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CAPECOO & THE ISlANDS

VOL. 48, NO. 40 • Friday, October 22, 2004

FALL RIVER, MASS.

Southeastern Massachusetts' Largest Weekly • $14 Per Year

Diocese readies to observe World Mission Sunday ~

Parishes this weekend will call attention to the Church's missionary activity.

FALL RIVER - Catholics in the Diocese of Fall River, like others worldwide, will recommit themselves to the Church's missionary activity through prayer and sacrifice, as they celebrate World Mission Sunday October 24. This year's theme is "So that all the nations may hear the Gospel" (2 Tim 4: 17), says Msgr. John J. Oliveira, diocesan director of The Society For the Propagation of the Faith. In a letter to all pastors, Msgr. Oliveira, who is also the pastor of St. Mary's Parish in New Bedford, said, "I am requesting your help in encouraging prayer and generous support for the missionary work of the Church." He said that those "are essential to the work of more than

1,100 mission dioceses dependent on the Propagation of the Faith," and he cited the Diocese of Marsabit in Kenya. There, the men in seminary training are from ethnic nomadic tribes. "A great contribution you can make is to encourage your people's generous and enthusiastic participation in this most important Eucharistic celebration for the whole Church," Msgr. Oliveira said. "Your voice - telling about the Church's worldwide missionary task can make a significant difference." Annually, World Mission Sunday is celebrated on the next-to-last Sunday in October. As described by Pope John Paul II, it is "an important day in the life of the Church because it teaches how to give; as an offering made to God, in the Eucharistic celebration and for the missions of the world" (Redemptoris Missio 81). The offerings that will be colThm to page 13 - Mission

BISHOP GEORGE W. Coleman addresses the large congregation that gathered at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette in Attleboro for a Rosary Celebration that concluded the diocese's centennial observance. More photos on page 16. (Photo by Eric Rodriques)

Bishop Coleman says _,Eucharist, Mary are prominent signs offaith in diocese ~

Thousands attend Rosary Celebration closing the diocese's centennial observances.

ATTLEBORO - Saying that the Eucharist as the center of Christian Life and devotion to Mary, the mother of God, have been "like pillars" and "signs of the faith of people" since the Fall River diocese was founded in 1904, Bishop George W. Coleman presided at a Rosary Cel-

ebration at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette, closing centennial activities. Thousands attended the October 11 event at the well-known Shrine that included music by a choir comprising members of many parishes, and Benediction. The assembly included retired Hartford Archbishop Daniel A. Cronin, who was bishop of Fall River from 1970 to 1991; members of the clergy; religious Sisters and Brothers, and representatives from parishes and organizations across the diocese.

Father George E. Harrison, pastor of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Parish in Seekonk, and chairman of the Rosary Celebration committee, was very pleased with how the event unfolded. "It met and exceeded all of our expectations," he told The Anchor. "It was prayerful, celebratory and inspiring. The day was a true reflection of the multicultural nature of our diocese. 'This event was a true celebration of what has been in our diocese and a wonderful prayer askThm to page 13 - Diocese

Regis College president to speak at Education Fund's Fall Dinner FALL RIVER - Dr. Mary Jane England, president of Regis College, will be the featured speaker at the 10lh annual St. Mary's Education Fund Fall Dinner, to be held October 28, at White's of Westport, with a reception at 5:30 p.m. and dinner served at 6:30 p.m. Proceeds from the evening support the St. Mary's Education Fund which provides needbased financial scholarships to

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students at Catholic elementary and middle schools in the Fall River diocese. England became president of Regis College, which is a Catholic liberal arts college for women, in 200 I, although her connection with the school began years ear~ lier as an undergrad student. She graduated from the school in 1959, and then went on to earn a medical degree from the Boston University School of Medicine.

Voter'S Guide -

From there she launched a national and international career as a child psychiatrist, the first commissioner of the Department of Social Services in Massachusetts; associate dean and director of the master in public administration program at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University; president of the American Psychiatric Association, president of the Tum to page three - Dinner

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Friday, October 22, 2004

(@bitnar!J THE SISTERS of St. Dorothy at Villa Fatima Convent in Dighton were recently visited by the order's general coordinator and her council members from Rome. The visit takes place every six years. Sister Catherine Rebello, general assistant, moderated a seminar discussing the work of the Sisters throughout the world. The Sisters of St. Dorothy evangelize through education in Albania, Angola, Argentina, Azores, Bolivia, Brazil, Cameroon, England, Italy, Malta, Mexico,. Mozambique, Peru, the Philippines, Portugal, Sao Tome- . Principe, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, and the U.S. Pictured are Sisters Jaci Dutra, Pessoa, general coordinator, left, and ". Giuseppina Cassassa, assistant.

Mrs. Helen Fitzpatrick MIDDLEBORO Mrs. Helen (Mahoney) Fitzpatrick, 87, wife of the late John J. Fitzpatrick, and mother of Deacon John J. Fitzpatrickjr., who serves at Holy Family Parish in East Taunton, died OCtober 15 at the Hannah Shaw Nursing Center here. Born in Roxbury, the daugh.ter of the late Dennis and the late Catherine (Donovan) Mahoney,

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she was a longtime resident of Malden. She was a graduate of Mission High School and Boston Secretarial School. A parishioner of St. Joseph Church in Malden, she was an avid Red Sox and Boston Bruins fan. She loved shopping and playing cribbage. Besides her ·deacon son, she leaves three other. sons, James P. Fitzpatrick of Hanover, Robert E. Fitzpatrick of Malden and Richard D. Fitzpatrick of Nashua, N.H.; 11 grandchildren, and 10 . great-grandchildren.. Her funeral Mass was celebrated Tuesday in St. Joseph's Church, Malden. Interment was in Forestdale Cemetery, Malden. The Gerald E. Carroll and Son Funeral Home, 721 Salem Street, Malden, was in charge of arrangements.

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PRACTICE THE DEVOTION OF THE FIRST· SATURDAYS, AS REQUESTED BY OUR LADY OF FATIMA

On December 10, 1925, Our Lady appeared to Sister Lucia (seer of Fatima) and spoke these words: "Announce in my name that I promise to assist at the hour ofdeath with the graces

necessary for the salvation oftheir souls, all those who ·on the first Saturday of five consecutive months shaU: 1. Go to confession; 2. Receive Holy Communion;.3. Recite the Rosary (5 decades); and 4. Keep me company for IS minutes while meditating on the IS mysteries ofthe Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me."

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In a spirit of reparation, the above conditions are each to be preceded by the words: "In reparation for the offenses committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary:' Confessions may be made during 8 days before or after the first Saturday, and Holy Communion may be received at either the morning or evening Mass on the first Saturday.

Catholics, Lutherans to celebrate anniversary ofjoint declaration WAYLAND -,- A liturgical the agreement between the Vaticelebration marking the fifth an- can and. the churches of the niversary of the Lutheran-Roman Lutheran World Federation that Catholic Joint Declaration on the states the 16th century chief docDoctrine of Justification will be trinal disagreement on justification held October 31 at 4 p.m., in St. - or how a person becomes'righAnn's Catholic Church here. teous before God - is no longer The presiders at the liturgy will . an issue dividing the two churches. be Boston Archbishop Sean P. This year also marks the 40th O'Malley, OFM Cap" and anniversary of the Second VatiBishop Margaret Payne of the can Council's Decree on ~ew England Synod, EvangeliEcumenism. cal Lutheran Church in America. . The purpose of the celebration The event recalls the signing of of those anniversaries is to focus on the Holy Spirit's work bringing closer a time when both Daily Readings churches will re-establish a full

Oct 25 Oct 26

Oct 27 Oct 28 Oct 29 Oct 30 Oct 31

FE>RE

TH8UGHT·

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Eph 4:32-5:8; Ps 1:1-4,6; Lk 13:1017 Eph 5:21-33 or 5:2a,25-33; Ps 128:1-5; Lk 13:18-21 Eph 6:1-9; Ps 145:10-14; Lk 13:22-30 Eph 2:19-22; Ps 19:2-5; Lk 6: 1216 . Phil 1:1-11 ; Ps 111:1-6; Lk 14:16 PhiI1:18b-26; Ps 42:2-3,5; Lk 14:1,7-11 Wis 11 :22-12:2; Ps 145:1-2,811,13-14; 2 Thes 1:11-2:2; Lk 19:110

etJSierfor tliose you row THE ANCHOR (USPS-545.Q20) Periodical Postage Paid at Fall River: Mass. Published weekly except for the first two weeks in July and the week after Christmas at 887 Highland Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 02720 by the Catholic ._ Press ofthe Diocese ofFall River, Subscription price by mail, postpaid $14.00 per year, POSTMASTERS send address changes to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall River, MA 02722.

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In Your Prayers Please pray for the fQllowing priests during the coming weeks Oct. 25 1935, Rev. Reginald Chene;-O,P., Dominican Priory, Fall River 1950, Rev, Raymond B. Botitgoin, Pastor, St. Paul, Taunton 1988, Rev, James W. Connelton, CSC, Founder, Stonehill College, North Easton \ ~ 1999, Rev. Msgr. John 1. Steakem,.pastor, St. Thomas More, Somerset

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Oct 27\ 1918, Rev. Francisco L. Jorge, As'sistant, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, New Bedford \ \ 1967, Rev. Edmond L. Dickinson, Assistant, St. Mathieu, Fall River . \ \ 1990, Rev, Joseph F. O'Donnell, Pa~or, Immaculate Conception, North Easton . . \\ ."

Oct.280 :1111111111111111111111111111111

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communion between them. According to Father· Mark Bergeron, ecumenical officer of the Fall River diocese, and a member of the Lutheran-Roman Catholic Dialogue Committee of New England, the public is invited to attend the liturgy at which choirs from local churches of both traditions will lead the congregation in song and prayer; as well as be guests at a reception to follow in St. Anne's Church Hall. That invitation extend$ to members of the clergy, who are asked to vest in red for the procession.

1923, Rev. Alfred E. Coulombe, Pastor, St. George, Westport 1956, Rev. Stanislaus Kozikowski, OFM Conv., Pastor, St. Hedwig, New Bedford

Oct 30 1992, Msgr. Robert L. Stanton, Retired Pastor, St. Paul, Taunton 2002, Rev. Denis Sughrue, CSC, Director of Postulancy, Holy Cross Novitiate, North Dartmouth


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American Women's Medical Association, and in the business sphere, as vice president of Prudential Insurance and president of the Washington Business Group on Health. She serves on numerous boards of colleges and universities, national health care institutions, professional organizations, and community groups. In 1998 she became a member of the Rosalyn Carter Task Force on Mental Health, based in Atlanta, on which she continues to serve, and in 2002 she was invited to become a part of the blueribbon task force of professional experts in the new Commission for the Protection of Children in the Boston Archdiocese.

MARY JANE ENGLAND,

M.D.

As president of Regis, she has general charge and overall supervision of all facets of the school's

Our Lady of the Cape to host Life in the Spirit Seminar BREWSTER - Our Lady of the Cape Parish will host a workshop entitled "Experiencing New Life," on November 7 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the church on Stoney Brook Road here. The workshop will introduce participants to the "Life in the Spirit Seminars," first developed by the Word of God Community in Ann Arbor, Mich., in the early 1970s. Offered to millions of Catholics world wide, the seminars focus on

a vital appreciation of the scriptural proclamation that "Jesus is Lord." The keynote speaker will be Father Marc Montminy, pastor of Ste. Marie and Sacred Heart parishes in Manchester, N.H., since 1988. Father Montminy is a former Charismatic liaison, director ofworship, director of Spiritual Renewal Services, and co-director of vocations for the Manchester diocese. For more information contact the rectory at 508-3'85-3252.

operation, including its educational programs, business operations, and institutional planning. England is currently leading Regis through are-structuring project to shape its curriculum into interdisciplinary centers with the intent of strengthening the college's position as one of the nation's signalliberal arts colleges for women in the 21st century. The Fall Dinner is one of two annual fund-raising events for the St. Mary's Education Fund. In the current academic year, the Fund is distributing more than $600,000 in need-based tuition assistance to nearly 700 students. Planners are still taking reservations from businesses and individuals who want to host a table or purchase a ticket to support the St. Mary's Education Fund.

