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VOL. 47, NO. IS

• Friday, April 18, 2003

FALL RIVER, MASS.

Southeastern Massachusetts' Largest Weekly • $14 Per Year


Friday, April 18, 2003

Easter television Mass to air at special time FALL RIVER - The televi- Fall River. Father Edward 1. sion Mass on Easter Sunday will Healey, Cathcdral' rector, will expand to a full hour and will air ,concelebrate. The St. Mary's Cathedral at a special time, from II :30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., on WLNE-TV, Choir, under the direction of Channel 6, Providence-New Madeleine Grace, will provide the music for the liturgy. Bedford. Those unable to attend a parMsgr. George W. Coleman, administrator of the Diocese of ish Mass because of age or infirFall River. will celebrate the Eas- mity are encouraged to make this tcr Mass from thc Cathedral of telecast a part of thc Easter celSt. Mary of the Assumption in cbration.

'Jesus in Disguise' is thenle of bishops' 2003 overseas appeal By

CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

WASHINGTON - "Jesus in Disguisc" is the theme for the 2003 Amcrican Bishops' Overseas Appeal, establishcd 60 years ago as the Bishops' Welfare Emergency Relief Fund. The theme is taken from thc bishops' 1999 document, "Called to Global Solidarity:' which says, "Through thc eyes of faith, the starving child, the believer in jail, and the woman without clean water or health care are not issues, but Jcsus in disguise." The appeal benefits: ~ Catholic Relief Services, which works with the poor in more than 80 countries; - Migration and Refugee Ser-" vices of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which resettles

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approximately one-third of all refugees admitted to the United States annually; - the Holy Father's Relief Fund, which assists victims of natural disasters and other emergencies around the globe; - the USCCB Department of Social Development and World. Peace, which helps the bishops share and apply Catholic social teaching on major domestic and international issues. In 200 I , the last year for which final figures are available, the collection brought in more than $16.5 million. Less than three cents of every dollar raised is used for fund raising and administrative expenses. Although the recommended date for the collection was Laetare Sunday, March 30 this year, U.S. dioceses are free to hold it on any other date they choose.

JEFFREY E. SULLIVAN FUNERAL HOME 550 Locust Street Fall River, Mass.

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BOARD MEMBERS of the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women met recently to discuss the forthcoming convention to be held at Christ the King Church, Mashpee, on May 3. The theme will be "Do Whatever He Tells You," and the k.eynote speaker will be Margo Chevers. Father Pat will entertain in the afternoon. This will be the 50th anniversary of the DCCW and President Betty Mazzucchelli is encouraging members to attend. For information, contact affiliate or district presidents. Pictured from left: Msgr. Daniel F. Hoye, Attleboro district moderator; Lynette Ouellette, first vice president; Msgr. George W. Coleman., dioce~an administrator; Pat Costa, fifth vice president and convention chairman; Father Philip A. Davignon, . moderator; and Betty Mazzucchelli, president. (Photo by Maddy Lavoie)

Charities Appeal kickoffs slated FALL RIVER - Soon after shedding their Easter finery, thousands of parishioners from throughout the Diocese of Fall River will be gathering for regional meetings to inaugurate the 62 nd annu~l Catholic Charities Appeal. Citing late Monsignor Anthony "Tony''' Gomes, an avid sportsman, the "kickoffs" will mark the formal beginning of this single most important diocesan fund-raising endeavor. The proceeds of the

Daily Readings April 21 April 22

April 23 April 24 April 25 April26

April 27

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FUNERAL PLANNING

!MaliJ it easierfor tliose you row

Acts 2: 14,22-33; Ps 16:1-2a,5,711; Mt 28:8-15 Acts 2:36-41 ; Ps 33:4-5,1820,22; In 20:1118 Acts 3: 1-10; Ps 105:1-4,6-9; Lk 24:13-35 Acts 3: 11-26; Ps 8:2a,5-9; Lk 24:35-48 Acts 4: 1-12; Ps 118:1-2,4,2227a; In 21:1-14 Acts4:13-21; Ps 118:1,1415,16ab-21; Mk 16:9-15 Acts 4:32-35; Ps 118:2-4,13- . 15,22-24; 1 In 5:1-6; In 20:1931

1111111·111111111111111111111111 THE ANCHOR (USPS-545-D20) Periodical Postage Paid at Fall River. Mass. Published weekly except for the first two weeks in July am the week after Chrisonas at 887 Highland Avenue, Fall River, Mass. 02720 by the Catholic Press of the Diocese of Fall River. Subscription price by mail, postpaid $t4.00 per year. POSTMASTERS send address changes to The Anchor, P.O. Box 7, Fall River, MA fJl722.

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Appeal are used to meet the cost of providing and expanding services for the needs of families and individuals approaching the myriad of diocesan agencies, institutions,_ apostolates and ministries. The first kickoff for residents of Cape Cod and the Islands will take place at Christine's Restaurant, West Dennis, April 22 at 6 p.m. The following evening, April 23, volunteers and parishioners from the Taunton and Attleboro Deaneries will gather at the Stoneforge in Raynham. Finally, at the largest gathering, residents of the greater Fall River and New Bedford areas will convene at White's of Westport. Msgr. George W. Coleman, administrator of the Dioce.se of Fall River, will have an opportunity to adqress the gatherings. Msgr. Thomas J. Harrington,

director of the Appeal, and Michael J. Donly, diocesan director of Development, will offer suggestions to those serving on parish committees and provide information about procedures to be followed in conducting the campaign in the respective parish communities of faith. Speakers will inform attendees of the specific outreach conducted by diocesan resources funded by the Appeal. Arlene McNamee, director of Social Services for the diocese, and Father Edward Healey, coordinator of Pastoral Ministry to the Sick, will be among those addressing the gatherings. One of the highlights of the evening's procedures will be the screening of a video prepared by David Fortin of Media Imagc of New Bedford, portraying the story oC the Catholic Charities Appeal in the diocese.

In Your Prayers Please pray for the following priests during the coming week _.ApriI22 1910, Rev. James L. Smith, Pastor, Sacred Heart, Taunton 1954, Rev. Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Pastor, St. Mary, Nantucket April 25 1940, Rev. John 1. Wade, Assistant, Sacred Heart, Fall River 1955, Rev. Raymond J. Lynch, Chaplain, Catholic Memorial Home, Fall River April 26 1982, Rev. Ubalde Deneault, Pastor Emeritus, St. Joseph, Attleboro 2002, Rev. James F. Greene, Chaplain, U.S. Air Force April 27 1925, Rev. Francis J. Bradley, D.O., Rector Cathedral, Fall River 1949, Rev. Romeo D. Archambault, St. Anne, New Bedford 1973, Rev. Edward F. O'Keefe, S.J., retired, St. Francis Xavier, Boston

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Friday, April 18, 2003

CATHERINE. LANDRY and Therese L.:Homme of Sacred Heart Church, North Attleboro, get ready to serve chowder and clamcakes during a 'recent Lenten supper. It was sponsored by the Duvernay Council.No.42 Union Saint Jean Baptiste/Catholic Family Life Insurance Group.

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A TOTAL of $900 was raised during a recent "All You Can Eat" Chowder and Clamcake Lenten Supper at Sacred Heart Church, North Attleboro. It be.nefited the St. Louis de Monfort Parish, an adopted parish in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Pictured with members of the council is Father David A. Costa, far right, pastor of Sacred Heart Parish.

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KJ:lights send rosaries, prayer books to troo'ps NEW HAVEN, Conn. Working with the Archdiocese for the Military Services, USA, the Knights of Columbus has donated 10,000 rosaries to troops serving Iraq. The Knights is also printing 100,000 copies of a book of Catholic prayers for military personnel. The book is sized to.fit in the breast pocket of a military unifOlm and is plinted on laminated pages for resiliency in wartime conditions. The book also includes introductions from Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien of the archdiocese and Supreme Knight Carl A. Anderson. Anderson said the donation of rosaries and prayer books was a show of solidarity with the troops. The Knights, he said, has a long history of such support, stretching back to World War I when the 01'- . ganization operated rest and recreation centers for troops in Europe under the banner, "Everybody Welcome. Everything Free." "The Knights of Columbus joins others the world over in praying for peace," Anderson said. "We alsp pray for the swift and safe return of our troops who are laying down their lives for others in acts of charity and service." The Knights has received reports of: several dozen 'members called to active duty since early February. U.S. Marine Major Jay

Aubin, who was killed in a helicopter crash in Kuwait on March 21, was a member of the Knights in Florida at the time of his death. Founded by 1882' by Michael 1. McGivney, the Knights of Columbus is the world's largest Catholic fraternal service organization, with more than 1.6 million . members throughout North America and elsewhere. In 200 I, members reported raising and contributing to charity a record $125 million and volunteering a record 58.9 million hours of service. EDICTAL CITATION DIOCESAN TRIBUNAL FALL RIVER, MASSACHUSETTS Since the actual place of residence of HEATHER M. COTNOIR is unknown. We cite HEATHER M. COTNOI~ to ap· pear personally before the Tribunal of the Diocese of Fall River on Tuesday, April 29, 2003 at 10:30 a.m. at BB7 Highland Av· enue, Fall River, Massachusetts, to give tes· timony to establish: Whether the nullity of the mar'riage exists in the Cotnoir· Wood case? Ordinaries of the place or other pastors having the knowledge of the residence of the above person, Heather M. Cotnoir, must see to it that she is properly advised in reo gard to this edictal citation. (Rev.) Paul F. Robinson. O. Carm., J.C.D. Judicial Vicar Given at the Tribunal. Fall River. Massachusetts on tbis the Bth day of April, 2003.

