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It’s amazing to me how quickly time passes us by. Here we are, two days from Tanksgiving, and we’re all wondering where the time went. In 2010 it was time to get it in, it was the year of the win, it was 20win. But how many of us really won this year? How many of us had gains that outweighed losses. How many of us used the flailing economy as an excuse, or justifacation as to why we’re not where we anticipated we would be 327 days ago?

Publisher/Editor In Chief Jessica Hagmaier aka Mz. fuSHion Sales/ Advertising Dept “Kool” Paul Redeemer Antionette Torrengano Jessica Hagmaier Sean Celestine Whitney Clark

When will we start stop talking and start doing? Will next year be your year? As we get into Decemeber, I’m going to start counting the times I see people tweet that 2011 is his or her year. Your year to do what? To keep talking about what your trying to accomplish, or actually accomplishing what you know in your heart you can? To continue to fake it til you make it? Or find worth and meaning in the seemingly impossible sruggle that is the journey of making something out of nothing.

Layout Design Jessica Hagmaier Money Graphics Cover Design Jae One (Urban Nerd Studios) Visanthe Shiancoe Cover Photo Photographer: William Cenac Shoot Director: Malik Pollard Stylist: Tina Durisseaux Assitants: Chris Ozen Brandon Hollaway Makeup: Tie Carrington Makeup Models: Michael Reyes

And I’m not going to talk about either. I’m just going to do it. The world should not hear of our success through our words, rather they should see it through our actions. Yesterday North Korea attacked South Korea through the use of missles, killing two and wounding dozens of others. North Korea said they did it because South Korea did that, but South Korea said they did that because North Korea did this but then North Korea said South Korea did that, but really South Korea did that becuase North Korea did this...

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Make sense? HELL NO...

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DMX said it best, waaaay before he could possibly even see his own demise: “To live is to suffer. But to survive, that’s to find meaning in the suffering.” Life is not easy, life is not going to be easy, you would not be living if life were easy, merely surviving, simply exsisting, like an Ameoba, the lowest form of life on the planet, you would just exist. I don’t know about you, but I’m trying to live. I’m trying to focus, to get my mind strong, to buckle down and grin and bear it until I make it to where I know I can go.

And neither does half the other shit we constantly talk about doing in our lives. If our only form of communication is through actions, there is no room for anything to misinterpreted, for any details to be lost in translation. The only course of action we would have would be to just get shit done, to stop complaining, and just start doing. If we can’t talk we can’t complain, we can’t make excuses. We can simply choose to become a victim of our circumstances or we can rise above, through the bullshit, and be the masters of our own universe.

Contributors Antionette Torrengano Sean “100” Celestine Tonga Williams Jessica Hagmaier “Kool” Paul Redeemer Lola Sims Photographers Positive Images J. Vince Jessica Hagmaier Tonga Williams Street Teams Colorado - Jae One Los Angeles, CA - Ant Wright Atlanta, GA - Lola Sims The Bay, CA - Rob J Official Houston, TX - Sean “100” Celestine St. Louis, MO - Jesse James Central Texas - Billy Mack Dallas, TX - Whitney Clark New Orleans, LA - Antionette Torrengano

And all you have to keep in mind is this: No matter how bad things are, keep your head down, get your feet planted, and push your way trhough the bullshit to the other side. Push your way to the top, to where you know you belong, because no matter how much shit you have to go through, no matter how bad things get, you can always take a shower when you get to the top.

Distribution The fuSHion Magazine LLC

Mz. fuSHion Much Love Always,

DIGGIN:

Hail Mary Just My Imagination Chillin With My Broad Whoa Devils Pie Playa’s Club Music Black Chevrolet One Mic Nobody

in da crates

2 Pac The Temptations Big Hawk Black Rob D’Angelo Rappin 4 Tay Erick Sermon Tone Toni Tony Nas Keith Sweat

For Subscriptions send $15 Check or Money Order to: The fuSHion Magazine 8615 Windfall Way Colorado Springs, CO 80908 The fuSHion Magazine thefushionmagazine@gmail.com www.twitter.com/ThefuSHionOnlin www.thefushionmagazine.com (832) 594 6874 “The Voice for Sports and Urban Entertainment”


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1. Winner of Open Mic Battle at SF2, Houston, TX 2. Lupe Fiasco performing at Trae Day, Houston, TX 3. MC Kane reppin fuSHion at Trae Day, Houston 4. Lil Flip repping fuSHion at his Ahead of My Time Album Release at SF2, Houston 5. Gorilla Zoe performing at Trae Day 6. Lupe Fiasco performing at Trae Day 7-8. Rick ROss performing at Stereo Live, Houston 9. Jas Prince, Shanell, and Lil Twist on stage at Trae Day 10. Lil Chuckee performing at Trae Day 11. Lupe Fiasco reppin fuSHion, Houston 12. Lil Flip at SF2, Houston 13. Hunnit Grand reppin fuSHion at Trae Day 14. Lil Twist performing at Trae Day 15. C Stone, TV Johnny, and D Will at Trae Day 16. Trae The Truth and Lupe Fiasco pasig out school supplies and backpacks at Trae Day 17. Rick Ross at Stereo Live, Houston 18. Trae the Truth, and Yo Gotti pose with the kids 19. Houston supports Trae, Trae Day 20. Young Buck and Gorilla Zoe at Trae Day 21. BigSean and Guest at SF2 Meet and Greet, Houston 22. Rick Ross at Stereo Live, Houston 23. Lil Chuckee, Gudda Gudda and Jae Millz preform at Trae Day 24. Vince Young reps Propain and fuSHion at Roxy, Houston


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25. Jayton and ABN shooting Dice at Trae The Truth’s Can’t Ban The Truth Mixer at SF2, Houston 26. Crowd at Trae Day, Houston 27. Prince fuSHion out for the count at Trae Mixer 28. C Stone reppin fuSHion at Dreams Strip Club, Houston 29. GO DJ Hi-C reppin fuSHion at Roxy 30. GO DJ Mankind, Mr. ROgers, LES, Trae The Truth and Gudda Gudda at Trae Mixer 31. Yo Gotti at Trae Day 32. Rex and Rick D - ABN at Trae Mixer 33. Currensy at Trae Mixer 34. Laybo and DJ II Deep at Trae Mixer 35. Rick D and HOTT TV at Trae Mixer 36. GO DJ J Boss reppin fuSHion at Dreams 37. Rick Ross at Stereo Live 38. Trae and Pimp C’s Son at Trae Mixer 39. Jodi Breeze Reppin fuSHion, Houston 40. Troublesum performing at Trae Day 41. Mama C and Pimp C’s 2 sons at Trae Mixer 42. Big Tho reppin fuSHion at Dreams 43. Big Sean and Fan at Sf2 44.DJ Mr. Rogers at Big San Mixer at SF2 45. Fans with Big Sean at SF2 46. DJ Mr. Rogers and Les at Tre Mixer 47.Trae adn Lil Chuckee, Houston 48. Mickey Factz at SF2, Houston 49. Troublesum reppin fuSHion at Trae Day 50. Jodi Breeze performing at Trae Day 51. Big Sean reppin SF2


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52. Mickey Factz with fans at SF2 53. Big Sean with fans at SF2 54. Fans line up to meet Yelawolf at SF2 55. Rick Ross at Stereo Live 56. Trae is interviewed at Album Release Mixer at SF2 57. Spark Dawg, B Starr and More at Big Sean Meet and Greet at SF2 58. Big Sean with SF2 Employees at SF2 59. Trae The Truth and Rockaway Productions 60. Rick Ross at Stereo Live 61. Yelawolf signs autographs at SF2 62. Yelawolf with Deana Dean and KoKo of Kode Productions 63. Yelawolf at SF2 64. Lil Flip’s Lucky Nites on Deck at his Album Release Mixer 65. Yelawolf and fans at SF2 66-73. DJ Teddi, friends, and fans celebrate her SEA Nomination in Dallas, Texas

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I see a bunch of ambitious people. Grinding: the pursuit of happiness is a hunger. Hunger for more as us “starving” artists and youth struggle to rise the corporate ranks, seeking to find ourselves all the while biting and chewing to gnaw through the competitive food chain. There’s a lot of hungry people in this dog eat dog world. You are young, ambitious, talented, creative, and gritting your teeth as you build your buzz hoping it creates a meal ticket that leads to millions earned, right? Here’s some Food for thought: What if I told you that your career ambition as an athlete, designer, artist, actor, model and any other creative expression is more than just a desire to eat financially? If you don’t pursue it, you don’t want it. Your pursuit is a direct reflection of your inner voice. That inner voice is your speech. You have a gift if you have a way with words, but you are a gift if you have a way with actions. How you shine is your beacon of light onto the rest of the world. Don’t take it for granted. As people we are born into this world, we start as a seed and cultivate ourselves into a crop of abundant opportunity. Will you turn out to be a weed only living to be picked out and thrown away? That’s up to you. Do more with life than just exist. What if I told you that there are many things are more important than your social climbing agenda? If our contribution is only for the short circle of people seen in our peripherals one may move forward but none of us will ever grow upward. In 2009 the recession led to 2.8 million Americans losing their homes in foreclosure or bank repossessions, that’s approx 8,000 a day. This year they are joined by another 2.4 million. Right now unemployment is at 9.6% and there are 50 million Americans in real poverty and tens of millions of Americans in a category called “near poverty.” One in eight Americans – and one in four children – depend on food stamps to eat daily. An estimated 85,000 families experience homelessness each night in either shelters or on the street, and these are just the recorded numbers. Whether classified as in poverty, near poverty, part time homeless or full time, reports show that out of the demographics more than 1 million of these people are children and on any given night, more than 300,000 children are homelessly sleeping on the street without food. Even beyond the homeless, even beyond the national scale, there is a local and state wide issue with hunger. There is a statistic called food insecurity which is an instable consistency in being able to afford the healthy recommended number of meals per day. Basically, it’s when finances place people in the struggle of deciding whether they are going to pay for their utilities and regular living expenses such as rent and medical care or if they are going to eat their next meal. The state of Texas has a 16.3% food insecurity rate. Meaning that 16.3% of people with jobs and with homes are sacrificing their nutritional wellbeing to put gas in their car or to keep their lights on.