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OFFICIAL His Excellency, the Most Reverend George W. Coleman, Bishop of Fall River, has announced the following appointments: Director of Office for Worship, Rev. Msgr. Stephen 1. Avila, Coordinator of Diocesan Events in celebration of the Year of the Eucharist, October 2004 to October 2005. Rev. Joseph Blyskosz, Director of Hispanic Apostolate for the Fall River Area with residence at Notre Dame Rectory in Fall River. Effective Immediately

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Friday, October 22, 2004

the living word

Health care for all One of the major concerns which envelop Americans centers on health care and insurance. The outrageous costs of medical care have affected millions of people. Each day the ranks of the uninsured keep rising. More arid more workers are losing health coverage. Businesses are either reducing benefit opportunities or not offering any coverage to their employees. As companies shift their factories to cheap foreign labor sites, many find themselves unemployed. In such situations people lose not only their job but their benefits as well. The weak position of labor compounds the situation. The unemployed become nameless. Playing Russian roulette with Medicare complicates the mess. Despite, and in spite of the political rhetoric, little has been done by the government to remedy the health care crisis. The results of this careless mind-set are becoming catastrophic. Everyone is paying more and receiving less. Those who have no heal~\ i~surance simply do not get help to manage emergencies, serious oiseases and preventive services. When a real need brings uninsured people to the hospital, everyone pays. It is estimated that paying for the uninsured adds up to 10 percent to everyone who pays premiums. . . Those who manage businesses are constantly looking for ways to reduce health benefit costs. One way many have faced this difficulty is to hire only part-time help. FUll-timers are expensive and business is out to make money for their investors. Employees come in second. As a result of our very expensive war-in Iraq, there is little that . will be done by Congress. In fact, there is little caring concern and consensus to remedy the difficulty on Capital Hill. Given the current political climate, neither Democrats or Republicans are able. to compromise, never mind ~ome to a resolution of this growing national scandal. It is so very sad to see politicians voting for weapons of destruction and refusing to help those in dire need of healing at home. Something is truly out of whack. All the rhetoric of the current presidential campaign is a mere smoke screen when it comes to health care concerns. Both parties are guilty of fraud in this regard. The sick get even sicker, while the verbiage of the powerful really ignores their difficulties. A national health care program is desperately needed in order that all Americans receive adequate health assurances. Most nations in the Western world offer basic free health services for their people. America ignores this reality under the guise of encapsulating socialism. Such a position is a failed attempt to face reality. Every citizen in the United States should have the basic right to receive governmental health care benefits. In education we pro- . claim that no child should be left behind. The same should be said in health care. No person should be without health care.assistance. Everyone has the duty to care for his or her own health or to seek such care from others. Life and health are precious gifts entrusted to us by God. We must take responsible care of them, taking into account the needs of others and the common good. Government is called to ensure that this common good becomes the foundation of health care and services. 'Somehow we have forgotten. or ignored that human life and well-being is the basis of all goods and is the necessary source and condition of every human activity and of society. We must renew this vision, and realize that each and every person has the right to proper health care.

The Executive Editor

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER Published weekly by the Catholic Press of the Diocese of Fall River 887 Highland Avenue P.O. BOX 7 Fall River, MA 02720 Fall River, MA 02722-0007 Telephone 508-675-7151 FAX 508-675-7048 E-mail: TheAnchor@Anchornews.org Send address changes to P.O. Box, call or use E-mail address

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Rev. Msgr. John F. Moore EDITOR David B. Jolivet

NEWS EDITOR James N. Dunbar

OFFICE MANAGER Barbara M. Reis

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FATHER EUGENE HEMRICK CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

Some time ago when I wasn't feeling myself, I took a walk to sort things out. Nothing was in balance. I was lightheaded, and my thoughts were running wild. As I wa!ked, a Benedictine motto came to me: "Ora et Lahara," meaning that prayer and good hard work go together. I recalled my comradeship with Benedictines and how one old monk would tell his class every so often: "Enough of getting ideas into . your head. Get out in the fields, and get some dirt under your fingernails." Remembering this, I stopped my current activities and began to work outside, cutting grass, pruning trees and pulling weeds. At the end of each day I was covered with dirt from head to foot. My arms and hands ached, and my golf game suffered terribly because of'it. But my head cleared up, and my nerves recovered. I felt like a million dollars. What is it in manual labor

the fingernails

that S9 often constitutes wholesome therapy? When we drop everything and commit to manual labor as a way of recovering our senses, we are on our way to doing just that. We have accepted the fact that we are uptight; we've moved into action to correct the situati(;m. Most of the time when we're uptight, we try to work through it while staying in the same situation - doing the same things. We don't change locations or environments.路 Dropping everything and working with the soil is a resolute move, one that changes the "scenery" for us. When we work outdoors, we also ventilate our system. So many of our buildings and homes are sealed. We live in recycled air. When we go outside, we often work in fresher air. I say "often" because polluted areas are not always that fresh. Also, changing from formal to informal clothing is rather freeing. Why? Because it says to us that we are deliberately

leaving our world of pressing concerns for awhile in order to become refreshed, renewed. Outdoor work relies upon our hands - pushing a lawn mower, using a hedge clipper or exercising a broom. If we are weeding, we get down on our knees and literally grub in the dirt. But there is more to outdoor work than exercise. Working on the lawn can touch off the artistic in us as we endeavor to make it beautiful. It takes a good eye to prune bushes. Most satisfying of all is to step back after this is done and admire the beauty of our work. And for the next few days we may well continue to experience a feeling of satisfaction each time we pass our work. If we have planted something, seeing it grows adds to the joy. One last thing deserves a mention here: sweat. Not the sweat of anxiety, but the sweat of hard, physical work. This type. of sweat is often at the root of true relaxation. Ah yes, the Benedictines had it right: "Ora et Labara."


Friday,

Octobe~22, 2 0 0 4 f i 1 J

At congress' opening, papal envoy urges, 'Ask who the Eucharist is' GUADALAJARA, Mexico (CNS) - Tens of thousands of people flocked to Guadalajara's Jalisco Stadium to attend a Mass opening the 48th International Eucharistic Congress. For many, Pope John Paul II's envoy, Cardinal Jozef Tomko, crystallized the congress' main focus as he led the October 10 opening Mass, urging people to "ask who the Eucharist is, not what the Eucharist is." "That was an amazing phrase. I think everybody will remember it," said Auxiliary Bishop Patrick J. Zurek of San Antonio, Texas, as fireworks lit up the stadium at the close of the Mass. Cardinal Tomko, president of the Pontifical Committee for International Eucharistic Congresses, said devotion to the Eu-

charist is needed in a world "shaken by the dark shadows of wars both known and forgotten ... (and by) the ideological attacks on marriage, the family and on human life from its conception." The scale of the event - and the fervor of those who attended - surprised many of the participants. "I've never seen anything like this," said Father Michael E. O'Mara of St. Mary Church, Indianapolis. "It gives you a sense of the universality of our Church." An estimated 65,000 people packed the stadium to near capacity and periodically broke¡ into thunderous chants of "You can see him, you can feel him, Jesus is here.", Each time Cardinal Tomko referred to the pope, the crowd

burst into applause, at times chanting "John Paul II, the whole world loves you." During the Mass, selections of the Scripture were read in a host of languages, including Spanish, English, German, Portuguese and French, among others. Thirty-five cardinals and some 250 bishops attended the event, along with hundreds of priests from six continents. Beyond their desire to share devotion to the Eucharist, many American and Canadian participants said they had an extra incentive to attend the congress because it was being held in Mexico. Father O'Mara said he was in Mexico for a week before the congress opened, meeting with Mexican Church leaders to strengthen the growing bonds between U.S. and Mexican dioceses.

School assemblies Diocese of Fall River. The I'd like to issue a challenge. No, not to the New York Yankees students across this wonderful diocese have here a perfect ... I'm already a daddy. Instead, opportunity to connect with I'd like to issue a challenge to all brother and sister Catholics across diocesan schools and religious the world, most of whom lack the education programs. basic necessities of life. How I'll explain. fortunate we are in this small dot This past week, as I was on the globe to have things like lamenting the most current state water, heat, clothing, food and of woe of the Boston Red Sox, . my spirits were buoyed by a package I received in the mail at The Anchor. The package contained a rosarymaking kit along with assembly instructions and a pre-addressed envelope with which to By Dave Jolivet return the newly crafted prayer beads. The package originated from Family Rosary, part of shelter. Things we take for granted each qay. Things other Holy Cross Family Ministries folks can only dream of. located right here in our diocese Doesn't it seem like a great in Easton, and Lewis & Co., a idea to be able to provide a least a family-run business specializing little food for the soul for some of in rosary parts. our brothers and sisters? Stay with me now, I'm getting Wouldn't it be a great idea for our to the challenge part. children to assemble with their Director of marketing at Holy own hands, instruments of prayer Cross Family Ministries, Susan that can provide some hope and Wallace, a good friend of mine, peace to people who have none? said that Family Rosary has Wouldn't this be a great teaching received requests from across the tool, illustrating how students globe for more than one million rosaries. "From June 2003 to July here can make a difference in lands far, far away? Isn't this 2004, Family Rosary has distribwhat Jesus teaches? uted more than 800,000 rosaries, but we couldn't fulfill the demand Family Rosary and .Family Ministries was begun by the for the rest due to inadequate remarkable Holy Cross Father supply," said Wallace. Patrick Peyton, the famed Enter Lewis & Co. This "Rosary Priest," and the man who remarkable little enterprise has coined the phrase, ''The family offered its services to the Family that prays together, stays toRosary cause. The company does gether," among others. not have the personnel to asIn fact the cause for Father semble all the rosaries, but they Peyton's sainthood, which is do have the supplies, and are ongoing as we speak, originated generously willing to donate in the Fall River diocese. How them. wonderful would it be for Enter schools and religious students across this diocese to education progJ.:an1s from the

My View from the Stands

become part of a special project that can be directly linked to the Rosary Priest? This is such a winwin opportunity ... our children can feel good about helping others, and less fortunate brothers and sisters will receive the treasure of a set of rosary beads where there's not much else to treasure. I challenge every Catholic school and religious education program in the diocese to get students involved in this marvelous undertak. ing. Let's get each student to assemble one set of rosary beads and send them back. As I see it, the only costs involved would be 60 cents from each "crafter" to mail the assembled rosaries back to Lewis & Co. to be distributed by Family Rosary. And that's it. Just think of how many people would be touched by this if you make it happen! To those schools and programs that have it in their hearts to become involved, please let us at The Anchor know about it, so we can keep our readers informed with stories and pictures. Okay? Good. To become involved, contact Stephen V. Lewis at Lewis & Co., at 800342-2400 or E-mail lewis@readyfund.com. If you would like more information or help coordinating this Missionary Rosary Project at your school or parish, feel free to contact me at the E-mail address below, or call 508-675-7151. Just imagine what this diocese can do to keep Father Peyton's mission alive, warm the heart of our Blessed Mother, and fulfill our,mission of evangelizing Christ's word. Comments are welcome at

dave;olivet@anchornews.org.