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the ancho.CS>

themo()rin~

Friday. April 18, 2003

the living word

Raise us up Each and every Christia~ should enter into the Paschal Mystery with a Resurrection prayer. We must ask the resurrected Christ to raise us up from our dark night of the soul. First and foremost, we have the obligation to petition the good Lord to free us from the evil of war and all that it entails.' As we view the endless media documentation of destruction and death, we cannot be part of a community that views war as an end in itself. Peace is more than the absence of war. It is more than a mere balancing of power between nations. As the great prophet Isaiah reflected, peace "is the effect of righteousness," not the self-righteousness as heard in so many political speeches. Rather, it is the right ordering of things thirsting after a more perfect reign of justice. War destroys the unit~ :of the hurrian family., " Eastertime reminds us .all that peace on eartk, which flows from the love of one's neighbor, symbolizes and derives from the peace of Christ. He is the Prince of Peace through his resur'rection. He sent forth the Spirit of love into the hearts of all people. Even in the midst of our current conflicts, it should be an Easter prayer that "They shall beat their -swords into ploughshares and their spears into pruning hooks; one nation shall not lift up sword against another; neither shall they learn 'war any more" Os.2:4). We should also pray that the light of the risen Christ shows us the way to restore and reinforce those international organizations that strive to outlaw all war by 'mutual agreement. The United Nations should be a forum for fruitful progress in this regard, Too many countries, including our own, use the United Nations as a personal political and nationalistic self-serving platform, Peace is born in an atmosphere of mutual trust. It cannot be achieved by thefear of war, Inan ever-shrinkiT)g world where communication is instant and where global marketing is a given, the common good has to be pursued. Our Holy Father consistently and constantly pleads for this,. day in and day out. This petition should be in the heart of every Christian this Easter. Our third supplication should ask the Lord to lift up his Church here on earth from the darkness that now engulfs it. Everyone in the Church family must seek the light that only can come from'the'Spirit. We cannot rely on mere administration policies to deliver us from the tribulations of the times. Hearts must be healed with compassion and understanding. As necessary as this is, it should not be ~he only goal to be achieved. The Church family must have a broad measure of affirmation that can only be achieved by a prayerful spirituality. We cannot become mere rea~tionaries. The light of healing should come from within the Church family. It cannot be enforced by headlines, litigiousness or threats. ,Rather, it flows from a renewed sense of the salvific will of a loving God. Only in the light of Christ's resurrection will we be able to dismiss the darkness that wishes to consume us. Bishops, priests, deacons and laity must share in a bond of unity that will unite the Church as we struggle once more to be an Easter people. ' , As we pray for America, the world, and our Church, may' we do so with a firmness of faith' tha't the resurrected Jesus will show us the way to become fully a blissful community that,truly bel ieves that he can raise us up from' all that chains us in our daily living,

The Executive Editor

theat1Ch()~

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OFTHE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER

"p.ubiished weekly' b~/the' Catlloli y P~ess of th!l Diocese of Fall River , 887 HighlandAvenue .': ".:-.,; :,.'~, P.O.' 80X,7,;" Fall River, MA 02720 ' -" 'fall River, MA .02722-0007 Telepho~e508~675~715'1: FAX 508-675-7048' , ' E-mail: TheAnchor@Anchornews.org ~end address changes to P.O. Box, call or use E~mail address ',EXECLITIVEEDITOR , Rev. Msgr. John F. Moore " EDITOR David B.,Joiivet

, NEWS 'EDITOR' ,James N: Dunbar

OFFICI;: MANAGER , Barbara M. Rels

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CANADIAN DELEGATES PASS THE WO'RLD YOUTH DAY CROSS TO THEIR GERMAN PEERS IN ST. PETER'S SQUARE AT THE END OF PALM SUNDAY MASS. CANADA HOSTED THE LAST INTERNATIONAL YOUTH GATHERING. THE NEXT WILL TA\<.E PLACE IN COLOGNE, GERMANY, IN

2005.

(CNS

PHOTO FROM CATHOLIC' PRESS PHOTO) \.

"THE WORD OF GOD KEPT ON SPREADING; AND THE NUMBER OF THE DISCIPLES CONTINUED TO INCREASE GREATLY" , (ACTS 6:7). ,~

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,

Unco'mforta'ble

lessons of history By

FATHER EUGENE HEMRICK CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

barricades also signals that we fear ever there is war. fofour safety and are being forced , \1nfortunately, the day will never When I spotted the new guard- either to build walls around our- come when we will see all of this disappear once and for all. Why say house in the driveway of the Libriry selves or go underground. ofCongress, I said to myself: "What As I continued to reflect, how- this? Because banicades, walls and is this world coming to? We already ever, it occurred to me that building uRderground hiding places symbolh~ve barriers almost everywhere you walls and going underground has ize the battle between the world of walk on Capitol Hill. Will we ever been part of human history from its darkness and the world of light. see the day when all this stops?" beginning. Whenever battles are fought, people As I pondered the scene further, ' During the days of the prophets, take cover. I became even more troubled. I Jerusalem often feared for its safety. How might we cope with this thought: "Not only is the Library of When, fat example, King Hezekiah somewhat disturbing thought?路 Congress one of the most distin- was about to be besieged by the I suggest ,that we internalize guished libraries in the world, but it Assyrians, he realized that even ' history's lessons. O'1e of those lesis a national symbol for learning and though Jerusalem was surrounded sons, which many of us don't like progress. Now it is surrounded by by protective walls, its water supply to think about, is that many things barricades and an additional guard- came from outside those walIs.1f the never change. As much as we sttive house, which are symbols of regres- Assyrians cut off that supply, Jerusa- for peace, we don't ever see it persion and th.e very opposite of lem would fall quickly. This vading the world to the point that progress." prompted him to build the tunnel of 'enemies no longer exist. What disturbs me'even more is Hezekiah, an underground passage History teaches us that as long as the talk of building all of that carried water from the Virgin's. we live, we will always have times Washington's visitors' centers un- Fountain just outside the walls of when we need to seck cover. Recderground. No doubt this plan has Jerusalem. ogJ)izing this may help us to accept architectural and efficiency,advanThroughout the Old Testament, certain facts oflife. As a result, some tages. With growing numbers of it was common for cities to be sur- ' of our anxieties may be soothed a tourists coming to Washington, these rounded by walls. Take for example bit. And our anger may lessen some-路 underground centers afford protec- the Walls of Jericho that were what at the sight of yet another bartion from the elements while they brought down by the Israelites. ricade where we'd much prefer to await their tum to view the capital's ,In medieval times, moats around see flowers growing. monuments. But with all the tal~ of castles were common. And in recent And we'll be reminded to conbombings and terrorism, building times we have seen the erection of tinue to include the larger world underground entrances and erecting bunkers and the use of caves when- around us in our prayers of petition.


the anchOlY

Friday, April 18, 2003

5

Exercising 'my right So few games played, so much their own division, and are just doesn't have any! to complain about already. barely above .500. Most of us Then there's Pedro. The $17M Ahhhhh the Red Sox are back! were hoping for the usual splen- man isn't getting any respect from Before I'm accused of giving did charge from the gates, having his employers. The diminutive up on the beloved Home 'hurler, who is always just one misthrown fastball Towne Team, which has - - - - - - - - - - - already happened several away from two months times this year, I'm simon the disabled list, wants ply cashing in on my right a long-term extension to as a long-time Sox sufhis already beefy conferer to moan and groan tract. Perhaps Mr. when things don't go our Martinez should respect By Dave Jolivet way. I have not, nor will the intelligence of the not, no matter what I've fans that have supported . him for the last halfsaid or will say, give up on my team until it is mathemati- to worry about a collapse only dozen' years, and thank his Crecally eliminated. Why, it's Easter after the All-Star break. Is it pos- ator for giving him the talent to weekend and we're still in the' sible that this could actually be the make obscene amounts of money hunt! year - starting slowly and build- playing a game. .On the other side of the ball, The glass is half-full way of ing into a hardball crescendo in thinking is that we're still in the August, September and October? Manny Ramirez and newcomer r.ace. The glass is half-empty per- Could this be the year when the Jeremy Giambi seem to be spective (shared by most· true Yanks finally find out what we go swinging broomsticks while opBosox fans) is that it's Easter through each summer? I hope so, posing pitchers are hurling weekend and we're already 3 Y2 because our hopes of leading the ,marbles. There's little doubt games behind the Evil Empire A.L. East from wire-to-wire were Manny will come around, but Giambi appears to be heading in with just 10 games played. And finished after opening day. the direction of other notable Sox that projects to the Yankees winWhy such an anemjc start? ning the American League East "Let me count the ways. First of pickups like Jack Clark and Jose Division by 560 games! all there's the Bullpen by Com- Canseco - sluggers who only What's worrisome is the Red mittee project. Most Sox fans are occasionally flexed their Fenway . Sox, who, by the way, are now pretty upset with this venture. It's muscles. Actually, all else in Red Sox actually wearing red socks, have pretty ironic that the faithful are been playing the cream puffs of up in arms about a bullpen that

My View

From the Stands

Letter to the Editor Editor: "It should be noted that any parish may hold the celebration of the Pauline Latin Mass at any time." This final sentence in a story in the Aplil 4 edition of The Anchor, on the celebration of the Tridentine Mass perfectly illustrates how the intent of the Vatican II Council's "Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy" and the "Instmction on the Liturgy" has been completely turned on its head. For decades I have been asking the clergy ancUor anyone who would listen, to provide me with the name of the document from the Apostolic See that has approved of the completeexpulsion of the Latin language from the Pauline Mass; a simple re-

Nation appears to running smoothly though. And Fenway is looking marvelous. One of my new goals in life is to get a couple of seats on the Green Monster, but that isn't likely since the Fenway brass sees fit only to sell the seats at the ball park and not via telephone or Internet. And since the seats go on sale during the week and since I work for a living, I'll continue to sit in the upper rightfield grandstands like other common folk. There, now that I've vented a bit, I'm ready to settle in for a long, successful season. A season filled with wins and homers and pitching gems and the occasional moaning and groaning sessions we all need and enjoy. And while I'm on the subject' of the Red Sox, one of their best fans and one who could moan and groan about them with the best if them died last week. My Uncle Pete was the' man responsible for fueling my passion for the Sox when I was just a puppy. As often as I could, I would go to his house across the street to get my daily dose of sports news. He would give me his Boston Record-American sports section after he soaked all he could from it. Back then there

was no ESPN or NESN or anything close. But my Uncle Pete was my personal sports information director, and I could more than hold my own on the sports scene with my friends at school thanks to him. As I grew older I saw less of him, but, when we did meet the con~ersation always swung around to the Sox - after asking about my family. Well Uncle Pete, I suppose now you know if and when the Sox will finally win it all. Since you're partially responsible for my being the Sox maniac I am today, maybe you can send me a sign as to when the big day will come. The Boston Record-American no longer exists, so you'll have to feed me information some other way. But don't do anything that will get you in trouble with the big guy up there. If that's the case, I can wait until they actually win it, or when I head up there myself - which ever comes first. Dave Jolivet, editor of The Anchor, is a former sports editor/ writer, and regularly gives one fan's perspective on the unique world ofsports. Comments are welcome at davejolivet@anchornews.org.