As seeds grown here, we all share the moral responsibility to nurture our soil, thus ensuring that we give back to the crops of humanity. We spend our lives consuming and in the meantime everything we are in turn consumes us. Far too many people are a cosign away from “success.” We look to each other for hand outs, support, or guidance towards material goals, then ignore, bypass, and deny the opportunity to be the helping hand to those in dire need. How narcissistic. You don’t have to have millions to touch the heart of one who may change the lives of millions. You don’t have to be famous to be an important contribution. And while on the subject of growth, here are a few thoughts: It takes you to go through what you went through to be who you are today and grow to who you can be tomorrow. If you haven’t moved past your past then you haven’t grown; Step outside your comfort zone. As long as you stay within what you’re used to you won’t grow beyond where you’ve already been or know. Don’t plant the seed of your desire in your subconscious mind then go the next morning and dig it up with doubt and fear. I challenge you to be a blessing when no one is watching. I challenge you be yourself when everyone is. I challenge you to go right when everyone goes wrong. Tests of character are not multiple choice and Questions of faith are not rhetorical. Let’s beat the statistics, let’s break the downward spiral and defy the odds of our competitive primitive human nature that leads to us disowning our own. They say we don’t care anymore, that we are too preoccupied with the temporary to acknowledge the everlasting. Is it true? Look in the mirror. Let’s not let our blind ambition of self preservation destroy our foresight towards a vision of care for our fellow man or woman. Society today is reminiscent of slaves content on their plantations because they, we, can’t see farther than the barbed wire fence that encompasses them, us. No matter your age, race, nationality, gender, creed, social status, organization, religion, or any other separation of man, just as we are to care for ourselves we all share a common obligation to the better our world; out of respect for the many generations before us and as assurance for our children and the generations to come. If we stand together, there is plenty to go around. Today could be the turning point. Right now could be the moment. Just a little food for thought. Be sure to clean your plate.


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What projects are you currently working on? Right now I’m working on my album. I just released one of my mixtapes a month ago named Welcome to the Future, that was something to get my feet back wet because I been on house arrest for the past 10 months. So now I’m back at doing my same old thing: Grind Mode.

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Who are some of the artists you’re listening to? I listen to a lot of old stuff like the old Pac album, old 8-Ball MJG” 400 degrees”, the old Trick Daddy I like all that old shit I don’t too much listen to this new school shit or whatever the fuck this is going on right now, I don’t do that.

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So I take it you don’t D-town Boogie? (Laughs) Hell nah! What’s your favorite football team? Last year it was Minnesota, but I’ve always been a Dallas Cowboys fan and that’s going to be forever. But I’m ride with Minnesota right now. Bu my brother, Pac-Man just signed with Cincinnati so I’m going to be riding with him too.

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Since you’re in Houston, TX. We have to ask: Do you pop pills, smoke kush, or sip lean? As long as I’ve been coming to Texas I’ve never drank lean; I’ve have popped pills one or two times but it made me feel like I was on crack; gave me this weird, geeked out feeling. So no lean, but lots of kush, a lot, I mean a whole lot of kush. As a matter of fact, as soon as I’m done with this interview I’ma be on it.

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Any Shout outs? Shout out to Trae the Truth for still doing the Trae Day event, the whole Houston, TX., Slim Thug, J. Prince (the big homie with all the ranches that run this shit) all these niggas that been showing love. Houston is like my second home so everybody already knows what’s up.

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http://www.stratagetikrecordz.com - http://www.GinoSkarz.SunsetUrban.com - http://www.sunseturban.com - http://www.myspace.com/ginoskarz

Stratagetik Recordz is an independent hiphop/rap record label owned and operated under J.Jarvis also known as Gino Skarz. The label features underground hip-hop/rap artist and producers while promoting, distributing, and marketing all of its current projects independently. Gino Skarz is an artist/producer as well as the CEO/A&R and recording engineer of Stratagetik Recordz. Gino Skarz currently has several albums and projects available on the internet and online music stores that are self-produced and marketed through the label. Over the past few years Stratagetik Recordz has developed and created music that hip-hop/ rap listeners can relate to and will appreciate. The label will continue to grow in its musical capabilities and experience while strengthening its network and fan base by producing quality music. Stratagetik Recordz/J.Jarvis Productions/Gino Skarz is an official member of ASCAP.


Redimade: RediMade is an artist from Houston, here to bring that classic sound back to Texas rap and beyond. Representing his camp, Eyes of Texas, consisting of Tugg Boat T, Mistah Mister, and RediMade himself, he has a goal to make music and keep it original. Hooking up with Houston Legends Chris Ward and Big Pokey has already given credibility to his sound and cemented the belief that RediMade has what it takes.

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Having already dropped his first mixtape, The First Dosage with GO DJ T.A.Z, his music is reaching the basses of all the slabs in the south and coming to a block near you. RediMade states, “I want to never sell a mixtape,” on his is route to restore the voids that unforgotten Legends like Big Hawk, Fat Pat, and more left us with in their demise. With the heart of hustler and mind of ‘G’, don’t take the streets word for it, get ready for the ‘First Dosage’ that RediMade and Foresight Ent. has cooked up for the streets.

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The First Dosage Available Now


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Words By: Mz. fuSHion Photos By: Mauricce Chatman Where have we seen you before? Well right now I do a lot of web work so I have been on my modeling management site www.stallionmodels. com, as well as the dynastyseries. com, www.ggirls.com and thisis69. com. I also had a small spread in Stunnaz Magazine. That was my first and only print magazine up to this point. Are you college Educated? I’d like to think so! I spent a lot of time and money in college but unfortunately I haven’t graduated yet, but I am a senior.

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What’s your perfect Fantasy football Team? I’m not much into fantasy football, but Ocho Cinco and Terrell Owens are some of my favorite players.

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How do you keep business business in such a male dominated and oversaturated industry? Well I pretty much stick to my guns. If what you ask of me is outside of my personal boundaries, then I don’t do it, plain and simple. What sets you apart from the millions of other girls trying to make it as a model? Well, I just do what I like to do and it’s carried me pretty far. I don’t have anything to prove to anyone so my work comes straight from the heart. Are you cakin it, solo dolo, or wifed up? I got a boyfriend, so I think thats cakin it, (laughs.) Nas or Jay? That’s a hard one. I’ve always had a physical crush on Nas and admire him because his music addresses more than “mainstream topics” but the hustler inside of me admires Jay-Z for the businessman that he is. I’d have to go with Jay-Z on that one. Bozo The Clown, Buzz Lightyear, Wall-E... love one, marry one, cheat with one... GO: I would definitely cheat on Wall-E because I don’t know who he is, I’d love Buzz because he has such a heroic spirit and Id marry Bozo because he would keep me laughing and that’s important to me. Define: Twitter Model, MySpace Model, Video Vixen: A video vixen is a model/actress that is primarily known through the videos she’s been a part of, while Twitter and MySpace models primarily mode of advertisement for themselves are those social networks. All right so how can the stalkers get in contact? Website: www.candygirlcece.com Booking: booking@stallionmodels.com Twitter: @candygirlcece Facebook: facebook.com/modelcandygirlcece

Measurements: 36-28-42 - Hometown: SF Bay Area - Ethnicity: African-American - Height: 5'7”


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Houston

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Words By: “Kool” Paul Redeemer

