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t ean VOL. 30, NO. 41

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Friday, October 17, 1986

F ALL RIVER, MASS.

Southeastern Massachusetts' Largest Weekly

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$8 Per Year

Technology demands, consistent ethic Spectrum involves all life issues

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A MISSIONARY SISTER brings joy and hope to a needy old person. You can support her work through the World Mission Sunday collection this weekend.

Prayer, gifts asked Sunday Mission effort of Church depends on the faithful This Sunday, World Mission Sunday, is the annual occasion, promulgated by Pope John Paul II, for the entire Catholic world to pray at the Eucharist for the missionary work ofthe Church and to offer financial support crucial to the ongoing work of world mission. The Church in the missions is growing and becoming more widely served by native-born priests, religious, and lay catechists. To care for the needs of increasing numbers of Catholics, and to reach out to other millions with the living Gospel of word and service, the mission Church relies heavily on the annual support of the Propagation ofthe Faith and more particularly on the prayers and sacrifices of the entire Church which are offered on World Mission Sunday. Moneys collected this weekend under direction of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith are distributed in their entirety to provide for the missionary and pastoral work of the Church worldwide. 51 percent of the collection is disbursed in Africa, Asia, Oceania, and parts of Latin America. Nine' percent goes to the Eastern churches and 40 percent is for missionary work in the United States.

In the Fall River diocese, Msgr. John J. Oliveira, local director of the Society for the Propagation of the Faith, coordinates the collection effort. Through the Propagation, help is provided for priests and religious who have little or no other source of sustenance. The bishop of a South Pacific diocese, for instance, writes that only help from the Propagation makes it possible for him to pro-

IN OBSERVANCE of October as Resped Life t

spedal teatures p3.

vide living expenses of $100 'a month for the priests and religious serving fulltime in his diocese. This amount covers not only food, clothing, and shelter, but must provide upkeep of the parish, school, social services and any medical facilities. The bishop noted that he would like to raise the stipend to $200 a month, but has no way of doing so. His priests, sisters and people are among a great many who would benefit from an

increased Mission Sunday collection. Through the Propagation, support is also provided for the formation of catechists, seminarians and novices, as well as for the essential mission work of announcing the Gospel, teaching the faith in greater depth to t,hose who have just barely heard of Christ, instructing children and adults in skills needed to live a better life and caring for the sick. This year's theme for World Mission Sunday, "Believe in your heart. .. Proclaim to the world... Jesus is Lord!" reminds us of our own gift of faith which, in the words of Pope John Paul II, is not meant for us alone but is to be shared with all the world as we support the mission Church with our prayers and gifts. Keeping al~ this in mind, Msgr. Oliveira asks on World Mission Sunday for the prayerful and generous support of members of the Fall River diocese. "I ask you to continue once again this year your assistance to the missions," he said. "The need is great. Your help is critical. I and those who benefit from your prayer and sacrifice will remember you and your intentions in our own prayers. May God bless you!"

PORTLAND, Ore. (NC) Technology challenges ethics "along the whole spectrum of life," Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin of Chicago said earlier this month at a two-day Conference on the Consistent Ethic of Life at the University of Portland. Technology, the cardinal said, demands a consistent ethic because "the spectrum cuts across such issues as genetics, abortion, capital punishment, modern warfare and the care of the terminally ill. We desperately need a societal attitude or climate that will sustain a consistent defense and promotion of life." Cardinal Bernardin, who chairs the U.S. bishops' Committee for Pro-Life Activities, popularized "consistent ethic of life" as a term for the underlying principle that shapes church positions on a wide range of issues affecting human life and dignity. Also featured at the conference were Father J. Bryan Hehir, U.S. Catholic Conference secretary for social development and world . peace; Sen. Mark O. Hatfield, ROre.; and author Sidney Callahan, psychology professor at Mercy College, Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. In a question session, Cardinal Bernardin said he hoped for a quick resolution of a major church controversy going on in the Seattle archdiocese, defended his position on gay rights, and defended church teaching on artificial contraception. The controversy in Seattle centers on the Vatican instruction to Archbishop Raymond Hunthausen to transfer authority over several areas of archdiocesan life to his auxiliary, Bishop ponald Wuerl. When a panelist questioning Cardinal Bernardin called Archbishop Hunthausen "a martyr to the consistent ethic of life," the comment drew immediate applause from the audience. Cardinal Bernardin said he knew Archbishop Hunthausen and Bishop Wuerl and thought they were wonderful men. "My heart goes out to both of them. I know Archbishop Hunthausen is suffering," he said. He said he was not free to comment publicly on specifics in the case, however. "It is my hope that in the near future this conflict can

be resolved in a way that will bring peace and harmony to the church," he said. "I will do all I can to promote that." On civil rights for homosexuals, an issue on which he was recently engaged in public controversy in Chicago, he stressed the distinction between homosexual activity and orientation. One has no responsibility for one's orientation, he said, but one must take responsibility for one's behavior or activity. He said he supports the church's teaching against artificial birth control, but would not include it within the consistent ethic of life framework because the moral issue in question was different. At a later press conference, Cardinal Bernardin was asked about news reports that the Vatican is tryingto move the U.S. church in a more conservative direction. He said he preferred to view the present as a period of consolidation after 20 years of radical change following the Second Vatican Council. Not all of the changes that took place were good for the church, he said, and some evaluation and adjustment is needed. Father Hehir, speaking of implications of a consistent ethic of life for U.S. power and technology, said, "We have the capability to shape the beginning of life or threaten to end all of it. The consistent ethic oflife attempts to take this capability and creativity and give it human meaning." On the nuclear threat to life on earth, he quoted Pope John Paul II's comment at Hiroshima that only "a series of conscious choices" can save humanity. Father Hehir urged a halt to nuclear testing as one way to control nuclear weapons. "This drives the arms race," he said. "It is time to say, 'Enough.' " Hatfield, unable to appear in person because of his congressional schedule, pleaded in a video address for nonviolence at home and abroad. Mrs. Callahan called abortion a "betrayal" of feminism, saying it does not contribute to women's rights, but pits women against their unborn children.

Vote your conscience on November 4


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THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River -

Fri., Oct. 17,1986

AMONG TAUNTON AREA residents preparing for the 32nd annual Bishop's Ball are, standing from left, Richard M. Paulson, Immaculate Conception parish, Taunton, and Horace Costa, Sacred Heart, Taunton, both on the decorating committee. Seated, Mrs. Assunta Finnigan, St. Ann's, Raynham, decorating; Mrs. Frances Zellner, St. Ann's, Taunton District Council of Catholic Women president; Mrs. Theodore Wojcik, St. Joseph's, Taunton, decorating. The winter social event will be held Jan. 16 at Lincoln Park Ballroom, North Dartmouth.

New Bedford DCCWtohost Dr. Stanton Joseph R. Stanton, MD, will speak at an Oct. 22 open meeting ofthe Family Affairs Commission ofthe New Bedford District Council of Catholic Women. To be held at St. Mary's Church, South Dartmouth, the meeting wiJI open with 7 p.m. Mass, celebrated by Father Thomas L. Rita, diocesan director of the Pro-Life Apostolate. Dr. Stanton wiJI speak in the parish center immediately after Mass. Dr. Stanton is known throughout the commonwealth for his writings and speeches on the issues of abortion, medical ethics and euthanasia. He has spoken in many areas of the Fall River diocese, including Bishop Stang High School, North Dartmouth, where he conducted pro-life workshops in conjunction with Massachusetts Citizens for Life. A graduate of Boston College and Yale University School of Medicine, he is an associate clinical professor of medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. He is chairman of the Value of Life Committee and of the Coalition for Responsible Government and is Massachusetts delegate to the National Right to Life organization.

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AT 75th anniversary Mass of St. Anthony of the Desert Maronite parish, Fall River, concelebrants included, from left, Msgr. Norman J: Ferris, pastor; Archbishop Francis M. Zayek ofthe Maronite diocese of St. Maron; Boston Cardinal Bernard F. Law; Bishop Daniel A. Cronin; Auxiliary Bishop John A. Elya of the Melkite/Greek Catholic diocese of Newton. (Gaudette photo)

Remember To Vote up to 8,500 abortions per year are paid for with our tax dollars. That is about one abortion every 15 minutes of every workday. Every Massa'Chusetts taxpayer is forced to support this destruction of unborn human life, On Nov. 4, a "Yes" vote on Question #1 would allow our state legislature to stop tax-funded abortion. Please consider this when voting.

