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MARCH 25, 2020 • THEONLINECLARION.COM • VOLUME 50, ISSUE 13 • MADISON AREA TECHNICAL COLLEGE OPINION

ARTS

SPORTS

Surviving isolation during the time of COVID-19 » 8

Sister Pie featured at Chef Series event

Baseball, softball seasons cancelled due to virus »13

Lisa Ludwinski, a Michigan baker and author, shares the story of her business, from making pies in her parents home to a fullfledged bakery » 11

Elections may require absentee voting CHRIS BIRD News Editor

College responds to COVID-19 crisis PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION

A WolfPack Alert notice on one of the campus monitors inside the Madison College main Truax building announces the initial campus closure, which has now been extended through May 15.

Classes moved online, buildings closed through May 15 TESSA MORHARDT & ANDREW KICMOL Editor in Chief & Editor Emeritus It’s been a turbulent few weeks for students, staff and faculty alike, as the situation worsened with COVID-19. It started with the cancellation of spring break study abroad trips to Italy and London, England, and having spring break extended until March 29. In the past week, it has culminated with the difficult decision to close all campus facilities until May 15 and moving all instruction online. Madison College officials have said they are trying to best ensure that students, staff and faculty stay safe and healthy.

This means all classes will meet online through the remainder of the semester. Originally, staff and faculty were going to be allowed to operate from inside the college, but now all facilities district wide will be closed and staff and faculty are required to work from home. Throughout the process, Madison College officials have stayed in contact with all of the staff and students to make sure that they know what plans are being made and what is to be expected. Madison College President Dr. Jack Daniels III shared his thought on the challenges COVID-19 poses in a statement posted on the college’s website. “This is an unprecedented time and

we continue to put the safety of the entire Madison College community in the forefront of all of our decisions,” Daniels said. “The college remains committed now more than ever to our mission of offering high quality, accessible education to our community. We continue to work together to help our students reach their personal and academic goals and also support our employees, who in turn are committed to supporting our students, through this challenging time.” Not only has Madison College closed down their buildings but have suspended all of the athletic team sea» SEE COVID-19 PAGE 7

With the COVID-19 situation becoming serious, many are practicing social distancing in an attempt to slow the spread of the virus. Large events are being cancelled, and in Wisconsin we have even had Gov. Tony Evers issue a “safer at home” order closing businesses and requiring people to limit themselves to essential travel. This whole situation comes at an important time. Election season. We are in the midst of the primary elections for both political parties, as well as countless other elections for congress, state level positions, and local positions across the nation. Louisiana, Georgia, Maryland, Kentucky and Ohio have already made the decision to delay their elections as a result of the virus. Puerto Rico has also requested to do the same. If we are to follow the order from Gov. Evers, then logically we may be facing some changing procedures as elections approach. There has been no word yet about any plans to delay elections in Wisconsin, but maintaining social distancing might make voting hard for most. One thing that anyone who would still like to vote could do to avoid coming in to contact with crowds, is vote early. Anyone can still receive an absentee ballot by request in Wisconsin until April 2. Brianna Stapleton Welch, Student Program Advisor at Madison College, reminds us » SEE ELECTIONS PAGE 7

Applying for unemployment can help through this challenging time CALEB A. BROWN Staff Writer As places of work and businesses around the world close or reduce operations, employers are forced to make the hard decision of laying off dozens of employees, attempting to minimize losses during these strange times. The Department of Health Services has ruled that restaurants may no longer serve dine in patrons, but may continue delivery and pick up services. Other businesses like tattoo shops, clothing stores, vintage stores, etc. that rely on in-shop purchases have been

forced to close altogether. Being one of the many recently laid off, I feel unsure about what the future holds. However, remembering that we are all going through this uncertainty together helps me feel a bit more at ease. For now, applying for unemployment is one of the best things we can do personally to stay on our feet after losing our source of income. The process is easy and painless. Starting at https://dwd.wisconsin.gov/ uiben/apply/ you can create an account. After this, you can log in and will be prompted to enter in some personal

information. Since Gov. Evers has declared an emergency, applicants do not have to complete a work search. There’s a specific option for applicants filing a claim because of COVID-19. Select this option and continue to complete the application. Your benefits will be calculated, and you can log in weekly to claim them. Fortunately, I work for a small business, and my employers have been reaching out to me every step of the way. They sent an email with direct instructions on how to apply for unem-

ployment benefits. Passing this information on to others is important, as larger companies may not have given this same guidance to their employees. The current situation reminds us how easy it is for someone’s world to fall apart in an instant. Factors out of our control mediate our lives on a regular basis. During more ‘normal’ times, someone else’s world may be in catastrophe. As we navigate through these times, as well as once we’re on the other side, practicing understanding, compassion, and communication is key in building a strong connection between us all.


2 | NEWS | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

THE CLARION

OFFTHESHELF

NEWSROOM

By Mark Luetkehoelter, librarian

Enjoy the Children’s Diversity Collection THE STUDENT VOICE OF MADISON AREA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

2019-2020 Tessa Morhardt EDITOR IN CHIEF

clarioned@madisoncollege.edu

Anica Graney

MANAGING EDITOR

clarion@madisoncollege.edu

Chris Bird NEWS EDITOR

clarionnews@madisoncollege.edu

Casey Anderson OPINION EDITOR

clarionopinion@madisoncollege.edu

Hailey Griffin ARTS EDITOR

clarionopinion@madisoncollege.edu

Christina Gordon SPORTS EDITOR

clarionsports@madisoncollege.edu

Britni Petitt PHOTO EDITOR

A little-known special collection housed by the Madison College Libraries is the Betty Franklin-Hammonds Children’s Diversity Collection. The collection is currently housed at the South Campus Library, offering some 350 children’s books touching on a wide variety of diversity issues. The collection offers both fiction and non-fiction books. Established in 1999 by the Madison College Student Senate and dedicated in 2003, the mission of the collection is to promote the Madison College values of excellence, respect, and integrity by helping children learn about themselves and others through the diversity of cultures celebrated in books. The Student Senate has also generously provided many of the

books in the collection. The collection is named after Franklin-Hammonds, who died in April 1999. After getting her Master’s in Social Work from Florida State University, she moved to Madison for work and became very involved with community affairs. She was president of the Madison Urban League for eight years, and during that tenure one of her primary missions was the academic achievement of African American students. She was also editor of The Madison

Times and a part-time instructor at UW-Madison’s School of Social Work. While she was the chair of the NAACP’s Education Committee, she was very involved with the Madison Metropolitan School District’s efforts to close the academic achievement gap. Throughout all of the varied work she did, interwoven was a strong focus on children’s literacy and the sharing of a wide range of perspectives. The collection contains not only a variety of stories

from different ethnicities and different parts of the world, but also stories from different genders and people of different abilities. A sampling of some of the titles in the collection include “The Librarian of Basra: a True Story from Iraq,” “Angkat: the Cambodian Cinderella,” “The International Cookbook for Kids,” “Amelia to Zora: Twenty-Six Women Who Changed the World,” “Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt,” and “My Diary from Here to There (Mi Diario de Aqui Hasta Alla),” and “Views From our Shoes: Growing Up With a Brother or Sister With Special Needs.” The collection is searchable in our Worldcat Discovery catalog using the keyword phrase children’s diversity collection.

Stephen Fabal WEB EDITOR

Emily Merlin

SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

Andrew Kicmol EDITOR EMERITUS

Luis Velazquez

BUSINESS DIRECTOR

clarionads@madisoncollege.edu

Brad Burt BROADCAST GENERAL MANAGER

clarionmedia@madisoncollege.edu

Mandy Scheuer OFFICE MANAGER

Maia Lathrop ILLUSTRATOR

Caleb Brown Destiny Hines Michelle Ledesma Grant Nelson Hunter Turpin Paige Zezulka CONTRIBUTORS

Doug Kirchberg ADVISOR

dkirchberg@madisoncollege.edu

CHRISTINA GORDON / CLARION

Protestors march past the Madison College Truax Campus on their way to the airport in opposition to plans to bring F-35 fighter jets to the Dane County Regional Airport.