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You have worked with many talented artists, who have been the most helpful in your career? I’d have to say Trae The Truth and Slim Thug. Those are my two big bro’s that gave me my access into the industry. I started working with both of them back in 2004-2005 and I still work close with them to this day. What is the Shit Factory? DSF aka Da Shit Factory is my independent record label I started with my classmates/bros back at Prarie View. It started off as a mixtape production/CD duplication biz to help us make a lil extra cash while in school then turned into a label/ production team that has been a major element in pioneering and developing the sound that is being celebrated in Texas today. The team consists of Stunt N Dozier, Party Boyz, D-Ray, L.E.$., Swagg Kingz, Claymaker, Ryan Hitz, Zavey, Vell, Lil Jeff, Mz. London, Young Black (BHO), the Party Boy DJz, Shelwreck, and myself. Where is your favorite city to party and/or perform? Man! That’s a tough question too! I love Houston; Even though it can get redundant at times, but that’s the beauty of it because there’s always somewhere to party. San Antonio is on my list as well. I’ve partied and performed everywhere from LA to NY to ATL to MIA to Vegas, but a lot of those “Party Cities” are overrated. Chicago and DC are always dope, as well as a string of clubs in small cities throughout the “Chitlin’ Circuit” from Arkansas to North Carolina. I understand you are the official DJ for recording artist Slim Thug. How did y’all hook up and are you working on any future projects? I was his official DJ from 2004 until 2008. I wasn’t just his DJ; I was a team member on Boss Hogg. I say that because I DJed, engineered, produced, etc for the whole camp not just Slim. It’s all one family, one operation. We linked up through Killa Kyleon. My group 211 had featured Kyleon on a track I produced and he was interested in hearing more production from me so he had me meet him at the Hogg Pen (studio) one day when Slim and Rayface where there. I went through some tracks and Rayface asked if I had anymore and I said yea on this mixtape I just dropped. He heard the mixtape and was like “Oh you DJ too?” He hit me up and I started doing mixtapes, recording, and production for them. I was primarily working with Kyleon and PJ from the jump. It wasn’t til about 6 months later that Slim reached out to me about DJing on the road for him since he needed an official DJ after just recently being signed. A few years later while Slim was working diligently on his sophomore album and Boss Hogg group projects, I ventured off, with Slim’s blessings of course, (laughs,) and went on tour as Letoya Luckett’s DJ on the Mary

If you could collaborate with any artist or producer who would it be? Artists at the moment would be Pharrell, Dwele, Wiz Khalifa, Nesby Phips, Kanye West, and Sia & Sophie of Zero 7, they have incredible voices. Producers would be Rod Temperton, Jimmy Jam & Terry Lewis, Manny, Dr. Dre, Warren G., DJ Uneek and Timbaland. I would strip them of all the production tools they are currently using and make them revert back to the tools and methods they used to make the sound that defined them. I know you have a lot of success with new talent, the Party Boyz seem to be on the rise, what’s next for the group? We’re currently dropping a new mixtape titled We In Dat Thang, which is basically an underground album. It will be a further introduction into the Party Boy world and will truly define and distinguish their sound. I heard you working with an artist from The Big Easy aka New Orleans, by the name of L.E.S, who is he and why should hip hop heads listen? L.E.$. is a producer/label’s dream. He’s a true student of the game. He’s probably a bigger music fan than me and knows just as much, if not more about music than me. And on top of that he’s talented as hell. He had great content, dope delivery, and a good ear. Those are the key elements to being a great artist. Everybody should listen to him, not just hip-hop heads because he’s not an artist that will get stuck in one category or genre. He just makes dope music in general. He speaks on everyday shit, shit that we can all relate to; not just the dope dealers, gangstas, or the rich and affluent. He speaks for the everyday urban audience that goes through what we go through. No fairy tales, but no depression either. That’s how people gravitate to him so easily. Look out for him. I made that same statement about an artist named Drake three years ago before ANYBODY knew who he was and look at him now, (laughs.) #imjustsaying What do you prefer Digital or wax? Has the traditional way of DJing been destroyed in your opinion? I prefer digital because that is the format that I came up on. I’ve always wanted to master turntablism with the Technic 1200’s, but I’m just too comfortable with my CDJ’s. I wouldn’t say the traditional way has been destroyed, I would just say that technology has advanced. It just took technology a very long time to advance when it came to the equipment used for DJing so Technics made their mark as the staple for DJing. I’m interested to see what’s next. What advice do you have for future DJ’s looking to break in the industry? First thing is to learn and master your craft. Secondly, work. That’s the only way you can make it happen. You have to out work everybody and exhaust all possibilities. Never turn down a gig if you’re available to do it. You’ll never know who’s in the crowd. I picked up a lot of bigger events/gigs from doing small b-day parties and weddings just because of an important person that was in the crowd. Get your business together and market yourself with biz cards, banners, flyers, websites, etc. Also you should be consistent with mixtapes to promote your talent. Last Question, What new duo has a better chance of winning a championship? T.O and Ochocinco or Lebron and D.Wade? The Heat. It’s a conspiracy. They’re all in the aCOONiminati, (laughs.)

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Who inspires you musically and who is your favorite DJ? That’s a tough question to answer because I’m influenced by so many different artists, DJs, and producers. Of course there is a list of legends from the past, but it also varies and depends on who is relevant and making dope music at the moment. If it’s imperative that I mention a few, then I’ll have to say: Dilla, Pharrell, the old Dr. Dre, the old Manny Fresh, Pimp C, Timbo, DJ Paul & Juicy J, Nitti, all the old west coast G-Funk era producers. As for DJs: Larose, Good Grief, Watts, Screw, AM, and Girl Talk.

J. Blige Breakthrough Tour. I then developed the Party Boyz and have been on the road with them as well. His {Slim’s} current road DJ is my big homie T-Gray of the Choppaholix. It’s all one big fam and we’re all in it for the same cause and reason so I still get behind the wheels for him from time to time.

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When did you start DJing and why? I first started DJing in 2002-2003 while attending Prairie View A&M University. Basically it was a combination of my love for music, my love for partying, and my love for entertaining that got me interested in DJing. I’ve always wanted to do anything dealing with music since I was a kid; from rapping to DJing to producing, and DJing was the easiest outlet for me.


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t s o L

e i v r Inte

W The

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Wiz Khalifa Something has come over hip hop.

There’s a new sound, a new feeling, a new existence coursing through the veins, pulsating through the heart, and taking over the mind of the industry. It is a new Movement, and no I'm not using the term MOVEMENT lightly. The forefather of this movement is arguably Kanye West. He made it ok for the common man, or even the privileged man, to be a rap phenomenon, showing that talent still has a place as the industry increasingly shows its willingness to trade talent for the reality of commercial appeal. Next Came Lupe Fiasco, who proved you don't have to be a Trapstar to be a Rapstar. And now there's Kid Cudi, Wale, B.o.B, Curren$y, Big Sean, Mickey Factz, and well Then there’s… Wiz Khalifa.


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"I didn’t even expect to be number one on iTunes. I don’t have any expectations. I just get high, make the music that I make, and the people just respond to it."


That’s really all you have to say. Wiz Khalifa… As young as he is in life and in the rap game he is already a household name. He took over the game by simply exploiting a medium so lost on traditional hip hoppers – The Internet. Ironically enough, it was actually a failed deal with Hip Hop Super power Warner Bros that allowed him to do so. Without the restrictions of a major label calling the shots, deciding the style, and determining what would and wouldn’t be a good look for the young star, Wiz went all out, taking every opportunity, and using every medium, to show his fans, The Taylor Gang, some of the most devoted in the industry, exactly who Wiz Khalifa really is. The Military/Pittsburgh raised rap artist has already performed at the SoundSet Music Festival, CMJ Music Marathon, South by Southwest Music Festival, and on the acclaimed Rock the Bells Tour. His own Tour with Yelawolf, The Deal or No Deal Tour, was so successful he has continued the trend by starting The Waken Baken Tour in September of this year, again with Yelawolf, which has sold out every venue, in every region it will travel to. In July, after releasing his mixtape Kush and Orange Juice, Wiz Khalifa signed a deal with Atlantic Records, even though he was courted by almost every Major and Independent Label in the game, including Rick Ross’s Maybach Music Group. Wiz also turned down an offer from Drake to join forces on tour, was named one of XXL’s Top 10 Freshman of 2010, won MTV’s Breakthrough artist of the year award, and had his own hat and t-shirt limited edition collection released through increasingly popular Diamond Clothing. And he’s really just getting started. What follows is an interview with Wiz BEFORE all the accolades, before the clothes, money, cars, and hos, (I suppose,) before he became a household name. This interview was conducted on February 12th, the day the Deal or No Deal Tour, to promote Wiz’s second album of the same name, opened at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Less than half a year later, almost nobody in America can surf the internet, watch baseball, or even light an aromatic, organic, stress relieving plant without thinking about the heavily tatted rapper, for lack of a better term, from the land of Black and Yellow. What will you achieve in six months?