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8TATUE of Our Lady of Fatima is borne through the streets of Fall River at Monday's 12th annual candlelight procession, which began at St. Mary's Cathedral and ended at St. Anne's Church, where Bishop Daniel A. Cronin was principal celebrant and homilist at a Mass for peace. (Gaudette photo) School, New Bedford. For the past 22 years she was at St. Mary's Academy, Bay View, in Riverside, The Mass of Christian Burial RI. was offered Wednesday at St. MarShe is survived by a brother, tha's Church, Pawtucket, RI, for John LaPierre, of Pacific Grove, Sister Jean Marie LaPierre, RSM, Calif., and a sister, Elaine Desros52, who died Oct. 12 at Mt. St. iers, of WatsonviJIe, Calif. Rita Health Centre, Cumberland, THE ANCHOR (USPS-545-Q20). Second RI. Postage Paid at Fall River, Mass. A native of Fall River, the daugh- Class Published weekly except the week of July 4 ter of the late John and Elizabeth and the week after Christmas at 410 High(Sullivan) LaPierre, she entered land Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 02720 by the Sisters of Mercy in 1951. Dur- the Catholic Press of the Diocese of Fall ing her teaching career she was on River. Subscription price by mail, postpaid the faculties of St. Joseph School, $8.00 per year. Postmasters send address to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall Fall River, and Holy Family High changes River, MA 02722.

Sr. Jean LaPierre

HCaring With Christ"

Barbara A. Gauthier, R.N.

President Rev. Edmund J. Fitzgerald

Moderator

"It's nothing personal, Mister. It's just that he only shakes hands with people who really love the Missions!"


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THE ANCHOR -

Diocese of Fall River'~ Fri., O"ct. 17, 1986

the living word

the moorin&-,· Consider the Real Question This issue of The Anchor includes a Respect Life section. We ask that you take time to read it. It is imperative that we who believe in life and all that it implies be well informed. There are too many in the church community who are playing games with life. Even in our own church family we find Catholics who feel that difficult situations take precedence over moral and ethical considerations. This is more than tragic. As the November 4 election fast approaches, the proabortion forces have left no stone unturned to encourage . people to vote no on Question 1. Those who are for life, who are attempting to muster yes votes on this question, are facing a tremendous uphill battle. So many who say privately they are against abortion have compromised the issue to such an extent that they publicly support continuance of Medicaid abortion in Massachusetts. They are the people who are attempting to procure a no vote on the referendum. It is important that all voters realize that pro-choice is not pro-life. Pro-choice is the term adopted by those who uphold abortion as a means to terminate pregnancy. On the surface, the word "pro-choice" can be confusing and muddling. One wonders if it was not coined to achieve such an end. As a matter of voter education, let those who wish to support life be clear about this distinction. Pro-choice is not for life. Pro-life is anti-abortion. It is also important for pro-life voters to know those who oppose pro-life activities in our state. The campaign against Question 1 is supported by a coalition that has been consistently anti-life. Its steering committee, as listed in the program for a recent organized labor awards banquet held at Southeastern Massachusetts University in North Dartmouth, includes the Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts, the Massachusetts League of Women Voters, Massachusetts Choice, the Massachusetts National Organization for Women and the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts. These organizations have joined in the attempt to ensure that Massachusetts taxpayer dollars will continue to fund Medicaid abortions. They have joined with perhaps the most liberal political leadership in the nation to make people believe that if they support a yes vote, they are limiting privacy and freedom. This is deceptive. Abortion destroys freedom and rights. It is a faithless act that destroys. It neither nourishes nor nurtures. It is unfortunate that such organizations have gone beyond the boundaries of debate in this issue. They have threatened church institutions with civil suits and loss of tax exemptions if they speak their mind in public, even within their own churches, on respect life issues. Consequently, churches have been advised to limit themselves to asking the faithful to follow their conscience on this issue. They cannot tell people which direction to follow on this moral and ethical question. Is this not an intrusion of the state into religious matters? Is this not making religious beliefs political issues? Is this not a rendering to Caesar of the things that are God's? If is in this spirit of setting the record straight that we consistently ask those who subscribe to the Catholic viewpoint of life to consider a yes vote on Question 1. Of its very nature the process of education demands conclusions. Such a process should bring one to the deliberate and well-considered conclusion that life must be respected in all its stages and supported by affirmative action.

"From my mother's womb thou art my God." Ps. 21:11

The consistent ethic .By Sister . Margaret Carney, OSF "Choose life, then, that you and your descendants may live" (Dt 30:19).

Since the beginning of the prolife movement in this country, these words have been a rallying cry and a source of reassurance. How do we understand the meaning of this passage today?

A key moment in answering this question came when Joseph Cardinal Bernardin delivered a series of speeches in 1983 and 1984 on the development of a "consistent ethic of life," invoking the scriptural image of Christ's seamless garment to convey the breadth of concern that Catholics should bring to their respect life mission. The magnitude of the challenge was not lost upon those listening, but it was not always easy to hear without deep emotional response. To be stretched, questioned, challenged to embrace a wider frame of reference, to rethink the connections among issues, to move The Editor beyond the inevitable tensions that . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1develop among people passionately

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Holy Spirit's stirrings of justice, prudence, fortitude and temper-. ance call us, the entire Church, to continuing conversion to the gospel message. Are we coming to understand that to "choose life" demands a thorough alteration of consciousness and conduct? Questions without precedent in human experience confront us:

genetic manipulation, nuclear warfare, control of human reproduction. Other questions that have always stalked the human conscience rise up with dramatic new contours: euthanasia, care of disabled newborns, capital punishment. We also live in an era in which the religious consensus that shaped the traditions ofthe Western world for centuries is no longer exercising a philosophical and practical monopoly. Finally, we live in a world of global consciousness.

October 19 Rev. Manuel A. Silvia, Pastor, 1928, Santo Christo, Fall River October 21 Rt. Rev. Edward J. Carr, P.R., Pastor, 1937, Sacred Heart, Fall River Chancellor of Diocese, 1907-21 Rev. Francis E. Gagne, Pastor, 1942, St. Stephen, Dodgeville Rev. Walter J. Buckley, Retired Pastor, 1979, St. Kilian, New Bedford October 22 Rev. John E. Connors, Pastor, 1940, St. Peter, Dighton Rev. Jerome F. O'Donnell, OFM, 1983, Our Lady's Chapel, New Bedford October 23 Chor-Bishop Joseph Eid, Pastor, 1970, St. Anthony of Desert, Fall River October 24 Rev. Marc Maurice Dagenais, O.P., 1982, Retired Assistant, St. Anne's, Fall River

Decisions made in our nation regarding many human rights (aid to dependent nations, population policies, arms treaties, to name a few) have dramatic effects upon peoples and economies far from our shores. • This multiplication of issues and their complexity create some of the most perplexing questions for individuals, agencies and governing bodies in the Church. Each of us is challenged to discover linkages among issues, while understanding the differences that exist among those issues; to work together in common witness, knowing that specific activities, lobbying structures, particular talents and time will necessarily differ on distinct but related efforts to promote human life; and to make the Church's moral vision and tradition available in a special way as part of the political process in our pluralistic society. In the seventh century before Christ, King Josiah led the Jewish people in a profound religious renewal. The Torah - with its injunction "choose life" - was rediscovered. In a dramatic ceremony the people rededicated themselves to the covenant with Yahweh. Our society too isli'ving through a moment ofjudgment and opportunity. To "choose life" today requires of each person and of society as a whole a renewed pledge to be ever more faithful to God's call to love, respect, and defend human life. Sister Carney is a faculty member of the Franciscan Institute, St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, New York.


Respect for Life is the essence of "caring with excellence"

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• Communicable Disease Clinic • Project H.E.L.P. (Hospital Emergency Lifeline Program)

• Parents' Diabetes Support Group Sr. Thomas More. O. P.

• Ostomy Clinic • Child Sexual Abuse Clinic

Sebastian Martin. (pictured in the center) was the 4000th patient to undergo surgery at St. Anne!s Hospital. Dr. Eduardo Troya. Ear/ Nose/ Throat Specialist (left) performed the ear operation. Frances Krudys. R.N. (right) offered Mr. Martin a gift on behalf of the OR staff, commemorating the occasion.