Group gathers in February to protest F-35 plan ANICA GRANEY Managing Editor

CONTACT US

NEWS PHONE: (608) 246-6809 ADVERTISING PHONE:(608) 243-4809 FAX: (608) 246-6488

SUBMISSIONS To submit an item for publication, drop it off at The Clarion office, Room B1260G Truax and Room D237 Downtown, or email it to clarioned@madisoncollege.edu. The Clarion reserves the right to refuse to publish any editorial submission or advertisement, which may be edited for length, taste and grammar. All opinions expressed in editorials and advertisements do not necessarily represent those of the Madison College administration, faculty, the student body or the Clarion staff. CORRECTIONS The Clarion strives for accuracy in all of its articles. If you have questions or concerns, please call us at (608) 246-6809 or e-mail: clarioned@madisoncollege.edu. REMEMBERING Adam Lee Suby, 1987-2009 Philip Ejercito, 1981-2013

On Feb. 29, a large group of Madison community members spent their leap day gathered outside the Madison College Truax campus to protest the incoming F-35 fighter jets the Air Force wants to station at the Dane County Regional Airport. As any student, teacher, or worker of the Truax campus will tell, it is not uncommon to hear loud jets fly overhead during the school day. Some community members have been up in arms about these proposed F-35 fighter jets since the announcement was first made in the fall, fearing the devaluation of their property and disruption of daily life made by the louder fighter jets. A large group started to form around 11:45 a.m. along Anderson Street near the Wright Street intersection. Large signs, megaphones,

and a variety of instruments accompanied the protesters as they made their way along Wright Street in between the Health and Information Technology building and the main Truax building. The protest lasted about 45 minutes and was policed by the Madison Police Department. Madison College had no affiliation with any regulation or contribution towards the protest. A concerned community member who was a part of the protest shared her thoughts with the Clarion. “This whole housing area is going to have to move, my sister’s property is going to go down in value, thousands of people are going to be affected, and they claim it’s for jobs which I’ve heard is a total misnomer, very misleading and dishonest. The military has a statement (in their proposal) that they’ll go where the least impact is and there’s tons of impact here so they’re actual-

ly breaking their own rules by coming here,” she said. “It’s a terrible spot for new, extremely loud, obnoxious, military planes to be coming in. And the planes now are so disturbing. It wakes little kids from naps. And I’ve gone to (city council) meetings and complained and they say things like, ‘yeah, we’re not supposed to fly over

your neighborhoods’ and it’s like, well, why are you doing that?” Despite efforts made by these community members, Madison remains a preferred location as of the latest update from the Air Force. However, they are still a few years off from action with projections for arrival starting in spring 2023.

CHRISTINA GORDON / CLARION

An aerial view of the protestors as they march,

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THE CLARION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | NEWS | 3

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

These buttons remind people of them importance of completing the 2020 Census.

Completing the Census is important for many reasons PAIGE ZEZULKA Staff Writer As another 10 years have gone by, the time has come for the Madison Community along with the rest of the country, to complete the 2020 United States Census. America has been submitting the census since 1790 making this the 24th census to date. Mandated by the Constitution, American citizens (and non-citizens) are encouraged to complete it. Census day, April 1, 2020, is just around the corner. Each residence in the country will receive information in the mail notifying them it’s now time to fill out the census. Individuals can fill this short questionnaire out either online, by phone, paper or in person. Since filling out the census is new to most of Madison College students, there are some tips that may assist them on the task. Brian Grady, the Principal Planner from the City of Madison Planning Division explains the importance that the form is filled out based on where an individual is living or will be living on April 1, the census reference date. This creates a more accurate count and lessens the odds of under counting or double counting pupils. If a student is on spring break and are away from the general Madison

area during that date, they should still count themselves based on where they have been living most of the year. “It’s important that everyone living in a household gets counted on a form. If you are living in an apartment or a house, whether you have 2 people, 3, 4, 5, everyone needs to be counted on the form,” Grady said. This is regardless of relation. Participation in the census is needed to create data that directs many aspects in the country. It calculates population in every state so the country can have equal representation within each level of government. Therefore, it is used to direct the number of house of representatives each state holds. “Equal population, equal voting. Each person, one vote,” said Grady. It also affects our state’s federal funding. “Approximately, $675 billion in federal funding is distributing every year,” said Grady, “Those numbers are good for 10 years. So, each person that is not counted on the form puts about $2,000 of loss in federal funding per person, per year.” Not only that, the census count brings in data that is used in certain decisions focusing on community transportation, housing affordability, educational and non-profit programs, as well as other city, state and govern-

ment related work. According to Grady, 10 years ago, Madison had one of the highest response rates in the country to the census, though our state still sees a trend of unequal response rates within all backgrounds and demographics. This leaves groups such as African Americans, Latinx communities, infants up to 5 years of age, renters (such as college students) and people who relocate often as undercounted populations. “Our population and demographics have been changing over time and so we need to make sure that we’re adjusting these subgroups that have been undercounted,” said Grady. There have been some past concerns about the census questionnaire that have led some groups to be undercounted, such as the distrust citizens have on the government and on society. Other concerns have been confusion on what the information gathered from the census is used for. Grady said the data collected from the census is all confidential. It cannot be shared to other agencies or departments and it cannot be used in any way to harm an individual. In order to promote these groups that need representation, the City of Madison founded the Complete Count Committee in 2019, with the chair being

State Representative Sheila Stubbs. The committee is filled with a mix of demographics and backgrounds that have been networking throughout the community for the past nine months to ensure results for the year of 2020. With the help of committee, community, and city staff members, awareness and encouragement to fill out the census has been shared via social media, local radio, as well as by hosting neighborhood events and promotional activities. According to Grady, $150,000 was provided by the City of Madison for this year’s overall census initiative. He also mentions that there are many census jobs available around the Madison area. There are part-time and full-time positions offering flexible hours, paid training and a $20 per hour pay rate. Madison College students are encouraged to join. If an individual is interested in helping the community while earning income, they can go online to the Census Bureau website https://2020census.gov/en/jobs.html to apply. “This is an important thing, an important civic duty, just like voting, to fill out this form and have that political representation at different levels of government and to help bring to the Madison community our fair of federal funding,” Grady said.

‘Coming Out for Liberation’ discussion hosted by Gender & Sexuality Alliance ANICA GRANEY Managing Editor

ALEXIS FLORES / CLARION

Author and activist Alex Iantaffi speaks at the Madison College Truax Campus at a Gender and Sexuality Alliance event in celebration of International Women’s Day.

In celebration of International Women’s Day, Madison College’s Gender and Sexuality Alliance (GSA) invited Alex Iantaffi, a champion for gender and sexuality discussions, to talk to Madison College students about gender and sexuality. This presentation took place on March 9 in D1630 with the “Coming Out for Liberation” presentation for students taking place from 1-2 p.m. and the “Life Isn’t Binary” workshop for staff taking place from 2:30-4 p.m. Alex Iantaffi is a licensed marriage and family therapist, author and independent scholar. They are also the former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Sexual and Relationship Therapy and currently host the Gender Stories podcast. Iantiffi began the “Coming Out for Liberation” presentation by having the audience acknowledge the indigenous lands they are currently on, their ancestors, and the web of life. They used breathing exercises to accompany this time of acknowledgement as well. “Gender is a landscape,” said Iantaffi. They used this metaphor to show how gender should be thought about. “If we think of gender as a landscape, we can open our minds to the possibility of other gender identities or expressions that we have not yet seen ourselves.” Iantiffi explained that assigned gender and gender expression are different and aren’t just

a recent phenomenon that some people use to discredit various gender discussions. “Gender hasn’t always been thought about the way we think about it now.” Continuing by giving examples of how gender roles don’t always line up with the traditional sense as they do now and were in fact sometimes mixed in different cultures at different times. This is known as gender expansiveness and Iantiffi uses this to show how this “is a part of this land’s past and present.” Iantiffi described the differences between sex, gender role, gender identity, and sexual orientation and said that current society has all of these factors separated into two categories: male and female. They go on to say that many people feel a mix of these factors that don’t necessarily fit into the traditional male or female categories. They go on to defend these different expressions: “Just because you haven’t met that gender identity or gender expression, doesn’t mean that gender identity or gender expression isn’t real.” So, what does it mean to come out? Iantiffi stresses the importance of coming out and working against oppression. “This is also why straight people don’t need to come out because they are not oppressed in this society.” Gender liberation is about inclusion and Iantiffi believes that everyone should help dismantle gender roles in this society. “What would happen if we dismantled gender? Anybody can be anything. That is the vision.”


4 | NEWS | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

THE CLARION

PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION

A projection wall in the Truax Campus cafeteria announces Madison College’s extended spring break.

COVID-19

Timeline FEB. 5

Wisconsin’s first case confirmed in Dane County (International travel related).

Below is a timeline of COVID-19 cases and COVID-19 related events in relation to Wisconsin and Madison College.

FEB. 6

Madison College President Dr. Jack E. Daniels III sends out a college-wide coronavirus update, letting students know about the positive case in the state and reminding students and staff to stay home if they feel ill.

MARCH 12

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers declares a public health emergency. The order allows the Department of Health Services to take all necessary and appropriate actions to respond to COVID-19. Two more COVID-19 cases are reported in Dane County, and Wisconsin’s total is now up to seven. The night before the girls state basketball championship games were to be played, the WIAA cancels all remaining winter state tournaments. Madison College announces that spring break will be extended through March 29. All on-campus events of 50 people or more are suspended through April 5, and athletic team seasons have been suspended. Any college-sponsored travel to events consisting of 50 people or more has also been cancelled.

MARCH 11

Total of confirmed cases in Wisconsin reaches six, with two cases in Fond du Lac County and one in Waukesha County. All are travel related. Madison College’s Center for International Education contacts the college’s international students to encourage them to reconsider any travel plans for spring break due to COVID-19. A message from Madison College President Dr. Jack Daniels lets students and staff know the college is making plans to provide academic instruction even in the event of a suspension of on-campus learning following the end of spring break on March 23.

PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION

Madison College announces that all college international travel programs are put on hold.