.aWe cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust the sails."

quest that continues to go unan- ' swered. It appears that we now have substituted one form of language ri- . gidity (Latin) i':l the old Mass for a new form of Iigidity (English) in the new; the very thing the Council Fathers were attempting to avoid. Cardinal Ratzinger sums it up best: "What happened after the Council was something else entirely: in the place of liturgy as the fmit of development came fablicated liturgy. We abandoned the organic, living process of growth and development over centuries, and replaced it - as in a manufactuling process - with a fablication, a banal, Qn-the-spot product." William H. MacLachlan . West Dennis

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~. Feitelberg Iilsurance IN THE April 4 edition, The Anchor incorrectly ran a picture of Holy Name Church, New Bedford instead of a file picture of Sacred Heart Church shown above. Several readers have contacted this paper about the inaccuracies of the Sacred Heart Parish history which ran in that issue. The Anchor will run a corre~ted history in the near future.

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Friday, April 18, 2003

Church teaching on evolution a

BREWSTER ~ "Come Walk With Me," an eight-week support seminar for bereaved person,s, sponsored by the' Lazarus Ministry Group, will begin April 25 at 7 p.m. at the Our Lady of the Cape Parish Center. For registration information call Eileen Miller at 508-896-4218 or Happy Whitman at 508-385-3252.

, Q. It would be big help if you would explain our present Catholic teaching about evolution. Years ago we were told evolution denied God's creation of the human race. 1Jten we read that -. our present p~pe approved belief time, knowledge and skills. Training and ongoing support will be, in the theory of evolution. What is provided. For ,more informatioI1 the story? (Indiana) .

nize that the theory of evolution is more than a hypothesis, more than a mere scientific conjecture or assumption. ' The pope makes two important ' points: - fiist, we must exercise extreme caution when we attempt to find answers to scientific questions

A. The evolution you call Debra Kenney of Catholic .speak of is, I assume, the Social Services at 508-999-5893. evolving of human bodies ' NEW BEDFORD _ St. Jo- from other living.beings ' that lived on earth before seph-St. Therese parish invites all human beings appeared. A to add their recited rosaries to its . lot of conflicting interpretaRosary Drive for Peace. For more tions of Catholic doctrines By Father information call Alice Beaulieu at about this subject have John J. Oietzen FALL RIVER - Catholic 508-995-2354. floated around during the Social Serv.ices and Compass past 200 years or so, some NORTH DARTMOUTH ,Bank are sponsoring a of them without either scientific or , in the Bible. Four years earlier he attributed the Church's condemnaHomebuyer Education Workshop A Divorced-Separated Support theological foundation. tion of Galileo to the fact that the April 30 and May 17 from 6 to 9 Group will meet April 28 from 7Today it is clear that no Catholic majority of theologians did not make p.m. at 路the Catholic Social Ser- 9 p.m. at the Family Life Center, dogma conflicts with such 'a theory a proper distinction between holy vice office, 1600 Bay Street. Top- 500 Slocum Road. It will feature of evolution. As long ago as 路1950, Scripture itself and the' interpretation ics will include homebuying pro- a health care video entitled. "Kids Pope Pius xn, in his encyclical given to it by Bible scholars and "Humatii Generis,'" maintained that cess, home inspections, credit re- Care." For more information call the Church has no.problem with the other theologians. ~orts, budgeting, mortgages, Joanne Dupre at 508-993-0589.' _ (Most everyone must be aware study of evolution by scientists and realtors, insurance and attorneys. by'now that the great 1路7th-century theologians. For more information call M. SOMERSET - The Parish astronomer, Galileo, was-punished The research, he said, which. Nurse Ministry of Saint Patrick's Lucia Vieira at 508-674-4681. by the Church, held under house Parish will sponsor a seminar en- "inquires into the origin of the .human body as coming from prearrest and forbidden to distribute his MASHPEE - A series' of -titled "Organ and Tissue Donawritings because he taught that the existent arid living m'ltter" creates four Natural Family Planning tion," from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. sun did not revolve around the earth. no difficulty for Catholic belief as Classes will be taught by the April 26 in the parish center, 306 long as we accept that the spiritual This was considered to contradict Couple to Couple League begin- South Street. For more informa- "part~' of our nature, what we call the Bible, which speaks rather of the ning April 215 at I p.m. at Christ tion call Claire Stevens at 508- the soul, is immediately created by sun moving, going up and coming the King Parish. For more infor- 678-3831. God (No. 36). down around the earth. See, for mation call Celina Della-Morte at ,On Oct. 22, 1996, addressing the instance, Joshua 10:12-13.) 508-833-9535. SOMERSET - A holy hour - Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Theologians of Galileo's day, for vocations will be held April Pope John Paul II agreed that new said Pope John Paul in his 1996 MASHPEE - The Third Or- 24 at 7:30 p.m. at St. Thomas , knowledge leads us now to recogaddress, did not make this proper der of Carmelites will meet April More Parish, 386 Luther Avenue. 27 at 5:30 p.m. at Christ the King , It will include Benediction of the Parish for an evening of,prayer, Blessed Sacrament. Refreshments rosary and study. They will gather will follow. For more information in the St. Jude Chapel. For more call 508-673-7831.-' "The only thing we have to fear Touches Off Hostilities at a Mall." information call Dottie Cawley at is fear itself," President Franklin D. A 60-year-old father, Stephen 508-477-2798. WEST HARWICH -- Be- Roosevelt said in 1933 in his first Downs, and his 31-year-old son, ginning Easter Monday the Di- inaugural address. That famous line Rog~r, had gone to the Crossgates Mall in Albany, N.Y., wearing TMISCELLANEOUS -:.. The . vine Mercy Holy Hour will be , resonated with patriotic Americans shirts, over turtlenecks, with Guaimaca Honduras Mission sung at 7 p.m. at Holy Trinity throughout the years of the Great sponsored by the Diocese of Fall Church, Route 28. It will continue Depression and later in River, is seeking' donations of por- 'all week though Easter Saturday World War II. Of course, some table sewing machines in good at 7 p.m. Members of the prayer working condition to teach native ,group will gather at 2:45 p.m. for Americans did become women how to sew clothes for the Mercy Sunday celebrati,on. afraid - a!1d with good their families. For pick-ups call No confessions will be available reason. They were the Lou Emond at 508-761-5432. that day. For more information, residents of our country who were dragged from Baby and young children's call 508-432-4000. their homes and confined clothes are also needed. ' By Antoinette Bosco in camps simply because WEST HARWICH......;. The they were of Japanese NEW BEDFORD - Volun- C,elebrate Life Committee of heritage. This was teers are needed for the Donovan Holy Trinity Parish will hold a whipped-up patriotism, and it emblems saying "Peace on Earth," House, a transitional home for holy hour April 27 at 2:45 p.m. at wasn't a new idea. It had really "No War With Iraq" and "Let - women apd children. Share your the church. taken off in World War I, fueling Inspections Work." They went to fear, anger and prejudice against the food court to have dinner, but German Americans. soon were approached by security La Salette Retreat Center The fueling of fear, anger and guards who told them to take the T947 Park Street prejudice got under way fast when shirts off. . , the war on terrorism was launched The younger man complied, but Attleboro, MA 02703~5115 after Sept. II, 200 I. Many people the father did not, believing 508-222-8530 who simply had a Middle Eastern strongly that individuals should be appearance were arrested and able to express themselves, detained without cause. especially when their message is of June 23-29 6 Day Preached / Directed Retreat People who protested the war in peace. That didn't fly with the Iraq have been accused ofbeihg , guards, who called the local police. June 23-July 1 8 Day Directed Retreat unpatriotic, even "enemies." They came in and arrested Downs Spa Weekend for Women 1 July 25-27 ,Forgotten is that we areAmericans, for trespassing. - blessed to live in a democratic , I called my sister 'who still lives Aug. 1-3 SpaWee~ndfor Women II . country that honors individual in Albany, and she said the story Aug. 15-21 6 Day Preached / Directed Retreat freedom. Or has that been changed was all over the Albany news. I 8 Day Directed Retreat behind dosed doors? ' asked her what the pervasive . Aug. 15-23 I was extremely disturbed in feeling was. She said, in a word, early March when I read a story in "Outrage!'~ For which I say, lbank The New York TImes headlined "A you. For more illformatioll., please call or write Retreat Secretary Message of Peace on Two Shirts The TImes story noted that

Questions

and '

,Answers

distinction and thus made Scripture "say what it does not intend to say." The Bible cannot be forced to '" answer scientific questions, like , evolution or the movement of the stars for example. Thus says the pope, theologians and Scripture scholars cannot do their jobs properly unli<ss they keep informed about what is happening in . the sciences. - second, the evolution theory, or any other established hypothesis, needs always to be tested against the facts. As , information gathers that fits the theory, its explanation of how life, including hum~ life, developed on , our planet becomes more and more probable. According to Pope John Paul, and by far most Catholic officials and ,theologians today,. the facts converg- . ing from many fields of human knowledge (geology, anthropology, psychology and so on) create a progressively "significant argument in favor of this theory." The complete text of this papal message is available from Origins, CNS Documentary Service, 3211 Fourth Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20017-1100. Ask for the Dec. 5, 1996 issue: We believe, of course, that God created the world. How he did it or how the energies placed in the cosmos by the Creator work to move all things toward greater complexity - or simplicity - is not part of our faith.

Will freedom be a casualty?

The Bottom - Line'

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Arthur Eisenb~rg, the legal director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, called this action at the mall an attempt to censor the free speech rights of its patrons. "We won~er where such censorship will end. Will the mall start prohibiting customers from wearing political buttons? The ultimate point is that we are a diverse society in which individuals hold diverse views." And may I add; "Isn't that the American way?" Are our freedoms going to' be a casualty of the war on terror? Donna R. Newman, a court appointed lawyer for Jose Padilla, accused of ' planning to explode a "dirty bomb," may have something to say on this. Her client can have no access to her, his lawyer, because President Bush has declared him "an enemy combatant." With much work ahead of her, she says, "If the government gets away with this, it can, with these rules, lock up any American." Perh~ps it is time to rem~mber again what Thomas Jefferson, knowing how easy it is to legitimize measures that can threaten civil liberties, wrote to James Madison in 1787: "A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth, general or particular; and what no just government should refuse, or rest on inferences."