You’ve done a lot of collaborations recently, with Curresnsy, Nipsey Hussle, Beanz. Are you trying to expand yourself out of the Midwest? I feel like my music alone, just me workin as hard and as long as I’ve been working, has expanded me to different regions. I work with different artists based on the relationship we already have. I’d rather have some form of a relationship with an artist, to where I know he fucks with me, and know that he’s a cool person before I even work him. I’ve never been one to try to get to many features or work with this guy or that guy. I’m more about making my own brand and having people respect me for what I do. I’ve feel like I’ve been doing that for a long time, and now I’m reaching out to other artists I respect, like Curren$y, like Nipsey, and French Montana. You’ve always used the internet to your advantage, and are all over YouTube with your video diary for lack of a better word. What’s your purpose in doing so? It’s the same reason you know about it. I just wanted to get people talking, and to stay relevant. I never thought it was going to be as popular as it was. I just did it to do it, but I think people kind of latch on to my personality, that’s what they say, so I’ve just kept it going, it’s spread and I’m building on top of it. I’m working on a new series now, I shoot them myself, I edit them myself and everything, so it’s real personal. As a younger artist has it been easier, or even natural for you to capitalize off the Digital Revolution? I don’t think it has to do with being a young artist, its more so has to do with being a hard worker period. Everyone has their own lane, their own niche, and the internet turned into mine and really worked out for me. That’s not to say the next artist can come along and do exactly what I did, and be as successful, or not as much so, that’s not the gauge. I feel like everybody has their own path they have to take, that’s the one that worked out for me and I just ran with it. How big would you say the mixtape game is to your career? What part does it play between the release of your albums? Its defiantly important for me because I make so much music, and my fans know me from making a lot of music, and dropping music consistently. So the mixtape circuit and the internet circuit, and all the love that the different blogs give me, it all just plays into each other. I get a lot of shows off of mixtapes so it’s real important in having people excited for a real project. What led to the downfall with your deal with Warner Bros? Seeing both sides do you prefer the major or independent route? It wasn’t a downfall with Warner, I think they just really had an idea of what kind of artist they thought I was, and that was just one side of me. I don’t think they were willing to put in the time, or maybe they just didn’t have the time or the drive to put in the groundwork. There was still a lot of hustling to be done and I think they wanted me to do just different things that I wasn’t ready to do. I just took it into my own hands and made my own career out of it. It’s not really a matter of whether I want to be independent or on a major, because you really just have to find the right Major situation and wait for it, work for it. But as for myself, I just know how much time and energy it takes as an artist, whether you’re on major label artist or an independent artist, you have to work with the same grind regardless. To me it really doesn’t even matter as long as you’re working hard.

So how exactly did you come up with your stage name? My grandfather actually gave me the name Khalifa. In Arabic it means successor or leader, someone who’s there to guide people and help them do well by sharing knowledge. He felt like that was what I was put here for. Wiz comes from me always hanging around older people. I was always the youngest dude in my crowd, and everything I put my hands on I was pretty much good at it, so I was called Young Wiz.

You hit number one on iTunes with Deal or No Deal, how do you plan on topping that? I’m not even thinking about that, for real, for real. The only way to top it is to be number one in the world, and that will happen whenever it happens. I didn’t even expect to be number one on iTunes. I don’t have any expectations. I just get high, make the music that I make, and the people just respond to it. If that turns into a number one then great.

You were born in North Dakota, when did you actually move to Pittsburgh? My parents were actually in the military during the early part of my life. My dad is from New York and my mom is from Pittsburgh. I was born when they were stationed in Minot, North Dakota. I was only there for a year and a half, he we moved overseas for a while, and back and forth in Pittsburgh until I was about thirteen, then I stayed.

What are you working on now? I’m about to drop two mixtapes. The first one is Kush and Orange Juice, which will come out in march, and then I got Cabin Fever, to drop shortly after that. I’m working on an album, with a definite 2010 release on it, working on a couple singles, this tour. Really just runnin around, workin.

How has the Pittsburgh hip hop scene influenced you? How has it affected your sound and development as an artist? There’s a lot of diversity in the Pittsburgh hip hop scene. As far as being a fan of the music from Pittsburgh, we all enjoy different stuff. I grew up listening to everything my cousin’s were listening to, as well as my older homies. That’s really what inspires my music, and just everyday Pittsburgh. Just hearing, and seeing, and being Pittsburgh has really inspired me as an artist. What obstacles have you faced tying to break into the game from Pittsburgh? None. We’ve been working from a grass roots standpoint, and it’s been nothing but a good thing, having the support of the whole city on my back, and being the face of what’s going on. I have a lot of people with me who carry the same sound, and we’re talking to the same people so its real consistent as well. People just respect that.

On a side note, explain the tattoo fetish. What tattoo started it and how did it get to where you are now? (Laughs,) I wouldn’t say it’s a fetish. I’ve always wanted to be tatted up, so as soon as I turned 16 I went and got my first, and by the time I was out of high school, I had at least nine, by the time I was 20, I had twenty. Now I’m 23 and I can’t even count em. Given that you are only 23 what can we expect from you in the next few years? Me to never stop workin hard. Even if I don’t get to number 1 and get to be the best artist that anyone has ever seen in their life, you’re going to know to expect good music from me with a consistent sound. I’m always be tryin to do shit and just be creative. That’s it. Anything you want to add? Just follow me on twitter: @RealWizKhalifa

Words By: Mz. fuSHion Interview By: Erica Jackson


You’ve always had the support of the streets; however were you surprised by the mainstream buzz you created, especially with the digital audience? Nah, I didn’t, I didn’t expect it all. I expected the hood, and the barrios, but to see the radio and everybody else, it’s crazy. It’s a blessing. So what about Behind Tint Volume 2 and Still Behind Tint gave it such a broad appeal? I think First 48, produced by Cy Fyre, really opened it up for me. Everybody’s tuning into A&E for the show but it’s our reality. As sad as it is it’s our reality, so I feel like a lot of people can relate to that track.

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Did you know First 48 was a hit when you made it? I mean, you almost had too... I didn’t. I was just looking at it like it was just another song on the mixtape tellin my story. I didn’t expect it to be what it is, but I promise you, I promise you I’m grateful.

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In Behind Tint Volume 2 and also at the mixtape release at SF2, you speak a lot about your mother and her situation with her health. How does that affect your drive as an artist, not just as a son? It made me work harder. I felt like I didn’t have to have as much time to waste. It made me want to achieve quicker, and put myself out there a little more. As far as the music, I love my mama so much, that it always touches me. When the beat drop I think about her struggle and mine and what we’ve been through. So it has a huge impact on my music. Through the grace of God your mom is going to be receiving a replacement kidney, which will allow her to get healthy. Given that, and the pressures that lessen because of that how will your music and work ethic be affected? I don’t know. We’ll see, because I really don’t know. You’re not really and “up-and-coming” rapper, but you are knocking on the mainstream door. That being said, what are you doing to separate yourself from the countless other rappers also trying to kick the door in? I don’t want o be a step above anybody. I just want to stay in my lane. Everybody who’s at where I’m at earned their place there. I want them to keep their status, I don’t ever want to be above any of them; I wanna be right beside them and I wanna do my part. I wanna be a household name and do my part for the city, stay in my lane. I don’t ever wanna be above anybody. So what would you say your lane is? I’m one of the speakers for the hood, the streets, the struggle, and the people who made something out of nothin. That’s my lane. I’ma do it for the people who hungry and trying to make it, who don’t really have a chance because it seems over for them. I gotta speak for them. What’s been your experience as an artist signed under another artist? It makes you humble yourself. It makes you play your position. I was the first artist to be signed to Boss Hogg. To be under Slim is real humbling, because that’s my partner and we started together. But it motivates me even more. He handles his job real well; he’s a good boss. He lets me keep my G Status and he doesn’t look down so I’m good. So how does that influence you when it comes to your own label? I mean we’re family. Even if we never rap again we’re family. They get the same treatment I get. Nothing more nothing less. Besides the label, what other business ventures are you looking at getting into? I can’t even lie to you, my dreams stopped at one point. But I’m finally home, so I feel like I can begin to dream again. I have my ideas, there are certain things I want to do. But I’m so brand new with it, and my dream died so long ago. But as I grow they’re coming back and I plan on venturing off into a lot of stuff. Right now I just want to make it though. You can’t argue with that. Anything you want to add? Good is good, all the time. Let me say that first and foremost. We’ve lost a lot of homies tears came with making this dream. In the midst of seeing all this go on and go down we’ve lost a lot. Rest in Peace to all the soldiers we’ve lost, all the homies on lock. Keep your head up and it is what it is. J Dawg The Young Hogg.

Words By: Mz fuSHion

The Behind Tint Series, especially Volume 2, aren’t typically what you would expect from a mixtape, the majority of the tracks were over original beats produced by Cy Fyre, lyrically you stayed away from the mundane like the token Oh Let’s Do It and All The Way Turnt Up freestyles. If this is the mixtape, what can we expect from the album? I go a little deeper. I don’t think it’s different lyrically but I go deeper in regards to my story telling. I touch on the same stuff but let you know a little more.

J Dawg: Gotta Get It

You just dropped Behind Tint Volume 2, followed by Still Behind Tint through Koch. So what are you working on now? I’m working on a compilation I have with Storm Down, and we’re working on Serve and Collect 3. Slim {Thug} and I just dropped Boss Hogg, so we’re working on a lot of projects. I’m trying to stay busy every day.