MARCH 14

MARCH 19

PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION

MARCH 10

Dane County’s second case is announced and the state’s total is up to three. Madison College announces it is suspending all college-supported travel to out-of-state locations and all travel to large-scale events of more than 250 people, including conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings scheduled through April 30. This includes both the baseball and softball teams out-of-state trips scheduled to begin on March 11.

MARCH 13

The Department of Health Services announces that the number of COVID-19 cases in Wisconsin has reached 19. Madison College announces the cancellation of all athletic activities, including spring sports, for the foreseeable future. All athletic facilities are closed through April 5, including practices, camps and fitness events. Gov. Tony Evers directed the Department of Health Services to order the closure of all K-12 schools from March 18 through April 6, although the re-opening date is subject to change. Nationally, 25.8 million students have been impacted by school closures due to the virus.

Wisconsin reports a total of 27 positive cases of COVID-19, including six in Dane County. Dane County issues an order banning all gatherings of 250 people or more.

Chick-fil-a, along with many other restaurants, offer only drive-thru or carry-out during the COVID-19 pandemic.

FEB. 28

Madison College cancels a college-sanctioned spring break trip to Italy due to the COVID-19 outbreak there.

Madison College President Dr. Daniels announces that “all Madison College facilities will remain closed through the end of the spring semester, Friday, May 15, in an effort to help slow the spread of COVID-19.” The statement said classes will resume using online delivery formats beginning March 30. Gov. Tony Evers announces two people have died from COVID19, the first deaths from the virus in the state.

MARCH 15

Dane County Public Health Officials ordered the immediate closure of all schools, banned gatherings of more than 50 people and limited restaurants to no more than half of their capacity. Madison College announces it is closing all facilities effective March 16 in response to “escalating concerns regarding the spread of COVID-19.” College officials are continuing to plan for instruction to resume on March 30 utilizing alternative delivery methods.

MARCH 17

Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers bans gatherings of more than 10 people statewide after the number of COVID-19 cases in the state rises to 91. State officials say there is evidence of community spread in Dane County, Milwaukee County and Kenosha County. Malls and bars throughout the state have been closed and restaurants are limited to take-out or delivery services only.

MARCH 20

Confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Wisconsin rise to 206, with three deaths. Gov. Tony Evers warns things will get worse before they get better. He said the state is facing a shortage of tests and equipment for health care workers.

MARCH 16

With Wisconsin’s number of COVID-19 cases having risen to 47, Gov. Tony Evers bans gatherings of more than 50 people statewide in an effort to curb the spread. Wisconsin Emergency Management moved to its highest alert level, the first time it has issued a “level 1” alert in response to a health-related incident.

MARCH 23

Gov. Tony Evers announces plans to institute a “safer at home” policy, closing all non-essential businesses and further encouraging residents to stay at home. Wisconsin’s number of cases of coronavirus stands at 416. Milwaukee County has the most with 204 confirmed cases. The state reported its fifth death from the virus.


THE CLARION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | NEWS | 5

Student Senate election begins March 30 HAILEY GRIFFIN Arts Editor Despite the closing of all Madison College campuses, the Student Senate Election will still take place. The election process is set to begin on March 30 via student email. Ballots will be sent out to students’ emails on the morning of March 30 and will close at noon on April 3. Students can also participate in the write-in candidate process, in which voters write the name of the student that they think would be a good candidate on their ballot. The winners of the election will likely be announced on Monday, April 6, via email and social media. According to Ellie Rome, Student Senate Advisor, “anyone who is eligible to vote will automatically get the email telling them to go and vote. Then they’ll see all the candidates, which will include a link to a candidate profile.” Candidate profiles will be located in the same section, as well as on the Student Senate website at https://www.madisoncollegesenate.org/. So, who is eligible to vote? Any student who is taking degree credit classes in a certificate or diploma program may vote. On the other hand, to become an eligible candidate, you must also be taking at least six credits in degree credit classes and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Because of the campus-wide shut-down, candidates will lose the ability to conduct in-person campaigns. However, candidates can still campaign via various social media networks, WolfPack Connect, or various friends who are also Madison

College students. According to Rome, “there are slightly more candidates running this semester than there were a year ago. …As for voters, our voter participation typically has not been very high. That’s very common across the U.S for community college student government elections.” Usually, voter participation includes 3 percent or less of the student body. When asked why voter participation was so low, Rome stated, “I think the main reason is that, especially for community college students, it’s easier to disengage from out of the classroom events. A lot of people have a billion things going on in their lives.” Madison seats on the Student Senate are open to students at the Truax, Goodman South, Commercial, and West campuses. In addition, there are five seats for the college’s four regional campuses – Reedsburg, Watertown, Fort Atkinson and Portage. Of course, there is also the position of Student Senate president. For the first time in three years, there are two candidates for the presidential position: Sean Green and Connor Jacobson. Along with the Student Senate president, 19 senators are elected as well. Out of the 19 senators, four officers are elected. According to Rome, the four different officer roles include “public relations, team development, legislative affairs, and administration and finance. They each oversee different parts of the senate to make sure that things run, and then they run subcommittees of the senate.” The role of the senators,

Connor Jacobson

Academic Program: Marketing Senate Position Running For: President Involvement: National Society of Leadership and Success, Virtual Reality club, French Club (Pending) What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate President? Honesty, Understanding, Loyalty, Truthful and Trustworthy. I'm good at talking to strangers, I have a genuine interest in others, I'd like to say I'm a solid leader, I'm able to solve problems and work as a team. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would love to see more of the main parking lots repaved. As a student I've personally experienced damages and missed opportunities because of the state of certain lots. I would like to continue helping students feel like they are in a safe, welcoming and educational environment. I would like to start calling Madison College "Madison Tech."

Sean Green*

Academic Program: IT Network Specialist Senate Position Running For: President and Student Senator Involvement: Student Senate Involvement: Admin & Finance Committee, Rules Committee, Legislative Affairs Committee, Team Development Committee, IT council (student body rep, not senate rep). I also work up at the front desk for Student Development and Retention Services. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would like to continue to push the issue on making mental health more widely accepted and known as they are already recognized as such in the Americans with Disabilities Act. I want to spend more time on the housing issue, and start to get that going as it has been somewhat dormant. Everything that is currently a priority, 3 yr plan, textbook affordability, etc. I want to keep those things alive and thriving. I want to work on getting more action in terms of representation at Goodman South going, I want to see

TRIBUNE NEWS TRIBUNE

Even though we’re not on campus, remember to vote in the Student Senate election. however, is to represent the student body. Rome states that “they sit on different committees in the college, or within the senate. They’re on shared governance counsels, and they’re supposed to be out there gathering feedback and insight about what is important to the students.” After being elected, presidents, senators, and officers must undergo a training and orientation process. Before the candidates are sworn into office on May 7, they participate in a three-hour, in-person training and team building session at the end of April. After they’re sworn in, student senate members remain a part

of the student senate until the first week in May the following year. The student senate also meets every other week during the summer to participate in more team building and training. This year, the Student Senate will have to find a way to switch meetings to an online format. Regarding online meetings, Rome said, “I hope that we’re still able to create community and bonding even though we might be restricted to online. We’re adaptable, and we’re in Student Life making a lot of tentative plans that make sure we provide the same engagement and community and

STUDENT SENATE CANDIDATE PROFILES

*Incumbent candidates who are Senators or Officers our public relations start to make more of a footprint. I want to continue to make the relationship between Shared Governance and Senate strong so that together we can be more efficient towards finding problems students may be having and finding the resolutions for them. Lastly, I want to keep doing what we can to help the issue of retention. Even though we have a lot of amazing things to help students who struggle, amazing instructors taking time out of their personal lives, the list would go on, etc, there are still slip holes where a student who is trying to utilize all of the help options to succeed, just doesn’t end up succeeding and that I want to fill those cracks in. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I like to be organized, set my priorities. I like to be prepared,

experience for students, even if we might not be able to see each other in person.” Rome anticipates that the Student Senate meetings will incorporate WebEx and perhaps Zoom, a couple of video conferencing applications. At this point in time, the Student Senate is working on issues that deal with housing accessibility (access to affordable housing and housing resources for students) and digital equity (student access to digital devices, software, and internet). “I think we will see, this semester, just how much digital equity is important to students,” Rome noted.

know my information before coming to the table. I like to learn, like to see statistics, very sharp eye, perfectionism. I like to engage and talk with people, I like to listen, with that comes empathy. I start what I finish, I follow through. I like to make sure there are open lines of communication between people, helps with being effective. When I want to see something change, when it makes me upset because someone or something is getting the raw end of the deal, I get serious, when I am serious, I put everything in it, I am approachable, I love to help, I love helping others. I am a team player, I am the Sean Green machine. What qualities do you possess that make you a good candidate to be the Madison College Senate President? The ability to listen, to empathize with others, do over, a leader isn’t a mix or match of qualities, its being able to have the core values of what makes a person whole to whom they are but also to whom they know they would like to be. Truth and honor and integrity. Those are my core values that I try and live by each day. Those same core values allow me to know what strengths and or weaknesses I do or do not have. And though that may not make sense if someone says “but you only see yourself one way, when everyone else may see you as someone else”. Well its circle, with my core values I know that that would be a weakness like everyone else, so I can then make it a strength to seek council on how others perceive me. Its like that with everything. As long as I have this willingness to want to help and grow and improve with which i decide (Senate, and Madison College in this case) then I stay true to my goals and the likeliness of achieving them. Leaders are not leaders from birth, they become leaders when they stay true to themselves, tackle a problem and fail, they learn from it, not because why they failed as a failure but instead how did there become a disconnect and why did this attempt not seem to mend and repair it. Leaders small and large are seasoned and have had to know they aren’t always right, sometimes listening and empathizing may be most effective, and that a true leader is willing to step back when the best idea isn’t the “leaders” idea, but the teams. Hopefully this, whatever I just wrote hear, shows that I make a good candidate. Never louder than lovely - my HS band director