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POPE JOHN Paul II holds an olive branch during Palm Sunday Mass in St. Peter's Square. (eNS photo from Reuters)

Pope prays for peace; Celebrates Christ's entry into Jerusalent VATICAN CITY (CNS) Celebrating the entry ofChrist, king of peace, into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, it is impossible not to pray

for peace in the city that continues to be marked by violence, Pope John Paul II said. The Mass marked not only Palm

Sunday, but also World Youth Day. At ilie end of the Mass, young people from Canada, hosts of World Youth Day 2002, passed the

Thoughts on baseball superstitions There is a saying that goes something like, "Nearly 98 percent of Mexicans are Guadalupanos (devotees of Our Lady of Guadalupe), but the number of Catholics is much smaller." In baseball this could be recast, "There are many hitters who make the Sign of the Cross, but the number of Catholics is much smaller." Thus, you might ask, What do the new baseball season, a Graham Greene character and statues of St. Joseph have in common? Or you might not ask at all and prefer a nap. However, let me address the issue - which is superstition, of cOlSlrse, no.t .a nap.

a nod to a dead man called St. Joseph to wearing a necklacelike thingy called a scapular." Or so I would snort. If the existence of God could not be soundly supported by intel-

two religious groups might be linked. Like Father Crompton, I cannot get very worked up any more about where "pure" piety ends and superstition starts. If superstition contains any seeds of faith, let them be planted. And, next time you see a baseball player tap his instep three times with the bat, then touch the bill of Sales And Service his cap, then bounce the bat on each shoulder Fall River's Largest twice, think of ritual. And Display of TVs if he gets a hit off Randy Johnson's 100-mph fastball, think ZENITH· SONY of the divine. Comments are welcome. E1196 BEDFORD ST. mail Uncle Dan at FALL RIVER cnsuncleOl@yahoo.com.508.673.9721

_-----------1--'::::::---,... The offbeat 1d f wor 0 Uncle Dan

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One obvious exception is baseball, where about anything can be raw matel;al forthesupematural-from spit and shoe laces to how one picks up a bat or puts on a cap. Here's where Graham Greene comes in. In his novel "The End of the Affair," the main character, MaU1;ce Bendrix, snipes at Father Crompton, "Your church certainly goes in for superstition in a big way - St. Januarius, bleeding statues, visions of the virgin - that sort of thing." The c1et;c is unruffled. "We try to sort them out. And isn't it more sensible to believe that anything may happen than ...?" I fought that logic with my own logic in the days I fought the logic of converting to Catholicism. "These statue worshipers (no 01'fense intended to you with walls pocked with figurine niches) believed a coin flip could be affected by any number of things - from

By Dan Morris

lect and reason, to heck with it. As it turned out, it could and can. Fortunately, my youthful disdain for the supranatural, mystical and unexplainable has matured over time. 'Partofiliereuonis,caniliill~

"lillie old lady Catholics" who have come into my life. These women know more ways to conjure up the holy. These women wrote the book on what Church people call "popular devotions." These women make some of these same people wince and whisper condescending things about "purifying" popular piety. These women are the ones to whom I turn when prayer is paramount. Most of us listen for God. These women know God. OK, I still tended to be a little skeptical when one of my favorites (Eloise, but don't tell her I told you) instructed me to bury a statue of St. Joseph upside down in the yard of a house I want to sell. Still, this sounded akin to things Norwegian Lutheran relatives have suggested doing with certain real estate agents. So, anthropologically speaking, these

World Youth Day cross to young people from Germany, which will host the international gathering of youths with the pope in Cologne in 2005. Although he looked and sounded strong, the pope again used a new chair with wheels and pneumatic height adjustment, allowing aides to push him behind the altar for the Eucharistic prayer, which he recited sitting. In his homily, the pope spoke about the contrasting cries of the crowds as Jesus entered Jerusalem and then faced crucifixion, "the festive 'Hosanna' and the repeated cry, 'Crucify him.''' Jerusalem, he said, is "the city of the prophets, many of whom underwent martyrdom for the truth; the city of peace, which in the course of centuries has known violence, war and deportations." The city, like humanity, rejoices on Palm Sunday because "Jesus, the king of peace;' has come to bring salvation, the pope said. Earlier, Palestinian youths, through the Laity Committee in the Holy Land, sent a message delivered by an Italian youth activist to ilie pope asking for his prayers of peace. "We pray to God Almighty that he will end the military occupation in our troubled land," the youths wrote. They said their rights as Palestinians have been neglected, and generation after generation has known only oppression and pain. The Palestinians asked young people and the pope "to pray with us for the peace of Jerusalem, to pray with us for justice in the Holy Land, so that the Palestinian people will be set free. We trust in God's

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word, and we know that we speak the truth, and ultimately it is the tJUth that sets us free." Pope John Paul said Christ is the "king of truth, of freedom, of justice and of love," the four pillars essential for the construction of peace as Blessed Pope John XXIII wrote 40 years ago in his encyclical on peace, "Pacem in Terris." Pope John Paul asked young people to read and study the encyclical and "try to put it into practice. Then you will be 'blessed' because you will be authentic sons and daughters of the God of peace." The pope told the young people, . "do not be afraid to offer your lives as a total response to Christ. He and he alone changes lives and the history of the world." Cardinal J. Francis Stafford, president of the Pontifical Council for the Laity, which is responsible for the gatherings, told repOf1ers, "Young people perceive through World Youth Day that the Catholic Church has placed pastoral ministry to youth as a pt;ority." Asked at a press confel~nce why so many young people are atlracted to "an old man," the 82-year-old pope, Cardinal Stafford said, "The Holy Father, unlike society, gives space to young people." "They perceive in this 'old man' someone who respects them;' he said, as well as trusting that in their search for God, for truth and for love they will succeed.

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Fall River diocese marks its centennial The following are the next in a series of historical sketches of the parishes comprising the Diocese of Fall River, founded in 1904. The series will run in chronological order from oldest to newest parish, according to diocesan archives, concluding in March, 2004, the centennial anniversary of the diocese. Please note that ALL parish histories will run in the order they were founded - even parishes which have been suppressed or merged. Histories of merged parishes will run according to the timeline.

St. Joseph's Parish, Woods Hole WOODS HOLE - With a rush of immigrants from Canada and Ireland moving into southern New England in the late 1800s, it became clear to Father Andrew Brady, pastor at St. Peter's in Sandwich, and Providence Bishop Thomas F. -Hendricken, whose diocese stretched out to Cape Cod and the Islands, that another parish was needed. The Woods Hole parish of 5t. Joseph was established in 1882 and it became the fourth Catholic Church on Cape Cod. The house of worship was built on the north side of Millfield Street on land given by Joseph Story Fay, a Boston businessman and local summer resident, who, although not a Catholic, employed a great deal of Catholics on his estate. The rectory, next to the church, was completed in 1888 and land for a burial ground, St. Joseph Cemetery off Gifford Street in Falmouth, was another gift from Fay in 1891: Repairs to the church and rectory due to storm damage and minor additions throughout the

years have not greatly altered the original structures. Father Cornelius J. MacSwiney, one of the priests from Sandwich who earlier had served Catholics in that region, was named the first pastor of the new parish. The wooden frame building on granite blocks faces the Eel Pond across the street. On the shore a 48-foot pink granite bell tower, constructed in 1929, and the Garden of Our Lady, were gifts from Frances Crane Lillie, a summer parishioner and wife of the director of the Marine Biological Laboratory. The tower bells, named "Mend" and "Pasteur" for renowned Catholic life scientists, ring the Angelus thrice daily. The bronze door, by Alfeo Faggi, depicts scenes from the life of St. Joseph. On the walls of the oratory in the tower base are small, bronze Stations of the Cross, also by Faggi. Verses for the stations were written by Irish poet Padraic Colum. To the east of the tower and ending in an arch, is the crosS-o shaped Garden of Our Lady, more

commonly known as the Mary Garden, established in 1932. Planted with flowers whose common names honor Mary, the garden is recognized as the first public garden in this country and has been the inspiration for the establishment of many other Mary Gardens in this country and around the world. In 1982, the centennial of St. Joseph Church, the garden was restored to the 1930s original design. More recent pastors among the 16 to serve St. Joseph's include: Father Bernard H. Unsworth, Father Edwin J. Loew, Father William E. Farland, Father Joseph L. Powers, and Father James P. Dalzell. Since 1997 the pastor has been Father Bernard R. Kelly. Carole Knebel is coordinator of religious education; Joanna Bossi heads the eucharistic ministry; Carol Wagner heads the Altar Guild; and Norma Perron is the organist and in charge of the music mirristry. ";; The rectory is located at 33 Millfield Street, and may be contacted by telephone at 508-5480990.

St. Patrick's Parish, Somerset SOMERSET - Historically, St. Patrick's Parish in Somerset can look to St. Joseph's Parish on North Main Street in Fall River, as

its mother parish. . Taunton River, as a mission of Up until the time of the offi- - St. Joseph's, attended Mass at cial founding of St. Patrick's in the Old Central Hall on Main 1883, the community of Catho- Street in Somerset Village. lics on the west side of the It had approximately 800 pa-

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rishioners from Irish, Portuguese and French-Canadian families, mainly farmers and industrial workers, who brought with them their most precious pos~ession, their faith. The 'cornerstone for St. Patrick's was laid in September 1873 and dedicated to St. Patrick in November of that year. . In 1877, the mission parish of St. Patrick's was joined with St. Jean Baptiste Parish in,Warren, R.I., as one parish by Bishop Thomas F. Hendricken of Providence, whose diocese included all of the region from Providence out to Cape Cod in Massachusetts. Father Edward E. Norbert was in charge of the mission communities until 1883 when Father James Masterson, a curate at Sacred Heart Parish in Fall River, was named the first pastor of St. Patrick's Somerset. His parish would include all of Somerset, and large parts of Swansea and Dighton. This year marks the 120th anniversary of St. Patrick's Parish, the founding parish of the Catholic communities on the west side of the Taunton River. It includes the northern end of Somerset, and parts of Swansea and Rehoboth.

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Today, the original church still stands and has been enhanced over the years with the last remodeling of the interior, a new altar and ambo as well as other renewals in the sanctuary, in 1997. There are currently 1,200 registered families representing approximately 3,000 persons. A parish center was added and opened in 1980 by then pastor Msgr. Robert Stanton. The most recent pastors have been: Father Edward Sharpe, Father Brian Harrington, and Father George Bellenoit. Msgr. George W. Coleman, administrator of the Diocese of Fall River, was the first vocation to the priesthood from St. Patrick's. The current pastor is Father Marc Paul Tremblay. Edward J. Hussey is the deacon; Janet Rausch and William Courville are the religious education coordinators; Anne Bouchard is the parish secretary; Antone Silvia is the sexton; and Adele Cabral is youth director. The rectory is at 306 South Street, Somerset, MA 02726-5617. It can be reached by telephone at 508-6721523; by FAX at 508-675-5787; and by E-mail atStPatParish@attbi.com. The parish Website is www.stpatricksomerset.org.