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Big Krit Wuz Here

And another comparison to Pimp, you make your own beats and do your own mixing? Is that true? Yes that is 100% true I produced all of Krit Wuz Here. 19 records. That is another experience within itself. I’ve always my beats since 2002. So to be able to produce your own album and develop your own vibe on all the songs, it’s great to get people to relate and to like the production as much as they do the rapping. That’s amazing, big ups to that. You definitely have a lot of talent. Appreciate that man. On one of the tracks you said you are “upset with the fact that no one wants real shit no more.” I wanted to ask you, what are your thoughts on the current state of hip hop? I feel like hip hop is a different way for people make money. It was d esigned for people to be able to help their families and especially to get people up out of poverty, get the lower class out of the hood and give people a way to believe in themselves. Now it’s openly a foundation of a brand. To me now thought the problem is the manufactured aspect feel of hip hop. It has become real processed. It’s real watered down. That's due to people after money really only trying to do whatever is hot right now, they don’t really stay true to themselves, or their sound. That’s the part that I dislike, no one’s telling both sides of the story. People talk about the glamour and the glitz; they’re not talking about the poverty and the depression. The reality is not there, that is what I get upset about and I express that through my music. Yea I rap about a good situation or cars but I always take it back to the hood and the poverty, the politics and spirituality in the music. In “Children of the World” I explained how I got this mind frame and this thought process, coming from where I’m from and what I looked up to. That’s my problem with music now. People normally don’t tell both sides. They don’t even keep it 100 with

themselves, they just trying to get a quick buck instead of really telling about their life styles. People aren’t looking up to them like their human; they look at the false superhero aspect.

That’s true, how much of that is the fault of the artists and how much of that is what the labels push for? It depends on how you came out. Labels don’t build an artist from scratch. An artist comes out, and lays the groundwork, puts out the image that they want, and once they build their buzz that is what the labels see initially. They look at who I am as a person and the kind of music I’ve already put out. My music is never really going to change as I try to get bigger and reach a broader market, but then you have others, who once they break in, they’re just trying to get that radio single, they’re not looking for the longevity, that’s when the label can come in and influence what your next single may be like, or what your album may sound like. Then there’s artists who come in and try to make a name for themselves, and hopefully the label will keep it 100 when your album comes out, but you might have already put yourself in a position where people only wanna hear dance music from you, or only want to hear a certain sound. For artists coming in, all I can say is be very careful of the product you’re putting out. You have to concentrate on quality over quantity. You may not make it over night, it may not be the first year or the second year, but eventually you will build a fan base off of just being yourself. That’s key to establishing and maintaining respect as well. Oh most definitely. That’s the only way you can do it, is being yourself. It’s easy to transform over time if you’re being yourself. Just like with Ceelo Green, throughout his career he’s been singing here and there but also expressing himself through his lyrical content, so when he does decide to go outside the box and sings a whole R&B song, or puts out a record like “Crazy” you don’t feel so far away. You’re like, “aw man, I already knew you had it in you.” So that’s why artists always have to keep it 100 and show people who they are as individuals, and it’ll all work out. Are you surprised by how well Krit Wuz Here was received by the industry? Was it expected? Honestly all I was concerned with was getting the album out and on a platform where people could listen to it. That itself was a blessing, so it completely exceeded all my expectations. People really related to it. I appreciated all the comments I received, most we’re good, but I even appreciated the negative comments because it meant that that person still took the time out to listen to my song, or comment on my record. Coming from where I’m from, this has been a long process, it’s been five years in the making to be able to put out a product where it’s just me by myself, and it shows my growth. All the comments, feedback, people wanting to collaborate, and those just looking forward to hearing more music, I never in a million years thought I’d e in this situation, being signed to Def Jam, having a voice, and being able to be myself. I’m blessed to be here.

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All right let’s jump right into it. You’ve been compared to Pimp C allot because of your delivery, your tone, and your content. How does it feel to be compared to such a hug hip hop legend? It’s definitely an amazing thing. I was extremely influenced by UGK growing up. I mean I’ve always been big on Houston music Lil Keke, Paul Wall, Chamillionaire, Slim Thug, the Swisha House camp, Suave House, Tela, you know what I’m saying? Artists like that are definitely influences as far as my music is concerned. So when people tell me that I remind them of them it’s not something that is really overwhelming, because I listened to them a lot growing up. From the production to the cadences, to the lingo, it’s definitely a part of where I’m from. I’ve been knowing of and listening to screw since 1998-99. The first screwed song I ever heard was Prince’s Purple Rain and I was thrown off by it like “Whoa, what is this?” At the end of the day, any comparisons are definitely a blessing not that I’m trying to sound like anyone else but I am definitely going to stay true to my roots and where I am from.

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(And he’s not leaving...)


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How will you improve on the next project? I definitely want to use live instrumentation more, I’ll be doing some more sampling, diggin in the crates, live background singers, having other artists singing the hooks, expanding on my subject matter, all that. As I go through life I experience new things every day, so just being able to continue to put my music out, and allowing my fan base to experience these things with me is huge. And staying true to myself will always be extremely important. Being yourself, and putting out good music so a major label will back you is extremely important. Being from where I’m from, being from Mississippi, we gotta be us, we gotta be country, and we gotta be proud of it. The World will appreciate that honesty and it’ll all be good.

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One of my favorite lines from the tape, “how can you protect your kids from the streets that made you,” you then go on to speak about corrupt churches, and politics. What’s the story behind that track? You know I’ve never really tried to get to political, but everybody has their opinions, and I express my opinion. I’m not trying to come across like I’m a politician or anything like that, I’m just expressing myself. Some people are going to agree with what I’m saying, and some people aren’t but it’s a reflection of what I’ve been through in life. Like being stereotyped; People assuming just because you’re riding around in your car and you have some rims you’re a dope boy and you get pulled over because of it. Or, some churches not being as personable as they used to. Where I’m from the church was filled with mostly all the people I knew, with my family, and at some point it, and other churches out there, just becomes this big machine, and it becomes a fashion show, or a way to push a person’s own agenda. Even down to the streets. How do you shelter your siblings or your children from the things in life that made you who you are? You may know that something isn’t right, but how do you protect them from that when you are a part of it? The record is kind of like preaching to people, but more or less just like, listen, and think about it. Whether or not you want to change as an individual is totally up to you, but at least listen to and think about these topics. Life is crazy, I’m a human being, I go through all kinds of situations so I just want to express to the world that I’m no different than any of the people that listen to my music. I go through the same things; spiritually, financially, just dealing with people in general, and that’s really what I want to bring to the table with my music, you can relate to me, you know? You claim that the states of the south have all seen their time in the spotlight, but that Mississippi has never had its run. Do you feel like you’ve been in the shadows of what David Banner has tried to do for the state? Banner definitely gave us a lot of hope that we can be who we are, producer, rapper, whatever you’re doing, and be known for it worldwide. It’s important that people from where I’m from come out with quality music, and that we’re ourselves in these songs. We’re influenced by a lot of different places because we’re in the middle of a real underground network being in Mississippi. We hear a lot of Atlanta, Texas, Tennessee, and Florida in our state, but we need to comprise all of the stuff we listen to and build off of it to really make a sound of our own. We already have the Blues aspect and the soulfulness in our story, just being from Mississippi. Now it’s a matter of packaging it and putting it out to the world. I’m definitely holding my weight and I just want to help other people I know trying to do their thing. Big Sant, Corleon, Boo Rosinni who’s signed to CTE, Donny Cross, Tito Lopez, there’s a gang of people from Mississippi that are doing their own part to help Mississippi blow up and have their own voices. I just look forward to the movement and being able to build and changing the stereotypes of what people think hip hop is, especially in Mississippi. There’s definitely a new wave of artists coming out and impacting the industry, and majorly influencing the changing sound of hip hop. Kid Cudi, Big Sean, Curren$y, Wiz Khalifa, you. Do you feel direct competition from any of these artists? Nah, I work with everybody. Curren$y is like my big brother. He’s definitely someone that I respect because we started out at the same time. 2005 is when I really starting hearing about him, and it’s crazy to see how he’s grown and come so far. I’m happy for and proud of all my partners. So in that aspect there really isn’t any competition. We just be ourselves, we’re around each other, we smoke, we drink, we make music, and we all stay in our lanes, live our own lives and we cool with the type of people we are. It’s really just important that we all make quality music. I put a lot of pressure on myself, as far as who Krit is, as far as putting out music, the mix aspect of it, the beats, all that. I want it to be perfect before it ever touches the internet, the blogs, or whatever. I put pressure on myself to make