6 | NEWS | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

Jenna Boyd

Academic Program: Post-Baccalaureate Paralegal Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: At University of Wisconsin Law School: 1L Class rep - Middle Eastern Law Student Association - elected as 1st year class rep, helped coordinate events, spread awareness of the group, helped plan annual LEO banquet. I had to work with a wide variety of personalities in various capacities. It was important to be an active listener and adapt/shift gears proactively. 1L Class rep Children’s Justice Project - elected as 1st year class rep, similarly helped coordinate events and spread awareness of the student group amongst students. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I’m very organized and possess an eclectic set of real life experiences. I’ve attended and graduated from a 4 year degree, I’m a mother of 3, I have had both entry level and professional careers, and I was raised in poverty and now have a fairly secure life. I can relate to many different perspectives while staying focused on the specific student’s needs. I’ve also professionally tutored and worked with adult students in the past. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I think the only way to make a system better or to keep a well run system going is to be involved and contribute. I’m a team player and I would like to help advance and achieve current goals.

Jonathan Jones*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: Student Senate VP Public Relations (2018-19): Interpersonal communications, social media outreach and utilization, organizational marketing. Student Senate President (2019-20): Inter-organizational collaboration, meeting facilitation, administrative delegation and planning. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? Leadership experience through a variety of both professional and academic environments, ability to express an idea in an efficient and agreeable way pursuant of lobbying/advocacy, ability to remain on task and complete a project by a deadline. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would like to see more interaction with the student body itself. I feel that the student leadership has a tendency of being too far removed for their constituents.

Ali Soumano

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer and IT Network Specialist Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: I am working in Student Life at the front desk. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I am speaking 8 languages and I was a leader of a big association in my country call “Les Jeune de la Caverne” and “ L’Excellence”. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would like to be engaged for student and give them the opportunity to enjoy being on the campus.

Haybe Haghi

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: I worked in the welcome center at Truax to welcome everyone to the campus. I am involved in Student Ambassadors. I am also a part of Intercultural Connect. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I am bilingual and have a background of multiculturalism. I have experience in communications since I worked as interpreter before that helps to understand details and try to find solutions in complex issues. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I want to represent my fellow students in the best possible way and to be their voice. I would like to be one of the Madison College Student Senators that make the positive change that students’ need.

THE CLARION

STUDENT SENATE

CANDIDATE PROFILES CONTINUED Sean Green*

Academic Program: IT Network Specialist Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement Student Senate Involvement: Admin & Finance Committee, Rules Committee, Legislative Affairs Committee, Team Development Committee, IT council (student body rep, not senate rep). I also work up at the front desk for Student Development and Retention Services. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I like to be organized, set my priorities. I like to be prepared, know my information before coming to the table. I like to learn, like to see statistics, very sharp eye, perfectionism. I like to engage and talk with people, I like to listen, with that comes empathy. I start what I finish, I follow through. I like to make sure there are open lines of communication between people, helps with being effective. When I want to see something change, when it makes me upset because someone or something is getting the raw end of the deal, I get serious, when I am serious, I put everything in it, I am approachable, I love to help, I love helping others. I am a team player, I am the Sean Green machine. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would like to continue to push the issue on making mental health more widely accepted and known as they are already recognized as such in the Americans with Disabilities Act. I want to spend more time on the housing issue, and start to get that going as it has been somewhat dormant. Everything that is currently a priority, 3 yr plan, textbook affordability, etc. I want to keep those things alive and thriving. I want to work on getting more action in terms of representation at Goodman South going, I want to see our public relations start to make more of a footprint. I want to continue to make the relationship between Shared Governance and Senate strong so that together we can be more efficient towards finding problems students may be having and finding the resolutions for them. Lastly, I want to keep doing what we can to help the issue of retention.

Katrina Willis*

Academic Program: Medical Coding Specialist Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: Current Student Senator 2017-Present and served in 2009: Facilities Investment and Planning Council, Professional Development Council, Academic Appeals Board, Public Safety Committee, Governor of Madison Area Technical College for Wisconsin Student Government. Current State President-elect (2020-Present) and member of Business Professionals of America (BPA), Vice President (2008) and President (2009 & 2017). Current member and former State President for SkillsUSA 2017-2018. Current member of Women LEAD and former Board Member 2018-2019; and Treasurer 20172018. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance volunteer 2018-Present. Scholar of Promise Mentor and Coach 2018-Present. Lab Assistant in the Accounting & Business Open Lab 2017-Present. Current member of Phi Theta Kappa since 2009. Member and volunteer at the First United Methodist Church since 2003. Volunteer, Special Olympics Wisconsin Region 6 2020-Present What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? Katrina is passionate about advocating for others, as well as diversity equity, and inclusion for all Madison College stakeholders, especially traditional and nontraditional students. Driven and dedicated to resolving issues that impact Madison College and all of its stakeholders, yet agile enough to think on my feet and make adjustments/recommendations as additional information is available. Experience working with the Madison College Student Senate; in Shared Governance; on the Facilities Planning and Invest Council; Professional Development Council; and the Public Safety Committee (and their initiatives); and administrative and office management skills. Great listener with resources to get the job done. Advocate. Collaborator. I also empower others to excel in their academic, leadership, and professional endeavors. I also have the wisdom and experience of serving under multiple administrations. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would like to accomplish each goal and initiative established by Student Senate for the 2020-21 academic year. I believe in light of the current pandemic, I would like for Student Senate and I to complete more community and outreach services to support students, as well as other Madison College stakeholders. I would like to 1) complete and implement the Energy Management Plan and start working on the next sustainability plan for the college; 2) establish mental health support protocol for the college; and 3) facilitate removal of barriers that prevent students from completing their degrees and help them return to college after overcoming barriers.

Elizabeth Hessler*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: Student Senate- Vice President of Legislative Affairs, Madison College: In this position my responsibilities were to assist with the maintenance of rules with in Student Senate and the relations with legislators. I learned about parliamentary procedure used in Student Senate and Student Senate policy creation. Model United Nations- President, UW-Stevens Point: In this position responsibilities included education and preparations for a national conference. I learned about leading a team and working collaboratively. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? With a deep interest in improving future experiences for public audiences, my personal passion for change can help move Student Senate initiatives such as food insecurity solutions forward. My attention to detail can assist in the maintenance and improvement of the image of Student Senate as a group of serious, professional students that want the best for the student body. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I am invested in the expansion of use of Open Educational Resources by faculty in order to further textbook affordability for students.

Marcus Rubio*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: During college, I offered quite a bit of my time to YWCA Madison. Initially I was a volunteer for the Children’s Program, and shortly after I became the Marketing & Development Intern. After a couple of months as an Intern, I was asked to take over the Volunteer Coordinator position. As an intern, I was to schedule team meetings, market annual events both online and in print, fundraise, keep in contact with donors, network, and fulfill data entry tasks almost simultaneously. As a Volunteer Coordinator I was to recruit people of all ages, run background checks, schedule interviews, host orientations, and also to train volunteers into their appropriate position. I learned about the beneficial impact people have on other people’s lives. I believe empathy is a characteristic that will drive us to a better future. Currently, I am an intern with United Way of Dane county and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Dane County. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? One quality that I humbly carry around with me is my drive to be the leader. I strive to give equal opportunity and trust in the team I work with during any given situation. To me, a leader should be responsible, personable, enthusiastic with an open mind, and aim for strategic change all while communicating effectively. I believe that these are the skills I’ve been able perfect in my extracurricular activities and workplaces. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? With the Madison College Student Senate, I would like one of my accomplishments to be getting more students involved within our school, and even more so within our community. I believe college can be a tough position to put one’s self through. In one moment students may feel confident where they are going in life, and maybe the next moment they hit a roadblock, or some unexpected life occurrence happens causing them to not feel confident, and feel distraught. I believe the connections we make in our lives are for an important reason, and finding that reason at the right time will help students to stay on track and fight for what they believe in regardless of what life wants to throw at us.

Nicholas Winer

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I’m hyper-involved in the current political landscape of today and see myself and my interest in the subject working in the advantage of the school with my involvement in the senate. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? One of my ideas include expanding the institution of parking and all around providing a better space for student accomplishments.