This was the first time Bishop Zurek has attended an International Eucharistic Congress, and he said a chief reason for his visit was that, as a member of the clergy in San Antonio, "We're like brothers with the Mexican bishops." "We have a saying on the border: 'una sola familia, una sola iglesia,'" said Bishop Zurek. "That is, 'one family, one church.'" Many Guadalajara residents expressed pride that their city known in Mexico for its Catholic traditions - was chosen to host the congress. Many of the groups, known as "adoradores," prayed roundthe-clock at Guadalajara par-

ishes throughout the entire week. The congress brought together bishops, priests and lay people from 80 countries for a full week of prayer and discussion aimed at bolstering devotion to the Eucharist worldwide. The congress included special eucharistic processions as well as visits to the sick and imprisoned. The congress closed Sunday with another Jalisco Stadium Mass that featured a message by the pope broadcast from the Vatican. That Mass, and one at the same time at the Vatican, kicked off a special eucharistic year that will run until Oct. 29, 2005.

Letter tOJathe Editor To all our brothers and sisters in the Diocese of Fall River. We are united with you today as you bring the centennial year's celebrations to a close. In both parishes, Guaimaca and Orica, groups from each neighborhood and all the pastoral ministries will be participating in adoration of the Blessed Sacrament from 1 to 7 p.m., giving thanks to God for all the blessings he has showered on the diocese and through the diocese to all of us here in Honduras. At 7 p.m. we will celebrate Holy pucharist in the principal church of St. Rose of Lima in Guaimaca and offer that Mass for

all our brothers and sisters in the Diocese of Fall River. Thank you for all you do for us and with us. Con todo carino,

Craig Pregana, Maria Ceballos, Lucia Gomez, Carmen Rivera and Paul Canuel

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Bumper stickers I'd like to see You probably have suffered the same disappointment as I have when visiting your favorite Catholic gift and bookstore - a dearth of bumper stickers. Yes, it is true that Catholic book and gift outlets are also notoriously low on soda machines and good used furniture, but you have to give them a little slack there, it seems to me. However, bumper stickers are to our powerful and known-around-the-world American culture what fortune cookies are to Chinese restaurants. Right? Really?

The offbeat world of Uncle Dan

Should Be Donating This Car to a Catholic Charity, and You Are Right." - "Honk If You Love Lent. Honk Twice if You Know What It Is." . - "Honk if You Love Jesus, and If You Don't I Guess We Can Assume You Are In Need of Counseling and Education Because Even Agnostics, Jews and Muslims - to Name a Few - Love Jesus." - "It's 10 p.m. Do You Know Where Your Bible Is?" - "Yes, That Is a Rosary Hanging from My Rearview Mirror." - "No Shirt? No Shoes? No Prob. lem. Contact the St. Vincent de Paul Society."

"Road Rage Is Not a Mortal Sin, But It Is Still Deadly." Interesting. - "The Highway to I don't quite understand this comparison at all. It does Heaven Is, in Fact, Paved for Too Many." not matter: Catholics have - "Support Your Local the same right to bumper Pastor." stickers as any other Ameri- "For a Low-Carb can, be they of Chinese, Irish Lifestyle, Try Prayer and or Polish descent. Fasting." Besides, any American - "I Brake for Little Old Catholic who can afford a' car can surely afford another, oh, Nuns." - "Will and Grace: A let's say somewhere between Message from Your Catholic 59 cents and a $1.98 for an Stewardship Council." American Catholic bumper - "Feel Guilty? Hi! I'm sticker. Catholic too." I know what you are - (With an illustration of thinking: You're realizing a priest): "These Collars you have seen very few Don't Run." Catholic bumper stickers - "Transubstantiation except for Marriage En. Rocks!" counter, Right to Life, "If - "Religion Should Not You Want Peace, Work for Be a Contact Sport". Justice" and "My Child Is - "If the Shoe Fits, Wear an Honor Student at the Combined Religious Forma- It. If Not, Give It to Someone Who Needs It." tion Program (aka CCD) of - If Your Niece Is a Our Lady of the Sister, and Your Second Mountaintop Catholic Cousin Is a Brother, and Elementary and St. Therese Your Brother Is Called. of Lisieux Parish." Father, Chances Are You Are It's high time we start .Catholic." writing and producing - "Want to Cross Swords Catholic bumper stickers. For with Some Friends? Join the starters, how about "I'm Knights of Columbus." Catholic and I Vote"? That - "Want a Good Tan? should scare the bejeebers Join the Maryknollers." out of John Kerry and - "Exorcise Regularly." George Bush. I'm not sure - "Yes, the Pope Is, In about Ralph Nader. Our crack team of thinkers Fact, Catholic." - "Support Hand-Holding at the Roadkill Theological Roundtable had several other During the Our Father." - "If You Are Going 70 suggestions, including but mph and You Can Read This certainly not limited to: Bumper Sticker, You Are - "Got God?" Closer to Heaven Than You - "This Driver Carries Might Want To Be." No Grudges." Comments are welcome. - "Lead an Altared Life: E-mail Uncle Dan at Become Catholic." cnsuncleOl@yahoo.com. - "You Probably Think I

By Dan Morris

-(

Friday, October 22, 2004

Ministry of beauty ugly duckling' who one day saw his own Debra Classen lived a nightmare 25 years beauty and then recognized the beauty in ago that remains a troubling horror story; Then others, I started drawing swans," she noted, "I an art student in California, she was enjoying a think that was God's idea." visit with her family. After dinner out that Another important step in Classen's faith evening, her mother went to get the car. She never returned. The next morning, police found journey was a visit seven years ago to the Trappist Abbey of Gethsemani in Kentucky, "I her body on the other side of the Golden Gate just felt compelled to go there," she said; Here Bridge. She had been raped and shot to death. she found "the gift of silence" and felt that in The killers never were found. this silence she had received a new direction ",This has been the single most life-changing from God. Not long after, with the help and event for me," Classen said, explaining, encouragement of her "Through this tragic husband Roger, loss, I found my Classen went back to Catholic faith." her artwork, only now And her faith has she had found a new led her to an imprespurpose. She wanted to sive new work that she use her talents to calls her "ministry of underscore that "beauty beauty": the founding By Antoinette Bosco is God's invisible of a magazine of art embrace." and inspiration titled Together the The Mute Swan. Classens publish a quarterly magazine that Classen had been searching always for ways features original, colorful artwork and deeply to find strength after her mother's murder. inspiring writings by both ancient and modern Some 10 years later, she joined an aerobics Christians whose spiritual ministry of beauty class. There a Catholic woman she befriended and hope the Classens trust will "redefine the invited her to Mass. loud cultural message marketing the perfection "After the Mass, they presented a mime of the crucifixion. I was so moved," Classen said. of external, youthful beauty" (Website, www. the muteswan.com). She began to understand how loss can lead to Classen's drawings of swans included those faith. Her conversion to Catholicism 10 years after with necks so long that they don't make sounds. her mother's death was a new beginning for She remembered the effect of the silence she her. Married and the mother of three young felt at the Gethsemani Abbey, where she understood so clearly that "beauty is God's children, Classen put her artwork on hold and became a therapist: Then she met Franciscan silent embrace and touch." Father Robert McCreary, who recognized' both Classen says: "We have a passion for God's her deep' and permanent pain and her gift of art. beauty and the contemplative path. We want to He told her that if she would "write and draw," share an awareness of beauty in accordance she would find the beauty in suffering. with God's standards and to recognize beauty as a路qualitY of the divine." "Because I used to think of myself as 'the

The Bottom Line

Keeping track of the years Q. How did we determine to use the initials B.C. and A.D. for before Christ and after (Christ's) death? This couldn't have been the way people determined dates before Jesus was born. How did they keep track of years in those days? (Florida)

book of Genesis. Early Christians employed a variety of methods to record history. Some used local Greek calendars. Others followed the most common Roman method of dating events from the foundation of the city of Rome about 735

A. You have a good ' question. Keeping track of times and dates in ancient history is more complicated than most people might suppose if they thought about By Father it. John J. Dietzen In Old Testament times and before that, the Jews, as most other B.C. cultures, usually based their Some Christians counted calendars on a particular ruler years from the supposed date or king ("in the 11th year of of the birth of Abraham and the reign of King Darius") or still others from a program of major events such as the taxation under Emperor Diocleti~m in the third cenBabylonian exile in the sixth century B.C. (Before Christ, tury. in English). Our method of dating The religious calendar in events from before or after the birth of our Lord came as a ' use by Jews today, supposedly based on the time from byproduct of attempts to settle the creation of the world, the' bitter controversy between began to be used only about the Eastern and Western 1,000 years ago. The "date" Churches over the date of of creation was computed by Easter. A Roman monk called adding up all the referen'ces Dionysius the Little invented to years and ages in the this way of dating in the sixth Hebrew Scriptures (our Old century, using the designaTestament), especially the tions B.C. and A.D. (Anno

r------------

Questions and Answers

Domini, the year of the Lord) Unfortunately many historical sources available to us today were unknown in his time. Using only the information at hand, he set the beginning of the Christian era, the birth of Christ, six or eight years later than it should have been. Thus, the birth of Christ took place, according to our calendar, about the year 7 B.C. Only centuries later was this new way of numbering years adopted even in the Christian world. The fact that it took hold at all is greatly due to the eighthcentury English Benedictine monk and historian, St. Bede, who used this method of dating in his monumental "History of the English People" and other historical writings. A free brochure answer路 ing questions Catholics ask about receiving the ~oly Eucharist is available by sending a stamped, selfaddressed envelope to Father John Dietzen, Box 325, Peoria, IL 61651. Questions may be sent to Father Dietzen at the same address, or E-mail: jjdietzen@aol.com.


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2004

Election 2004

Ambassador Flynn speaks out on stem cell debate

TIGHT RACE If the election for president were held today, for whom would you vote1