sure it all works out, but I’m not about to drive myself crazy. But the new movement is going to be great for hip hop. There are a lot of new artists out that are really hungry and are just speaking on where they’re from, Yelawolf, Smoke DZA, Freddie Gibbs, Jay Cole, Big Sean, and more. What it comes down to is that we’re young and we just get to it. Period. Hometown Hero was a huge single, what was your intention with that song? Just to be real. I was rapping about a lot of content that just means a lot to me, and thank God a lot of people can relate to it. I was just telling the story on how the game really can be like high school. There’s a lot of politics, a lot of rumors here are there, a lot of talkin. Sometimes it’s just showin and provin. It’s crazy because I’m talkin about Mississippi in the hook, King City, M Town, Hometown Hero, and people don’t even care, they still relate. I was told at one point you can’t really represent where you’re from in your songs because it makes it territorial, it’ll keep it from going global. But everywhere I go, I’m performing the song, I’m still throwing up the M, I’m still hollerin out Mississippi, and people still rap it back to me, and respect me, and feel it, because we all hometown heroes in our own way. You know you go through what you go through in life and you get through it, to succeed however you may succeed. You ultimately become a Hometown Hero because you went through your trials and your tribulations and that’s really want that record is about. Me talking about hip hop and going through what I’ve been through and may go through, all the negativity and being able to overcome it and be in a position where I can just live my life and my dream. All right, well a little off topic, but it is football season. Being that Mississippi doesn’t have a home team, who are you pullin for? Man to be honest with you, as far as football goes, Randy Moss is just so cold with it, that wherever he goes, I’ma be a fan of. We don’t have a home team, so I follow players; you know what I’m saying? So how do feel about Lebron signing with Miami? I understand that the pressure of getting a ring is extremely important. If you don’t have a ring, then you don’t get put on that “Great” pedestal, in essence you didn’t go platinum. I feel that, but legacy wise, the majority of the “greatest” stayed with one team and walked out with a ring or two over the course of their career. Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan, even Kobe, I’m pretty sure he’s going to just stay with the Lakers. Jordan went to the Bulls and they became the dominate team they were overtime. They built that championship team; same with Kobe, getting the ring was a process. I feel like it would be worth more for Lebron to stay with one team, and grind it out to win a championship, then to go to a powerhouse, a team that already has ring, recently without him. Legacy-wise, Lebron going to Miami doesn’t help at all, but I can’t knock him for wanting to win it all either. A ring in his sport is very important. Ok real quick, give me the first answer that comes to mind: favorite song of all time? Liberation by Outkast. Dream Collaboration? Andre 3000, Ceelo Green, and Bun B. What’s your biggest pet peeve in regards to the industry? A&R’s not going further down south. Your biggest fear? Failure. What’s important to you outside of music? Really just choppin it up with my family, man. Being around family is just a really dope thing. Drinkin, pourin up, and talkin shit on the porch, barbequin if possible, eating is very fun, chillin with shawtys, I could really go all day with this. Just being country and enjoying life, just enjoying life. Anything you want to add? Cinematic Music Group, Multi Alumni, Def Jam Signee. Hit me up on twitter @BigKrit. I try to answer everybody back if possible, it’s been getting crazy but I try and do my best. I am the only one talking on there, there is no mystery person runnin my page. Be on the lookout for The Alumni project, which is me, my partner Big Sant; be on the lookout for all the artists I called out earlier from Mississippi, they about to be out doing their thang. We believe in hip hop and it’s about global music at the end of the day.


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Krit Wuz Here

Words By: One Hunnidt

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What are you working on now? A lot of stuff. Would you like to elaborate? Well I’ve been investing in coffee, we’ve got apples coming in from Boston, and we’re working on expanding in to donuts. Cy Fyre… (laughs.) Seriously? We’re working on dozens of projects, we’re working on records with major labels; and we’re also working closely with pretty much everybody in Houston. More recently I produced First 48 by J Dawg, Deuces and Tre’s on Can’t Ban The Truth, and the intro to Slim Thug’s The Thug Show and Produced J Dawg’s Still Behind Tint released through E1.

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What are you working on outside of the Houston market? I’m working on some top secret stuff. I can’t really go into detail now, but I’m working with a bunch of cats, working on full projects, both independent and major.

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How long have you been producing? What made you start? I started producing in 2004. I’ve always liked music but I’m not really a rapper and I wanted to get in the game somehow, and I found my niche in making beats. Given the short time you’ve been producing how did you establish such a strong presence and name for yourself, especially amongst major label artists? I attribute to this thing called #FuckSleep mainly. My team and I average two or three days straight in the studio with maybe a three hour nap. Most other people work eight hours a day, our day is 72 hours. I really got serious about producing in 07 when I came back from the Bahamas, so I went into overdrive. So what started the whole #FuckSleep movement? Really that’s just my way of thinking. Regardless of music, or what we’re doing, my whole team feels the same way; it’s about productivity and being the best you can be in the time you’re given. You never know when it can be taken from you. Outside of Houston what are some of the major artists you’ve worked with? Rick Ross, The Game, Snoop, Mistah Fab, Young Buck, Gunplay, a lot of people really. All the joints I’ve done have been on mixtapes. You’ll know it’s mine because I put that Fyre Tag on it. In your opinion what are the five biggest tracks you’ve produced thus far? I Am The Streets - Trae featuring Rick Ross and The Game, First 48 – J Dawg featuring Slim Thug, Gucci, Fendi track for Chamillionaire, and Trae’s I Am Houston. Both Sides of The Fence with Trae and Rob G is also a real important track to me because it was one of my first tracks. Since you mentioned the name, what’s your take on the ongoing Trae vs. 97.9 situation? I definitely hope that situation gets resolved. Trae’s like my big brother. He was the 1st person to give me a shot in the game, the first person to give me some responsibility producing records. So that’s my brother. My loyalty is definitely

with big bro. They gotta get that situation taken care of because that’s the only radio station out here. I know for the sake of Houston, given that Trae does so much for the community, this has to be resolved, someway, somehow. What are your four biggest mixtapes industry wise? Trae’s The Streets Advocate Mixtape, Rick Ross’s The Timeless Audemars LP, Chamillionaire’s Mixtape Messiah 7, Don Killuminati 2k10 by The Outlaws, J Dawg’s Behind Tint II and Still Behind Tint. Then there’s The Gift Mixtapes that we put out for free, those are just beat mixtapes. Expand on that, what’s the point of a producer doing a beat mixtape that he gives out for free? We’re actually working on the third one now, with Blaze Burna who is an artist I work closely with. The purpose of doing it is just really to give back. We’ve been lucky; it’s a one in a million shot to be able to make a career out of this music stuff and sometimes I don’t feel like I deserve it, even though I we work real hard. I really just want to give back to the cats who really want production but can’t afford it. Blaze and I have been working together since High School, so I know what its like to try and get beats and producers are charging like $800 a beat, and not be able to afford it. We just want to give back to those cats who don’t really have the opportunity to purchase beats right now. What exactly is the Fyre Factory as an entity? The Fyre Factory is mainly a production company, consisting of myself, Blaze Burna, My n***a Irv who also produces, my business partner Mic of GMG. There’s a lot of us but really a music conglomerate of producers, and writers. We just put together tracks. Our first artist will be Blaze Burna and his Insomniac Mixtape with DJ Storm. Myself and Blaze Burna are the main members of The Fyre Factory. Blaze has written for Yung Joc, done songs with Slim Thug, J Dawg, Tum Tum. Usually when I send out a beat, I’ll send it out with a concept, or a hook from Blaze, and a lot of the time the artist will use it. If you weren’t producing what would you be doing? I really can’t say. I don’t want to speculate, but even though I started late, I feel like this is what I was made to do. I can’t speculate on anything else. So what are you working on outside of production? Almost everything I do is production based. But we have a lot of packages that we offer that includes beats, CDs, graphics, and more for a low rate. We’re working on building a new headquarters so-to-speak, we do beatshopping programs for other producers, we have Blaze Burna hooks and songs going. We work really closely with my boy Jimmy Boi and his companies, with Boss Hogg Outaws. We just have a lot going on right now. Well that’s all I have unless you wanted to add anything? Well I’m going to come to your house and make sure you edit out all my “ums” and “You knows,” but besides that check out my upcoming tapes with Mistah Fab, Big Hood Boss, Jimmy Boi, Killa Kyleon, Blaze Burna’s Insomniac, and Mixtape Monster, T Double, Iz from 454 Life ENT out of the Bay, Fuck Sleep 1 and Fuck Sleep 2, and The Gift Parts 1-3 coming soon!

GOT BEATS?


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Words and Photo By: Mz. fuSHion

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Exploring The Technical Side Of The Industry: Cy

Fyre


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BANK: THE OFFICIAL MR. 912 It’s legitimately that time of year for Bank “Mr. 912.” With a DJ Scream mixtape entitled, “The Deposit” hitting the streets soon, he’s running at a 100 miles per hour with hardly any time to slow down. “I’m focused more than ever right now,” states Bank “Mr. 912.” “I have the platform that I need in place and a great team behind me, so go time is now. Hailing from Vidalia, GA, which is about 3 hours South of Atlanta, Dontell “Bank Mr. 912” Hill is hardly your average small town rapper. Committed to being a part of the bigger picture as well as paying his dues to the city that made him, he has his eyes set on taking the industry by storm. Having already opened up for major artist such as Plies, Lil Boosie, Gucci Mane, and Yung Joc, this young MC knows exactly what it takes to make it; and from how he sees it, he’s almost half way there. Already having released his first mixtape “Bank Roll” in 2005, Bank is determined to make “The Deposit” a mixtape with a high return, no pun intended. Featuring Three Six Mafia and Project Pat, and with DJ Scream adding his talent and undeniable mixing abilities, how could he lose? In addition he is also currently working the streets with his new single “Crazy,” which has already received a number of radio spins in his hometown and surrounding markets. With this mixtape “The Deposit” expected to do serious numbers, it shouldn’t be long before Bank is cashing in all over the country, pun intended. - J. Jamz


west:

Motivated by his own blue print to life, James “Hustle Man” West has always stayed in a lane of his own. From the first time he took to the block at the age of 12 to his now full time focus on his passion for music, this 25-year-old rapper is determined beyond reason to make his presence in the music industry felt. With plans in site that include group collaborations, mixtape releases, and a number of other opportunities, he’s worth taking the time to get to know. A couple of years ago you had a hot single with Young Buck, called Hustleman. What have you been doing since then? Grinding. That song had crazy momentum behind it since it came out at the same time him and 50 cent were beefing. I had all types of people calling but I couldn’t really move like I wanted to with it because 50 had a freeze on Buck. So I have been working hard and making the necessary moves to keep my name in the streets and busy. What is the new single you’re working now? The song is called, “Got Bread” and it features Yo Gotti and Starlito. We’re expecting a nice run with it. What other projects are you working on right now? Right now, I’m working on a mixtape and a group project called Trash Bag Gang. Starlito (who is Yo Gotti artist) and 3 other hot artist from Nashville are on it, but I’m the only one that’s not from there. What would you want our readers to know about you? I try to keep everything in my raps realistic so the average person or hustle can relate to what I’m saying. I’m not a punch line rapper that’s trying to go over your head but I’m also not about to dumb down my music to get a deal. Where can our readers find out more about you and your movement? Check out West on youtube.com/westhustleman or westhustleman@gmail.com.