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2008

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EASTER MESSAGE - 2003 Peter, expressing at one and the same time his faith in Jesus and his love for him said, "Lord you know everyAfter his resurrection, Jesus appeared to his disciples thing; you know that I love you!" in various places, on the road to Emmaus, in Galilee, and Like the two disciples on their way to Emmaus, we may in a room in Jerusalem. By meditating on these encounters of the Lord with his disciples, we can learn much experience defeat and confusion. And like the disciples ofJesus about the centrality of Christ's resurrection in our lives gathered in Jerusalem, we may on occasion feel "startled and terrified." The Lord gently helps us understand the strength that and about our relationship to him. comes from his triumph over death. Ever present in our lives, W hen Jesus began to walk with his two disciples as he offers us the precious and irreplaceable gift of his peace. they went from Jerusalem to Emmaus, he did not reveal In our society, which values so highly what immediately who he was. Rather, he can be known through the scientific method, helped them understand from the it may be difficult to believe what canHoly Scriptures that what had not be perceived. The risen Savior happened in Jerusalem, his invites us to himself and encoursuffering, death, and resurages us, "Do not be unbelievrection, took place in oring, but believe." Finally, to der that God's plan be those who, through weakfulfilled. The two disness, have distanced ciples returned to themselves from the Jerusalem immediLord, the risen Christ ately to proclaim offers no reprimand. To the good news, those who desire to re"The Lord has turn to him he asks, truly been "Do you love me?" as raised." a prelude to granting them his gift of mercy When Jesus and forgiveness. appeared to his disciples In At this time of inJerusalem, the ternational turmoil and Gospel describes war, may we open our them as being hearts generously to "startled and Christ, crucified and afraid." He did not risen, who comes with the comment on their lack offer of peace. Wherever the of faith or their fear. Risen Christ enters, he brings Rather, he encouraged with him true peace. May that them and said, "Peace be peace enter our hearts and lives and with you!" families today and always! Throughout the world on Easter, Christians greet Thomas was absent when Jesus each other with the joy-filled expression of faith, was present with the other disciples and "Christ is truly risen. Alleluia!" Confident that the doubted that he had been raised from the dead. When the Lord stood before Thomas, he did not dispar- Risen Lord is in our midst, I pray that all the faithful of the age him for his lack of faith. After inviting Thomas to Diocese of Fall River experience the profound joy of Easter place his fingers and hand in the place of his wounds, and the fullness of blessings of this holy season! Jesus offered him an invitation, "Do not be unbelieving, Sincerely yours in the Lord, but believe."

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

A nd when the Risen Lord encountered Peter for the first time after Peter had betrayed him three times, Jesus did not berate him for his disloyalty. He asked him three times, "Simon, son of John, do you love me?" Simon

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(Rev. Msgr.) George W. Coleman Diocesan Administrator

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.Friday, April 18, 2003

NBC-reporter who died in Iraq was baptized Catholic as an adult By

CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

edy and we'd talk about the people behind the story and how they must feel." Bloom's dedication to his work was reflected in televised eulogies by such NBC colleagues as Tim Russert and Katie Couric calling him "tireless," "relentless" and "the consummate professional." Bloom, 39, dropped his duties as co-anchor of NBC's "Weekend NEARLY 300 students and faculty from The Catholic UniToday" program, versity of America perform Leonard Bernstein's 1971 "Mass: where he had been A Theater Piece for Singers, Players and Dancers" at the for the pas t th ree school's new Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center in Washyears, to go to the ington. (CNS photo courtesy Catholic University) war zone, where he was embedded with the Army's 3rd Infantry Division. twin daughters of A blood clot in his Bloom at Immaculeg ultimately led to late Conception Cathe embolism that The celebrant, who has tried to thedral in Wichita. By JERRY FILTEAU killed him outside of keep his increasingly rebellious Bloom and his wife, CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE the Iraqi capital of congregation faithful and praying, Melanie, also had Baghdad. He had WASHINGTON The himself breaks down as he cries another daughter. Catholic University of America's "Pacem, pacem, pacem" ("Peace, Writing in The ~awakened in the morning after spendmusic school hosted a week of in- peace, peace") and in anguish Catholic Advance, ing the night in a terdisciplinary dialogue on flings the host and chalice from Wichita diocesan America's social, political, cul- his hands onto the floor. newspaper, former NBC CORRESPONDENT and news anchor cramped tank and tural and religious turmoil in the As the celebrant, who has KWCH colleague David Bloom travels through the Iraqi desert with walked about 10 I960s, culminating April 5 and 6 unvested, collapses, one at a time Chuck Weber said the U.S. Army's 3rd Infantry Division in a recent yards before collapsin performances of Leonard the congregants rise and sing the Father Blackledge photo. Bloom died of a pulmonary embolism while ing. Bernstein's 1971 "Mass: A The- final song, "Pax: Communion," was proud of his Bloom had "a covering the war in Iraq. (CNS photo from NBC) ater Piece for Singers, Players and reprising the devotion before young convert. compassionate heart Dancers." Mass heard at the start of the "'He's a rising star, you know,' the priest would that served him well Bernstein's "Mass" premiered composition, "Sing God a secret say in his thick Irish brogue and a sense of delight in a business not particularly known for its kindon Sept. 8, 1971, as the inaugural songlLauda, Laude (praise, usually reserved for one's own son. 'He's going ness," wrote Weber, who now works for the Dioperformance opening the . praise).". _ places. He's ,big,'" he wrote. cese of Wichita. "One of the last images of Dave Kennedy Center. During his short time at KWCH, Bloom was a scene from an Iraqi battlefield where he took In the series of eveningsym- .: The performance at Catholic posiums preceding the perfor- known as "Bloomy" in the newsroom, according off his headset and gave it to a soldier who then University, billed as the first an- mances, faculty from various de- to Weber - was a 25-year-old cub reporter. beamed as he talked to his wife about their newnual President's Concert, featured partments· of the university disAs a reporter, he was naturally skeptical about born baby." . some 300 students of the univer- cussed the turbulence of the I 960s anything and everything. He asked lots of quesWeber said Father Blackledge "was rightfully sity choir, chorus and orchestra, that set a .framework for tions, including the tough questions. proud of his young convert." with music school dean Murry Bernstein's composition - the "As far as I know, he didn't wear his religion "He knew - as I did - that Dave Bloom was Sidlin conducting and profes- civil rights movement, the Peace on his sleeve, but he lived it every day," Weber one of the good guys," he added. "It makes me sional singer Douglas Webster in Corps, growing divisions over the wrote. "More than once we would sit in the news- smile to think of the two of them together in the lead role as the celebrant. war in Vietnam, the sexual revo- room late at night after he'd reported on some trag- heaven." Webster is regarded as foremost lution, psychedelic-drugs, the asinterpreter of the role and played sassinations of John F. Kennedy, it when "Mass" was performed at the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., the Vatican in 2000. quirky cop-crook dynamics but classification is A-II - adults and Robert F. Kennedy and Malcolm . "Mass" is an eclectic 100- X, the riots at the 1968 Demo- eventually bogs down in complex adolescents. The Motion Picture plotting and a morally ambiguous Association of America rating is minute piece that draws on mod- cratic Convention, the Berrigan ern American jazz. blues and rock brothers and the peace movement, resolution. Some violence, an PG - parental guidance sugmoti fs as well as the classical the Weather Underground, the implied affair and sexual refer- gested. styles tra9itionally associated Black Panthers, the National "The Man Without a Past" ences, fleeting nudity, brief drug with mu·sical compositions of the Guard killing of four students at abuse and much rough language. (Sony Classics) Mass. Droll Finnish tale in which a Kent State University in Ohio The USCCB Office for Film & It portrays growing doubts and, for Catholics, the Second Broadcasting classification is A- man (Markku Peltola) who was about faith in the congregation, Vatican Council. IV - adults, with reservations. mugged stumbles out of a (c~, ~'I()vii(e beginning in a series of tropes, or Summarizing those events, The Motion Picture Association Helsinki hospital without any interpolated passages, after the political scientist Michael Foley of America rating is R --' re- memory, money or ID to live "Confiteor" in which blues and said a strong sense of hope charstricted. among kindly poor folk where he ICaIIV~Ulllle~ rock singers question the myster- acterizing the early '60s gave way "Holes" (Disney) meets a prim Salvation Army ies of sin. repentance and faith. to increasing tension and polarNEW YORK (CNS) - The An innocent youngster (Shia worker (Kati Outinen) but evenOne sings, "What I say I don't ization as peaceful movements for following are capsule reviews of LaBeouf) is sent to a desert re- tually discovers his unwanted feel/What I feel I don't showl change were met by violent resis- movies recently reviewed by the form camp where the teens are identity. Writer-director Aki What I show isn't· real/What is tance and parts of those move- U.S. Conference of Catholic forced to dig hundreds of holes, Kaurismaki observes his stoic real, Lord - I don't know." ments themselves became more Bishops' Office for Film and but with the help of a runaway pal characters with considerable The doubt turns into open chal- radical and violent. (Khleo Thomas), he outsmarts the deadpan wit and a gentle compasBroadcasting. lenges to faith as the trope follow. snarly camp owner (Sigourney . sion that upends the cliche of a Msgr. Stephen Happel, dean of "The Good Thier' ing the "Credo" is titled "Non religious studies, said "Mass" reWeaver) and mean overseer (Jon man-with-amnesia plot. Brief vio(Fox Searchlight) Credo" ("I don't believe"), and it flected many of those currents. An addicted ex-con (Nick Voight). Based on Louis Sachar's lence and an off-screen suicide. reaches a crescendo at the "Agnus "Some hated it. Others saw it as Nolte) kicks his habit in order to adventure-packed novel, the film Subtitles. The USCCB Office for Dei" as its final phrase, "Dona prophetic and moving into a new mastermind an elaborate heist in- uses flashbacks to detail a cen- Film & Broadcasting classificaIlobis pacem," builds from a quiet paradigm." VOlving the Monte Carlo casino, tury-old family curse. Director tion is A-II - adults and adolesprayer for peace to a raucous, inBy manipulating different complicated by a flaky teen side- Andrew Davis offers abundant cents. The Motion Picture Assosistent demand: "Give us peace genres of music and playing them kick (Nutsa Kukhianidze) and a plotting and nifty visuals, offset ciation of America rating is PGnow and we don't mean later.... off against one another, he said, suspicious detective (Tcheky by some undernourished charac- 13 - parents are strongly cauDalla nobis, Dona nobis. ... Give Bernstein "gave impetus to what Karyo) dogging his every move. terizations._Brief violence and a tioned. Some material may be inus something or we'll just start was done with Catholic music for Writer-director Neil Jordan's crass expression. The USCCB appropriate for children under taking." the next 15 years." heist caper has a clever set-up and Office for Film & Broadcasting 13. WICHITA, Kan. - David Bloom, the NBC N~ws reporter who died of a pulmonary embolism April 6 while covering the war in Iraq, was baptized a Catholic by a Wichita priest, now deceased, who saw him as "a rising star." Bloom met Father Michael Blackledge, a priest of the Diocese of Wichita, after joining the staff of KWCH-TV, NBC's affiliate in Wichita, 14 years ago. In addition to baptizing Bloom,