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Women and abortion By Juli Loesch A woman who becomes pregnant and does not have the support of the child's father or her own family becomes too often the "ideal" candidate for abortion. While perhaps this has always been the case, it is even more so today when abortion is widely available and socially accepted. Our society has made abortion "easy" - at least in terms of accessibility. But is it so easy? While some women may undergo an abortion with little or no physical or emotional trauma, it is becoming apparent, as more and more women speak of their abortion experience, that they are far fewer than pro-abortion advocates would lead one to believe. Why do so many women feel they "must" abort? Why do others, faced with similar situations, choose life for their child? I would like to tell you the stories of three women - or rather, I would like to let them speak for themselves. Evelyn: It was almost 40 years ago. I was a university student. All my friends and I came to the university for intellectual exploration and also glorious love and freedom. Part of what wefound was a m(!ss ofabortions. Some women say their decision to have an abortion was their first serious decision. It was not like that with me, nor, I think, with my friends. The decision to sleep with our boyfriends, to live with them, was serious, and involved immense changes. But the decision to have an abortion was not difficult. We followed one after another. Ifyou had a problem pregnancy, then of course you had an abortion. I look back on that with amazement. Why "of course"? I think the compelling element was our desire to see ourselves and be seen as good people. A "good" woman does not pressure her boy-

Pastoral care of the sick hrings His life

to hospitalized patients. nursing home residents and parish home hound ... THROUGH HOSPITAL CHAPLAINS AND PARISH PASTORAL CARE

OF THE SICK PROGRAMS

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"Sometimes the Sick are not considered as persons, and their care can become a ''job'' . ... You are called to "humanize" sickness; to treat the sick ~ a creature of God, as a Brother/Sister in Christ. It is without doubt a difficult and demanding mission. " Pope John Paul II - Address to the Hospitaller Order of St. John of God

Diocesan Department of Pastoral Care to the Sick P.O. Box C328, Westport, MA 02790 Rev. Edmund J. Fitzgerald, Diocesan Director

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friend into marriage. A "good" daughter does not upset her parents, does not become someone whose conduct needs to be explained. A "good"person does not make choices that create complicationsfor powerful people in her life - boyfriend, parents, friends. And so, when [ realized [ was pregnant, without thinking, assuming I was doing the only possible thing, [lookedfor an abortionist. It was not hard to find one. He was in a small apartment in a poor section of town. It was much like any doctor's office, but bare. The doctor performed competently. It did not hurt much. I rested briefly, .paid the doctor $250, and went home. Andso it was over. [felt nothing, no grief, no shame. Gradually, as feeling returned, I began to ask myself what we wer.e doing, my friends and I. What kind of world were we building? It became clear to me that we were building the wrong sort of world, a world in which a mother could kill her own child and it would be just nothing, nothing at all. Later, another of my friends became pregnant. I told her that she didn't have to have an abortion, that there were alternatives. She was touched. She said I was the only person who had said that to her. But my solitary tentative voice was not enough. She had the abortion. Over the'years, I have talked to others of my ge,neration who had abortions, and many say that they wish someone had told them "you don't have to do this, you know. " It might have made a difference. I recall that somehow my pregnancy had seemed the end of the world. Later, I broke up with my boyfriend: that, too, seemed the end of the world. I survived that, as we all do, and I could have survived continuing the pregnancy, had I called on my own strength. I wonder about the counseling women get when they go to abortion clinics today: how often is a woman told that she is strong, that she does not have to give up hopefora good life if she continues her pregnancy? To choose to have your baby -and raise it or give the child up for adoption - is a harder choice. Somehow it always seems easier to kill an inconvenient person than to have to deal with an unwanted "someone. " But are we not here to do the things that are ofvalue, the things that make our humanity worthwhile? I am sorry I chose the easier path. Corinne: When I was a young girl, I guess I was looking for a prince who would give me beautiful things, a happy home with children, and, most of all, a sense of being important and lovable. When I met a man who seemed to be this prince, [. was flattered by his approval and willing to do anything to keep it. Soon, my selfimage became only what I saw reflected in his eyes. We married and I became pregnant. This seemed wonderful to me, but, as always, I looked to him to see how I "should"feel. He saw the child as a hindrance to our life, an unwanted responsibility. He made it clear that ifI did not get a "safe, legal" abortion, our relationship would be in trouble. I had to choose between him and our child. I chose him. When I was under the anesthetic, I dreamed that I had been

left in a white void where [was to remain forever, alone and without contact with another living soul. Yet when the abortion was completed and I awoke, [felt no regret for the child who now lay in lifeless pieces. [had chosen what I thought would bring me the most happiness. But as the days went by, my sense of emptiness and loneliness grew. [ began to turn my heart away from my husband. When he left on a business trip, I found a lover. Soon after we were divorced. I then began a long line ofrelationships with men to whom I lookedfor love and a sense ofpurpose. A kind of callousness came upon me. Thoughts of suicide became frequent, while my relationships became more and morefalse. I married again - a truly good man - and yet I still felt incomplete and purposeless. So strong was my habit of seeking solace through a new man, that, even though [ loved my new husband, I betrayed him with yet another lover. When I became pregnant again, I knew it was not my husband's child. The complexities of bearing another man's childfrightened me. I deeply feared the repercussions to my marriage and the shame this illicit relationship's exposure would bring to my family. I felt I had to abort this child to save my marriage. The physicalpain ofthe suctioning process was not so bad, but nothing could kill the pain of my growing sense of loss. One night I wept uncontrollablyfor hours, and no one could console me. I was self-destructing, and I knew it. I had been going to church, and putting on a show ofbeing a good person. Yet I held God at arm's length. I was so deep in despair that I could not even cry out to Godfor help. Yet in the midst ofthat most troubled time, God began to touch the heart ofmy husband. Through the amazing gentleness I observed in his heart and actions, I could see that God was beginning to call us to healing. I turned more and more to the Lord, and in time I realized the wrong ofmy selfish acts, especially the taking of those innocent lives. My husband reached out to me with compassion and understanding, sharing the new-found faith we had both discovered. Yet as I steadily grew in knowledge ofGod's love and forgiveness for me, I found I did not need to cling to my husbandfor support and assurance of self-worth. I was finding all these things in my relationship with God, which never failed me. Today I am able to give my husband the very love I am receiving sofreely from God. It is a love that frees us both to be the kind of unselfish people we dreamed we could be. Now I know that fear gives death, but love, only love, gives life. Marcy: I me/my boyfriend at the Newman Center in college. We prayed together, we went to Mass together, but for some reason we couldn't see why we shouldn't sleep together. So, five years ago, when I was twenty, unmarried, and a junior in college, I became pregnant. . Marriage didn't seem to be an option. I didn't think pregnancy in itself was a good reason to get Turn to Page Seven


Continued from Page Six

married. Besides, he wasn't offering to marry me. Even though I had been active in the pro-life movement, I found myself thinking about an abortion. I wouldn't have to tell my parents I was pregnant and have them feel hurt and upset. It would have been easy. But I just couldn't do it. I finished the semester at school and then went to a different city for the rest of my pregnancy. I knew early on that I would place my baby for adoption. It was very difficult to prepare for this. But my priest said, "Never think of it as 'giving your baby up. ' Think of it as caringfor the child in the best way you can, giving the child all the things you want it to have. " I knew that if my child was adopted, he would have a father and a mother; with me, he would have apart-time uneducated mother who had to work full-time to support both of us, and no father. Placing himfor adoption was being fair to him. That thought kept me going. I chose to go away to have my baby. I didn't want everyone to know. And some ofmyfriends-I found out later - would not have supported my decision to have this child. They couldn't fathom why I'd go through with the pregnancy. It's almost as though the "sin "was not sex outside of marriage which they were doing too - the "sin" was being pregnant. I relinguished my babyfor some of the same reasons women have abortions. I didn't want to have a baby; I wanted to'finish school; I wanted a career. I qlso know many ofmy friends

would not have supported my decision to place my son for adoption. If I was surrounded by people saying, "Oh, how could you give your baby away?" or "Why don't you keep him? I'll help you take care of him, " it would have been more difficult. Because although I was sure I was doing the right thing for him and for me, I, like most pregnant women, also experienced strong feelings of wanting to keep him. During my pregnancy, I tried to be conscious of the child growing within me, and aware that our relationship was going to be short. I spent a lot of time praying, talking to the baby and singing making our relationship as full as possible, given the circumstances. But preparing to part with a newborn baby is like preparingfor a death. If you know someone's going to die, you can try to spend time with them; but when they do die, it's still hard. There were a lot of tears. I really felt the power of God's love. though. I felt very much in his hands during that time. There was a very difficult time immediately following the adoption. I'd be gripped byfears: " What ifhis new parents are terrible people? Or what if they die in a car accident? Or what if. ... " But I had to come back to the fact that even ifmy son were here, living with me, I wouldn't have control over his life: I would still have to trust in God. Finally, after the grieving, there came a time of contentment. I'll never forget my son, although I'll probably never see him again. I am at peace with my decision. There is no pretending that three