THE CLARION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | NEWS | 7

Barbara Moreno*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: I have worked with the Volunteer Center at the college, specifically with different types of volunteer activities and the Service Learning Academy. I am also part of PTK honors society as the Co-VP of Social Media and Marketing, where I get to experience with leadership and teamwork. I like to explore different areas with the honors program. This semester I decided to start a project on a memoir of my life in Wisconsin. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I see myself as a hard worker. I am determined and passionate to help others and learn about what I am capable of achieving by doing so. I am also a very responsible and active learner. I am not afraid to ask and to try different things. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? Help promote the work and expand the invitation to others for the great opportunity being part of the Senate is. Work and complete one of the ideas the Senate has. Specifically, try to work more on the house accessibility issue.

Justin Jones

STUDENT SENATE CANDIDATE PROFILES CONTINUED

Eric Ziebell*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: TriO What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? Politics runs in my bloodline. My oldest brother is the current president of this student Senate and I wanted to try my hand in the political spectrum. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? Make changes to the students’ lives and impact the community as a whole

Academic Program: Cyber Security Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: Current Senator on Public Relations Committee, Team Development Committee, and IT Council. IT Network Intern What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I have been on senate before and i am determined to do stuff! What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? Expand and help students voice their opinions!

Vernon Ziegler

Aleemuddin Syed*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, Delta Alpha Pi Honor Society, Staff writer for the Clarion What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? Dedication, ambition, persistence, verbal skills, writing ability What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? Promote student awareness of relevant issues.

ELECTIONS

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 that “this is a great way to still be civically engaged and cast your vote while maintaining social distancing. The Wisconsin Elections Commission is recommending that people request absentee ballots sooner rather than later. Don’t wait until the deadline.” Before this situation became more serious, Madison College had early voting and voter registration events planned, but these have had to be cancelled. Ellie Rome, Student Program Advisor at Madison College, wrote “unfortunately the Early Voting has been cancelled at Madison College due to the extended spring break and facilities closures.” Rome went on to explain that early

COVID-19

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 sons, events, and traveling. Madison College is trying to do its best to make sure COVID-19 does not spread. As the situation with COVID-19 continues to evolve, Daniels encourages students and staff to watch for additional communication from the college. “Together we are facing many unknowns, disappointments and frustrations. The patience and understanding you have all shown is truly remarkable and our mission to serve our students and community is stronger than ever,” Daniels said. “We will continue to communicate with you. Watch your campus email, visit our website pages devoted to COVID-19 updates or follow news updates we provide on our official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts.” With all of these changes that are being made, Madison College’s only

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Goodman South Campus Senator Involvement: Student Senate as a Senator, Wolfpack techie as a volunteer technician What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? I have some really good detailing, listening, social and researching skills. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? A better place for students to achieve success.

voting is still planned to be happening in Madison, and there is a constantly updating list of early voting sites at http://www.cityofmadison. com/clerk/elections-voting/voting/ vote-absentee/in-person-absentee-voting-hours-and-locations. Both Rome and Stapleton Welch recommended that anyone with further questions or concerns regarding elections, absentee ballots, registration, etc. in Wisconsin turn to the toll-free voter help line run by the Wisconsin Election Commission at 1-866-868-3947. Anyone who is already registered to vote can request an absentee ballot at myvote.wi.gov, and anyone looking for more info on absentee voting can find it at https://elections.wi.gov/ sites/elections.wi.gov/files/201901/29-32%20Absentee%20Voting%20 2019.pdf

“Together we are facing many unknowns, disappointments and frustrations. The patience and understanding you have all shown is truly remarkable ...” DR. JACK DANIELS III MADISON COLLEGE PRESIDENT thing in mind is the safety of everyone in Madison. There are many resources out there to help show you how to prevent getting COVID-19, how you are able to help others who are more at risk. You are able to find helpful resources online at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prepare/get-yourhousehold-ready-for-COVID-19.html

Francisco Eujenin Campos*

Academic Program: Liberal Arts Transfer Senate Position Running For: Madison Senator Involvement: Before coming to Madison College I went to a different technical college, NWTC, there I was part of the student senate and also a student ambassador. Since it was a small college, I was the only international student in the student senate, therefore, it was difficult to make people hear what I had to say. With the help of my self initiative, I overcame that difficulty and started taking the initiative in some project (most of them related with diversity and inclusion). Last semester, I joined the organization United Common Ground here in campus, there I learned a lot more about different cultures and I realized how diverse this country and college really are. I also started volunteering at Academia Latina, a center that helps Spanish speaking students to earn their GED. What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate? Since my early years in high school I have always had leadership positions and since I got to the U.S. I have been working really hard to make the language stop being a barrier for my leadership skills. I have years of experience at organizing events I am very good with social media. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I want to be able to show my leadership skills, emphasize more the diversity in campus, and help to improve the presence of Madison College in the community.

Connor Jacobson

Academic Program: Marketing Senate Position Running For: President Involvement: National Society of Leadership and Success, Virtual Reality club, French Club (Pending) What qualities and skills do you possess that would make you a good candidate for Senate President? Honesty, Understanding, Loyalty, Truthful and Trustworthy. I'm good at talking to strangers, I have a genuine interest in others, I'd like to say I'm a solid leader, I'm able to solve problems and work as a team. What would you like to accomplish with the Student Senate? I would love to see more of the main parking lots repaved. As a student I've personally experienced damages and missed opportunities because of the state of certain lots. I would like to continue helping students feel like they are in a safe, welcoming and educational environment. I would like to start calling Madison College "Madison Tech."


8 | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

opinion

THE CLARION

THEBUZZ

Questions asked to you, our readers.

EDITOR: CASEY ANDERSON

What are you most looking forward to this spring break?

CLARIONOPINION@ MADISONCOLLEGE.EDU

"Zip lining." Hailey Kohls

"Going to Perkins at 11:30 at night."

"Crying." Alex Cook

Brandon Jones

Surviving isolation

Bittersweet end of the semester due to virus CASEY ANDERSON Opinion Editor I doubt many of the graduating class was expecting last week to be their last time walking out of Madison College’s campuses as a student. For some, that may be relieving and celebratory. Hey, saving on gas money, right? Not too shabby of a deal. But for many others, including myself, it is heart wrenching and bittersweet. The Clarion staff, although what you see of us is precisely wrapped up into a few AP styled pages, is a family. We spend our time writing for you, playing harmless (most of the time…) pranks on each other, laughing in the office, and getting to know each other, well, way too well. It breaks my heart to think that just last week, it was our last time walking out of a school that has brought so many unexpected friendships that will soon be stretched over state borders, and memories that drift into a sleepy head, resting on a pillow. I know we are all sick of hearing news regarding the coronavirus. I know that online classes will most definitely suck. The technology we’ve all had our eyes glued to for years, will be encompassing and becoming a vessel for our education, and that is not ideal. This whole situation has made many of us realize that school is not what we have always made it out to be. It is more than just homework, or an annoyance that forces you to drag yourself out of bed, a sleep-thief. School may cause a few pains,

TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

Fending off illness during COVID-19 pandemic not easy CHRIS BIRD News Editor

» SEE SEMESTER PAGE 9

I started feeling sick on Tuesday, March 13. I didn’t think much of it, I mostly felt tired and had a bit of a headache, but I had to take a test, try to get some sources for articles and generally live my life. By the next day I was completely out of commission. I had a fever, then I had chills, developed a cough, and I ached all over. I immediately thought that this was checking off marks that you don’t want to be seeing, given the current situation over COVID-19, but I still haven’t gotten the chance to get tested. All I keep hearing about regarding testing is that there aren’t enough to go around, and if I’m being honest, I don’t think I could even have driven to a doctor because of a combination of how awful I felt and how disoriented I was from a lack of sleep. I did decide, though, that this seemed too close to what the symptoms of the new virus can be, and I was going to ride this one out in self-quarantine. The day before I started feeling fatigued, my partner had actually left on a trip for work (awful time to travel, but they are actually doing fine), which means I am quarantined for real. Rolling

CLARION EDITORIAL BOARD 2019-2020 Tessa Morhardt

Chris Bird

EDITOR IN CHIEF

NEWS EDITOR

Anica Graney

Hailey Griffin

MANAGING EDITOR

Casey Anderson OPINION EDITOR

ARTS EDITOR

Britni Petitt

PHOTO EDITOR

The views expressed by The Clarion editorial board do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Madison College, its student body or any faculty therein. They are comprised of the writers listed above and/or of those who write for the Opinion section. LETTERS POLICY

Letters to the editor should be typed or written legibly, be 250 words or less, and include the writer’s name, phone number and email address. The Clarion reserves the right to refuse to publish any editorial submission or advertisement, which may be edited for length, taste and grammar. All submissions become the property of The Clarion and may be used for publication. Bring letters to The Clarion office, Room B1260G Truax, or email clarioned@madisoncollege.edu.

solo through COVID-19 (or some other nasty bug). I was lucky enough to have the essentials already in my apartment before the worst of this really hit me. I had enough food to last me, though I’ve got to say that I’m tired of ramen and soup, and I have plenty of toilet paper and soaps. The only thing I had to restock on was cold medicine. I pulled that off by using a food delivery service to get cold medicine from a local gas station along with some snacks. I noticed that the app had an option to leave the stuff at the door for me, which was a convenient way to keep myself isolated and still get that sweet relief. The worst parts of being self-quarantined was passing time. I was just looking forward to feeling healthy again. Fantasizing about what it feels like to be able to breath through your nose again, or what it feels like to not be hot and achy. Past the first day, I wasn’t really down to do much but move around for maybe half an hour at a time before feeling tired again, which meant that most of the things I did to entertain myself was watch shows and play old games. With the occasional phone call from my partner to keep me company. I watched all of “Code Geass,” a crazy

movie called “Tales From Earthsea,” and some old Star Trek because that’s my jam. I started a new file on my old copy of “Wind Waker” on my Gamecube and generally just tried to relax when I felt well enough to. All I got out of this experience was a massively messed up sleep schedule, a real sense of disconnect from the outside world, and the knowledge that I can keep myself fed and somewhat healthy when left to my own devices. People keep telling me that streets are pretty empty and there are shortages in stores, but I have yet to see these things for myself. I almost wonder what I’m going to see when I go out to get food and live my life regularly when I finally feel all better. I would not recommend self-quarantine for your next vacation, but if you think you might get sick or are getting sick I would say make sure you have plenty of cold medicine to help you through, get yourself a stock of some food you are confident you can make in a fever dream haze, and have somebody call to check in on you every once in a while, it helps a whole lot. And don’t go crazy hoarding all those supplies, you need enough for about two weeks, so don’t go overboard. Stay safe and healthy everybody.