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Cardinal raps senator's vote against federal ban on partial-birth abortion By GEORGE P. MATYSEK JR. CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

BAI..TIMORE - Cardinal William H. Keeler of Baltimore criticized a vote against a federal ban on partial-birth abortion by Sen. BarbaraA. Mikulski, a Catholic Democrat who lives in his archdiocese. "I am deeply troubled by your continuing insistence that ,such a heinous procedure should be available in the United States of America," Cardinal Keeler said in a letter to Mikulski. The Senate vote March 13 to enact a ban passed 64-33. Also voting against a ban was Maryland's senior senator, Democrat Paul S. Sarbanes, a member of the Greek Olthodox Church.. The bill, which President Bush has said he will sign, prohibits doctors from committing an "ovelt act" designed to kill a partially delivered fetus. The bill includes an exception in cases where the procedure is necessary to save the life of the mother.

In his letter, Cardinal Keeler said the bill describes the procedure with great precision, "so as to avoid any possible confusion with other abortion procedures not covered by the ban." . Charging that partial-birth abortion '''has ,no place in a decent and compassionate society," the cardinal told Mikulski, "The new federal bill that you voted against incorporates congressional findings from medical expert testimony that partial-birth abortion is never necessary to protect the health of a woman; and, indeed, that it exposes women to substantial and additional health risks." A former chairman of the U.S. . bishops' Committee on Pro-Life Activities, Cardinal Keeler pointed to the "moral horror" of partial-birth abortion by highlighting the case of an Arizona infant who survived the procedure. ' He noted that, according to an American Medical Association summary of medical literature on fetal pain, children are receptive to ,

pain as early as 18 weeks' gestation and continuing thereafter. Despite the claims of supporters, of legal abortion, Cardinal Keeler said it is not true that partial-birth abortion is used "only very rarely." He cited a January survey of abortion providers completed by the Alan Guttmacher Institute, an affiliate of Planned Parenthood, that estimated that 2,200 partial-birth abortions were performed in the year 2doo. ' He also quoted the executive director of the National Coalition of Abortion Providers as saying that the "vast majority" ofpartial-birth abortions are completed on "a healthy mother with a healthy fetus that is 20 weeks or more along." "Every single partial-birth abortion procedure destroys the life of a real child - a unique child with a unique destiny," Cardinal Keeler said. . "I regret that once again you did not see fitto vote in favor ofthe ban," he told Mikulski, a graduate of the

Vatican says collapse of Saddam's regime offers opportunity for Iraq VATICAN CITY (CNS) As Baghdad and other Iraqi cities fell to U.S.-led forces, the Vatican said the collapse of President Saddam Hussein's regime was an opportunity for the Iraqi people and offered to help in the massive humanitarian task that lies ahead. At the same time, Church officials said the reconstruction of Iraq was a job for the international community, not for a single country. They expressed alarm that the fighting so, far had left a power vacuum, which set off widespread looting in major cities. The Vatican's official reaction to the fall of Baghdad emphasized hopes for the future rather than the devastation of a war the Holy See strongly opposed. It said the departure of Saddam's government marked a "significant opportunity for the

population's future." , war developments. "No~ that Iraq's material, poCardinal Joseph Ratzinger, the litical and social reconstruction is Vatican's top doctrinal official, coming into view, the Catholic said that the "result is happier than Church is ready, to lend the nec- could ,have been thought." He said essary assistance through its so- the conflict "could have ended cial and charitable institutions," differently," especially considerthe Vatican said. ing the possible threat of the use A top U.S. official who met of chemical weapons. with Vatican officials last week In the post-war period, the carsaid Church leaders had made dinal said, "It is important that the "concrete proposals" on how reconstruction of Iraq is not carCatholic groups in Iraq could help ned out by just one power but by distribute much-needed humani- all nations: It is a common respontarian aid. The official, John R. sibility of all of us for this torBolton, U.S. undersecretary of mented country." . state for arms control and inter" national security, did not detail the proposals but called the meeting "constructive and helpful." Other Vatican officials welcomed the apparent winding down of the Iraqi conflict, but said the international community needed a stronger voice in post-

Institute of Notre Dame and Mount St. Agnes College in Baltimore. "I pray that our representatives in Congress will follow the Senate's lead and vote to ban this tenible procedure." Cardinal Keeler has repeatedly sought the support of Maryland's delegation to the U.S. Senate to

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Native son missionary bishop -returns to Massachusetts roots By MIKE GORDON ANCHOR STAFF

FALL RIVER - For 45 years, Bishop Donald Joseph Leo Pelletier,. M.S., of the Diocese of Morondava, Madagascar, has been serving the people of Africa. He has traveled to remote villages spreading the Gospel, helped to build schools and churches to serve c;ommunities of new Catholics and dug more than ~~ 100 wells fqr'drinking watt<r, but MARY KILARSKI of. Hammond, Ind., prays during 'a he's not slowing down just yet. candlelight vigil for peace and for U.S. troops at St. Thomas During a recent, two-month-visit . More Church in Munster. Pope John Paull! prayed for!=l quick to the Fall River diocese to see end to the war and said he was especially worried about the friends and family, he dropped in to "defenseless civilian· population." (CNS photo' by Karen The Anchor to tillk about life in the LOCAL. VILLAGERS build a church in the Diocese of Callaway, Northwest Indiana Catholic) Morondava, Madagascar, as Bishop Donald Pelletier M.S., looks African country. Born in East Blackstone in 1941, on. He was recently in the Fall River diocese to visit friendsand the 72-year-old bishop says "faith relatives and spread the word about his mission. keeps him going," and that even though visiting the small communi- people are very generous wi'th the ture. Only 20 percent of the native ties takes a lot of energy it's been "a little they have and are enthusiastic people are. Catholic with most pracwhole lifetime of wonderful ser- about their faith. vice." . Masses sometimes will run for ticing Anamism, the belief that all . Bishop Pel1etier was ordained a several hours and include lots of. objects have a soul or spirit. The mission was founded by priest Oct. 28, 1956 after making his singing. Because many who attend . religious profession as Missionary travel on foot an average of 25 min- Americans in 1928, but now there utes to be there, it becomes a social are only four Americans left of that of La Salette in 1951. By LISA GULINO project." . He traveled' to Madagascar, the gathering as well as spirituai one original group. Priests serving DIOCESAN DIRECTOR' OF .. The rosar.y directs the mind world's fourth largest island, when · according to Bishop Pelletier. Morondava now are from India and ADULT EDUCATION and heart of the one praying to he was 27-years-old after studying "It's important to give them a liv- Poland, and many are native men .J?espite the hectic; pace of so- recall the mystery of Christ and for two years in Rome. He was ing faith," he declared. who have come under the wing of ciety today, the ceaseless, swirl- his saving works. A distinguish-' asked to serve the missions for five There,are 18 different ethnic Bishop Pelletier who was ordained ing images and sounds of mass' ing mark of Christian spiritual- years initially, but the need was so groups in Madagascar, but only one bishop on Feb. 13,2000. media and instant communica- ity is' the disciple's dedication to . great and still is, thathe has made it language, Malagasy. It has been a . There are currently 12 men in the tions capabilities, the human 'be ever more con formed to a lifetime of service. real challenge to bring people to- minor seminary and eight in the spirit naturalfy seeks peace'and Jesus Christ. In these words one.' "The country is still very poor," gether for worship because of the major seminary preparing for the quiet. The image of the well- recognizes the call of St. Paul said the bishop. "The average in- remoteness of many villages, but priesthood. "One of my happiest known commel:cial showing a to "put on the mind of Christ." come is only $50 a month.'" · "the Lord is working here," said the moments is when local boys become woman frantic with the busy- By meditating upon the life qf Currently there are many projects bishop. "We have a lot to be grate- priests," said the bishop. "It's a very ness and noise of daily life cry- Jesus, with the company of .underway to build churches and ful for. There is tremendous progress satisfying moment to see young men ing out "Calgon take me away!" Mary, we encounter the face of schools throughout the large terri- . in the Church." I've been able to help and guide be comes to mind. Contemporary Christ - the face marked by 'tory as wel1 as medical centers where . Currently they have 52 nuns ordai!1ed." culture is witnessing an in- moments of joy, light, sorrow people living in the tropical climate. working in the diocese with 10 more Another joyful event is to see creased interest" in things 'spiri- and glory. . can get medicine and see a doctor. coming in. There are 28 priests and young people involved in the Cathotual and a desire for quiet reflec"We can't keep up with the qe- 180 catechists. Priests travel as the lic schools go on to the .university. St. Luke records that Mary tion. Individuals. communities "kept all these things, ponder- mand," he asserted. As he spoke, he bishop does to serve the many vil- In 1958 there were 200 in schools and nations all seek peace. ing them in her heart." The Holy pointed out buildings under con- lages. "It's a big island," the bishop run by religious sisters. Today there As our fragile world pines for Father observes, "Against the' structioninphotoshehadtaken.One said. "There are 20 dioceses .in are more than 3,000 and the bishop peace, Catholics are again re c background of the words of the showed native people carrying lum- Madagascar and it's challenging says they coul.d have even more minded and urged to take up the · Hail Mary the principal events bel' across a river while another was because'there are no roads:' He trav- growth. rosary and pray for world peace. of the life of Jesus Christ pass of those same people building a els in a four-wheel-drive truck to Bishop Pelletier has also built When Pope John Paul II de- before 'the eyes of the soul. They church for their village. · visit villages where people do not homes for religious sisters and clared this the Year of the Ro- put us in living communion with The bishop said it's important for have electricity, running water or founded an organization that cares sary, he reminded the People of Jesus through --'- we might say the people to have a hand in build- decent homes. The island is about for people with physical and mental God to seek from the Father the · - the heart of his mother. At ing.churches and schools because the size of Texas and is home to ap- disabilities. gift of peace. The Holy Father the same time our heart can em- they feel that it belongs to them and proximately 15 million people He's planning on visiting St. writes, "At the start of the mil- brace in the decades of ihe 1'0- the community. He added that the. whose prim.ary work is in agricul- Louis and New York before returnlennium which began with the sary all the events that make up ing to Madagascar on May 8. This terrifying attacks of September the lives of individuals, families, trip, he says, has not only been a Ii, 2001, a millennium which nations, the Church, and all huchance to rest and rejuvenate himwitnesses every day in llUmer- manity." self, but to also spread the word ous parts of 'the world, fresh One discovers the reality of about his· mission to people in the scenes of bloodshed and vio- their own life, their own history United States. lence, to rediscover the rosary and their own future linked toWith plans for more schools means to: immerse oneself in gether, caught up as it w~re in and churches to be built, he hopes contemplation of the mystery of the joyful, luminous, sorrowful that people might be able to help Christ who is our peace. Con- and glorious mysterfes of the ropush those to completion with dosequently, one cannot recite the sary. nations. rosary without feeling caught up The pope adds, "thus the "It's been nice to come back' to in a clear commitment of ad- simple prayer of the' rosaryvisit and good to be here out of the vancing peace." marks the rhythm of human heat, but my friends and my family The rosary is by its nature a life." and my home are there. You're pm1 prayer for peace because at its The Office of Adult Educaof the family there. It's been a vel)' core is the contemplation of tion will be hosting Rosary good experience." Christ, the Prince of Peace. The . Holy Hours throughout the Donations to help the mission in pope writes, "Anyone who as- Diocese of Fall River during -the diocese of Morondava should be BISHOP' DONALD Pelletier blesses the cornerstone for a marked accordingly and sent to similates the mystery of Christ the 'month of May. Please join new church in Morandavo, Madagascar where he has been· Bishop Donald Pelletier, La Salette - and this is clearly the goal of us for prayers for world peace: the rosary - learns the secret ·For mo're information call 508- a missionary for 45 ye~rs. The Diocese of Morandavo is one. Shrine, 947 Park Street, Attleboro, of peace and makes it his life's 678-2828. . of 28 on the .Iarge island. MA 02703.