These RESPECT LIFE Ministries Serve The People of God By Enhancing The Dignity And Quality of Thei r Lives.

women, each telling her own story, can 'Convey the enormous range of situations surrounding unexpected and difficult pregnancies, nor the range of attitudes and actions with which women respond. There are literally millions of"problem pregnancy" stories, and each one carries its own burden of suffering: a suffering all too often suppressed by women themselves, and unacknowledged by those around them. Evelyn, Corinne and Marcy (not their real names) remind us that we must listen. We must listen to the stories of women - and men - whose lives have been changed by conceiving, nurturing or failing to nurture, new life. Taking responsibility for our power to generate human life is not easy. But it is through this struggle for the proper control of our sexual energies and powers that we become free of compulsions and self-centeredness. As Evelyn pointed out in her story of illegal abortion, women are too often trivialized in the area of moral decision-making. Parents and society encourage them from young girlhood to be "nice," to be accommodating, rather than to act with moral maturity, insisting upon their own dignity and that of their children. Often overlooked in the abortion decision is the importance of men's involvement. It is often the desire to spare a boyfriend or a husband the inconvenience of fatherhood that motivates a woman to destroy her unborn child. Men who are not called to responsibility are also morally trivialized. While the slogan for legal abortion is "pro-choice," the situation of the aborting woman is often experienced as "no choice." What

is often needed is not just physical, tangible support - although this is essential - but also a sense of hope, empowerment and respect. As Evelyn noted, it takes more than one person wanting to do the right thing, and being strong enough to do it. It takes a community: a community that respects God's plan for sexual love in marriage and encourages women and men to settle for nothing less. A community that makes sure that a woman does not lose out on edu-

cation or chances for a decent job because of pregnancy. A community that says women do not have to be fearful, that they are strong and can help one another. A community that says children are not just the children of their parents, they are children of us all. Juli Loesch, founder of Prolifers for Survival, is a staff assistant in the National Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office for Pro-Life Activities.

CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES And Special Apostolates REV. PETER N. GRAZIANO EXECllTIVE DIRECTOR

ATTLEBORO 10 Maple St. 226-4780

MAJOR PROGRAMS • ADOPTIONS • APOSTOLATE FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

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CAPE COD 261 South St. 771-6771 FALL RIVER 783 Slade St. P.O. Box M - So. Sta. 674-4681 NEW BEDFORD 59 Rockland St. 997-7337

I,.


Pro-lifers laud abortion decision WASHINGTON (NC) - Prolife leaders have praised a decision to lift a government regulation that had required federally funded family planning clinics to give information on abortion to pregnant clients. Under the regulation, government-funded clinics were required to give a woman seeking advice on a problem pregnancy "non-direc-

The work of His hands

.

tive" information on abortion along with facts on prenatal and infant care, foster care and adoption.

SHATTER THE WORLD OF SERVICES OFFERED: SIGN LANGUAGE PROGRAMS RELIGIOUS SERVICES EDUCATIONAL SERVICES RELIGIOUS EDUCATION SOCIAL PROGRAMS & OUTINGS INTERPRETER SERVICES HOME & HOSPITAL VISITATIONS MONTHLY NEWS LETTERS

.

By Richard Doerflinger

In January 1986, the Hemlock Society published a model bill to legalize active euthanasia. This "Humane and Dignified Death Act" would require physicians to obey a terminally ill patient's request for "aid in dying," defined as "any medical procedure that will swiftly, painlessly, and humanely terminate the life" of the patient. The society's founder and director, Derek Humphry, announced that his group will press for enactment of this law nationwide, beginning in three states with large elderly populations: Arizona, California and Florida. Humphry says his organization anticipates opposition from the Catholic Church, and that it is training ministers of various faiths to counter all religious arguments against euthanasia. This new boldness on the part of euthanasia advocates is the culmination of a decade-long struggle over "death with dignity." The popularity of Betty Rollins' Last Wish, an account of her efforts to help her mother commit suicide, confirms that the euthanasia debate is moving into a new phase. An idea once seen almost universally as barbaric now seems to intrigue many Americans as a new and daring solution to individual and social oroblems. This trend seems likely to continue as social and economic pressures to limit life-sustaining measures for the elderly become more intense. The continued aging of the American population, due in part to the falling birthrate and the trend toward the one- or two-child .. family, has raised alarm over the viability of Social Security and other support systems.: The ability of modern medicine to prolong life, often at great expense, has been blamed for much ofthe modern escalation of health-

Pro-life groups had complained that the rule kept them from participating in the $142.5 million a year federal family planning program because they did not tell pregnant clients about the availability of abortion.

SILENCE

.

Is euthanasia gaining?

Services available to hearing and hearing Impaired, or anyone with a disability benefiting from sign communication.

Diocesan Apostolate For Persons With Disabilities

243 Forest Street Fall River, MA 02721 Tel. 679-8373 (Voice or nV) REV. JOSEPH VIVEIROS路 Diocesan Director

.+~*~~~~+~~+++~~++++++++~~++~++++++++~+~+++~

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.. .

care costs, prompting Governor Richard Lamm's remark that elderly people have a "duty to die" and make way for the next generation. Contemporary high-technology medicine seems to have lost its ability to care for debilitated patients when it can no longer cure. In this social context, voluntary euthanasia presents itself as the easy way out in resolving a wide range of individual and social problems - in much the same way as abortion was touted in the 1960s and 1970s as a solution to problems such as child abuse and poverty. Abortion has not solved any of these problems; rather, it has aggravated the problem of our "aging population," and has desensitized many people to the evil of euthanasia. Hard To Believe Many of us do not appreciate how close our nation is to authorizing active euthanasia. Having emphasized the humanity of the unborn for so many years in the abortion debate, and having won at least a provisional victory for the rights of handicapped newborns, we find it difficult to believe that our legal system could allow the killing of adults who are clearly "persons." Yet in some ways euthanasia is more difficult to argue against than abortion. We say abortion is wrong because it is the direct killing of a defenseless human being. Few forms of euthanasia are as clearly violent as abortion, and those methods that hasten death by withdrawing basic necessities do not have the appearance of a lethal act at all, at least on the surface. The victim may seem willing rather than defenseless. And the very fact that he or she is a human being and legal person is used by some to ground a fundamental "right to choose the time and manner of one's death" - a right sometimes based on the "right of privacy" used to justify abortion. Public resistance to euthanasia

has eroded over the past decade as "right to die" slogans have become commonplace in the legislative debate over treatment of terminally ill patients. Since the first "living will" law was enacted in California in 1976, more than thirty-five states have enacted similar legislation. While many of these laws have incorporated essential safeguards to prevent them from authorizing euthanasia, the laws have been publicly hailed as efforts to ensure "death with dignity" or to protect the terminally ill patient's "right to die." Even the Karen Quinlan case has been described as a landmark "right to die" case, although the young woman in question lived for 10 years after her parents won the right to remove her from a respirator. This and similar court rulings, as well as "living will" legislation generally, have been described by many as authorizing "passive" euthanasia. Once one accepts this label, active euthanasia appears to be the same basic action performed more forthrightly. Thus it seemed appropriate to the Hemlock Society to propose its new euthanasia bill as an amendment to California's "living will" law. But from a Catholic viewpoint, this use of terminology is highly misleading. While withdrawing life-sustaining means can sometimes be morally equivalent to euthanasia and therefore gravely wrong, at other times it is morally acceptable and should not be labeled "euthanasia" at all. "Extraordinary" Means The Catholic Church's rejection of euthanasia is absolute and unyielding. The Second Vatican Council condemned "euthanasia or willful suicide" as crimes against humanity (Gaudium et spes 27), and the Vatican's 1980 Declaration on Euthanasia confirmed and elaborated this teaching. The Declaration explains that human life is a gift from God over which we humans have stewardship but not absolute dominion. Since life is the basis and necessary condition

PATRONESS of the

FALL RIVER DIOCESAN COUNCIL OF CATHOLIC WOMEN

UPHOLDS THE SANCTITY OF LIFE" IS EUTHANASIA in their future?