BOSTON - Raymond Aynn, manner that effectively provides the a fonner three-tenn mayor of Bos- best hope for the future while preton and fonner U.S. Ambassador serving human dignity." to the Vatican (appointed by PresiScientific research on embrydent Clinton in 1993) spoke out onic stem cells has shown these publicly recently to address the con- cells carry a multitude of risks. In troversy surrounding the issue of the lab, embryonic stem cells have stem-cell research. Aynn, who now a tendency to develop into tumors serves as chainnan of the national and grow uncontrollably. In a 2002 BUSH ,. BUSH organization, Catholic Citizenship, study, 20 percent of Parkinson's . , ' "~r, said there is one key distinction not rats injected with mouse embryonic , 9%:" being made which is critical to un- stem cells died of brain tumors. derstanding the issue. . Robert Lanza, medical director of Undecided Undecided "The distinction that needs to be Advanced Cell Technology stated, made clear is the difference be- "In animal experiments, teratomas tween embryonic and adult stem- (tumors) containing fully fonned Nader Nader cell research" said Aynn. ''To not teeth have been reported (The Scimake this distinction is to reduce it entific American, June 2004). to a political talking point and we Robert Langer, professor of shouldn't be playing politics on chemical and biomedical engineersuch an important issue." Acknowl- ing at MIT has pointed out the need From a random nationwide telephone survey of 1,217 likely voters made Oct. 4-6. edging that the issue has certain for more resources devoted to adult Margin of error is plus or minus 2.9 percent and is higher in sub-groups. ethical implications, Aynn was stem-cell research. ''Many hospitals quick to point out that this is not a in Massachusetts and other states religious debate. have been neglecting an easily acSource: Zogby International Š 2004 eNS Graphics "We are committed to support- cessible source of stem cells with ing whatever resources are neces- minimal ethical issues - umbilisary to help science find cures for cal cords of newborn babies people who are suffering. And what which have already proven their we know is that adult stem-cell therapeutic value." (The Boston therapy has already proven success- Globe, April 6, 2004) ful and the most effective means to Adult stem-cell therapy has alaccomplish this. Yet, embryonic ready proven successful in treating stem-cell research has been pro- 56 different ailments including MillBY PETeR FINNEY JR. moted to the public as the best tiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE through schools, health care and unborn child is not a thing;' he said. course despite the risks it poses. The spinal cord injuries, heart damage social services - and its diversity. ''Abortion is the destruction of inNEW ORLEANS - Catholic Carr acknowledged the pain and nocent, unborn human life. I respect worst thing we can do is provide and multiple forms of cancer. false hope with an unproven sciCatholic Citizenship is a non- ,voters should make their political confusion among Catholic voters in those who say, 'This (issue) is it for ence that compromises human partisan organization whkh pro- judgments based on the fundamen- evaluating the presidential candi- me.' But it is not enough to prorights." motespublkpolicy education and tal issues of respect for human life dates' stances on issues in the No- claim. We have to engage and perAynn continued, "We are in fa- Catholic laity involvement in the and respect for human dignity, an vember 2 election. He said the doc- suade." vor of protecting all human life. politicalprocess. Catholic Citizen- official of the U.S. Conference of trinal note from Cardinal Joseph Carr said since the Sept. 11, But, we can't be reckless in our ap- ship is headedbyformer U.S. Am- Catholic Bishops said at a recent Ratzinger to the U.S. bishops at 2001, terrorist attacks there is a proach. We need to move forward bassador to the Vatkan, Raymond New Orleans seminar. their June meeting was "a very more urgent need than ever for the quickly, compassionately, and in a Flynn. The seminar was on the U.S. powerful reminder that, to Catho- Church to refocus on its mission as bishops' political responsibility lic politicians, there can be no false proclaimed by Jesus in the fourth statement titled "Faithful Citizen- separation between faith and (their) chapter of Luke: to bring glad tidship: A Catholic Call to Political lives." ings to the poor, proclaim liberty Responsibility." The document deThe "Doctrinal Note on, Some to captives and restore the sight of scribes "a consistent ethic of life" , Questions Regarding the Participa- the blind. SOUTH BEND, Ind. (CNS) control more routine spending; to as the "moral framework'~ from tion of Catholics in Political Life" "Responsible citizenship is a .The 900-member Catholic Medical guarantee protection of conscience, which Catholic voters should ad- said that, while freedom of con- virtue. Participation in the political Association has called for sweeping and to encourage experiments in di- dress all issues in the political arena. science leaves Catholics free to process is a moral obligation," he ''Without life, nothing else mat- choose among political parties and added. refonn of health care delivery in the ocesan self-insurance. Dr. R. StevenWhite, president of ters," said John Carr, head of the strategies for promoting the comUnited States and proposed better "I predict someone will ask the ways to help the poor and uninsured, the Catholic Medical Association Department ofSocial Development mon good, they cannot claim that question in the next few weeks, restore trust between patient and and chainnan of the task force that and World Peace of the USCCB. freedom allows them to promote 'Are you better off than you were doctor, respect the conscience of all produced the statement, said in a ''Without human dignity, life is in- abortion,euthanasiaorotherattacks four years ago?'" Carr said. ''The telephone interview that too many complete. They go together. The on human life. question should be, 'Are we better parties and control costs. Carr admitted that, in his own off? Are the unborn protected, are The organization urged the re- third part;ies with financial interests moral measure of something is fonn in a statement titled ~'Health are making decisions about patient whether it protects human life or life, "I feel politically homeless the poor being lifted up, are the sick Care in America: A Catholic Pr0- care. Some mandates actually pre- harms it, whether it supports human sometimes." His mother is a Pro- being cared for? This is about posal for Renewal;' which was ap- vent doctors from waiving fees for dignity or does not." Life Republican who ran a preg- people, not principles." The seminar, held at Loyola Uni- nancy program in Minnesota; his proved and released at the poor patients and others that violate He added that this presidential organization's recent convention in the conscience rights of health care versity, included commentary on the father is a Pro-Life Democrat "who election is not about President providers. Orlando, Aa. document by Jesuit Father Fred believes his party should protect the George W. Bush, the Republican Bishop Robert F. Vasa of Baker, Kammer, provincial of his order's weakest." nominee, or Sen. John Kerry of After examining the present state "This is not a cause for one Massachusetts, the Democratic of health care, the statement makes Ore., episcopal adviser to the Catho- New Orleans province and a fonner month or one election;' Carr said. nominee. six main proposals: to give incen- lic Medical Association and a mem- head of Catholic Charities USA. ''It's about whether the woman He said Catholics can contrib- ''The fundamental issue is human tives for people to purchase their ber of the task force, said the own health insurance directly with association's statement supports ute to the political process and the life. I'm convinced we're not go- who cleans your office at night can refundable tax credits; remove bur- medical care for everyone, but not debate about the common good ing to prevail unless we get it right take her kids to the doctor," said because of the Church's "consistent about human life. We have to Carr. ''The central question is who densome and unjust mandates; al- through socialized medicine. The association's statement was moral framework rooted in the change hearts and minds." has a place at the table of life? I low choice ofprivate insurance poli"Our task is to persuade a ma- think we're white-water rafting cies by creating voluntary sponsor to be posted in the near future on its sanctity of human life" as well as "its experience of service" jority of American citizens that the against cultural forces." coverage; to allow consumers to Website at www.cathmed.om.

ALL

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Catholic voters urged to consider respect for hUlDan life, dignity

Catholic Medical Association urges health care reforms


Catholic Citizenship, a lay Catholic organization, has produced the following Voter Guide to inform Massachusetts voters about currentissues.

Catholic

C1T]ZENS~IJP

c"Fa·itrifu,ll Cirizensfiip~ t~n) ttle Catf"lorlc fradltion~" responsiE>l'"e citizensnip~ i9 a1 virtue: participation) in~ ttla ponticalt procesS' i§ al moral~ ooligation'l. n' .LJNITED ..sTATES ;.C0NFERENCE OF CATHOLIC BISHOPS

Calholic,CjiliaJEJJlp Voter Guide General Election November 2 c

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-

Diocese of Fall River

RECORD OF INCUMBENT STATE LEGISLATORS' ROLL CALL VOTES I

u.s. Senate races in Massachusetts this year.)

1) Marriage Affirmation and Protection Amendment (2004): Define marriage as the unique union of a man and a woman without simultaneously creating civil unions as equal to marriage. (#3 of nine votes in Constitutional Convention.) (2004 Almanac) 2) Protection of Marriage Amendment (2002): Bring definition of marriage to a vote in Constitutional Convention (House and Senate Journals, July 17, 2002) 3) Pro-Life: Supports legislation to protect human life in all its stages (MCFL Primary Election Survey, 2004) 4) Charter Schools a. House· Support charter schools (2004 Mass Political Almanac) b. Senate· SUpport charter schools (2001 MA Political Almanac)

DOES CANDIDATE SUPPORT OR OPPOSE: 1. A federal constitutional amendment to protect marriage as only between one man and one woman? 2. Legal recognition of homosexual civil unions? 3. The Unborn Victims of Violence Act? (Makes it a separate crime if fetus injured or killed while carrying out a violent crime on a.pregnant woman.) 4. A ban on human cloning? 5. Prioritizing abstinence for global HIV/AIDS? 6. The use of human embryos for stem-cell research, which destroys the embryo? (Adult stem cells have already successfully treated a variety of diseases and have no ethical issues.) 7. A ban on partial-birth abortion? 8. Vouchers for children in failing Washington, D.C. public schools, that may be used for private schools? 9. Faith-based organizations' participation on an equal basis in federal programs providing social services, like helping drug addicts overcome addiction?

=

=

=

=

= =

KEY: S Supports 0 Opposes Y = Yes N No M Mixed NA No vote record available or not in office at the time, or no roll call taken. NV Did not vote. Name

Rep. or

Hometown

Sen.

District Name

D

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Ashland

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0

5

0

5

0

5

5

5

James P. McGovern Worcester

0

0

5

0

S

0

5

0

0

0

4th

Barney Frank

Newton

0

0

5

0

S

0

5

0

0

0

4th

Chuck Morse

Brookline

U

5

0

S

0

S

0

5

5

5

:, 3rd

Ronald Crews

R-Wrentham

l_

9

8

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NV Norfolk, Bristol & S25 M 5 Middlesex y NA Creedon, Robert D-Brockton 2nd Plymouth & S29 5 0 Bristol 0 -ND-Milton Sen. Joyce, Brian Norfolk, Bristol & S24 0 _NV , Plymouth _._----00 -fC 0 1sfBristol-&-- ·S03 Sen. Menard, Joan D-Somerset Plymouth Sen: -Montigny, Mark- D~N:-Be<lfoJij--2rnfBnstor&- -SO~- -0- - 0 - -N- -S~. Plymouth 'Fijymouth&-- ·S27- -0- - 0 - -N- -0 Sen. Murray, Therese b-:Plymouth Barnstable O'Leary, Robert D-Cummaquid Cape & S05 0 - - 0 - -N- _NA , Islands . 1st Plymouth&- ·S28 -5- - 0 - -M- o Sen. "Pacheco, Mark R-:- D-=Taunton Bristol '9rlstol-OJorfolk ·S02- -0- - 0 - -NSen. ·Sprague, joAnn- R:Walpoi-e(Not running) Sen. Brown, Scott

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STATE REPRE5E. TATIVE5 5th

Martin T. Meehan

5th

Thomas P. Tierney Stephen P. . O'Malley Jr.

6th

John F. Tierney

6th

Lowell

0

0

5

0

Framlnghan

R

5

0

5

Nahant

R

.

- - . - - . - -

Salem

0

0

S

0

0

5

0

5

0

0

0

0

5

M

5

5

S

5

0

5

0

0 -

..

0

.

,-

7th

Kenneth G. Chase

cambridge

R

5

0

5

5

S

M*

S

5

5

7th

Edward J. Markey

Malden

0

0

5

0

5

0

5

0

0

0

10th

William D. Delahunt Quincy

0

0

5

0

S

0

5

0

0

0

10th

Michael J. Jones

R

0

5

5

S

S

M*

5

S

5

Plymouth

Rep. Atsalis, Demetrius D-Hyannis 2nd Barnstable H002 5 NV N 5 Cabral, Antonio D-N. Bedford 13th Bristol H023 ( ) -ON 0 I -ORep. Canavan Christine D-Brocklon . 10th Plymouth H121 5 N 0 Rep. -Correia, Robert D-FarrRiver 7th Bristol Hofr -S- - S - - y -S~ y Rep. Creedon, Geraldine D-Brockton 11th Plymouth H122 5 0 0 -0- y ~gan, James H. D-Taunton 3rd Bristol H013 NY 5 I ~e.:. -- 0 Rep. Flynn; David D-Bridgewater Sth Plymouth H119 5 N M -50 Rep. George, Thomas R-Yarmouth 1st Barnstable H001 (Not running) 2nd-Plymouth- -H113 -5- - 0 Rep. -Gifford-Williams R-Wareham 5 Susan - - -5- N S 4th Barnstable H004 5 ~ep. Gomes, Shirley A. R-Harwich Rep. Haddad, Patricia D-Somerset 5th Bristol . H015 ( ) - 0 - -N- O D-Freetown 12th Bristol H022 -5- -OM 0 I ~e.:. Howland, Mark Rep. Kafka, Louis D-Sharon Sth Norfolk H104 0 - -ON 0 -5R-Attleboro 2nd Bristol H012 -5- M S I ~e.:. Lep-per, John - - 0- N Rep. Patrick, Matthew . D-Falmouth 3rd Barnstable H003 0 5 y _S==:J R-Sandwich 5th Barnstable H005 -S- - 0 ~ep. Perry, Jeffrey y Rep. Poirier, Elizabeth R-N. Attleboro 14th Bristol H024 5 S S Rep. Quinn, John H019 -5- - 0 D·Dartmouth 9th Bristol Y _S~ Rep. -Rodrigues, Michael D-=FalfRiver- BthBristol-- -ROTs" 0 - - 5 - - ' i - S Rep~ -straus, William M. D-Mattapoisett 10th1lrfstol-- lf02Q' "0- -0'" " f.r- -8---' -y 0 EEiJi, ~Sul@ii!:]:)~vlcnk Q:E~IIJ~i~ __ ,6th BjisfoC =.~~._ RQj6 .. O· -5 O-~' Rep.__ Travis, Philip D-Rehoboth 4th Bristol H014 _5. . 5 Y l... _.. - - ---- - -- '._ .. .. --. ---~I'.

