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ingly and in fact prohibitively so. Besides I don’t think that a life of marching would ingratiate itself upon a son who won’t even walk up the stairs to the bathroom. Your penchant for drunken revelry, questionable hygiene and a dark tendency for perverted acts have forced me to send you quite far away, if for no other reason than for your poor mother’s health. Further to your personal qualities, I believe I have found a suitable career for you. The Prince’s own vizier oversees a Collegium of Wizards (I believe they refer to themselves colloquially as “mages”) far from here. In fact suitably far from here as to allow the expeditious convalescence of your beset mother after your last debacle with that young woman and the goose. The buildings themselves are suitable isolated and secluded for reasons that the Master of Submissions didn’t deign to go into but he seems a reasonable and gentlemanly chap so I believe that there could be hope for you. The bearer of this letter is Manfrey, a trusted servant who will see to your needs and have you escorted safely to the College. He also has suitable funds as to cover your tuition fees, lodgings and other expenses. I hear that the set up costs for a “mage” are not inconsiderable. However, after considering the benefits, geographical and otherwise I believe it is a sound investment. Write frequently but do not feel under any impingement or obligation to visit us.

Your father

20th Day of Nalmenus Lord Bottykaeck

I fervently hope that this letter finds you in good stead and that your good lady wife is on her way to a whole and speedy recovery. I must report with some regret (and indeed shame on my own part) that the task of escorting Master Bertrum to the Collegiate Veneficus did not start out well. I attended the master at the prescribed place. The institute was a hive of debauchery and villainy, where young women and younger men cavort in acts so shameful were I to put them to ink the ink would surely slough from the parchment. Forthwith, I removed the young master from the establishment and made haste to the lodgings I had previously engaged, to make ready rooms for us both. I had also engaged a tailor of some repute to attend us, so that the young Master might be suitable attired for his new career and his first semester. The task of measuring the Master was made more arduous because for the duration of the tailor’s visit he was passed out. I at least managed to clean the vile extrusions from his lapels before the tailor and his boy arrived. Such was the disgust of the tailor that I was forced to give a pseudonym, lest such a farce reflect upon you my Lord. After much heaving and to-ing and fro-ing, we measured young

Master Bertrum and I paid the tailor in advance for eight sets of good attire, suited to a man of good station. He agreed to have them sent along to the Collegium, for I understand that the only tailor in proximity to the Collegium makes good his monopoly of the area in hard coin. The following day we made our way to the coach -house. Alas, the Master had procured a bottle of something the locals use to polish breastplates and had consumed the lot before I had realised he had even revived from his comatose state. A local man was bribed into lending me his wheel barrow and we made good our time to the coach house. In the coach, the Master turned an alarming shade of blue around the gills but recovered before I could find a physician. He seems to be fine now and indeed in high spirits. The Collegiums’ edifices themselves are magnificent. I settled the Master in and took care of his lodgings and enrolment – a not inconsiderable sum as you can ascertain from the chits enclosed within. I have parcelled out the Master’s allowance for the month as instructed. Tomorrow we shall visit the local shops to purchase the necessaries for his new career. Please find within, the start up prices for your son’s new career. Please know that I am doing my utmost to secure the best value for your penny as I am able: Cauldron -Trupence, Laboratory set (including burn kit, heavy apron and eyewear) – 4 pence, Utensils -2pence, Glass ware – 2 Silver pennies, Parchments and writing utensils -1p Text books (various arcane topics) – 1sp and last but not least the ‘Spell Book’ cost five pence.

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The Gazebo - Issue #3  

The Gazebo is a free, quarterly e-zine dedicated to gaming in the UK and Ireland.

The Gazebo - Issue #3  

The Gazebo is a free, quarterly e-zine dedicated to gaming in the UK and Ireland.

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