for all other human goods. itl destruction is an especially grjevou.s violation of the moral law whether the -victim consents or not. Particularly important is the De~laration's d~finition of ~ut~. nasla as "an action or an omISSIon which of itself or by intention causes death; in ord,er that allsuffering may in this way be elimi· nated"(empbasis added). Adeliberate effort to hasten someone's death is wrong whether achieved by gunshot or starvation. Morally what- is important is that one intends the person's death -- either as an end in itself, (lr as a means to another end (such as ending the person's suffering). This does not mean, however, tnat it is always wrong to withhold or withdraw treatment t(l prolong life. At times such treatment can cease to be effective in prolonging life, and one may wish to discontinue it because it is useless. Or its use may entail severe suffering or other burdens, rendering it morlllly optional despite its effectiveness in prolonging life. When treatment seems useless or Unduly burdensome. the Church refers to it as "extraordinary" and recognizes that a patient may choose to accept or refuse it. Treatmentthat provides a clear benefit without imposing grave burdeDl on the patient is called ~ordinary;" a patient has a moral obligation to request it and others bave an obligation to provide it out of respect for the patient's life. In light oCtile debate over treatment for handicapped newborns, it is important to add that "ordinary"meansdo not become"extmordinary" simply because the

patient is handicapped or otherwise debilitated. Catholic morality allows one to judge the ben~fits and burdens ofdifferent treatments, not the value or quality of individual human lives. Generally speaking, one cannot compile a list of treatments that are"ordinary"and"extraordinary" in the abstract, because thesejudgments will depend on the benefits, risks and side-effects of a treatment for an individual patient ina particular situation. Therefore it is extremely difficult to describe how these principles should be applied to the drafting of laws. Lhriog Wills Most existing "living will" laws do not present a direct conflict with this teaching because' they claim to authorize withdrawal of !ife-sustaining treatment only when it is futile - when death is "imminent" or will occur soon even if treatment is continued. But these laws are generally open to objection because they express a bias t(lward authorizing withdrawal of such treatment, instead of equally enhancing tlte patient's right to request treatment. It is also far from clear that a "living will" by itself can provide the kind of informed conSent appropriate to life-and-death medical decisions. A person who is generally healthy signs a vaguely worded declara~ tion moothl\ or years before there is a need for a treatment decision, and this declaration il then made legally binding on a physician regardless of his or her medical jUdgment or the: views of the family or other loved ones who might. help apply the declaration to a specific situation. These: and other deficiencies in "living will" legislation have been articulated in

Guidelines for Legislation on Life· Sl.lstaining Treatment, issued by the Bishops' Comminee for, ProLife Activjtje~ in November 1984. Some new legislative proposals raise tlie issue of euthanasia more directly. For example, "durable power ofattorney"laws have been proposed as a means for aV(liding the deficiencies of the "living will," because they simply empower someone to make all health care decisi(lns (In behalf of a patient when he or she becomes mentally incompetent. Such laws are often broad enough to authorize forms of euthanasia by omission. Judicial doctrine in the United States has established tbatan informed and compe-tent patient has an almost unlimited right. 10 refnse even life·saving treatment. An absolute transfer (If this power to another person could authorize forms of homicide by deliberate neglect, and be used to bring assaultcharges against health care personnel who try to provide life-saving care against the proxy's wishes. Another new proposal is known as the "Uniform Rights of the Terminally III Act." Drafted by the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State laws (NCCUSL), this bill is intended for enactment in all fifty states in order to create a uniform "living will" policy. But in important respects the Uniform Act goes beyond the policy of many existing "living will" laws. For example. -it explicitly allows a pregnant (emale patient to demand withdrawal of all life-sustaining treatment even if continued treatment could save her child's life. Moreover, the scope oftbe Uni-

form Act is much broader than' that of many state laW5 because it defines patients as "terminal;' if !hey wDuld die in a short time without life-sustaining treatment - even if they could live a long time with continued treatment. Another issue raised by the Unif(lTID Act involves nutrition and hydration: their use is authorized if necessary for alleviati(ln of pain, but the Act does n(l1 clearly recognize their role as "ordinary" means for sustaining life. Since removal of food and water invariably brings on a particularly unpleasant death in a short time, and these can gellerally be provided without significant pain or other burdens to the patient, a s(lund medical ethic will maintain a presumption in their favor when useless or burdensome interventions have been withdrawn. As with the abortion controversy. the euthanasia debate unaV(lidably involves claims and counter-claims as to whether this deadly solution would resolve individual and ~ocial problems or bring more serious pT(lblems in its wake. For example, would euthanasia actually reduce the suffering and despair of elderly and debilitated patients in nursing homes, or remove their last vestiges of hope and self-respect as the "right to die" gradually becomes a "duty to die"'? Psychiatrist David Peretz predicts a future that has endorsed "rational suicide,'" in which social institutions will argue in certain cases that "individuals are irrationally clinging to life - the elderly, feeble, defective, mentally ill, poor, etc.• when 'rationality' (i.e., scarcity) dictates that they 'choose suicide.' "

When analyzed carefully, the feature of the euthanasUl movement that m(lst appeals to modern

Americans: - its commitmenf

(0

radical individual freedom proves illusory. If the freedom to kill (loeself to end suffering is the core issue, then logically this freedom cannot be granted only to the terminally ill. S(lme teenagers and others face equal or greater suffering in var· ious circumstances and may wish the freedom to end their lives. When a "tlQW-t(l" suicide manual for the terminally ill was published in France in 1982, its first reported use was by several depressed young men who were perfectly healthy. But if euthanasia advocates are serious about restricting their "solution" to certain gf(lups ofseverely debilitated people, the fact that only this group is given its "freedom" will indicate that the real issue is a social judgment that some lives are objectively worthless - and it will no longer seem logical to insist on v(lluntariness in every case. A aociety that effectively told its members to be indifferent toa suicidal penon's death, or even to help him exercise his "freedom"by offering to nudge him off II bridge, would destroy ita own humanity even more quickly than it destroys the lives of its vietims. Ifwed a not want to live in that kind of society, now is the time for us to marshal our educational. legislative and. caring efforts to emure that it doeS not come into existence. Ricbard DoerOinIK .......... director of tbt Office for Pro-l.I& Activities_of tbe National Confamct of Catholic Bkhops.

, • GOD'S SPLENDID Gm Respect.The Sanctity of Life! ,', I ,"':,i ,"

.'l;", ,r

SOCIETY OF ST. VINCENT De PAUL DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER

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"Human life

is precious

He came that we might have LIFE

because it

DIOCESAN FACILITIES OFFICE 368 NORTH MAIN STREET FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS

and have it

is the gift

more abundantly

of a God Rev. Msgr. John j. Regan, Director

whose love THOUSANDS OF BALTIMOREANS saw this billboard, recently placed in 10 locations around the city by Right to Life of Maryland. (NC photo)

Rev. Lucio B. Phillipino, Assoc. Director

is infinite; and when

INlS~

God gives

'Ry

life, it is

SERVING THOSE WHO FOR SO LONG SERVED US

-

forever." - Pope John Paul II AT A TIME OF LIFE when they 8fe preparing to make decisions that may affect their entire futures, y·oung peopleneed and deserve respectful guidance from those who care for them. (Conklin photo)

The Diocesan Office of

Family Ministry

CATHOLIC MEMORIAL HOME

MARIAN MANOR

2446 Highland Avenue

33 Summer Street

Fall River, Man.

Taunton, Mass.

MADONNA MANOR

OUR LADY'S HAVEN

85 North Washington Street

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North Attleboro, Man.

Fairhaven, M.~•.

Rev. Ronald A. Tosti

Director

DR. WAGDY AZIZ', anesthesiologist at St. Anne's Hospital, Fall River, explains the hospital's state-.of-the-art respirato-ry and blood temperature monitor, used during surgery. Constant updating of such equipment manifests the h~spit~l's co~cern for

patient wellbeing.

THE UNSHAKABLE Catholic belief that life is to be respected at every stage is symbolized by this elderly woman demonstrating at a pro-life rally on behalf of the unborn. (NC pboto)


12

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. '17, 1986

Knights fund research institute NEW HAVEN, Conn. (NC) The Knights of Columbus have awarded a $2:50,000 搂Jan! to the Pope Paul Institute for the Study of Human Reproduction in Omaha. Neb. The funding will cover institute expenses for 1986-1987. The year-old institute conducts

natural family planning programs for couples, continuing education for doctors ;lnd n~r~~~ and It research program on reproduction and infertility problems. It has been endorsed by the Vatican and by the archdiocese of Omaha. Its operating budget comes from grants and donations.