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I the ~ , Immigration restrictions jeopardize -- other key interests, bishop says Friday, April 18, 2003

By

PATRICIA ZAPOR

CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

WASHINGTON - Immigration controls instituted since the Scptember II terrorist attacks have upset a delicate balance between security and the U.S. tradition of welcoming immigrants and now jeopardize other long-term national interests, said the chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Migration. Bishop Nicholas A. DiMarzio of Camden, N.J., told a conference of immigration lawyers and advocates recently that because of the attacks "many were wil1ing to exchange freedoms for protection, an illusory compromise." U.S. economic, cultural and social interests now and into the future are at risk because of policies that forsake the country's immigrant heritage and the American open society, Bishop DiMarzio said. As examplcs, hc cited thc cnactment of thc USA Patriot Act, which gives the attorney gencral broad powers to detain people based upon "rcasonable grounds to belicvc" they arc involvcd in tcrrorist activity, and indcfi-

nitely detain them even after the historic U.S. policy of welthey are exonerated ()f terrorism coming immigrants - requires involvement. Administrative careful navigation, he said. policies target people from cer"Considering the evidence tain countries and cal1 for asy- before us, it seems clear that our lum seekers to be dctained, elected and appointed officials while refugec admissions have have not been respectful of this f:.llen to their lowest level in balance," he said, "and now it decades, Bishop DiMarzio said. jeopardizes our long-term na"The question about these ac- tional security interests" of ecotions is, firs't, are they designed nomic, cultural and social diverto make us safer, or is there an- sity. The new Department of other agenda afoot?" he asked. "Are they designed to root out , Homeland Sec.urity, which enterrorists or路 to terrorize immi- compassed the former Immigragrant commu'nities?" tion and Naturalization Service Bishop DiMarzio told the au- among dozens of other agencies dience of about 200 people that it absorbed, must not be al10wed the U.S. bishops recognize the to chill the environment for imright and responsibility of the migrants so that they are disgovernment to protect its citi- couraged from coming to the zens. That would apply to some country, he said. "We must resist the temptasecurity efforts such as better screening, sha'ri!1g of informa- tion to construct a fortress tion among agencies, document America which permanently alfraud prevention 'and monitoring ters our fundamental character of people who overstay visas, he as an immigrant nation and an open society," the bishop said. said. He drew a parallel between But other steps, including blanket detention policies, sus- , the' current situation and the World War II-era order by Presipe~ding due process and mass deportations, demand closer dent Franklin D. Roosevelt perscrutiny, Bishop DiMarzio said. . mitting internment of al1 people Balancing the two sets of in- of Japanese ancestry. "This decision was viewed at terests - national security and

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the time as a reasonable response to a threat of national security," said Bishop DiMarzio. But in 1982 a congressional report conclud~d that the detention was the result of "race prejudice, war hysteria and the failure of politicallea'dership."

"Sixty years after Pearl Harbor, we are not being mindful of the lessons of history," Bishop DiMarzio said, "Sacrificing our values and identity as a nation of immigrants wil1 not necessarily make us safer, but wil1 certainly make us weaker, an outcome any terrorist craves."

Sisters ofSain.t Joseph of r.Boston Your donations are used for our ministries and the care of our retired Sisters. Please send your donations to: The Sisters of Saint Joseph of Boston Office of Development 637 Cambridge Street Brighton MA 02135路2801 617.746.2114

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PRACTICE THE DEVOTION OF THE FIRST SATURDAYS, AS REQUESTED BY OUR LADY OF FATIMA

On December'10, 1925, Our Lady appeared to Sister Lucia (seer of Fatima) and spoke these words: "Announce in my name that / promise to assist at the hour ofdeath with the graces necessary for the salvation oftheir souls, all those who on the first Saturday of five consecutive months s~all: 1. Go to confession; 2. Receive Holy Communion; 3. Recite the Rosary (5 decades); and 4. Keep me company for /5 minutes while meditating on the 15 mysteries ofthe Rosary, with the intention of making reparation to me." In a spirit of reparation, the above conditions are each to be preceded by the words: "In reparation for the offenses committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary:' Confessions may be made during 8 days before or after the first Saturday, and Holy Communion may be received at either the morning or evening Mass on the first Saturday.

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f MEMBERS OF the Coyle and Cassidy High School Senior Physics Team display the trophy ,they took home for capturing first place in the Eastern Massachusetts Physics Olym.pies. They are joined by Headmaster Dennis R.Poyant.

Friday, April 18, 2003

MEGHAN'FLIGHT, a parishioner of St. Rita's, Marion,' tenuQuslyfeeds a cow during avorunteer visit at the Glenmary Farm in Vanceburg, Ky. Flight was one of several students from St. Anselm College in N~w Hampshire to travel to the farm to participate in an immersion program of the Glenmary Home Missioners.

Coyle Physics Tealll aces tou,rney TAUNTON.- It was a long besting ,runner-up Dover day of intense competition involv- Sherburn by 40 points, Events ing eight different challenging' included Pictionary in which stuevents, but in t~e end the mem- dents had to identify physics terhers of the Coyle and Cassidy minology and Junk Yard Wars High School Senior Physics Team ' where students we're challenged were award winners taking first to create a gizmo to propel an place at the Eastern Massachu- object the farthest. setts Physics Olympics, , - . The team members are: The team placed first with an Meredith Conant, David Grant, overall score of 715 points, Allyce Sullivan, Kevin Crowley,

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Kyle Bradbury, Amy Chase and Nicholas Bernier. . Members of the Juilior Physics Team also competed in the event taking first place for constructing a marble roller coaster. Team members are: Justine Hill, Sean Henry, Patrick Rodenbush; Michael StIinger, Christopher Des,rochers, Brendan Ducth, Kevin Correia and Jessica DiCarlo.

. ~ EIGHTH-GRADE students路 Michael Lopes 'and Randy Medeiros of Holy Family-Holy, Name School, New Bedford, act out the play "Back There," by Rod Serling during a路recent performance for parents and students.

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SISTER OF Mercy Suzanne White, dressed as a tube of Crest toothpaste, addresses students at St. Anthony School on the importance of dental hygie'ne. Sister White teaches presGhool at the New'Bedford school: '

SSe Peter and Paul seeks lDissing alumni 'FALL RIVER - SS. Peter and Paul School is searching for missing alumni from the class of 1928. A special event is being planned to acknowledge the 75 'h armiversary of their graduation. , Information is needed on. the following class members: Fred Beggs, Louis Carr, Raymond Doherty, Eileen Dwy~r, Warren Fitzgerald, Irene, Cuillot, Lawrence Lewis" Walburg . McNamara, Eleanor Murphy, Veronica O'Brien, Jam'es Powers, . LORRAINE CHAREST of Bishop Stang High School, is Kenneth Russell, Margret Smith, congratulated by students Kristin Hetzler and Racine Silva Grace Sullivan, Williahl Sullivan during a Faculty Appreciation Tea. Charest is a member of and Arthur Turcotte.' : If you have any i~fo~mation the World Language Department and a 1963 graduate of the please call 508-672-7258. North Dartmouth school. . I'

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Youth religiosity seen as factor in low tobacco, alcohol, drug use WASHINGTON (CNS) - A as various family and school probnew study indicates that religios- lems. ity serves as a buffering agent for As part of the study, students adolescents that keeps them away were told, "Here are some quesfrom tobacco, alcohol and drug tions on what you think about things. Read each one, and circle use. "Those adolescents who a number to show what you think." viewed religion as a meaningful They were asked to respond on a part of their life and a way to cope scale of one to four, ranging from with problems were half as likely "not at all important" to "a little to use drugs than (were) adoles- important" to "pretty important" to cents who didn't view religion as "very important." The statements they were asked important," the study said. The study was published in the to evaluate in this way were: ''To March issue of thejournal Psychol- believe in God"; "To be able to rely on religious teachings when you ogy ofAddictive Behaviors. The study's results were com- have a problem"; ''To be able to parable for students in grades seven tum to prayer when you're facing through 10, the grades involved in a personal problem"; and ''To rely the study, and among ethnic types, on your religious beliefs as a guide although Caucasians did not score for day-to-day living." Religious belief has been found quite as high as African-Americans and Hispanics. The results in past studies to result in lower also cut across types of families: substance abuse rates among those with both parents at home, adults. Religiosity is just one buffer single-parent fami lies, and "blended" families with one par- against substance use. Family support is another, Wills said. "Finanent and one stepparent. The buffering effeets of religi- cial resources can be a buffer if osity were a bit more pronounced you're unemployed," he said. ''At the individual level, bufffor girls than for boys, but only in later adolescence. Thomas Ashby ering could occur because religiWills, one of the three Albert osity affects attitudes and- values. Einstein School of Medicine pro- For example, religiosity may be fessors who conducted the study, related to perceived meaning and said these effects were not consis- purpose in life," the study said, and tent all the way through the study. could also be related to values and The study looked at 1,182 pub- attitudes about substance use. lic school students in the New York These factors could moderate the metropolitan area who were rep- impact of negative life events." The study added, "In theory, resentative of the New York state population. The interviews were buffering might also occur beeause conducted once a year for four of (people's) relations to coping years as the students went from processes, social networks, or both. seventh through 10th grade, so re- Religiosity may influence the way searchers could track their physi- people tend to cope with problems cal and social development as well and their perceptions about the as their response to such stresses coping functions ofsubstance use."