Now's the time for spring cleaning EMILY MERLIN Social Media Director Perhaps some of you, like myself, accumulate unnecessary items over the winter. Such as weird gag gifts from your friends Christmas exchange, or a stuffed animal your grandma gave you because you were infatuated with giraffes when you were younger. Little does grandma know your favorite animal is a shark now. Regardless of how you got them, they have been collecting dust ever since. Unlike other people, I love spring cleaning. I love going through old boxes of junk and throwing them away because they

don’t spark joy (thank you, Marie Kondo). I find it extremely therapeutic. It is almost as if I am throwing away part of my old life to be able to get on with my new one. I know some people are extremely sentimental and what to keep everything that has value. But is it necessary to keep that pencil your first boyfriend in high school gave you? No, no it’s not. Throw it away. Even if you are still with that boyfriend, go make new memories with him instead of reminiscing about high school. Plus, spring cleaning doesn’t have to be boring! Put some music on and dance your heart out while trying to decide if you need three milk cartons worth of CDs. Maybe

just digitize them (or listen to them on your phone like the rest of us). It’s also entertaining to find stuff that you thought you lost! Imagine thinking you lost your old Gameboy when you moved out, but hey! It was still in the box in your closet that you never finished cleaning out! Now I know I get weird looks when I tell people I love organizing, but it makes me feel like I have control over something in my life. It makes me feel calm and I don’t stress about not being able to find things. Everything has a place and it all has a purpose. Keep in mind, that things you » SEE CLEANING PAGE 9


THE CLARION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | OPINION | 9

Is Madison happy?

CLEANING

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 don’t need, someone else might need them. I find it fun to open up a new garbage bag and stuff it with clothes that don’t fit me, my style, or my life. But it might fit someone else, so I donate stuff as much as possible. The point of the story is to clean because it’s good for you. Even if you can’t get everything done at once, that’s okay! Start small! Start with that junk drawer in your kitchen (everyone has one) and buy some organizers. You can either make your own (out of cardboard boxes) or buy them (you can get them at the dollar tree). Now, go get cleaning!

SEMESTER

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TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

A picture of the Wisconsin State Capitol at dusk.

WalletHub puts Madison 3rd on its happiest rankings MAGGIE BUSHAW Staff Writer According to WalletHub, a personal finance network, Madison is reported to be the third happiest city in America. This conclusion was made by a WalletHub study that ranked towns in America based on depression rate, income-growth rate, the community, and environment. If we were to take WalletHub’s advice, in order to become our happiest selves, moving to Plano, Texas and making more money would accomplish that. However, I do not think that it is that black and white. WalletHub studies show that if

people make $75,000 a year, they will be happier and won't be as depressed or stressed out. While that seems plausible, I don't think it works that way. I think it depends on who you spend your time with, and what you spend your time doing. Plus, we have Culver's custard and cheese curds. How can we only be the 3rd happiest city? There are various things people can do to become happier and make Madison the 1st happiest city in America. One thing is to exercise and eat healthy food. Both of these will make people feel physically better. Plus, exercising regularly has been

proven to relieve stress. Another way to improve happiness is to sleep more, which may be harder for some people than others, but who doesn't love sleeping? If I had to choose, I would sleep all day long. Other options that can bring people happiness include reading, drawing, singing, and other personal hobbies. There are so many things people can do to become happier; It all depends on what you love to do. For me, that means going to school and writing. WalletHub says that the community and the type of environment people live in also has an impact on people's happiness which I agree with.

I will admit that. But school gives more than it takes. School gives friendships – even the small ones that never leave the classroom walls, yet give you a friend who makes you smile in class. School gives time to explore yourself – a plethora of classes, each taught by a professor who is eager to help you learn just a bit more about the world we live in. School gives a home – a home that many of us treasure and find comfort in, though we hardly realize it while we are there. And we have had a lot of that taken away from us because of this virus. But do not let this virus rob you of the rest of your education. Tune into your online classes and crack open that dusty textbook when you should. Email or call your professors with questions when you have them. Stay curious and diligent. Your education is still available and waiting for you, even though it may be through a screen. And, bonus – now we can learn in our pajamas.

MAILBAG Letter to the Editor

When Irish eyes are smiling, it isn’t because they are drunk TERRI SEVERSON Contributor I understand that the opinion piece “Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, or don’t” written in the Clarion by Anica Graney, focused on the three main attributes given to the Irish and St. Paddy’s Day celebrations. Wearing green, leprechauns, drinking and getting drunk. The references to its origin and spending the day trying to convert pagans was for humor, I get it. I do believe however that a paper that has two articles featuring Black History month and an article dedicated to a Chef who brought his family favorites of Middle Eastern fare to share with students can do a little better job representing one day to celebrating Irish history and heritage? My grandfather was the first of his Irish family to be born in the United States in

CLARION STAFF PHOTO

A Happy St. Patrick's Day decoration in a Madison-area yard. Superior Wisconsin. His parents and two older sisters took the hazardous ship voyage leaving a country suffering from severe economic hardships after a decade of being ravaged by famine. He was very devoted to his Irish background. St. Patrick’s Day was a special day in our family that had little to do with green beer. As a young girl, my sister and I performed traditional

dancing for our St. Raphael’s grad school classmates on St. Patrick’s Day. A meal of corned beef and cabbage was sure to follow. What we celebrated, one day a year, was our Irish heritage. The beauty of the day as it came to be celebrated in the United States, was that everyone wanted to be Irish for one day a year. It was a long way from the ridicule and hatred

that the Irish faced early on in their citizenship. In a 2019 “Made in History” article in “The Washington Post” author Edward T. O’Donnell reports that 150 years ago the Irish were reviled as a band of foreign terrorists; “Irish American terrorism added to the long-standing stereotype of the Irish as inherently violent people and the claim the Irish would never make good Americans. Obsessed with their homeland, they willingly imperiled American lives and U.S. national security in a reckless bid to win Ireland’s independence.” There are even reports of a secret meeting held in the 1960s by Billy Graham and 25 church leaders to keep an Irish Catholic, John F. Kennedy Jr., out of the White House. In the ’90s we located family members still living in Ireland and reunited with them. It is

pretty amazing considering what the people of the nation went through. The Library of Congress education web page reports that the population of Ireland decreased by almost half between 1841 and 1930. 4.5 million Irish migrated to the United States during that time. Our Irish family members told us that it was common for those left behind to hold a wake, as you would after a funeral, for the departing family members. Many families never learned the fate of their loved ones. As any DNA “23 and ME” testing will tell you, I have a mixed heritage. Irish, German, French, Indian and more. One day a year I’m guaranteed to hear, “When Irish Eyes are Smiling” and know exactly what that looks like as I remember the glint in my grandfather’s eyes when he spoke of being Irish.


10 | ARTS | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

THE CLARION


THE CLARION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | ARTS | 11

A slice of Sister Pie

arts EDITOR: HAILEY GRIFFIN CLARIONARTS@ MADISONCOLLEGE.EDU

TESSA MORHARDT Editor in Chief

TESSA MORHARDT / EDITOR IN CHIEF

Lisa Ludwinski at Madison College’s Chef Series.

Madison College had the pleasure of having Lisa Ludwinski, owner of Sister Pie, on the monthly Chef Series earlier in March. Ludswinski first went to school for theater, but then ended up moving back home. Upon her return home, she started to bake. Sister Pie began in her parent’s home about 40 minutes outside of Detroit, Michigan, in a small town called Milford. Sister Pie stayed in Ludwinski’s parent’s house for a year, then moved to a shared commercial building for another year. Finally, Sister Pie moved to an actual bakery in 2015. Ludwinski trained under Christina Tosi, a talented baker, and former Milk Bar employee. Tosi taught Ludwinski the baking basics. While shadowing Tosi, Ludwinski found out how fast a business can grow and spread across the country. She realized that she did not want to open multiple shops. Ludwinski was grateful for everything that she was able to experience while she was shadowing Tosi and working with several wonderful women. Ludwinski expressed, “I never wanted to open up a business in New York. I think the competition element of it was one thing, but I was traveling back to Michigan quite a bit during that period, and I had gotten to do an internship through Momofuku.” Ludwinski’s advice to other bakers is to “spend a little more time in the industry … sometimes I wish I would have found out five years earlier that I was into this so I could go into more kitchens and learn more.”