Words By: Lola Sims


V


VS isanthe

hiancoe

There’s nothing more fickle then the life of a football player. Free Agency, injury, unexpected losses, concussions, firings, even reality TV all have an impact on the life and death of a football players career. One year your team can go 0-16, the next 16-0. One year your team could be battling it out in the NFC championship, the next they could be battling every Sunday to just break even. At the beginning of the season the Minnesota Vikings were arguably the team to beat, and starting veteran Tight End Visanthe Shiancoe couldn’t agree more. Now it seems, as the Vikings suffer yet another grueling loss and fall to 3-6, their season is already over. But then again this is football... And on any given Sunday, anything can happen...

All right let’s get right in to it, what are your predictions for this year? Both for the team and for yourself? We will be the NFC North champions, and I just see us building more on what we accomplished last year. Based on the team we put together, I feel like we are a super bowl contender. As far as me, I scored 11 touchdowns last year, 12 if you include the post-season, but the way to stay hungry is that you can’t be content, you have to set higher goals every year. What I’m going to do is treat this season, like I had a bad season last year. I’m going to put forth a lot of effort, and try to be a valuable receiver on this offense.


In my opinion ya’ll outplayed the Saints in the championship game last season… (Laughs) You know a lot of people are saying that… How do you feel about the rivalry now? You know, that left a bad taste in our mouth, it something we wanna brush our teeth from, so to speak. At the same time though, the past is the past and all you can do is learn from it. We learned from all the mistakes we made and we’re going to make sure we don’t make those same mistakes this go around. This game is going to be a physical game, obviously. A lot of people know about the (Darren) Sharper situation, as well as all the other little contributing factors. It’s going to be a very physical game and its going to be won by all.

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So what is going on with you and Darren Sharper? I mean, we’re friends, don’t get me wrong, we’ll be friends this year; let’s just leave it at that.

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Farve is Farve, extremely unpredictable. That being said do you feel, now and into the future, Tavaris Jackson is strong enough, and skilled enough to lead you this year where Brett Farve did last year? I defiantly do. I’ve watched Tavaris progress from last year. He’s always had the physical capability, but now I’m seeing him take it deep into the next level. I definitely know that we can make it with Tavaris, he has a tremendous drive.

them, make them do stuff at 12 at night. Nah we gotta practice the next day. We leave the rookie’s alone. The most we do here is make them do a talent show, and get food and stuff like that for us. Other teams do all sorts of crazy stuff, but it really just comes down to how you’re coming at the rookies. If you’re coming at them in a degrading, condescending way then that’s a different story. You show respect and you can have fun with it, but that’s what rookie’s do. They carry helmets, they get water for the vets, they do things like that. It’s all for love though. At the end of the day were all on the same team. How much do players get into fantasy football rankings? Do the players themselves really even know how it works? Is it an ego boost? You know it’s really the fans that even let us know what’s going on with fantasy football. Everyday someone’s saying, “Oh man I picked you up,” or things like that. I don’t really know how to play it though, I don’t know what’s going on with it. All I know is the fans talk about, “You helped me win my championship,” or “I need so many points this week, Shank make it happen.” The only way I’m connected to fantasy football is through the fans, and I like that interaction.

People only see Sunday. They don’t see the work that goes in all week. They only see the touchdowns; they only see Adrian rushing for 150 yards… They don’t see all the hours upon hours... of work that goes into every day.

How much does not knowing who your quarterback is going into the preseason affect you into the regular season? The thing is we’re going to focus on the guys that are here. We’re all going to get on the same level, on the same page. Anything outside of that circle is going to fall where it’s going to fall. I’m worried about getting myself ready to catch balls, and run routes, and make the right decisions. I’m taking care of Shiancoe right now, that’s all I have control of. Then what do you do personally to get yourself ready for a game? You know people only see Sunday. They don’t see the work that goes in all week. They only see the touchdowns; they only see Adrian rushing for 150 yards… They don’t see all the hours upon hours of tape we watch every week, all the time we spend in the weight room, going over the playbooks, the coaching. There’s so many hours that go into every day, every aspect of our profession, but we take it and we run with it because this is what we do. So if you have 5 songs you have to listen to before each game what would they be? It all depends on what kind of mood I’m in. I’m a real moody person and I like to do whatever I feel at the time. One day I might want to go to Miami so I’ll get on a plane and go to Miami, the next day I might want to go to Vegas, the next India. When it comes to music one day I might rock with R&B, one day I might rock with rock, so it all depends. Most likely though (Rick) Ross is going to be in there somewhere.

Oh yea, it’s definitely fun. Whenever you retire you have to get into it… You know how to play it? Man, I’m addicted, I play every year… Oh you do? Man I don’t even know what’s going on with that. I know there’s different leagues, and certain people do different things, there’s a draft, but I don’t know how nothing works.

It’s all that. And it’s all based on points. You draft a certain number of players to each position and pick who you start based on how many are in an actual game, and then you’re given points based on how well each individual player does in the actual game. You get points for sacks, touchdowns, receiving and rushing yards, interceptions, etc. Oh, ok, ok… I guess… (laughs.) (Laughs) it’s all about the competition I guess… Yea, people really get into that, these fans take fantasy football very serious! For real! His freshman year Adrian Peterson was my sleeper pick, and I’ve picked him up every year since, but I missed my live draft last year so I had to just go with who the computer picked for me. I was pissed, he gets me 40, 50 points consistently on his own…. In a game? Not in just one game… Yea, in one game. You get 1 point for every ten yards rushed, 6 per touchdown and so on. His rookie year Adrian was runnin 150-290 yards a game consistently, he was rushing for damn near 2 or 3 touchdowns a game, so yea… I was a little heated; I was a little salty last year… Awwww…. (laughs.)

So that’s the only mandatory selection? Yea, Ross is definitely gonna be in there, and maybe Jay-Z.

So…. yea… we got a little off track… I’m sorry… (Laughs) It’s all good…

There were a few incidences, so to speak, at the beginning of the season, during training camp, involving rookies and possible hazing practices. From your point of view as a veteran, is “breaking-in” rookies vital to team building? Or is it just for fun? I think it’s half and half. It all depends on what team you play for and how each individual guy takes it. The Vikings don’t participate in hazing at all because we’re trying to win. We’re not going to tie people up to the goal posts or open up their doors while their sleeping and throw cold water on

Getting back to it, in the off season you do a lot in the community and with the kids, what were you working on in that area this off season? I do a whole lot of things. I went to visit some dialysis patients in DC, last Christmas I took a bunch of underprivileged kids Christmas shopping at Dick’s Sporting Goods, Me and Darnell Dockett ran a free football camp for over 300 kids. There’s a lot of stuff I’m involved in. Shank love the kids man, Shank love the kids.


You seem to be pretty big on health and eating right, maybe even more so then the average football player… Oh yea, your body’s your temple, you have to take care of it inside and out. If you’re going to get optimal performance from your body you have to have a clean system, an efficient system. When it comes to what I eat, I eat right, I run a lot, do a lot of stretching, always get a massage, take supplements, and I’m always in the weight room. I make sure that I’m always prepared, that my body can do what my brain tells it to do when my brain tells it to do it. If I have to make a quick cut to the right, my brain has to tell my body to do it, and then my body has to carry out the action. If I’m not at my peak I may not cut as fast or jump as high, or perform how I want to. You know what I’m saying? Expanding on that, you’re a known foodie… A foodie?? What’s a foodie? Ummm… (Laughs,) you’re a connoisseur of food… Oh! A Foodie… F-O-O-D-I-E (laughs,) yea I got my own show this year on NBC in Minnesota. They follow me around and check out what I eat at different restaurants, you know being a food connoisseur or whatever the hell you wanna call it. That’s really all it is, following me around and seeing what I like to eat, with some random topic thrown in, cause I’m a random dude at times. It’s going to be some good stuff.

