sandra Volchko

Make your gift extra special by making Handprint Gift Bags and Tags! This is a great gift giving craft for Toddlers and Preschoolers; you can even do this one with your baby! 



Here’s what you’ll need... •• Construction paper 
 •• Pencil 
 •• Scissors 
 •• Glue 
 •• Marker 
 •• Embellishments (optional) 
 •• Paper bag (or gift bag) 
 •• Hole Punch (for gift bag) 
 •• Ribbon/twine/yarn (for gift bag) 



Here’s how you make them... 1. Trace a handprint onto a piece of construction paper and cut out. If you wish, decorate your handprint with embellishments, like glitter glue, sequins, markers/crayons, glitter, etc. Glue onto a paper bag, or to make it fancier buy a plain gift bag at the dollar store. Or tape your handprint onto your gift and write a special message for a personalized gift tag! (You can also punch a hole in the tag and then thread a ribbon/twine/yarn through the hole to tie the tag onto the gift box’s bow/ribbon.) 2. Once you have glued the hand print, fold the top of the bag over, punch two holes in it, thread a piece of ribbon through the holes and tie a bow at the front. Another, although messier, option is to brush a thin coat of paint on a hand and press it onto paper and cut it out.

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Christmas Holiday Treat Jar Here’s what you’ll need... • Jar 
 • Snack food 
 • Ribbon (optional) 
 • Glue (optional) 



Here’s how you make them... 1. Start to fill your jar with your Christmas snacks. We put Banana Chips, Craisins (dried cranberries), unsalted peanuts, cashews, almonds, and Christmas colored M&Ms. Choose any snacks you’d wish, just make sure that everything is unsalted. Otherwise the salt will draw the moisture out of your other treats and ruin the taste. 2. Layer your snacks so that they are at least 1” thick, otherwise your snacks will run into each other and won’t look ‘layered’. A regular sized canning jar will take about 1 cup of snack for each layer - this is a great opportunity for the kids to practice ‘measuring’. 3. To finish off your jar tie a piece of ribbon around the lid. We wrapped and crisscrossed a ribbon around our lid and secured it with a drop of hot glue (or fabric glue). If you want to add an extra special touch, why not make your gift tag out of a handprint, just a quick way to make your gifts even more personalized! 


Sandra is a Registered Nurse, a Mother of two, and the founder of www.busybeekidscrafts. com, a free resource for children’s crafts and activities. Sandra created this online resource to share with the world creative and inexpensive ways to spend quality time with children while at the same time teaching them valuable skills.

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November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

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Meet Mary Brodsky By: Dave Ribble

She believes in Fairies “That’s the real trouble with the world; too many people grow up.” —Walt Disney

A child’s

innocence and the wonder of life is too soon replaced by a hectic and competitive world; a rapid rush to put kids in older clothes, let them watch cable shows someone else has decided are age-appropriate and worry about whether they are developing at the speed they should. The other side of that coin, however, says we would love for our children to remain in an innocent world of wonder for a while longer because the grownup part of real life will be here, soon enough. Mary Brodsky agrees. This Grandmother is fulfilling her life-long dreams to write and create for children. Mary told me she has always had stories swirling around in her head; stories about fairies, fairy tales, discovery, about the simple truths in life and about how all of us are important no matter who we are, where we came from or what circumstances surrounded our coming into the world. In a relatively short period of time, Mary Brodsky’s imagination has created 10 characters (and counting) that balance out ethnicities, ages and genders, all with a sense of wonder as well as humor. Dave Ribble: What prompted you to design characters like these and the stories that go along with them? Mary Brodsky: I guess it was like a light bulb being switched on. When I found out my son was going to have a baby girl, I just naturally thought of fairies. Little girls love fairies, always have, always will! I just started jotting down my thoughts and the girls came to life. A really funny side bar to this, however is that one month later my daughter-inlaw was told, “Oops, just kidding… your having a boy”. So it wasn’t long before my first boy character came along in time for our grandson’s arrival.

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

DR: Have you always been a storyteller? MB: I’ve been telling stories to my kids ever since they were little. Parents and grandparents can identify: you read the child several stories at nap and bedtimes but they always wanted the last story to be something I would make up right then and there. The more stories I made up for them, the more stories would come to me at odd times during the day and at night. I never know when they will come, but they just keep coming. DR: Does each story contain a moral? MB: With this particular series there are definite “lessons” learned with each story line. I wanted to help parents teach basic morals in a way that would appeal to this age group. DR: Are these characters and their stories built around any particular religion? MB: No, not really. I am a strong Christian woman but the theme of each story comes from a pure loving place so the stories work fine for anyone’s particular Faith. DR: Are more characters being developed? MB: This first series has 10 fairy characters, each with their own book. The tenth one is already written in fact, which is called “Catia’s Christmas Gift”. My illustrator is a full time student and isn’t quite able to push it out fast enough for this Holiday season so Christmas 2013 is in the works! www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


“When we are children we seldom think of the future. This innocence leaves us free to enjoy ourselves as few adults can. The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind.� — Patrick Rothfuss, The Name Of The Wind

too. I also plan to create older characters so that as the children become older they will have characters to follow who have also become older.