Ludwinski has really looked at all the negative kitchen cultures and the typical patriarchy within the kitchen setting. Sister Pie created a kitchen culture that is based on kindness, direct communications, and being able to make mistakes. Being able to change the food culture is what inspired her to be around the group of women who she works with. Sister Pie focuses on “… how different we can be from more traditional kitchen culture.” Sister Pie is always working on how they can improve and become better in the workforce. Sister Pie has put much thought and effort into the rules that they set and the handbook that they made. They talk about privilege, race, ways of thinking about things differently, and opportunities. Ludwinski makes sure that all her staff know what the company’s ultimate goals are and that they are talking with one another. Ludwinski ensures that if a problem comes up, the staff will handle it in a manner of nonviolent communication, by starting with observations and talking about feelings and needs. She wants to make sure that everyone is given a chance while running her business. According to Ludwinski, the planet, people, and profit are the things that run a sustainable business. People are the top priority, but the planet and profit closely follow. Sister Pie also has a cookbook called “Sister Pie” with recipes and stories of the bakery. You are able to find the book on Amazon for $14.59. You can also find Sister Pie at 8066 Kercheval Ave, Detroit, MI. To gather more information about them, visit www. sisterpie.com.

‘The Invisible Man’ takes a hard look on domestic violence DESTINY HINES Contributor “The Invisible Man” touches on the hard subject of domestic violence. The opening scene features Cecilia (Elizabeth Moss) trapped in a violent and controlling relationship, lying in bed in a dark room. Cecilia tries to move her husband Adrian’s hand from her shoulder as he sleeps. Adrian, played by Oliver Jackson-Cohen, is a wealthy and brilliant scientist. In response to Cecilia leaving him, Adrian fakes his own suicide. Once Cecilia starts to notice odd things happening around her, she tries to share the possibility that Adrian (Jackson) is still alive. She explains to others that he has found a way to be invisible. Unfortunately, Cecilia lands herself in a psych ward after Adrian, upset

by the possibility that his secret could get out, murders Cecilia’s sister Emily (Harriot Dyer). Emily’s murder takes place while she meets Cecilia at a busy restaurant. Cecilia tries to convince Emily that Adrian is still alive and that she is, in fact, not crazy. This suspense-filled 1933 classic remake, “The Invisible Man,” features actress Elizabeth Moss, also known for her award-winning role in “Handmaids Tale.” Written and directed by Leigh Whannell, this Sci-Fi psychological thriller was well put together. “The Invisible Man” had many unexpected surprises throughout the movie, along with jaw-dropping, shock-worthy scenes. I left the theater feeling satisfied, and I wasn’t left wanting more. I look forward to seeing more from director Elizabeth Moss stars as Cecilia in “The Invisible Man.” Leigh Whannell.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE


12 | ARTS | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

THE CLARION

‘These Shining Lives’ shines

PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION BY TOM FONFARA

Characters Catherine, Frances, Charlotte, and Pearl react to the news of their fatal radium poisoning diagnosis.

ANICA GRANEY Managing Editor Madison College’s Performing Arts presented “These Shining Lives” March 12-15 in the studio theater. The play, written by Melanie Marnich,

was directed by Miranda Hawk and featured many Madison College students as the characters. “These Shining Lives” features the story of four young women in the 1920-30s working for the Radium Dial Company by painting watch faces with radium. As they work, they are consequently exposed to high

doses of radium and eventually end up with radium poisoning. The company they work for says that radium is supposed to be good for them, but the girls’ failing health says otherwise. Congratulations to the cast and crew of this production on a successful performance.

PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION BY TOM FONFARA

Above: Tom Donohue holds his wife, Charlotte Donohue’s, face. Below: Charlotte Donohue says goodbye to her children as they the courtroom.

PHOTO PROVIDED TO THE CLARION BY TOM FONFARA

Left: Characters Charlotte and Frances look off into the distance.

‘How Democracies Die’ an informative, learning experience KALEIA LAWRENCE Contributor Democracy in the United States is dying. Does that sentence scare you? If it does, consider reading “How Democracies Die” by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt. Since it was published in 2018, the book is up to date. It’s an easy read. With the amount of information that it contains,

you would expect it to read like a textbook, but it does not. It takes ideas that can be confusing to understand and lays it out in a simple manner. Those who are not politically inclined would still find it understandable. So, what is “How Democracies Die” all about? It might be easy to scoff at the idea that it would be possible for democracy to die in the US;

we have the Constitution and all those amendments! Surely, it should be okay to be satisfied with the current state of democracy. It is not. What has always been a seemingly sound form of government for the United States has been slowly but surely eroding. And why is that? What kills a government? Is it the political leaders, or the people who support them? The

authors take the readers on a journey of exploring democracies in different countries, and how they have risen and collapsed. “How Democracies Die” doesn’t just focus on the United States, it also delves into other countries. Having examples of other governments to look at gives context to what is occurring in the US. I would recommend this book to anyone willing to

consider ideas that might be scary or outside of your comfort zone. If you want to learn more about the current state of the US government, “How Democracies Die” will give you a lot of information. Like the Washington Post’s new slogan says, “Democracy dies in darkness.” Don’t let our democracy die without learning and enlightening yourself with more perspectives.


THE CLARION

sports EDITOR: CHRISTINA GORDON CLARIONSPORTS@ MADISONCOLLEGE.EDU

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | 13

MEETTHEPACK

SOFTBALL MORGAN DERCOLA

Profiles of WolfPack athletes

BASEBALL ELIOT TURNQUIST

A sophomore from Sun Prairie, Eliot Turnquist was named first-team all-conference and first-team all-region in 2019. In 2019 Turnquist, had an ERA of 1.70 in 37.0 innings pitched, only allowing 15 hits while striking out 51. Turnquist was a three-time letter winner at Columbus High School, where he was an infielder and pitcher in baseball. Turnquist was named first team all-conference as a senior for pitching and

TURNQUIST

DERCOLA

second team all-conference as a sophomore and junior as an infielder in the CapitolNorth. Turnquist was also selected to the WBCA All-Star Game as a senior. He is the son of Heidi and Eric Turnquist.

A sophomore from Sussex, Morgan Dercola was named second-team All-N4C last season. In 2019, Dercola had a batting average of .425, with 23 RBI’s. Dercola was a four-year participant in softball at Sussex Hamilton High School, where she was a four-time first team all-conference selection in the Greater Metro Conference. Dercola was selected Player of the Year in the conference as a junior. Dercola also received WFSCA All-State honors, and was a fourtime WFSCA all-district honoree and threetime all-state recipient. She is the daughter of Carrie and Chris Dercola.

Spring sports seasons cancelled

Threat posed by coronavirus brings an end to all NJCAA spring sporting events CHRISTINA GORDON Sports Editor

The Madison College baseball and softball team will have to wait a year to be able to play again after the recent cancellation of their respective season by the NJCAA in an effort to protect athletes and fans from the spread of COVID-19. “We are fully supportive of the measures that both our college and the NJCAA has taken in response to COVID19. While they have been difficult decisions to make, they have absolutely been the right decisions,” said Madison College Athletic Director Steve Hauser on the recent announcement of the cancellations of the spring sports seasons. Both teams had already started their seasons. The baseball team posted a 1-3 record after a hard road series. The softball team started their season out strong, going a perfect 8-0 in the N4C Dome Jamboree.

The front page of the Madison College athletic department’s website announces the cancellation of the 2020 spring sports seasons. “I am extremely disappointed for all involved: student-athletes who have worked long and hard to prepare for the season, their parents and family members, and our coaches and staff who are all so invested in the entire process,” Hauser said. “I know how important this is, and how much this means to everyone. It’s a real empty feeling.” Madison College’s head baseball

coach Mike Davenport and softball coach Leo Kalinowski have been hard at work preparing their young teams for the season. “Our coaches are very disappointed as well for all involved, but they too, fully understand and support decisions that have been made in an effort to keep folks healthy and slow the spread of COVID-19. Our coaches and student-athletes are hurting right now,

that’s for sure,” Hauser said. According to Hauser, spring sports athletes will not be charged a year of eligibility. “Both the NCAA and the NJCAA have both ruled that baseball and softball players will not be charged with a year of athletic eligibility for this year,” he said. “I’m sure we will all learn more specifics about those student-athletes that will transfer to 4-year colleges and universities in the near future. Right now, our student-athletes, all of us, simply need to control what we can control and not worry about the things we cannot.” In addition, none of the spring sports teams are not allowed practice time during this time period. “We all enjoy doing our part to put things in place so that our student-athletes and our teams can have a great experience here,” Hauser said. “It’s heart wrenching to know that our baseball and softball teams will not be able to compete this spring, nor will our other teams be able to practice for the remainder of the academic year. And, we realize that there are much more important things that we all need to focus on right now.”