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Answer Codes: S = SUPPORTS 0 = OPPOSES U = UNDECIDED Y = Yes N = No M = Mixed - = NO RESPONSE • = COMMENT: Candidate provided additional comment available on request by email to: info@catholicyote.ofi 0

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KEY TO ANSWERS AND PARTY CODES

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Party Code: D = Democrat R = Republican U = UnenrolledlIndependent L = Libertarian GR = GreenlRainbow

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Catholic Citizenship Voter Gulide continued on page

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9

HOW THIS VOTER'S GUIDE HELPS YOU deliberately endorse or promote any of these actions. and lower office. Some people become congressional repreThis voter's guide helps you cast your vote in an no candidatc who really wants tq' advance the common sentatives, senators, or presidenls without having been informed manner consistent with Catholic moral teaching. good will support any action' contrary to the non-negl>- elected to a lesser office. But most representatives, senaII helps you avoid choosing candidates who endorse poli- tiable principles involved in these :issues. tors. and presidents started their political careers at the cies that cannot be reconciled with moral norms that used I. Abortion . I. local level. The same is true for state lawmakers. Most of to he held hy all Christians. The Church teaches that, regarding a law permitting them began on city councils and school boards and worked On most issues that come belore votcrs or legislators, abortions, it is "never licit to obey it, or to take part in a their way up the political ladder. the task is selecting the most ellcctive strategy among sev- propaganda campaign in favor ofsuch a law, or to vote for Tomorrow's candidates for higher offices will come a:ll morallr good options. ACatholic can take one side or it" (EV 73). Abortion is the intentional and direct killing of mainly from today's candidates for lower offices. It is the other and not act contrary to the faith. Most matters do an innocent human being. and t1ierefore it is a form of Iherefore prodent to apply comparable standards to local nOI have a "Catholic position." homicide. : candidates. One should seek to elect to lower offices canBut somc issues conccrn "non-negotiable" moral prinThe unborn child is always a1 innocent party. and no didates who support Christian morality so that they will ciples that do not admit of exception or compromise. law may permit the taking of his life. Even when a child is have a greater ability to be elected to higher offices where One's position cither accords with those principles or docs conceived through rape or ince~t, the fault is not the Iheir moral stances may come directly into play. not. No one cndorsing the wrong side of these issues can child's. who should not sutTer death for others' sins. HOW TO DETERMINE A he said to act in accord with the Church's moral norms. 2. Euthanasia CANDIDATE'S POSITION This voter's guide identifies live issucs involving Ollen disguised by the name "mercy killing." euthanaI. The higher the onice, the easier this will be. "non-negotiahlc" moral values in current politics and helps sia is also a form of homicide. No person has a right to Congressional representatives and senators. for example, you narrow down the list of acceptable candidates. take his own life, and no one has the right to take the life repeatedly have seen these issues come before them and so whether they are running for national. state, or local of any innocent person. have taken positions on them. Ollen Ihe same can be said otlices. In euthanasia, the ill or elderly are killed. by action or at the state level. In either case. learning a candidate's You sho'uld avoid to Ihe greatest extent possible voting omission. out ofa misplaced sense of compassion, but true position can be as easy as reading newspaper or magazine for candidates who endorse or promote intrinsically evil compassion cannot include intenlionally doing something articles, looking up his views on the Internet. or studying policies. As far as possihle, you should vote for those who intrinsically evil to another person (cf. EV 73). one of the many printed candidate surveys that arc distribpromot~ policies in line with the moral law. 3. Embryonic Stem Cell Research uted at election time. In many elections there are situations where all of the Human embryos are human beings. "Respect for the 2. It is often more ditlicult to learn the views of canavailable candidates take morally unacceptable positions dignity of the human being excludes all experimental didates for local offices because few of them have an on one or more of the "non-negotiable" issues. manipulatiori or exploitation of the human embryo" (CRF opportunity to consider legislation on such things as aborIn such situations, a citizen will be called upon to 4b). tion, cloning, and the sanctity of marriage. But these canmake tough choices. In those cases, citizens must vote in Recent scientific advances show that ollen m~'dical didates. being local, often can be contacted din.'Ctly or the way that will most limit lh~ harm that would be done treatments that researchers hope to develop from experi- have local campaign offices that will explain their posiby Ihe available candidates. mentation on embryonic. slem cells can be developed by lions. In this guide we will look first at the principles that using adult stem cells instead. Adult stem cells can be 3. [f you cannot determine a candidatc's views by should be applicd in dear-cut races where there is an obtained without doing harm to the adults from whom they other means. do not hesitate to write directly to the candiunambiguously good moral choice. These same principles come. Thus there is no valid medical argument in favor of date, asking for his position on the issues covered above. help lay the groundwork for what to do in situations that using embryonic stem cells. And even if there were bene· HOW NOT TO VOTE arc mnre ditlicull. fits to be had from such experiments, they would not jusI. Do not vote based just on your political party anilKnnwing the principles thai are applied in ideal situa- tifY destroying innocent embryonic humans. . iation. your earlier voting habits, or your family's voting 4. Human Cloning tradition. Years ago, these may have been trustworthy tinns is useful when facing problematic ones. so as you review the principles you should keep in mind that they "Attempts ... for obtaining a human being without ways to determine whom to vote for. but today they are ollen must be applied in situations where the choice is any connection with sexuality through 'twin fission,' often not reliable. You need to look at the stands each canmore difficult. At Ihe end of the guide we will otTer prac- cloning, or parthenogenesis are to be considered contrary didate takes. This means that you may end up casting votes tical advice about how to decide 10 cast your vote in those to the moral law. since they are in opposition to the digni· for candidates from more than one party. cases. ty both of human procreation and of the conjugal union" 2. Do not cast your vote based on candidates' appearYOUR ROLE AS A CATHOLIC VOTER (RHLI:6). ance, personality, or "media savvy." Some attractive, Catholics have a moral obligation to promote the Human cloning also involves abortion because the engaging, and "sound·bite-capable" candidates endorse eommon llood through the exercise of their voting privi- "rejected" or "unsuccessful" embryonic clones are intrinsic evils, while other candidates. who may be plainleges (cf. ece 2240). [t is not just civil authorities who ,/ destroyed, yet each clone is a human being. looking. uninspiring. and ill at case in front of cameras. 5. Homosexual "Marriage" have rcsponsil>ility for it country. "Service ofth~ common endorse legislation in accord with basic Christian princigood require[sl citizens to fulfill their roles in the life of Troe marriage is the union of one man and one ples: 3. Do not vote for candidates simply because they the political community" (CCC 2239). This means citizens woman. Legal recognition of any other union as "marshould participate in the political process at the ballot box. riage" undermines true marriage, and legal recognition of declare themselves to be Catholic. Unfortunately. many But voting cannot be arbitrary. "A well-formed homosexual unions actually docs homosexual persons a self-described Catholic can'didates reject basic Catholic Christian conscience does not permit one to vote for a disfavor by encouraging them to persist in what is an moral teaching. , 4. Do not choose anlOng,candidates based on "What's political program or an individual law that contradicts the objectively immoral arrangement. "When legislation in favor of the recognition of homl>- in it for me?" Make your decision based on which candi· fundanlental contents of faith and morals" iCPL 4). Acitizen's votc most ollen means vqting for a candidate wbo sexual unions is proposed for the first time in a legislativc dates seem most likely to promote the common good, even will be the one directly voting on laws or programs. But assembly. the Catholic lawmaker has a moral duty to if you will not benefit directly or immediately from the being one step removed trom law-making doesn'tlet citi- express his opposition clearly and publicly and to vote legislation they propose. 5. Do not vote lor candidates who are right on lesser zens oil' the hook, since morality requires that we avoid against it. To vote in favor ofa law so harmful to the comissues but will vote wrongly on key mordl issues. One canmon good is gravely immordl" (UHI' 10). doinll cvillo the greatest extent possible, even indirectly. WHICH POLITICAL OFFICES didate Illay have a record of voting in line with Catholic Some things arc always wrong. and no one may delibvalues except for. say, euthanasia. Such a voting record is SHOULD I WORRY ABOUT? eratcly ·vole in favor of them. I.egislators. wbo have a Laws are passed by the legislature. enforced by the a clear signal that the candidate should not be chosen hy a direct vote, may not support these evils in legislation or programs. Citizens support these evils indirectly if they executive branch. and interpreted by the judiciary. This Catholic voter unless the other candidates have voting vote in favor of candidates who propose 10 advance them. means you should scrutinize any candidate lor the legisla- records even less in accord with these moral norms. HOW TO VOTE Thus. to the greatest extent possible. Catholics must avoid ture. anyone running tor an executive ollice. and anyone I. For each office. first detennine how each candidate vUling for any candidate who intends to support programs nominated for the bench. This is true not only at the stands on each of the issues that will come betore him and nr laws that are intrinsically cvil. When all of thc candi- national level but also at the state and local levels. True. the lesscr the office. the less likely the ol1ice involve non-negotiable principles. dates endorse morally harmful policics. citizens must vote 2. Rank the candidates according to how well their holder will take up certain issues. Your city council. for in a way that will limit the harm likely to be done. example, perhaps will nevcr take up the issue of human positions align with these non-negotiable moral principles. FIVE NON·NEGOTIABLES 3. Give preference to candidates who do not propose These live current issues concern actions that are cloning hut may take up issues connected with abortion intrinsically evil and must never be promoted by the law. clinics. It is important that you evaluate candidates in light . positions that contradict these principles. 4. Where every candidate endorses positions contral)' Intrinsically evil actions arc those that fundamentally con- of each non-negotiable moral issue that will come beli1re to non-negotiable principles, choose the candidate likely flict with the moral law and can ncver be deliberatcly per- them in Ihe otlices they are sceking. Few people achieve high ollice without lirst holding a to do the least harm. If scveral are equal, evaluate them lilrmeu under any circumstances. It is a scrious sin to