I am already making notes and creating characters for the second series, Gnome Hill. DR: What do you feel is the overriding benefit to these books and to these characters you have created? MB: I love encouraging young minds to grow and be creative. I also love encouraging good morals and positive values in children. There is a verse that I absolutely live by and it says, “Train up a child in the way he should go, even when he is old he will not depart from it.� (Proverbs 22:6).

DR: Diversity of the characters has been important to you. MB: I am very interested in the diversity these books address. I started with their nationalities because we have so many wonderful nationalities in our world. Little ones shouldn’t be limited to seeing only one type of way or look. Beauty comes in all sizes, colors and personalities. DR: A quote on your website mentions homeschooling, a favorite subject of this publication. You weren’t homeschooled but you feel like your mom really taught you more than you learned in school? MB: That’s true. We returned home from school each day and talked about everything. We looked things up and discussed them. Mom was certain that our education continued well beyond the classroom. I have a particular appreciation for moms who are homeschooling their children. I think it is great.

DR: What age range are they designed for? MB: Well, my 23-month-old grandson absolutely loves to have his ‘Bubby’ read all of them to him already. Of course, his attention wanders so we have to paraphrase a lot. Basically, they are beginner readers, I would say from kindergarten through fifth grade. DR: Where are these sold? Are they available for the Holidays? You also have supporting products, such as Pillows that are already full color or, interestingly, you also offer the pillows in B/W so that the child can color them. MB: Yes, they are available for the Holidays. The first 3 books are available on my website – alwaysandforeverbooks. com, right now and my son Jake is working on the details to put all the books and products up on Amazon. DR: So you are connecting with the children in more than one way. MB: I have always felt that if the child can be more interactive with the characters, even by just having a pillow with a favorite character, for example, the stories come alive even more. I get to touch each child this way and that is so rewarding to me. DR: Ok, tell us more about the coming new series. MB: Gnome Hill will include the fairies in the story line and the Gnomes are included,

Dave Ribble is a Consultant, Speaker, Trainer & Writer. www.daveribble.com

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Your Child is Uniquely & Wonderfully Made

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

39


Educational Mobile Apps and Websites As you travel over the river and through the woods to Grandma’s house, or wherever you holiday travels may take you here are some of the best mobile apps and websites to keep your student travellers entertained as they learn.

Consider these 10 mobile apps: 1. Kahn Academy: Kahn Academy allows you to learn almost anything for free. 2. Brain Teaser Extreme: 
 Figure out tiled puzzles with no idea of what you are supposed to be unscrambling. 3. Brain Trainer by Luminosity.com: Luminosity.com teamed up with some of academia’s most notable neuroscientists to deliver 10 great games meant to provide a cognitive boost in some of the most important mental areas. 4. World Nomads Language Guides: This suite covers 25 languages so far, targeting travelers hoping to remain safe and secure during their globetrotting adventures. 5. USA Factbook Free: The USA Factbook makes for the best start in picking up all the basics about America, including capitals, flags, topographical and musical maps, and other cool features. 6. TapQuiz Maps World Edition: Conquer the planet through comprehensive quizzes about all the countries of the world. 7. HowStuffWorks: One doesn’t need an engineering degree to appreciate and understand the systems that drive daily lives around the world. 8. Musee du Louvre:
 Hundreds of high-resolution photos make the works of Old Masters and other artistic innovators stunningly pop, and the Louvre supplements the spectacle with videos, virtual tours and presentations. 9. MoMA:
 Take a little trip and see the Museum of Modern Art. The venerable collection provides users with digital tours, research materials, artist bios, mini-lessons, and other valuable assets to an artistic education. 10. iTunes U: Some of the biggest names in higher education, like MIT, Oxford, and Yale join up with beloved institutions (The New York Public Library, Library of Congress, Museum of Modern Art, etc.) to provide iPhone users with one of the biggest, best open source repositories around.

By: The Homeschool Handbook Staff

Discover these educational websites: 1. http://www.howtosmile.org/ ~ American Association of School Librarians’ 2012 Best Website Winner presents some of the best science and math activities. 2. http://wonderopolis.org/ ~ This is a site where wonder and learning are nurtured through the power of discovery, creativity and imagination. Wonderopolis is brought to life by the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL). 3. http://docsteach.org/ ~ Research and view thousands of primary source documents to bring the past to life as classroom teaching tools from the billions preserved at the National Archives. 4. http://www.si.edu ~ Explore our national ‘attic’. The Smithsonian asks
and answers questions about science, art, history and culture. 5. http://nsdl.org/ ~ The National Science Digital Library is the nation’s online portal for education and research in
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. 6. http://www.nsf.gov/news/classroom/ ~ National Science Foundation Classroom Resources is a diverse collection of lessons and web resources arranged by subject. 7. http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forkids/home/index.html ~ Find activities and information from NASA in science, technology, engineering and mathematics; young students will also enjoy the kids’ club activities. 8. http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/ ~ ‘Travel’ the world through photos, videos and games. 9. http://www.arkive.org/ ~ Explore 15,000 of the world’s endangered species. With over 100,000 photos and videos, discover what these animals, plants and fungi look like, what makes them special and why we should protect them. 10. http://iwitness.usc.edu/SFI/ ~ IWitness is an online site that provides access to search, watch, and learn from more than 1,000 video testimonies of Holocaust survivors and other witnesses.