PERMANENT deacon candidates are installed as acolytes at St. Mary's Cathedral rites. (Gaudette photo)

11 future deacons installed as acolytes

(John 15:12)

Worldwide Marriage Encounter 878-3106

or 540-0606

In a step towards ordination as permanent deacons, II men were installed as acolytes in Ocl. 5 ceremonies at SI. Mary's Cathedral. In the context of Mass, the installation rite took place following the Gospel, when each man to be installed received bread to be consecrated as Bishop Daniel A. Cronin prayed: '"Take this vessel with bread for the celebration of the eucharist. Make your ti!e worthy of your service al the table of the Lord and of his Church." In brief remarks at the end of' Mass. the bishop thanked the new

THE KNIGHTS OF COI.UMBUS

RESPECT LIFE

acolytes for their generosity in serving the Church and for their "hard work in preparing themselves for this day." He also acknowledged the contribution offamilies to the work of deacons and expressed appreciation to Father John F. Moore, director of the permanent diaconate program. and to the other priests who aid in 'he program. Addressing the acolytes, the bishopsaid "We should never forget the holiness of the Eucharist. We should strive to be as holy as the things we touch." Resped Life Sunday Notin~ that it was Respect Life Sunday, Bishop Cronin urged those who understand that life is a gift of God to use their influence in lifeaffirming ways. "Little groups have done much in the history of the church," he declared, "from the days of the catacombs to now. Today we have not only the obligation but also the privilege of makina known the sacredn~s of liCe in all its forms. In little groups we can influence legislators., businesses, the marketplace - we must proclaim that life is a gift of God. We must not let the modern world forget that. We pray we can meet the challenge." Among threats to life and the 'quality ofJife, the bishop listed not only abortion, at issue in November votingiD Massachusetts. but child, spousal and substance abuse, war and violence in the streets. Speaking of "subtle indicators" of a growing feeling that life in old age is not worth living, he warned that

"an attack on life at any stage can beelaborated into an attack on life at all stages." Those installed as acolytes were Louis A. Bousquet, St. Anthony of Padua parish, New Bedford; Richard M. Dresser, St. Francis Xavier, Hyannis; Claude A~ LeBlanc, St. Mary, New Bedford; Paul J. Macedo, Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, New Bedford. James MarzeIliJr., St.John the; 'Evangelist. Pocasset; John deA. Moniz.. St. Anthony of Padua,' Fall Ri....er; Marcel G. Morency, St. Anne, New Bedford; Michael E. Munay, St. Ann, Raynham. Robert G. Normandin, St. Louis de France, Swansea; James M. O'Gara. Our Lady of Lourdes, Taunton; John Welch, St. Ann, Raynham. Deacon Roland P. LePage was liturgical deacon for Sunday's Mass. The lectors were Sisters Doris Kelly, OP. and Rita Pelletier, S5J, both associated with the diaconal formation program.

Remember To Vote The "right to life" is a natural. God-given risht. not dependent on changeable, human laws. Our slate and nation's laws should reflect . the basic values and morality of the people. It is each citizen's right and responsibility to help form laws that proteel and promote respect for all human life. A "Yes" vote on Question #1, on Nov. 4, would help stop the destruction of human life by halting tax-funded abortions in our state. Please consider this when voting.

Program aids abuse victims MASSACHUSETIS STATE COUNCIL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS

. WALTER 1. ALMOND, State Deputy

The clinical social work department at 51. Anne's Ho!!.pital, Fall River, has initiated services to child seJl:oal abuse victims. Aimed at evaluating and treating children who have been sexually assaulted by non-earetaken, the program is one of a limited number in the state awarded federal moniesthrough the Victims of Crime Act. The program identifies, evalu-

ates and treats young victims of sexual abuse. assisting the child and his or her family in reducing emotional trauma.

new

The program's services are available at no direct charge to those assisted路 and referrals to it are accepted from any source. Program workers will also meet with area groups and agencies on a consultative basis.


BEe E LEGAL WOULDlTBE RIGHT? ABORTION IS THE ULTI CHILD ABUSE There are alternatives to abortion. There have to be. THIS MESSAGE COURTESY OF PRO-LIFE EDUCATION OFFICE, MASSACHUSETTS CATHOLIC CONFERENCE, PARKER HOUSE - RM 180, BOSTON, MA 02108 PHONE 617-523-4860

-1-


Choose life, then, that you and your descendants may live. 0130:19

MAKE YOUR

VoicÂŁ

HEARD I

PRO-LIFE APOSTOLATE Rev. Thomas L. Rita Diocesan Director .

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gram calls for independent testing A church panel has given prelim- of shroud particles in seven differinary approval for carbon-14 dat- ent laboratories, three of them in ing of the Shroud ofTurin, believed the United States. He said the small piece of materby many to be the burial cloth of ial would be removed from a secJesus Christ. Scientists hope the complex test- tion of the shroud where no visible ing, which would destroy. about image exists. The laboratory results two square inches of the 14-foot will be compiled by three separate linen cloth, will date the material scientific institutes; a meeting will to within 200 years of its true age, follow to evaluate the testing and thus help determine whether it methods. Final results are expected to be is authentic or a medieval fake. Plans for the testing were an- given to the pope no later than nounced recently by Italian Car- Easter 1988, Chagas said. It will be dinal Anastasio Ballestrero, who up to the pope whether to allow as archbishop of Turin has cus- the results to be published, he tody over the shroud in the pope's added. A team of 42 international sciname. Cardinal Ballestrero said that he would discuss the plan with entists has studied the shroud, but Pope John Paul II, who will make' its origins remain unclear. It has been held in the Turin cathedral the final decision on the matter. Church officials have allowed a since 1578. Several theories have been adnumber of scientific tests on the shroud in recent years, but have vanced to explain the cloth's strikresisted the carbon-14 method be- ing image. The latest, published by cause of the destruction involved. two scientists in June, suggests it The cloth bears the image of a man was caused by heat from a cruciwho apparently suffered cruci- fied body reacting with limestone particles absorbed from a Jerusafixion. lem tomb. The planned testing was ap~-----Four Times More proved during a recent three-day meeting of experts in Turin organMassachusetts pays four times ized by Carlos Chagas, president more for abortions than the entire of the Pontifical Academy of Sci- federal government pays for aborences. Chagas said that the pro- _tions in the 50 states.

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16

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 17,1986

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IF YOU CAN'T GOGIVE THE HOLY FATHER'S MISSION AID TO THE EASTERN CHURCHES

October 19th is Mission Sunday - World Mission Day. Christ asks all of us to be missionaries. He does not expect everyone to leave home and family and labor in His vineyards in foreign lands. You have work enough in your own neighborhood! But He does expect all of us to help spread His Gospel. You can answer His call in another way ... through your gifts to Catholic Near East. the Holy Father's 9wn mission to the Eastern Churches.

GO TEACH For just $15 a month. you can train a native priest ALL a Sister, for $15. For only $15 a month, you can NATIONS "adopt" a needy child. They'll send you their photos and write to you. Churches. schools. clinics. rectories and convents, chapels and prayer huts are needed for our neighbors. You can build a special Memorial for someone you love. The true spirit is to give what you can. remembering that your gif~ wi.1I help ~ur priests and sisters carryon their Chnst-IIke service in the Near East. A Your Sunday dinner will seem tastier (and be more

TASTY meaningful) if you share your blessings with the RECIPE hungry families huddled in refugee camps of the Near East. Missioners must feed both body and soul of their people. . . you can help feed a refugee family for an entire month for $20. (Can you feed your own family for a single meal with $20:) Sacrifice for a family you may never meet except In prayer. To express our thanks. we'll send an olive wood rosary from the Holy Land. We need your prayers!

.)0.

ANOTHER WAY TO HELP

Through Catholic Near East Deferred Giving Plans. you receive a guaranteed income for as I~n,g as you live. Then your gift goes to the help of Chnst s poor in the Near East. The good you do lives on after you. Write for details today.