Cath 0 Ii ( CITIZENSHIP

www.catholicvote.org

based on their views on other, lesser issues. 5. Remember that your VOle today may affect the offices a candidate later achieves. WHEN THERE IS NO -ACCEPTABLE- CANDIDATE In some political races, each candidate takes a wrong position on one or more issues involving non-negotiable moral principles. In such a case you may vote for the candidate who takes the fewest such positions or who seems least likely to be able to advance immoral legislation. or you .may choose to vote for no one. Avote cast in such a situation is not morally the same as a positive endorsement for candidates. laws. or pro· grams that promote intrinsic evils: It is only tolerating a lesser evil to avoid an even greater evil. As Pope John Paul II indicated regarding a situation where it is not possible to overtum or completely defeat a law allowing abortion. "an elected official, whose absolute personal opposition to procured abortion was well known, could licitly support proposals aimed at limiting the hann done by such a law and at lessening its negative consequences at the level of general opinion and public morality"(EV 73; also CPI. 4). Catholics must strive to put in place candidates. laws, and political programs that are in full accord with nonnegotiable moral values. Where a perfect candidate, law. or program is not on the table, we are to choose the best option. the one that promotes the greatest good and entails the least evil. Not voting may sometimes be the only moral course ofaction, but we must consider whether not voting actually promotes good and limits evil in a specific' instance. The role ofcitizens and elected officials is to pro· mote intrinsic moral values as Illuch as possible today while continuing to work toward better candidates. laws. and programs in the future. THE ROLE OF YOUR CONSCIENCE Conscience is like af! alarm. It warns you when you are about to do something that you know is wrong. It docs not itself determine what is right or wrong. For your conscience to work properly. it must be properly intormedthat is. you must inform yourself about what is right and what is wrong. Only then will your conscience be a trusted guide. Unfortunately, today many Catholics have not formed their consciences adequately regarding kcy moral issues. The result is that their consciences do not "sound off' at appropriate times, including on Election Day. A well-Iormed conscience will never contradict Catholic moraltCllching. For that reason, ifyou are unsure where your conscience is leading you when at the ballot box. place your trost in the unwavering moral teachings of the Church. (The Catechism of the Catholic Church is an excellent source ofauthentic moral teaching,) WHEN YOU ARE DONE WITH THIS VOTER'S GUIDE Please do not keep this voter's guide to yourselt: Read it. learn from it, and prepare your selection of candidates based on it. Then give this voter's guide to a friend, and ask your friend to read it and pass it on to others. The more people who vote in accord with basic moral principles,the better ofT our country will be. ABBREVIATIONS CCC Catechism of the Catholic Church CPI. Congregation of the Doctrine of the Failh, Doctrinal Notes on Some Questions regarding the Participation of Catholics in Political Life CRF Pontifical Council for the Family, Charter of the Rights of the Family EV John Paul II, Evangelium Vitae (The Gospel of Lifel RHL Congregation lor the Doctrine of the Faith. Instruction on Respect lor Human Life in lIS Origin and on the Dignity of Procreation UHP Congregation tor the Doctrine of the Faith, Considerations regarding l'roposals to Give Legal Recognition to Unions between Homosexual Persons

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Catholic Citizen$hip Voter Guide -

continued from page eight Voter guide keys are on page eight.

STATE OF MASSACHUSETIS CANDIDATE ISSUES DOES CANDIDATE SUPPORT OR OPPOSE: 1. Massachusetts' Constitutional Amendment to protect marriage as only between one man and one woman? 2. A Federal Constitutional Amendment to protect marriage as only between one man and one woman? 3. Legal recognition of homosexual civil unions? 4. A "Woman's Right to Know Acr to provide a 24-hour reflection period before an abortion, information on medical risks. fetal development and altematives to abortion like adoption? '5. Parental consent for a minor's abortion? 6. A ban on partial birth abortion? 7. A ban on the use of human embryos for stem cell research. which destroys the embryos? (Adult stem cells have cured a variety of diseases and have no ethical issues.) 8. A ban on clonir:'g' of human embryos? '9, School choice 'in the form of tuition tax credits or tax ,deductions for parents with children in private or parochial schools? 10. Legislation to protect human life in all its s!Bges? (Wil,1 be categorized as Yes. No or Mixed) '11. Supports the Death Penalty (House only)

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Sunday is World Mission Sunday - please give generously Let's Come Together For Prayer & Praise at a

Diocesan Prayer Meeting Saturday, October 30 9:30 am

Ms. Barbara Wright AT A EUCHARISTIC celebration in India, "anyone who encounters Christ in the Eucharist cannot fail to proclaim through his or her life the merciful love of the Redeemer," explains Pope John Paull!. Sunday is World Mission Sunday. Please give generously. (Photo by MISSIO)

will speak on

"Forming Community"

Pope tells Catholics: 'Feel sent as Missionaries of the Eucharist' In his message for this year's World Mission Sunday to be celebrated this weekend, Pope John Paul urges Catholics to feel "sent as missionaries of the Eucharist to carry to every environment the great gift received." In Sri Lanka, where baptized Catholics comprise only three percent of the population, there is a "hunger for the Eucharist:' explains one bishop there - and a living out of the pope's call to be "missionaries of the Eucharist." The bishop noted "the laity embrace our priests and appreciate the sacrifices they make, such as having to journey far and often on foot to rather remote villages to celebrate Mass for them," he explained. "After the Mass, they then go out .with great enthusiasm, to tell their neighbors about the salvation that our Lord has won for them. As a result, this year alone, we have seen the number of baptized Catholics increase by about 6,000," he added. Throughout the developing world, missionaries proclaim Jesus' message of peace and love to those who suffer with devastating pov- . erty and the violence of war. In his message for World Mission Sunday, the Holy Father discusses such difficulties - and the strength to be drawn from the Eucharist. ''The Holy Spirit, with invisible but powerful working, guides the Christian people on a daily spiritual itinerary in which they encounter difficulties and experience the . mystery of the cross. The Eucharist is the 'bread oflife' which sustains those who, in tum, become 'broken bread' for others, paying at times even with martyrdom for their fidelity to the Gospel." A bishop in Sudan once called. his African homeland, "a living tent." Bishop Antonio Menegazzo of EI Obreid speaks of the difficulties his people face: "Just think, we have been at war since 1983! My diocese is in the middle of the war

St. Anthony's Church 126 School St., Taunton

area and many people are killed ev- those who day after day bring the Sponsored by the Diocesan Service Committee ery day. Despite this, each day, Good News 9f Jesus Christ to all For more info call Mary Leite @ 508-822-2219 dedicated catechists persist in nations and peoples. spreading the faith, often in grave peril to their very lives. They continue to go out to establish prayer centers where people can come to explore the faith and eventually be baptized. In the past years, we have between 3,000 and 4,000 baptized at Easter. God can bring good 11 things even in the middle ofa war." Catholics in Tamil Nadu, India, mark World Mission Sunday with . Feitelberg Insurance has been navigating the insurance a daylong, joyous celebration. 1\\'0 weeks prior to the event, the parish marketplace since 1916. Let us put your business insurance priestand his assistants educate the program on the right course. people on the work of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, which receives the offerings collected, as well as on the worldwide mission that is the responsibility of every baptized Catholic. The people are told that their most precious gift for the missions is prayer. Although Tamil Nadu is a poor area of India. the people are extremely generous. Last year, the diocese raised $3,192 to foster the worldwide work of lay catechists, priests and religious. As the Holy Father encourages in his message, they have "lived World Mission Sunday with a Eucharistic spirit." The Church is universal. So is its mission. And so is World Mission Sunday. Celebrated each year in the context of the Eucharist, it reminds us that we who eat Christ's Body and drink his Blood are sent to continue his mission to the world. Pope John Paul II says, "The Church offers Christ, the Bread of Salvation, to all peoples that they may recognize him and accept him as the only Savior of mankind." This weekend, we Catholics of the world join at the Eucharist in celebrating our common mission vocation. We offer prayers for the h. Fall River • W. Bridgewater • Somerset Church's missionary efforts in Sri (_CIolla' Lanka, Sudan, India, and more than ~ Plymouth • Dartmouth • Hingham 1,150 dioceses throughout the developing world. And we too offer our financial help to support all

"We cannot direct the wind, hut we can adjust the sails.

Life

Business

Personal

Employee Benefits

~ Feitelberg Insurance 508-676-1971

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112

Frida~

October 22, 2004

Sunday is World Mission Sunday - please give generously

Missionary Sister, shows God's love to the poorest in Namibia Sister Ingrid Oletti keeps going. Day after day, she makes the rounds in Katatura - a city in Namibia whose name means "the place nobody wants to go." The German missionary had served in the south of this African country as a teacher before coming to Katatura, a city just north of the nation's capital of Windhoek. Here, the upper class live in tin huts, banged together from old, rusty barrels, car bodies and colorful advertising signs. Others sleep under plastic bags, while their children live in scrapped cars. This day, Sister Ingrid steers her white car over roads without signs, se~rching for a woman who visited her at the St. Vincent de Paul Center earlier ,that morning. She finds Naomi in a small, windowless corrugated iron shack that actually belongs to her sister and brother-in-law and their two children. Naomi and her own four childrel) sleep on the dirtand-rock floor. There is no light, no water, no furniture - and no protection against the bitterly cold African nights. Sister Ingrid talks with Naomi, discovering that the family often goes days without food. It is a common story, one this missionary has heard many times before - but her attentiveness and loving concern make Naomi feel that this is the first time her new friend, Sister Ingrid, has listened to such a sorrowful tale. Sister Ingrid promises food for her and her family, and teaches her to make fried-cake. The Center will provide Naomi

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all the ingredients to make friedcakes. Naomi can then sell the cakes, buy ingredients to make more - and have additional money to purchase food for her family. Before she leaves, Sister Ingrid gives the children some candy. Before little Ben has compl~tely unwrapped his sweet, he runs over to Naomi so that his mother can have the first taste. "Karunga ne mu yambeke," ("God Bless You") Sister Ingrid says to the family as she leaves. B'ut this mother and her children know he already has - in the person and presence of Sister Ingrid. And then Sister Ingrid is back in her car again, going to see another family; this time an elderly woman who is raising her three grandchildren and trying to get them into schools. Sister Ingrid will try her best to help them, even if she has to put the whole family in her car and drive them from school to school to find a place where they can get an education. "We have visited some 1,400 families in their homes - and this figure grows by the week," Sister Ingrid says of the outreach from the Center. Hundreds come daily to the Center. "We have little money for food and other essentials, but nobody leaves here empty handed." Or, it would seem, without hope - thanks to the missionary Sister who heard the call'to "go" and who keeps doing that, day after day, seeking out and serving the poor.

, FEEDING THE 3,000 after an ordination ceremony, there is fish, rice and vegetables for , all. (Photo by M I S S I O ) '

After' years of darkness', a new life for the Church' in Cambodia

The young man still bears the scars of another era in his native Cambodia - even though he was only 10 years old when his country was plunged into darkness. It was back in 1975, when the country's ruthless rulers decreed_that all religion would be abolished. ,No one would.pe aIlowed to go to church; no one would be allowed to pray. But the boy of 10, Vythy Mimetto, found a way. Each night at the children's camp where he lived, he would quietly say the Our Father and the Hail Mary before he went to sleep. . " "I used to whisper' prayers and keep my hand over my mouth so no one would see," he recently recalled. "I thought that if I didn't say the prayers each day I would forget them and that there would never be anyone to teach me them again." Thanks to his faith and that of countless others, Vythy Mimetto's worst fear never can true. Even tho~gh no priests survived the years of persecution, the Catholic faith did. And since 1990, when Christians were once again allowed to worship in public, it has grown and even flourished. Best of all, the ranks of survivors have produced not only vibrant churchgoers, but also the men to serve and guide them. The priesthood is back in Cambodia. The first ordinations since 1975 - when Pol Pot came to power and the era of persecution and geno, cide began - took place earlier this year. Bishop Emile Destombes, the 66-year-old prelate who presided at the ordination ceremony, called it a "historic event" for the local Church. "The people are gradually awakening from their nightmare," he said. "They are beginning to realize that they survived and that a new start is possible." Father Paul Lay is one of the new priests and he was barely older than lO-year-old Vythy when the Cambodian dictators came into power. At 13, he was forced into a work brigade, separated from his parents and other family members. "I had to work like a man," he recently told MISSIO (Propagation of the Faith/Germany) news service. "We built a dam with shovels and our bare hands. There was never enough to eat. Many of the people in our brigade died of starvation. Anyone who could not go on or who tried to resist was brought into the forest by Pol Pot's henchmen and beaten to death with spades." The death toll in Cambodia's years ofdarkness is stagSISTER INGRID visits Naomi and her family in Namibia. gering. At least 1.7 million Cambodians were put to death; Sunday is World Mission Sunday. some estimates have the number at three million.