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So how did that even come about? I don’t know… with all these interviews and stuff I do like that I guess people are interested in knowing me and what’s going on with me. People are always on my Twitter and facebook. They like keeping up with me, and I like it, I like interacting with people. I like talking, all that good stuff.

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So continuing down the pop culture road, how has Twitter affected the league? It’s our way of interacting with the world and with our fans. I’m more interactive on Twitter then a lot of players. I like to respond to fans and people and things of that nature. I tweet some off the wall funny stuff here and there, you know whatever’s on my mind. You’re going to get the jist of Shiancoe, of what kind of person I am. So what’s your take on football players becoming involved with the reality TV phenomenon? Mike Vick got his own show, TO got his own show, Ochocinco got his own show and was on Dancing with the Stars… What do I think about that? I feel like some of that stuff is real, but I also feel like some of that stuff isn’t accurate. I feel like some of it is scripted. As a fan you have to make your own assessment on that, but I know the inside, and some of it is… fugazi. It’s all fun; it’s something for the people. It’s entertainment, were entertainers, and that’s just another form of us entertaining. I’m not knocking anybody, everybody gotta do what they like, you feel me? Yea, I feel you, there’s one I definitley think is scripted… Man, it’s scripted as shit… Man… I’m just going to leave that alone, (laughs.) Ok off the top of your dome: Who are the top five athletes of all time… John Riggins, Mark Monk, Reggie White, Joe Namath, and Mean Joe Green. That’s original; most people pick Jordan, Aikman, and Bird… Oh you mean athletes period? Well those are my top football players. Athletes period… well shit, you gotta say Woods. Tiger Woods is in there. Finish this sentence: If I wasn’t playing football… I would be in the information technology field, or the information sciences and systems field. Are you working on anything outside of football? I’m working on getting my Masters, and a few other things, but I don’t want to expose anything right now. Ask me in about a year how things are going. Ok, lastly just a random question since you’re a Random guy; When you think of football players you think of big strong dudes, manly men, with the big dog as a the pet of choice but… you have two ferrets right? (Laughs,) yea I have two ferrets. Ok so why ferrets? It’s not even a typical pet, let alone what you think a football player would have… I’ve had them since college. I love animals, but at the same time I travel a lot so I need an animal that I’m able to handle. With all the traveling I do, they are easy animals to deal with. But since I’ve had them since college, I’ve stuck with them. They have great personalities too. They run around and hop around when they get excited, like I do when I get excited, they’re just like little puppies. Well that’s all I have for you unless you wanted to add anything? Nah, I think that’s it, just follow me on twitter @VShiancoe and check out www.visantheshiancoe.com. Ok well then, just make one prediction, from the top of your head for the season… The Vikings will at least, at least, make it to the playoffs. At least. But we definitely have the potential to win it all, and it will be a big disappointment to not…


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PerrishCox DenverBroncos PerrishCox DenverBroncos PerrishCox DenverBroncos PerrishCox DenverBroncos


We asked Visanthe Shiancoe his take on this subject from the veteran’s perspective, but I want yours: What’s your take on the rookie “hazing” that most teams have? (Laughs.) Man I hate it! It’s actually stupid. It depends on the person you’re messing with. Me, I’m a laid back type of dude, but I’m only going to take so much. It depends on how far you go overboard with it as to how I’ll react to it. You have some people who have a bad attitude or hot temper. When it comes to vets asking you to go and get somebody food there’s a lot of people that wouldn’t do it. So I mean it’s cool, it’s something that has been around the league for a long time. Like I said, it just depends on what the vets are trying to do to you. What is the Veteran/Rookie relationship is like on the Denver Broncos? The vets love the rooks. If you are making plays and have a good attitude every day, taking advice from them, then you are establishing yourself in a relationship off the field and on. It’s all about who you are and how you are going about things. You have a lot of rookies come in with a bighead like, “I’m a first round draft pick and I’m better than you and about to take your position.” That attitude will make it difficult for teammates to get along. There are other rookies who pick up the culture from the vets and help the best they can. You have the good and bad, but on the Broncos it’s great. So far, what would you say are the main differences between college and pro games? It’s not too much of a difference as far as talking about playing, but a lot of the smaller things make it different. As far as the help, you have to make alot of calls and this and that. The plays aren’t too hard, but technique wise example you have to use your hands a certain way and take a step this way or that way or you have to play inside or outside leverage. So it can be difficult but if you learn and remain smart about the whole thing the situations will guide you. In college the game is alot slower, you have some good players and some are only aiight. Some games you could take a play or two off. In the league that ain’t happening! You take one play off in the NFL and you are beat, touchdown. In the NFL every quarterback is good and everybody is fast. The major differences are talent levels and alot of the smaller mental things. Denver is notorious for having a strong defense on paper, but then struggling with the follow through. Based on training camp and the preseason how do you see it playing out this year? I really don’t know. In my opinion we are good, but I know we still have a lot of pushing to do. The first game we play Jacksonville and we all have a positive attitude and relationship. As long as we keep the communication level up and we all do our job and stay on the same page, we can come out on top.

Do you believe you will make an immediate impact with the team and on the game? Oh yea. That’s my goal. I go all out every day, even at practice; I want to have a good day. Sometimes after a mistake I get down on myself but that’s when the vets come out and tell you “Next time it comes around just do it all right.” That’s what I look forward to going into a game, to make every play right. If everyone has that attitude, I think we will be a great defense. Who or what poses the biggest threat to the Broncos playoff hopes? The quarterback, he makes all the decisions. As far as defense, all of us. We are bonded together. Like I said every quarterback is good and will find mistakes. The whole defense, we need all 11 on their job. We are our own biggest threat. Are you one of the players that uses twitter and will be tweeting fans? I am but I’m not into it like that. Every now and again I get on twitter to update a few positive things we got going on and chop with up with my family and my dudes a little bit. I also get on facebook to keep in contact with my people back home and from school. I really don’t like to give my phone number out anymore. Being that you are from Waco, Texas, what was the determining factor on making the decision to play college ball at Oklahoma State? It was a lot of things. I was actually committed to LSU. On visits there I had fun; I just didn’t think that was the right decision to make. It would have been because of the partying and all the pretty girls, which wouldn’t have been the right thing to go for. When it came down to it, I had a good relationship with the head coach and DB coach at OSU. There was no real trouble for me to get into at Oklahoma State at all. I was going to go to LSU to run track and play football. At OSU the track team wasn’t too talented so I left that dream alone to focus on football. Also at OSU I was promised I could come in and start. I wanted to play and not ride the bench. LSU had Jackson and another upper classman cornerback at the time so I wouldn’t have been able to play like I did at OSU. Coach Dunny came to my house and promised me and my parents that I would come right in and take the 1st kick return. I didn’t believe it until it actually happened. He told the truth, and that first return I ran back for a touchdown; and the rest is history. All right a couple random questions to finish this off: Who in your opinion are the top three rookies coming into this season? Me, Dez Bryant with the Cowboys and Big Suh from the Bears, that dude is all domination. In your opinion, who are the top 5 athletes of all time? Deion Sanders, Jerry Rice, Champ Bailey, Jarrel Revis, and Peyton Manning. What are your top 5 songs in your iPod? I’m listening to Boosie, Lil Wayne and Jeezy. Top song is Jeezy All White Everything. I got the new BMW and it’s white on white. That Jeezy is my theme song when I go out and get crunk and also in the locker room. Finish this sentence: If I wasn’t playing football... I would be running track. I ran the two hundred, the hundred, and I was the State Champion in long jump 3 out of the 4 years I was in high school. Any shout outs? Awready, my lil kinfolk Robert he raps and calls himself Official but to me he is family, we call him Squirt, (laughs) make sure you include that. And you know I have to shout out all my people back at home. Shout out to all them. Words By One Hunnidt

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Given that you weren’t a first round pick, do you feel that you have more to prove as a player? I mean yea. I got into a little trouble coming out of college. In the bowl game I got suspended or whatever, kind of hurt me and brought me down. But that’s my main goal; to prove everybody wrong about their doubts or about their thoughts about the type of person I am. I got a lot to prove. I still haven’t proved what I want to yet so I’m still pushing.

What are your personal goals for this season? My personal goal is to be the defensive player of the year. Yes, it’s a hard goal to accomplish but I think it should be every rookie’s goal. I want to make plays every game, help my teammates out and hopefully come out with victory. I want to be one of the biggest reasons that we win the game.

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For those who don’t know, describe the process for rookies. What are the odds of securing your spot on the team, even if you were drafted? It depends on when you were drafted. 1st and 2nd round draft picks are basically secured. The NFL is spending so much money with whatever team is picking you up you’re basically secure for one or two years. People after that, it basically depends on talent. You have to be talented, make plays, and you have to know the playbook, fit in with the scheme of things, the team, and the veterans. You basically help out the best way that you can.


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The fuSHion Magazine Vol 3 Issue 4  

Wiz Khalifa, Visanthe Shiancoe, Big Krit, Lil Flip, J Dawg, Savage, Cy Fyre, Perrish Cox, Models, Skiddalz, DJ Mr Rogers, and More

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