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Dear Monsignor Nolan:

Please return coupon with your offering

co

Enclosed:$

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to be used for:

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NAME

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STREET CITY

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CATHOLIC NEAR EAST JOHN CARDINAL O'CONNOR,

President

MSGR. JOHN G. NOLAN, National Secretary CATHOLIC NEAR EAST WELFARE ASSOCIATION

1011 First Avenue. New York, N.V. 10022 Telephone: 212/826-1480

Pursuing economic justice By Ronald T. Krietemeyer . A quick look at this problem Taking the dignity ofthe human reveals that one in every four person as its starting point, the American children under the age U.S. bishops' pastoral letter on the .ofsix is poor. Almost 60 percent of economy places special emphasis poor families with children receive on human rights, and specifically no government assistance, have no health insurance and cannot pay economic rights. medical bills. According to Catholic social Less than half of all poor chilteaching, human rights include not dren are immunized against preonly civil and political rights, such as freedom of speech, worship and ventable diseases such as diphtheassembly, but also rights of a spe- ria and polio. Poor children are at .much greater risk of prematurity, cifically economic nature. For example, all people have a low birthweight and death before right to food, clothing, shelter, the age of one year. Children born adequate income, employment, in poverty have a death rate three medical care and basic education. times higher than that of non-poor These fundamental economic rights children. This picture of poverty among form a kind of baseline, a set of minimum conditions for economic children means that human dignity is being violated in a most justice. Through legal and constitutional basic way. When poverty"impairs structures, democratic societies the physical or mental develophave developed the means to secure ment of a child, it is offensive to civil and political rights. Economic God. The Catholic moral vision also rights have not been granted a simprompts us to see poverty in a ilar status in our society, however. The bishops' pastoral letter calls social or communitarian perspecfor a "new American experiment," tive. We see the poverty of-l3 milan effort by the whole society to lion American children as inteshape economic and social institu- grally related to the welfare of the whole community. In a very real tions. Catholic social teaching goes sense, when poor children are debeyond abstract moral principles; prived, we are all deprived. it includes the concrete realities of Not the Same economic life. Children living in "Knowledge is one thing, virtue poverty is a specific case. is another." - Cardinal Newman

If part of our faith is a commitment to human dignity and human rights, then we must act on this commitment. The most important way to do so is through our daily work in the home, the office, the factory. Beyond this there are several kinds of activities that we might consider. . First, we can deepen our knowledge and understanding of Catholic social teaching. We need a longterm commitment to learn more about Catholic social teaching and to tell others about it. A second opportunity for action is through direct service to those in need. Experiencing the smell, the taste and the feel of poverty is one of the most effective ways to learn about economic injustice and what we can do about it. Finally, pursuit of economic justice must take believers into the public life of the nation. In this way, we will not only be speaking for the voiceless; we will also be advancing the common good and serving as instruments of God's kingdom. Ronald Krietemeyer is director of the U.S. Catholic Conference Office of Domestic Social Development and staff person for the bishops' committee in charge of drafting the forthcoming pastoral letter on the economy.


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Abp. McEleney NEEDHAM, Mass. (NC) Archbishop John Joseph McEleney, 90, retired archbishop of Kingston, Jamaica, and ?ne ~ft~e founders of Fairfield Umverslty In Connecticut, died Oct. 5. The Jesuit, who headed the Kingston archdiocese from 1950 until 1970, died in a Needham hospital after suffering a stroke ~t the Jesuit Campion Center In Weston, where he had lived since 1982. Following his retirement from the Kingston archdiocese, the archbishop lived at Boston College and worked in the archdiocese of Boston until 1982. Born in Woburn and a graduate of Boston College, Archbishop McEleney joined the Jesuits in 1918 and was ordained a priest in 1930. Along with other Jesuits, he founded Fairfield College Preparatory School in 1942 and became its first rector and president. The school grew into Fairfield University, which opened in 1947, incorporating the preparatory school. Archbishop McEleney headed the Jesuit's New England Province from 1944 to 1950, when he was named archbishop of Kingston. SS. PETER & Paul religious educ~tion program student There he was a defender of the poor, an ardent opponent of racism Kristen Carrita with prayer pal Mary Grogan. and a supporter of the black power movement ofthe 1960s. He warned, however, that such movements should not use violent means to 40 first communion candidates later this month. achieve justice. from the parish school and reliOn Nov. 15 the students will gious education programs of SS. visit the home again, wearing their Peter and Paul Church, Fall River, first communion clothes. They will recently visited the Catholic share in a Mass of celebration with INDIANAPOLIS (NC) - Nuns Memorial Home, also Fall River, their prayer pals and will receive in the Indianapolis archdiocese to "team-up" with residents as the Eucharist with them. have asked for salary increases to "prayer pals." SS. Peter and Paul teachers bring them up to the level of SS. Peter and Paul principal Ann Walsh and Sylvia Belliveau church-employed lay professionals Kathleen Burt said the residents are involved in the project, together by 1990. A committee representpromised to pray for the children, with Kate Garland, Catholic Mem- ing three communities with mothwho will receive first communion orial Home activities director. erhouses in the archdiocese submitted the request after consulting superiors of other nuns working in the archdiocese. Archbishop Edward T. O'Meara said "It is perWASHINGTON (NC) - A committee on Employment Op- fectly reasonable for the sisters to representative of a California His- portunities. The hearing received make the request and it is one that panic group has accused Planned reports on the status of Hispanic the archdiocese must respond to." The move came because religious Parenthood of targeting Hispan- youths and families. communities need more income as ics in family planning efforts. She Government-sponsored popula- they face deficit or near-deficit called for an end to government tion control programs which profunding for the organization in mote abortions and sterilizations budgets. testimony to a congressional com- target California Hispanics ,and The Difference mittee. undermine Hispanic respect for "The present state is a state of Carmen Beatriz Bernal, cochair marriage and family, said Ms. childhood, the future that of manand founder of the California- Bernal. hood. . . .Such is the difference based Hispanics for SocialJ ustice, between earth and heaven." She especially criticized reachcalled on the government to "get Matthew Henry out of the popuiation control bus- ing Hispanics through school-based iness" and cease funding for clinics, which, she said, are "stra"government-dependent organiza- tegically placed" in predominantly Hispanic populated areas. tions like Planned Parenthood." She also scored "offensive literShe made the plea in recent testimony before the House Select ature" of population control groups Committee on Children, Youth which she said instill "anti-family, and Families and the House Sub- anti-life thinking in our young."

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 17, 1986

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THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 17, 1986

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Shoreway Acres has so many reasons 10 escape 10 Falmoulh for a lruly memorable weekend. A dining room where Lobsler Bisque and Chaleaubriand are regular occurences. An inviling indoor pool and sauna. A shorl walk 10 splendid shops and Cape Cod beaches. And the entire weekend. with eight meals. dancing. and our unique BYOB club. probably COSIS less Ihan a room and meal allowanct:" someplace else. ThaI'S what makt:"s Shoreway Acres the ullimalt:" valut:".

SUPPORT OF FAMILIES is an important component of mission programs. You can help through the World Mission Sunday collection this weekend. A Dint't'll ramily Ht'sort Box i\. Show SI. Falmouth. MA 02541 (6171 :,41HOOO MA residt'nls call frt't· Kl)()-:i52·7100

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Court refuses to dismiss challenge WASHINGTON (NC) - The U.S. Supreme Court Oct. 6 refused a Reagan administration request to toss out of court a lawsuit by abortion advocates seeking to end the Catholic Church's tax exemption.

HWe talk about serving the poor. Here you have the most abandoned poor, the very sick, the people who are begging, who have nothing. My work is teaching them how to love, and helping them to become aware that they are valuable persons. Christ died for them! ... " - Father Patin Father Patin is pastor in a village in North Thailand where many of the people suffer from leprosy. Through your prayers and sacrifices for the Propagation of the Faith you share in the work of missionaries like Father Patin.

Support Your Catholic Missionaries

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Reverend Monsignor John J. Oliveira 368 North Main Street Fall River. Massachusetts 02720

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ANCH 10/17/86

like Abortion Rights Mobilization 'at an unfair political disadvantage' in pressing their own position. After delays caused by several years of legal wrangling, U.S. District Judge Robert Carter brought wide public attention to the case last May when he imposed $IOO,OOO-a-day fines on the National Conference of Catholic Bishops and U.S. Catholic Conference for refusal to obey subpoenas to produce extensive documentation in the case. In appealing the fines and the order to obey the subpoenas, the NCCB-USCC questioned the standing of Abortion Rights Mobilization and other plaintiffs to bring suit as well as the jurisdiction of the federal courts over the case. Carter had ordered the fines after the appeals court denied a government petition for a writ of mandamus, or extraordinary review and dismissal of the case, on grounds that the issue was outside the court's jurisdiction and the plaintiffs had no standing to sue.