Father Lay eventually made his way to a refugee camp in Vietnam, where he had his initial contact with Christians. It was the strength of their faith in the midst of dewlation, in fact, that led to his own interest in the Church - and to his eventual ordination, as a priest. One of the three men. ordaj'led with Father Lay lived in the same refugee c~mi.p' and got to know him at 'the time, and with him was impressed by the missionaries who also settled among them. "Today's Church in Cambodia grew from these camps," Bishop Destombes said. "Many people found a deep faith there. These are the men and women who are building the Church in Cambodia today." The ordination of the four new priests, a happy ceremony held in an open courtyard, attracted a throng of 3,000. Some shed tears in the midst of their joy, recalling darker times not all that long ago. But the Church in Cambodia, out of the shadows at last, was on the move again. A Church that could only whisper its prayers a generation ago had found its voice once more.


1_ _F_"_'d_8Y _,_O_ct_o_be_r_2_2_,2_0_0_4

Diocese

Continued/rom page one

ing God for the graces to continue into the future." The following is the text of Bishop Coleman's homily. "How good it is for us to be here as we bring to a close the year marking the centennial of the founding of the Diocese of Fall River - here in the presence of Our Savior in the Blessed Eucharist, here at the Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette. I am most grateful to Archbishop Cronin for joining us today, mindful that he served the Church of Fall River for more than 20 of our 100 years. I thank all gathered here today at this Rosary Celebration as we recall all that God has accomplished in our Diocese of Fall River under the care and protection of Our Lady' of the Assumption. The Eucharist has been the center of the faith life of our local Church of Fall River and it has been the center of every. parish community of our diocese. Devotion to our Blessed Mother is evident in t:1e many parishes placed under her protection. From our Cathedral parish of Our Lady of the Assumption in Fall River to Immaculate Conception Parish in North Easton, and to St. Mary's Parish in Taunton; from Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in New Bedford to Our Lady of the Cape Parish in Brewster and to St. Mary, Our Lady of the Isle Parish in Nantucket, the people of our diocese have called upon the protection and intercession of Mary, the Mother of God and Mother of the Church, The Eucharist at the center of Christian life and devotion to Mary, the Mother of our Savior, have been like two pillars which have been prominent signs of the faith of people of our diocese for the past 100 years and which will enable all of us to look forward with hope to future years. I am reminded of a remarkable dream described by St. John Bosco about 150 years ago. He described a dream or vision of the Church as a ship taking refuge between two pillars in the sea. There were many smaller ships drawn up to do battle against the big ship; they were the enemies of the Church and persecutions. Two pillars or columns rose from the sea a short distance from each other. On the top of one was a statue of Our Blessed Mother with the phrase 'Help of Chris-

Mission

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tians' written beneath. On top of the other pillar was the Eucharist, a Host, beneath which was written 'Salvation of the FaithfuL' The commander of the ship was the pope. He was directing all his energies to steering the ship between those two columns or pillars as enemy ships moved in to attack. Sometimes the large ship, the Church, suffered large, deep holes in its' sides but as soon as the harm was done, a gentle breeze blew from the two columns and the cracks closed up and the gaps were stopped immediately. The pope, overcoming all obstacles and enemies, guided the ship between the two columns and fastened a chain from the bow of the ship to the column on which stands the Host, and fastened a chain from the ship's stem to the column on which stands a statue of Our Lady. All the ships which had fought against the pope's ship were scattered and broken to pieces. We can identify the many elements of that dream vision. The Church, then as now, was undergoing many trials. In this remarkable dream described by St. John Bosco, the Church has two means by which it may be saved in the midst of her difficulties - devotion to Jesus in the Eucharist and devotion to our Blessed Mother Mary. During this centennial Rosary Celebration we highlight both those pillars of our faith Jesus in the Eucharist and devotion to Mary, his mother and Mother of the Church. As our yearlong celebration of the diocesan centennial draws to a close, a new and significant year begins. Our Holy Father, Pope John Paul II, has announced that the year beginning this week and continuing through next October will be known as the Year of the Eucharist. It is providential, I believe, that as we complete a year of reflection on what God has done in our diocese for the past 100 years, we are provided' the opportunity to prepare for the years ahead by deepening our understanding of the Eucharist and by our devotion to the Eucharistic Lord. The Holy Father notes the importance of the twin pillars we have taken note of today - the Eucharist, the sacrament of salvation, and Mary, the Mother of God and of the Church. He also

proposes a plan for us at the beginning of this new millennium. He explained, 'To contemplate the face of Christ, and to contemplate it with Mary, is the "program" which I have set before the Church at the dawn of the third millennium, summoning her to put out into the deep on the sea of history with the enthusiasm of the new evangelization. To contemplate Christ involves being able to recognize him wherever he manifests himself, in his many forms of presence, but above all in the living sacrament of his Body and Blood.' Pope John Paul II has expressed in such magnificent terms the task that lies ahead for each of us during this third millennium. The task is this - to contemplate the face of Christ and to contemplate his face with Mary. The Holy Father calls upon us to recognize Christ wherever he may be found, but most especially in the Eucharist, in the sacrament of his Body and Blood. On Calvary, as he died on the cross, Christ gave to Mary the beloved disciple and, in him each of us, when he said, 'Behold your Son!' To each of us he also says: 'Behold your mother!' Our Holy Father points out that experiencing the memorial of Christ's death in the Eucharist also means continually receiving this gift. 'It means accepting -like Johnthe one who is given to us as our mother. It also means taking on a commitment to be conformed to Christ, putting ourselves at the school of his mother and allowing her to accompany us. Mary is present, with the Church, and as the Mother of the Church, at each of our celebrations of the Eucharist. If the Church and the Eucharist are inseparably united, the same ought to be said of Mary and the Eucharist.' Today, in bringing to a close the celebration of our centennial year, we praise and thank God for all that he has accomplished in the hearts of the faithful bishops, priests, deacons, consecrated religious, and laity of our diocese. The history of our diocese is a history of God's grace in southeastern Massachusetts. This day, as we mark the opening of the Year of the Eucharist, we gaze out upon the next 100 years and beyond. In looking toward this new millennium, Pope John Paul II envisioned the Church 'like a vast

opened because of the growing number of young men hearing Christ's call to follow him as priests, as areas devastated by war or natural disaster are rebuilt, and as other areas, long suppressed, are- opening up to hear the message of Chtist and his Church. That is why the involvement and commitment of

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ocean upon which we shall venture, relying on the help of Christ.' On this journey we are accompanied by the Blessed Virgin Mary, who is a sure guide for our steps. Through her interces-

sion may the Lord be generous in granting us and those who come after us an abundance of his grace as we continue the mission of the Church, that mission upon which we all have been sent."

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La Salette Retreat Center 947 Park Street Attleboro, MA 02703-5115 508-222-8530 Fall Grief Education Program Sr. Judith Costa, SSD Cost $15 at the door Thursday Evenings: 6:30 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Facts About Grief November 4 Afternoon Recollections Fr: Fern Cassista, MS Cost: $20 with pre-registration - $28 at the door Sundays: 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. Lessons from Saints October 24 November 21 The God ofSecond Chances For more information, please call or write Retreat Secretary

A GREAT DAY IS COMING! On WORLD

MISSION SUNDAY, Octobe!' 24, OUf' Holy Fathef', Pope John Paul II, caDs ewiry Cadwlic to celebrate, at the Eucharist, tiOCation to be missionary and to help the Missions.•. 'ffPRAY for the Church's

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worldwide missionary work

'ffOFFER financial HELP through the PROPAGATION' OF THE FAITH.

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Continued/rom page one

lected on Sunday are destined for a common fund of solidarity distributed in the pope's name, by the Society ef the Propagation of the Faith among the missions and missionaries of the entire world. Every year, the needs of the Catholic Church in the missions grow as new dioceses are formed, as new seminaries are

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Catholics from around the world is so urgently needed, the pope said. "As I ask your own prayers and gift on World Mission Sunday, I assure you of my gratitude for your help throughout the year and my prayers for you and those you serve," Msgr. Oliveira said in his letter to pastors.

The Society for THE PROPAGATION OF THE FAITH Altn: Column ••• aPontifical Missi01l Society Rev. Msgr. John J. Oliveim. V.E. 106 Illinois St.. New Bedford. MA 02145

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114

Friday. October 22, 2004

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MSGR. THOMAS J. Harrington (center) poses with Bill Gushue and Bob Bagana, chairmen of the recent Msgr. Thomas J. Harrington Golf Tournament. One-hundred-and-forty golfers gathered for this community event at Acushnet River Valley Golf Course to benefit students of Holy. Family-Holy Name School, New Bedford. After a day of beautiful weather and golf, participants enjoyed dinner in the clubhouse.

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ST. JOHN the Evangelist School, Attleboro, is celebrating.its 50 th year of Catholiceducation June 11, 2005 with the celebration of Mass and a dinner for former students. Above are members of its first kindergarten class from the 1955~ 1956 school year.

St. John the Evangelist School to mark 50th anniversary in 2.005 ATtLEBORO - St. John the ner at the Attleboro Elk's Lodge grade one. The arrival of the SisEvangelist School, which has been will follow. All former graduates ters of Mercy allowed the school providing quality Catholic educa- and staff interested in attending to house grades one-eight by 1960. Enrollment was high and lack tion for children in Greater Attle- should ca1l508-222-5062for more boro sinc'e it opened its doors offi- information. The planning com- of space forced the elimination of cially in 1955, will celebrate its mittee is also seeking old photos the kindergarten. In keeping with and personal memorabilia for a the rationale for the school's ex50th anniversary in 2005. The principal, Passionist Sister display. istence, the religious staff saw to Mary Jane Holden,' said planning The community of St. John the the integration of faith and learnfor a June 11, 2005 dinner-dance Evangelist welcomed the an- ing. is currently underway and she is nouncement of building plans by After the Second Vatican looking forward to the celebration. Father John Shay on March 14, Council, the school underwent a "It's a special occasion," said Sis- 1954 anq immediately began a se- number of changes to keep pace ter Holden, "and an exciting time." ries of fund-raisers to raise mon- with the times and counterparts Committee members 'are mak- . ies. An initial bequest of $120,000 in education. Classroom instrucing plans and Sister Holden said specifjcally designated for the . tion was diversified. Grades fivethey are "hoping for a tremendous building of a school had been left eight were departmentalized and kindergarten was re-established. turnout offormer students and staff . by Thomas McCaffrey. of St. John's. It should be a nice The cornerstone was laid in the Math and science programs were evening to get together with old fall of 1954 and by September complemented by hands-on friends." 1955 a new Catholic elementary learning .materials and technolMass will be celebrated at St. school, costing $550,000, wel- ogy w;as incorporated into the John's Church at 4 p.m. and a din- corned students to pre~primary and curriculum.

"When tbe World Mission Rosary is completed, Qne bas embraced all c(mrinencs, i~ .' / '.,\ all . people in pra)le~," \u !\\J \ .Archbishop Fulton J. Sh~cn I

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. . . \..-~/. inaugurated by Archbishop .. \ / Sbeen, remember in each " -",~-_/' . decade one area where tbe Churcb .' . . continues ber evangelizing mission: .' Africa, Asia; the Americas, the Pacific Islands .. and Europe ,home of our Holy Father.