Baseball team shows its youth in early games CHRISTINA GORDON Sports Editor

WolfPack sweeps N4C Jamboree CLARION FILE PHOTO

Madison College sophomore Jordan Martin, right, is shown pitching during the 2019 season. Martin pitched the WolfPack to a win against defending conferene champion Rock Valley College on March 5 in the N4C Jamboree.

Madison College softball team wins 8 games in tourney ANICA GRANEY Managing Editor The WolfPack softball team finished undefeated at the North Central Conference Dome Jamboree prior to the cancellation of its season due to the spread COVID-19. The team faced eight teams over three days, six of which were conference foes. Madison College opened the Jamboree on March 5 with a close win against defending conference champion Rock Valley College, 5-4.

Rock Valley is the NJCAA Division III defending national champion and was ranked No. 1 in pre-season polls. The WolfPack scored once in the third inning and four times in the fourth inning to take a 5-0 lead. The Golden Eagles rallied with four runs in the fifth inning, but were shut down the rest of the way. Madison College sophomore Jordan Martin secured the win, pitching an impressive two-hitter and did not allow an earned run. That same day the WolfPack faced No. 6 Joliet Junior College, with

freshman Olivia Bobak going 2 for 3 at the plate and starting the game in the circle. Bobak doubled to score Gracie Malin in the first inning, and Madison College scored two runs in the third inning and two in the fourth to take a commanding 5-0 lead. Joliet was held at bay until the seventh inning, when it scored three runs before Lauren Green came in to close out the game and earn a save. » SEE SOFTBALL PAGE 14

The Madison College baseball team was able to get in four games before the season was suspended due to concerns about the novel coronavirus. With just nine players returning and only three sophomores with postseason experience, the baseball team has a young roster with 18 new faces. Madison College showed its youth in the first four games. The WolfPack lost three of them by one run, including two extra-inning games. “We are young, last year’s entire team position player wise were all sophomores,” Madison College head coach Mike Davenport said. “Cam Cratic, Carson Holin, and Pierson Gibis were the only players to have an at bat in the national tournament. Those three are the only players with postseason experience. But it is a talented group, we have a lot of new parts and pieces.” Madison College was supposed to start their season on February 28 and 29 at the Babe Howard JUCO Classic in Millington Tennessee. Due to inclement weather the JUCO Classic had to be cancelled. Madison College was still able to play on Febr. 29. The WolfPack traveled to Cedar Rapids Iowa, to play a double-header against Iowa Central Community College. Madison College dropped a pair of » SEE BASEBALL PAGE 14


14 | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

SPORTS | THE CLARION

SOFTBALL

BASEBALL

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13

Facing three conference teams on March 6, the WolfPack dominated two of the games, winning in the fifth inning with run rules. Starting the day with Milwaukee Area Technical College, sophomore Cathryn Hiller held the Stormers scoreless the entire game and struck out eight batters. Madison College had 15 total hits and ended the game with a score of 16-0. Martin pitched against Triton College and won 2-1 after going an impressive eight innings and striking out 13 batters. The game ended up going into extra innings after being tied at a score of 1-1. Triton scored one run at the top of the eighth, but the WolfPack was able to respond with two runs, securing the win. Finishing up the day, the WolfPack defeated the College of DuPage 13-2 in a fifth inning run rule win. Similar endings happened March 7 when the team faced Harper College, Elgin Community College, and Bryant and Stratton College. All of the games end with a fifth inning run-rule win. Madison College beat Harper College, 13-1, racking up 12 hits including home runs by Malin and Anna Manke. A 13-hit effort led Madison College to a 15-4 victory over Elgin Community College, with Malin and Abby Luczak each getting three hits. An eight-run fourth inning powered the WolfPack past Bryant & Stratton College, 13-4. This put the WolfPack at an 8-0 record for the start of the season. “The team hitting was the main reason, with aggressive base running, that we were able to 10 run rule some of our opponents,” said Madison College coach Leo Kalinowski. Kalinowski said the hard-fought scrimmages the team has had in practiced helped prepare it for the tournament. “Many of the teams we played, it was their first games of the season, as it was ours. However, we practice off campus at times and have played a number of game-like scrimmages. This enabled us to get some of the early season bugs out. Even though it was our first regular season games, the extra team scrimmages prepped us for game-like conditions.”

extra-inning games against Iowa Central to start the season. In game one, Madison College was able to get an early lead on two-run home run by freshman Jeff Holtz in the first inning. Madison College didn’t score another run until the 12th inning, when sophomore Jacob Kaiser drilled a 0-1 pitch over the left field fence, giving the WolfPack a 3-2 lead. But Iowa Central rallied with two runs in the bottom of the 12th inning to win, 4-3. Kaiser ended the game 2-5 with an RBI. Sophomore Eliot Turnquist got the start for Madison going four-innings, with eight strikeouts. Freshman Jacob Wilde came in in relief and went four innings striking out seven. Freshman Luke Hansel got the loss after his 3.1 inning effort. In the second game, Madison College once again would lose by one run, falling 3-2 in eight innings. Freshman Jett Thielke got the start for Madison College, and went seven innings allowing three hits while striking out 11. Once again Madison College wasn’t able to get much offensive production only getting two hits and drawing two walks. Freshman Eli Kramer went 2-3 at the plate and also stole three bases. Madison College got a win on March 1, when it traveled to Bloomington, Ill., to play Heartland Community College. Madison College may not have gotten much production offensively but Neu’s and LeTourneau’s pitching was clutch for the WolfPack in the 4-1 victory. The WolfPack used a big 4-run fifth inning to win the game, scoring on one hit, four walks, an error, and two wild pitches. Sophomore Andy Neu started the game and pitched 4.1 innings allowing four hits and no runs. Freshman Riley LeTourneau came in and pitched 2.2 innings allowing one hit on one run, while striking out four. Freshman Nathan Ebersole went 2-3 at the plate. Neu got the win for the WolfPack. In the second game, Madison College allowed a potential victory to slip through their fingers. Leading the game 3-1 going into the sixth inning, Heartland was able to score three runs in the bottom of the inning. Sophomore Bryce Konitzer got the start and went a strong five innings striking out four while only allowing three hits. Holtz went 2-2 with an RBI. Freshman Logan Mantz went 1-4, but his one hit was a solo homerun.

CLARION FILE PHOTO

Madison College pitcher Jackson Brown is shown during a game from the 2019 season. The WolfPack baseball team got in four games before the season was cancelled, winning one of them.


THE CLARION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020 | 15

THELIGHTERSIDE BREWSTER ROCKIT

Puzzles and Cartoons

TIM RICKARD / TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

BREWSTER ROCKIT

TIM RICKARD / TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE

CROSSWORDPUZZLE Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis / MCT Campus

ACROSS

1 *Ready to set sail, say 8 Diplomatic rep. 11 Machines with Windows, briefly 14 More tired 15 Foe of Chiang 16 Swing, jazz or rock ’n’ roll 17 *1950s sitcom co-star 19 Early internet company 20 Investor’s purchase: Abbr. 21 Amazement 22 German cameras 24 Bashful 26 *Hester Prynne’s mark of shame 28 No-no 31 Continental coins 32 “Inside the NBA” analyst Shaq 33 Returning GI’s diagnosis 34 Capitol Hill helper 38 Musically monotonous 40 Collection of sacred songs 42 Geeky type 43 19-Across et al. 45 Lazy __: revolving tray 46 December mall figure 48 Foolish 49 *“Which side of the debate will you argue?” 52 June honoree 53 Really bothers 54 Fair-hiring inits. 56 Wood for bats 59 Home security co. 60 *Culpable one 64 Fairway position 65 Bruins legend 66 Answered

67 Title for Elton 68 Once called 69 Chess match climax, and what the last word of each answer to a starred clue can have

DOWN

1 Hooting birds 2 Not masc. or fem. 3 Begin to parallel park, with “in” 4 “... __ quit!” 5 Feel crummy 6 Race with batons 7 Sketched 8 Org. with a Health Care Advocacy web page 9 Ducks whose males have green heads 10 Slow-tempo Spanish dance 11 Quiet partner 12 Zagreb native 13 Taco topper 18 Harass 23 “Casablanca” heroine 24 Stinkers 25 Prefix with

gram 27 Zodiac borders 28 Bugs Bunny or Bullwinkle 29 Lestat creator Rice 30 Bar pint contents 33 Sauce with basil 35 “__ miracle!” 36 College faculty head 37 Shore bird 39 __ of iodine: antiseptic 41 China’s continent 44 Group of jurors

47 Ferdinand II’s realm 49 Rings, as a bell 50 Bike spokes, geometrically 51 Furry aquatic mammal 52 Elder statesman 55 To be, in Tours 56 Puccini piece 57 Pipe part 58 Stevenson’s villainous Mr. 61 Wrath 62 Scoreboard abbr. for a rainout 63 High school subj.


16 | WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25, 2020

THE CLARION

Profile for The Clarion

The Clarion issue - 3-25-20  

The March 25, 2020, issue of The Clarion looks at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted students.

The Clarion issue - 3-25-20  

The March 25, 2020, issue of The Clarion looks at how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted students.

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