Editor’s Note: Some mobile apps listed also appear in an article at http://edudemic.com/2012/10/the-90-best-ios-apps-for-mobile-learning/, ‘The 88 Best iOS Apps for Mobile Learning” posted by Jeff Dunn.

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Homeschool Handbook | November / December 2012

www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com


product spotlights Teaching History with Games for Ages 3-129!

Learn about our Six History Games that turn learning history facts, geography, inductive thinking skills, and chronology into games that kids and adults like to play. These are perfect for those who think they know nothing about history, and for those who like studying history already. Our games and ideas help kids learn, and they help parents teach in creative ways. Play with your children, or they can play without you. These games are designed so that children can learn how to play, and then play with each other. For more information visit www.classicalhistorian.com .

Kingdom Tales

These exciting classic allegories take place in the Enchanted City and reveal the truths of the Kingdom of God to adults and children alike—a book for anyone who enjoys The Chronicles of Narnia and Pilgrim’s Progress. Follow along as Scarboy learns of the King (Tales of the Kingdom), faces his greatest fear and is changed from Scarboy to Hero (Tales of the Resistance), and then discovers that he is never alone in the Kingdom (Tales of the Restoration). Includes all 36 tales by David and Karen Mains (a compilation of 3 books) and has been updated by My Father’s World. Each story includes application questions for family discussion. To order visit www.mfwbooks.com or call (573) 202-2000.

Aqua Swims Away

The fairies of Forever Forest have arrived. Come along on the adventures of Dew, Zee, Kelli, Calli, and all of their friends in a new series that is sure to excite! In Aqua Swims Away Aqua leaves the forest (and her chores) thinking it must be better somewhere else. She soon finds out that leaving everything behind isn’t as good as it sounds. A great reception awaits her return to Forever Forest. To find out more about this and other books by Mary Brodsky, please visit www.alwaysandforeverbooks.com .

DK’s History of the World

Why did the ancient Egyptians build pyramids? How did the Black Death devastate medieval Europe? What started the Industrial Revolution? You’ll find answers to all these questions and more in this guide to world history, now updated and revised exclusively for My Father’s World ®. This beautiful, full-color, 378-page hardcover book omits the section on prehistoric man and animals found in other editions. It is used in My Father’s World ® ’s high school curriculum, World History and Literature, and would also be a great addition to any family library. This exclusive book, recommended for junior high, high school, and parent reference, is available by visiting www.mfwbooks.com or calling 573-202-2000. www.TheHomeschoolHandbook.com

November / December 2012 | Homeschool Handbook

41


resources ADVERTISERS: Page # IFC

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BC

My Fathers World®

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Contributors: 3

Online Courses for…

Becky Cooke & Diane Kummer

www.hslda.org/highschool

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The Holidays

MaryAnne Morrill

www.thehomeschoolhandbook.com

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St. Nicholaus Day in Czech

John De Gree

www.classicalhistorian.com

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The Single Most Significant Thing I Do

Carolyn Henderson

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Holiday Party Etiquette

Monica Irvine

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Online Testing

Debbie Thompson

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Seven Reasons to Study History…

Sarita Holzmann

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What? or That!

Andrew Pudewa

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Can Literature Be Taught Meaningfully?

Robin Finley

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Mentor Your Children to Their Greatest…

Donna Vail

www.aninspirededucation.com

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Adding to the Beauty

Paige Timer

www.mfwbooks.com

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The Gift of Giving

The Homeschool Handbook Staff

www.thehomeschoolhandbook.com

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This Is Your Life

Dr. Barton Goldsmith

www.bartongoldsmith.com

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Christmas Pepper & Peas Potatoes

Amy Roskelley

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Apple Pie Christmas Ornament Pancakes

Amy Roskelley

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Gorgeous Gift Presentation

The Container Store

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Handprint Gift Bags and Tags

Sandra Volchko

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Christmas Treat Jar

Sandra Volchko

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Meet Mary Brodsky

Dave Ribble

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Educational Mobile Apps and Websites

The Homeschool Handbook Staff

www.thehomeschoolhandbook.com

Product Spotlights: 41

Teaching History with Games for Ages 3 – 129!

www.classicalhistorian.com

Kingdom Tales

www.mfwbooks.com

Aqua Swims Away

www.alwaysandforeverbooks.com

DK’s History of the World

www.mfwbooks.com


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