THE CHOIR at Our Lady of Mount Carmel School, New Bedford, under the direction of Ann DeFrias, prepares to sing during a recent' liturgy.

c-c to honor new haU offamers TAUNTON - The 11th annual inductions into the Coyle and. Cassidy High School Warrior Hall . of Fame will take place November 19 at ceremonies in Middleboro, This year's inductees. are: Frederick Fitzsimmons,' Class of 1934 (deceased); John Drislan, . '5i;CharlesConnell, '53; Thomas . Bradshaw, '71; Jaime (Leonard) Wilkinson, '95; and Kkemakolem (Kern) 'Nwosu,'96. . STUDENTS FROM St. Francis Xavier School, Acushnet, .For further information, 'contact ,Jamie Crossman, Office of visit the school's grotto for a recent pra'yer service honoring '. Development and Alumni, at 508- St. Therese of Lisieux, known as "The Little Flower." The event 823-6164 ext. 6 2 6 . ' was organized by the school's National Junio~ Honor Society.


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Friday, October 22, 2004

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'Therese' promoters hope to reach 900 theaters Independent film on life of St. Therese of Lisieux opens today in Swansea By NANCY FRAZIER O'BRIEN CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

WASHINGTON (CNS) - "Therese," the long-awaited movie about the life of St. Therese of Lisieux, opened October I at 32 theaters in 14 states, and its promoters eventually hope to reach 900 movie screens in the United States. Unlike most other films, however, its scheduling is heavily dependent on the number of people in a particular area who register on the Web at www.theresemovie.com to indicate they would be interested in seeing the film. The registration is free. Produced more than two years ago by the independent Luke Films of Portland, Ore., and financed by individual donations, ''Therese'' grossed more than $350,000 during its first weekend, ranking it No.4 in perlocation average among all 190 films playing around the country that weekend, Luke Films announced in a news release. But, said Lourds Ambrose, head of film distribution for Luke Films, '''Therese' is not about box office figures. It is all about how many audiences are touched by the insight of the story." St. Therese, also known as the Little Rower, entered a French Carmelite convent at the age of 15 and died of tuberculosis nine years later. Among the theaters showing ''Therese'' on its opening weekend were six sites in California and five in Texas, as well as theaters in major metropolitan areas such as Chicago, Denver, New York, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Las Vegas and Portland. Parishioners at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Little Rower in San Antonio were instrumental in bringing the film to their city for its Texas premiere September 29, a day before the official opening and the same day as the national premiere in NewYork City. Led by parishioner Rose Garcia, a team of some 40 volunteers from the basilica collected 20,000 signatures in two weeks at local Catholic churches in support of bringing ''Therese'' to San Antonio.

"I received a telephone call from film producer Leonardo Defilippis late Friday, September 10, saying he had good news for San Antonio," Garcia told Today's Catholic, the archdiocesan newspaper in San Antonio. She immediately called Discalced Carmelite Father John M. Suenram, pastor

of the basilica, with the news. Father Suenrarn told Today's Catholic that it was appropriate for San Antonio to host the Texas premiere, since it is home to the national shrine built in honor of St. Therese in 1931 with donations from around the world.

LINDSAY YOUNCE stars as Therese Martin - St. Therese of Lisieux in the recently released film "Therese," produced by the nonprofit production company, Luke Films. The film opens today at Swansea Cinemas, Swansea (508-674-6700). (CNS photo from Luke Films)

The shrine, declared a basilica in 1998, houses a painting of St. Therese done by her sister, Celine, and served as host to the saint's relics in San Antonio when they toured the United States for four months in 1999. Tonya Lynne Wildhaber, director of media relations for Luke Films, told The Florida Catholic, Orlando's dioces~m newspaper, in late September that, although no Rorida theaters were among those with an October' I opening, its later scheduling in the state depended on interest generated through the Website. "As word gets out about the film, we're hopeful that Catholics throughout Rorida will express interest in having it brought to their area," she said. "As more people register through the Website, we'll be able to look at the numbers and determine what cities will receive the film next." A distributor liaison reviews new registrations at the Website daily. Once the targeted number of registrations for major cities has been reached, distributors are contacted and the film is sent out to theaters. An announcement on the movie's Website seemed to indicate that Roridians had been successful in showing their interest. "Therese" opened October 15 in five Rorida cities - Jacksonville, Miami, Miami Beach, Tampa and Winter Park - as well as at 18 other locations around the country, bringing the total number of states where the ftIm will have aired to 21. Additional openings are scheduled for today in Manchester, N.H., and at Swansea Cinemas, 207 Swansea Mall Drive, Swansea, Mass., 02777, (tel. 508-674-6700) and October 29 in South Bend, Ind. The Office for Film & Broadcasting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops classified the film as A-II - adults and adolescents - and said it is "not so much a textured spiritual portrait of the young French nun considered by Pope Pius X 'the greatest saint of modern times' but a series of hagiographic tableaus which may be edifying to many Catholic viewers."

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Why does路 God allow evil? By KASE JOHNSTUN CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

Sometimes life is confusing. If God loves us, why would he

let 9-11 happen? Why would we lose friends to car accidents, gunshots or suicide? Why do humans hurt other humans? If God loves us, why do we go to war? Why do we abort fetuses? If we are made in his image, does that mean God is evil since we hurt each other? No. We are made in his image in the sense that unlike the chair you are sitting on or the broccoli you had for dinner last night, we can reason, make decisions, choose to be good, to do the right thing.

Many things have changed our view of the world in the last few years. A warm helping of fear has been served up on our plates. We have good reason to wonder why. There are those who might be _ tempted to say that God is not everywhere because if he was he would have stopped these things from happening. Such a thought makes sense to a certain degree, but it is false. Many teens question what they believe. This is natural. A teen's brain is waking:.up, questioning, pondering. I'm not that old. I remember what it's like. Most of us cruise through these years feeling something inside that tells us

that what we believe in is right. Then, all of a sudden, something like 9-11 happens and throws a wrench into everything, awakening that doubter

inside. Again, this is natural. This doubt is part of the gift of reason God gave us. I personally have struggled with 9-11. When it happened, I sat in an office in Dublin, Ireland, thousands of miles

away from my family, new to the area and basically friendless. It scared me to be alone without the ones I loved. I asked too, "How could God let this happen?" I am a young layperson trying to come to terms with the evil in the world, struggling with it every day. I have come up with a solution that helps me, and maybe it will help you too when you start to focus on the horrible things that surround us at times such as death, war, hate, torture, suicide and pain. God has given us free will, free will to do good or evil. Some people pick evil, like the 9-11 hijackers and those with guns on the streets in our own

cities. There are many of them, but those who take God's free will and choose to do good far outnumber the others. If they didn't, our existence would be finished by now. I like to put 9-11 into context by thinking about the millions of good things done every day by people. They, again, far outweigh the horrible things. God is always there waiting for us to choose good, as it is always an option for us. This helps me wrap my brain around the horrible things in the world. If you have a good way to wrap your brain around those things, I would love to listen. I'm at Kasetate@hotmail.com.

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Friday, OCtober 22, 2004

SCENES FROM the Rosary Celebration at the National Shrine of Our Lady of La Salette: Top, youth .from Santo Christo Parish, Fall River, display their banner; left, a statue of Our Lady La Salette is processed .into the, large tent prior to the festivities; right, a statue of Our . Lady of Fatima is carried as part of the Rosary Celebration: (Photos by Eric Rodrigues.)

Fre~Catechume~ate

Saturday, October 30;2004 10:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. Cat/hedr~I-Camp: E. Freetown

tea,!!~'for ~y p~~yer,"-stu,dY"

Join other parish RCIA of inspiration, Questions and abswers as Margie Sullivan walk p~rticipants through the Pre-tat~chumenate.PracticarsuggestiOri~,will be given specific@llly for the Period of Pre-9atectlumenate (Peridd of Inquiry). Resource folder~ will be giilerft6 pafticipdnts as well as1m opportunity '''-to see RCIA speCific resources~ J.

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Rrayer Leader: paula Raposo '~ PersonaJlestimony: Ed Langley \' Musicians: MiChael{e'lIier,. Sa/ra Tellier, Merc'i'vailencourt About the Presenter: Margie Sullivan

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w~r(x"p~rience i9~he

Js a formation and implementation of the Rite of Christi~n Initiation of Adults. Margie's experience includes service as a team member wit~'the North Am~ricah Foru~ on the cat~chumenaf since 1997, regional team development facilitator for RCIA,l~~~at:and workshop faCilitator, ~ighteen years of service in the Diocese of Richm'o~~~ parish staff ~ini~try anc:Nfi,ocesariyCIA formation consultant, and is a visiting lecturer at~ Mary's semtnarr, Baltimore. ,9he provides ongoing ministry formation for initiation teams, cate~cal leaders and p®sh1eadership on diocesan and nationallevels. ~ Both experienced teams as well as newly formed RCIA teams will benefit from this day of prayer and formation. Registration is a must by October 27,2004. $5.00 registration fee per person. Register by calling Lisa M. Gulino Office of RCIA (508) 678-2828

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also available. For more information call 508-997-2290.

NEW BEDFORD - A concert of sacred music will be held Sunday from 2:30-4:30 p.m. at St. Anthony. of Padua Church, 1359 Acushnet Avenue. It will feature organist David Langevin, director Frank Wilhelm, and trumpet player Dave CHATHAM - The Pro-Life Touchette. For more information call Prayer Groups of Holy Trinity and ,508-993-1691. Holy Redeemer Church will sponsor a holy hour Sunday at 1:30 p.m. NEW BEDFORD - A prayer at Holy Redeemer Church; 57 High- service for peace, sponsored by Holy land Avenue. Rosary will be fol- Family-Holy Name School will be lowed by Benediction of the Blessed held Sunday at 3 p.m. at St. Sacrament. For more information Lawrence Martyr Church, 110 Sumcall 508-945-0677. mer Street. It is themed "Peace in Our Families," and will include DIGHTON - St. Peter's and St. Benediction of the Blessed SacraJoseph's Heath and Wellness Edu- ment. For more information call cation Series will resume October 25 508-993-3547. at 7 p.m. with a program entitled "The Road We Travel to Wellness." NORTH DARTMOUTH - A Barbara Britto will be guest speaker. Diocesan Divorced-Separated SupIt will be held at St. Peter's parish port Group will meet October 25 center, 207 Main Street. Refresh- from 7-9 p.m. at the Family Life ments will be served. Center, 500 Slocum Road. Topic for the evening is "Rebuilding After DiFALL RIVER -A program en- vorce." For more information call titled "Early Detection' is the Best Bob Menard at 508-673-2997. Protection: A Breast Cancer Survivor's Story," will be held OcORLEANS - A Separated-Ditober 27 from 6-7 p.m. at the vorced Catholics Support Group will FIRSTFED Center for Breast Care meet October 31 at 2 p.m. at the parat Saint Anne's Hospital. For more ish center of St. Joan of Arc Church. information call 508-235-5289. Guest speaker Mercy Sister Betty Doyle will addJ:ess the topic "DiscovMISCELLANEOUS -'- A pil- ering Ourselves and God in Dreams." grimage to our nation's capital for For more information call Father Rithe annual March for Life is being chard Roy at 508-255-0170. organized by the Pro-Life Apostolate, for January 23-25. It will WESTPORT - A parish misinclude Mass at the Basilica of the sion will be held October 24-25 at 7 National Shrine of the Immaculate p.m. at St. George's Church, 12 Conception and a Mass celebrated Highland Avenue, led by Don and by Bishop George W. Coleman for Pat Turbitt. For more information diocesan pilgrims. A youth bus is call '508-992-5402.

The Office of the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults Presents:

"Jn9uiring About the

ATTLEBORO - The National Shrine of Our Lady ofLa Salette will host Jacqueline M. Sitte Saturday at 9 a.m. for a program entitled "God is Rich in Mercy." The day will include exploration, reconciliation and healing. It will conclude with the celebration of Mass at 4 p.m. To register call 508-222-5410.

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~ Thousandsattend RosaryCelebration closingthediocese's centennial observances. ~ Parishesthisweekend willcallattentiontothe Church'smission...

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