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The Propagation of the Faith

I I want to support the work of our Catholic Missionaries. I YES! IEnclosed is my gift of: I o $100 0 $50 0 $25 0 $10 0 $5 0 Other $. 0 $1000 0 $500 0 $250 Special gifts are needed tool I o When possible I will make a monthly gift! I I . Name

The high court's two-word "petition denied" ruling has no legal effect, however, on a more detailed and substantive effort at the federal appellate level to have the case dismissed. Last summer, lawyers for Abortion Rights Mobilization, the U.S. Catholic Conference and the U.S. Justice Department argued the pros and cons of the more substantive appeal before the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York. The three-judge appeals panel there was originally expected to rule quickly on the case, but its decision had not yet been issued as of Oct. 6. At issue, both in the appeals court and in the petition denied by .the Supreme Court, is whether Abortion Rights Mobilization and other plaintiffs, who originally filed suit in 1980, have legal standing to force court review of the Internal Revenue Service's implementation of its tax exemption policies. The plaintiffs argue that the Catholic Church has illegally politicked for anti-abortion candidates and that the church's retention of its tax-exempt status puts groups

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Montie Plumbing & Heating Co. PUBLICITY CHAIRMEN . Ire Isked to submit news Items for this column to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall River, 02722.. Name of city or town should be Included, as well as full dates of all activities. Please send news of future rather than past events. Note: We do not Clrry news of tundralslng activities such as bingos, whlsts, dlInces, suppers and bazaars. We are happy to Clrry notices of spiritual Ilrogram$, club meetlnRs, youth projects and similar nonprofit activities. Fundralslng prajects may be advertised at our regular rates, obtainable from The Anchor business office, telephone 675·7151. On Steerlnll Points Items FR Indicates Fall River, NB IndiCites New Bedford.

DIVORCED AND SEPARATED, CAPE Cape Cod and Island ministry for divorced and separated Catholics meeting 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday, St. Francis Xavier church basement, South Street, Hyannis; speaker: Elaine Piepgrass, Healing Emotional Wounds; information: Patti Markey, 771-4438. ST. MARY, FAIRHAVEN Young parishioners interested in playing CYO basketbaIl, or volunteer coaches may caIl the rectory, 992-7000. Adult Forum meets Nov. 18; speaker: Rev. Philip Jacobs, pastor of Good Shepherd Episcopal church, Understanding the Episcopal Faith. IMMACULATE CONCEPTION, TAUNTON Young Adult Bible Sharing Program meets 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays beginning Oct. 22, parish center; open to all young adults interested in Scripture; information: 824-8378. Instrumental ensemble begins rehearsals 3 p.m. Sunday; new instrumentalists welcome. O.L. MT. CARMEL, NB Parishioner and permanent deacon candidate Paul J. Macedo has been instaIled to the ministry of acolyte. New Portuguese choir members welcome; information: parochial vicar Father Gastao A. Oliveira, 993-4704. October Portuguese rosary devotions 5: 15 p.m. Monday through Fridays,~ p.m. Sundays. ST. BERNARD, ASSONET Family Life evening 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday; Therapist/ family counselor Melodye A. Broadley wiIl speak on "Tough Love"; information: Paula KeIley, 644-2309. ST. DOMINIC, SWANSEA Children's liturgy celebrating the 75th anniveersary of the parish II :30 a.m. Sunday. ST. MARY, SEEKONK Annual Mary Day celebration 2 p.m. Oct. 26. ST. STANISLA US, FR Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. HOLY NAME, FR Youth group rolIer skating outing Sunday; meet in school parking lot before 6: 15 p.m. departure; alI highschool age parishioners welcome. CATHEDRAL, FR Choral concert by the New England Conservatory Chamber Singers, under the direction of former parish organist and choir director David Carrier, 7:30 p.m. Oct. 24; alI welcome; no admission fee. Vincentians meeting 7:30 p.m. Oct. 21. FAMILY LIFE CENTER, N. DARTMOUTH Retreat for II th step men begins today. Lamaze natural childbirth class Tuesday evening. Bishop Stang High Schol, N. Dartmouth, retreat day Oct. 22. HOLY ROSARY, TAUNTON The Kolbe Guild will serve refreshments after all Masses Sunday. WIDOWED SUPPORT, TAUNTON Greater Taunton area support group for widowed Catholics meets 7:30 p.m. Monday, Immaculate Conception church haIl, Taunton; guest speaker: realtor Philip LaFrance; alI welcome.

NEWMAN ASSOCIATION,SMU The Newman Association at Southeastern Massachusetts University, N. Dartmouth, is sponsoring a series of programs on topics of current and historic interest. AIl talks will be held from noon to I p.m. in the Board of Governors room. AIl welcome. . Oct. 20: Have You Considered Suicide?, Rev. David Buehler; Oct. 27: The Role of the Catholic Church in South Africa, T. Ranuga. Nov. 3: Evolution: Theory of Law?, D. Mulcare; Nov. 10: A World View From Early Christianity, Father W. Hakeem; Nov. 17: The Uniqueness of Judaism, Rabbi W. Kaufman; Nov. 24: Formation of Conscience: Father Robert A. Oliveira; Dec. I to 22: Advent Program. January 26, 1987: Fundamentalism- Help or Hindrance?, Sister M. Tacy; Feb. 2: Spirituality and Art, H. Cummings; Feb. 9: The Old Testament: Living Covenant of God's Love, Father Marcel Bouchard; Feb. 17: Reincarnation in Christianity, D. Filipek; Feb. 23: Stages of Faith, J. Fitzgerald; March 2: Pacifism, P. Foley; March 4 to April 19: Lenten program. SACRED HEARTS ALUMNAE, FR Alumnae of the former Sacred Hearts Academy presented a substantial gift to the Holy Union Sisters Centennial Fund through Sister John Elizabeth, S USC, alumnae advisor. The gift foIlowed an alumnae reunion attended by over 800 people. Among its features was distribution of Christmas ornaments in the form of the academy building, now demolished. Information on obtaining them: Peggy Leger, tel. 674-2157 days; 678-6675 evenings. COUPLE TO COUPLE LEAGUE, CAPE Certified Couple to Couple League representatives Robert and Kathryn Swegart will offer instruction in natural family planning beginning 7 p.m. Nov. 16, Our Lady of the Cape parish halI, Brewster; registration information: 432-7192. ST. THOMAS MORE, SOMERSET Parishioners wiIl meet at the parish center 7:30 p.m. Oct. 20, to plan for the annual parish Thanksgiving Day Dinner. Day of prayer with intention of respect for alI life Wednesday; adoration of Blessed Sacrament foIlows 9 a.m. Mass, continues through 7 p.m. prayer and Benediction service. SS. PETER & PAUL, FR Father Peter N. Graziano wiIl be instaIled as pastor at I I a.m. Mass Sunday by Msgr. John J. Regan, vicar episcopal. Retreat meeting 7: 30 p.m. Monday, school. Parish school 8th grade class Mass I: 15 p.m. Tuesday. Activities committee meeting 7 p.m. Tuesday, Father Coady Center. CYO hayride 3:45 p.m. Sunday. ST. JOHN EVANGELIST, POCASSET Vincentian meeting after 10:30 a.m. Mass Sunday. Parish council meeting 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. O.L. VICTORY, CENTERVILLE New CYO officers: Dan Hassett, president; Suzy duMont, vice-president; Christine Fournier, secretary; SheIly Crawford, treasurer; Mary Lortie and Catherine Childs, representatives to parish council. ST. JULIE, N. DARTMOUTH Msgr. Patrick J. O'NeiIl will be instalIed as pastor at II :30 a.m. Mass Sunday by Msgr. Luiz G. Mendonca, vicar general; reception wiIl folIow in parish haIl.

THE ANCHOR-Diocese of Fall River-Fri., Oct. 17, 1986

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OKLO MISSION SUNDAY OCTOBERI9 . The missionary spoke softly to the listeners in the church. His words, though soft, became engraved, burning, on their hearts. The children come to me, he said. They come to school, walking five miles, maybe six. Their little faces are not round and full, but thin and hollow; their eyes already tired. I give them what I can; I teach them what I can. But in the middle of the night this question haunts me: How can I tell themhow can I truly put it across to these hollow-cheeked, tired childrenhow can I tell them that God loves them?

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BELIEVE in your heart...

The missionary held out his arms, as if to embrace every listener in the church. I need you. I need you to pray for me. I need the help you can give, which I can pass on, a sign of God's love.

PROCLAIM to the world...

The missionary will not be here to plead with us on Mission Sunday. He is home in Africa.

JESUS IS LORD!

But his words are here. And you are here.

PLEASE BRING YOUR GIFT TO MASS THIS WEEKEND OR MAIL TO

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10.17.86