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The heart's wisdom and kindness By CHARLIE FOR ALWAYS

I close my eyes And there in the shadows I see your light You come to me out of my dreams across the night You take my hand, though you may be so many stars away I know that our spirits and souls are one We've circled the moon, and we've touched'the sun So here we'll stay For always, forever Beyond here and unto eternity For always, forever For us there's no time and no space No burial our love won't erase Wherever you go I still know in my heart You will be with me From this day on I'm certain that I'll never be alone I know what my heart must've always known That love has a power that's all its own And for always, forever Now we can fly And for always and always We will go beyond goodbye For always, forever Beyond here and unto eternity For always and ever You'll be a part of me And for always, forever A thousand tomorrows may cross the sky And for always and always We'll go on beyond goodbye Sung by Josh Groban Copyright (c) 2002 by Warner Bros. If you follow this column, you know that I welcome suggestions from readers. This is how I heard of Josh Groban. A reader in Mt.

MARTIN • CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

Pleasant, Iowa, E-mailed and told me how much his recordings have helped her face challenges in her life. She recommended that I review his "For Always." This song first appeared as part of the soundtrack from the Steven Spielberg film "Artificial Intelligence." In this version, Groban and Lara Fabian delivered a duet. A more recent recording is offered on his CD "John Groban in

that can affect any rcality. Each of us is a min-or image of the Creator. Consequently, we participate in God's design to 1111 our world with love. Of course, fear often enters our minds with a different message. Fear, wanting us to be calculating and measured, cautions us not to reach out to others. I've wlitten many times about how teens have many oppol1unities to touch others' lives. I hope that you have thought about the positive difference you can make for others by listening to the promptings of your heart. I want to make one further suggestion. When it comes to picking a career, first consider this question: How can I offer more of the power of my heart to the world? Put aside concerns about income and retirement plans. Those concerns do require consideration. But when it comes to following Jesus, we need to consider paths and opp0l1unities that will help bring his vision and teachings to others. Concert." The disc comes packDuring our lives, most of us aged with an 80-minute DVD of will spend more time at work than the perfonnance. Audiences in any other endeavor (including everywhere applaud the quality of sleep!). What will be the ways that Groban's vocals and the way he projeets his personality through his you make a "for always" contribution to God's family? music. Life does bring uncel1ainties The song makes a strong and unknowns regarding the statement about the power of love. future. Nonetheless, the most It emphasizes that no matter what important time is "now," the occurs in a relationship, once we present. How will you follow the have truly loved another the bond wisdom that your "heart must've with this person always remains. always known"? How will you fill For the person in the song, this the present time with love? insight comes when he realizes Your comments are always that "I know what my heart welcome. Please write to me at: must've always known that love has a power that's all its own." The chmartin@swindiana.net or at song's message is true: The heart's 7125W 2008, Rockport, IN 47635. wisdom and kindness are a power

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Television violence and aggression By

EFFIE CALDAROLA

CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

You're dipping another greasy, salty fly into the catsup when your mom reminds you of the old maxim, "You are what you eal." Personally, this adage always stlUck me as silly. Yes, I know I should eat healthy stuff versus junk food, but does it really persuade me if I envision myself as a plump green pepper rather than a bag of Dolitos? There's a study out that puts some teeth into a play on that old saying, however. You are what you continually watch on television and at the movies. In the March issue of the journal Developmelltal Psychology, a study by psychologist L. Rowell Huesman and colleagues at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Resem'Ch presents a

marked con'Clation between the amount of violence people watch as kids and how aggressive they become later in life. Over the years, studies on viewing and violence have come up with mixed results, but the weight of research always has pointed to what seems like common sense: There's a relationship between seeing constant violence and being overly aggressive. Now with this exhaustive study, which used 329 adults who initially were surveyed as children in the late I970s and then followed, it seems we have a pretty good case for monitoring our viewing habits. The study found that for men mld women, the "high TV-violence viewers" were more likely than others in the study to have shoved someone, punched, beaten or

choked an adult or committed a crime or moving traffic violation in the past 12 months. The researchers recommended that parents restrict viewing of -=~":l1

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of Age violence by toddlers through preteens as much as possible. That included the violence of cartoons and superheroes as well. None of us can go back and eliminate the violence we saw as toddlers and pre-teens. But we can monitor the entertainment we see now, and we can honestly think about how culture's steady diet of violence is shaping us.

I'm old enough to remember the old cowboy-and-Indian shoot .em ups. There was no such thing as political correctness then, and the Indians, never called Native Americans, were often portrayed as the bad guys and killed. Did this make me a violent person? I don't think of myself as such, but it's too easy to simply say, "I saw a lot of Indians get shot, and it didn't affect me." For one thing, I've spent years trying to understand the root causes of prejudice in myself and in our national character. And violence is depicted more graphically every year. For example, TV deaths in the 1950s were bloodless. Today, graphic, bloody depictions of death and dismembennent are typical fare. Violence is not only gratuitous and plentiful, but it's often offered as the only or best solution to

problems and conflict. The "bad" guy is often so totally evil that we are urged to feel no compulsion in seeing him blown away. It's not the occasional escapist film, but the steady banllge of this violence that wears down our sensitivity. I love eating chips. I think that old commercial jingle, "Bet you can't eat just one," was probably written with me in mind. An occasional serving of chips spices up a meal. But if I continually give in to my chips compulsion, I'll soon see the results in my skin, energy level and waistline. Worse, thel'C would be l'Cpercussions not immediately evident in the con'Osive, clogging effect on my cardiovascular system. It shouldn't take a university study to convince us a steady diet of media violence will have just as cOI1'osive an effect on our Spilit.

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The story of the Apostles: JaDles the Less By JOHN

Over there: How parishes can help the deployed and theirfamilies: NORTH DARTMOUTH who have been in similar situThe diocesan Office of Fam- ations (e.g. Desert Storm, Vietily Ministry has released a se- nam); '. ries of ideas that area parishes .- organize' gatherings of can utilize to assist deployed families of the deployed milisoldiers and their families. The 'tary so that they can get to' list was compiled by the Na- know one another; , ' tional Association of Catholic - allow children to gather Family Life Ministers. in the school,'religious,educa"At the same time that we :tion or other supervised parish. pray for a rapid end to this war, 'setting to discuss their con-' itis important to recognize the cems for a deployed parent; , tremendous sacrifices being - organize,baby-sitting for made by our troops and their parents so that they can have families and to offer them sup~ time to shop, go to the movies port," said Scottie and Jerry or just spend some quiet time; Foley, directors of the dioc-think of w'ays to aid famiesan Office of Family Minis- lies who may be'experiencing try. "Perhaps something on financial difficulties while this list will suggest a way for, their family member is deparishes, schools and other or- ploy,ed; , ganizations to do that." --,- put together a "crisis - conduct a weekly service team" to visit families if a famto pray for deployed members ily,member is reported as missof the parish; ing-in-action, wounded or - determine who the de- killed. ployed family members in ''These suggestions offer your parish are, by creating a ' parishes, schools, religious book of special intentions for education classes and other ormilitary personnel and their. ganizations practical ways families. If numbers pe~mit,' they can be of physical,. moral ' include the names in the Gen- and spiritual support during, eral Intercessions at Mass; this difficult times," said the - designate someone to Foleys. "No matter what our drop regular notes of support attitude toward the war may from the parish to the person be, our military personnel and who is away, and to maintain their families are making a treregular contact with the fam- mendous ,sacrifice and deserve ily; our support." - have children and adults To learn more about the put together "care packages" National Association of for parishioners overseas; Catholic Family Life Minis- form support groups for ters and their resources for family members of military families, visit their Website at personnel; recruit parishioners www.nacflm.org. '

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After watching an Indiana Jones movie, I became interested in the holy grail. Is it a real artifact? Has it been found? -Gregory Dear Gregory, That artifact has been the object of countless legends and crusades. It has not been found. More than likely, it never will. The "cup" of Matt. 26:27 was probably a very plain vessel, as were most drinking bowls of that period.

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Dr. lohn Heird is a Bible historian and archaeologist. He is a writer and lecturer on biblical backgrounds and the devel(Jpment director for the Diocese of Little Rock. Write him at drdig@lampcom.com.

ST. JAMES THE LESS

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including terrorist activities. (Imagine discussions around the family table: One son was a traitor to Israel and the other was in constant danger of arrest by the Romans. Poor Alphaeus must have longed for daughters!) But in actuality, both brothers, in the power of the risen Christ, were effective witnesses and workers for the Gospel. James is given as one of the Lord's disciples in the upper room after ' Christ's ascension (Acts 1:13). It was to James that Peter wanted news of his miraculous escape transmitted (Acts 12: 17), and James seems to have been regarded as the head of the fledging Church of Jerusalem. It was also he who suggested only four Jewish practices be imposed on· Gentiles wishing to be followers of Christ, reaching a compromise with Paul (Acts 15: 13-21). Paul reported to him and sought his approval several times. Many scholars think this James is the James of the Epistle of James, who opens the letter by calling himself, "servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ," , which may indicate it was an official title. Here scholars divide among the persons belonging to the name. James the Greater, James the brother of the Lord, and the James who was the authority figure of the early Jerusalem Church are all interspersed in tradition and historical accounts. However, after a productive time of ministry and leadership, James the Less, son of Alphaeus, the leader of the Jerusalem Church, was, according to the second-century writer Hegesippus, thrown from the pinnacle of the Temple in Jerusalem, and then stoned to death by the Pharisees. If we can learn one fact from the power of Christ, it is this: even the most divided families can be united in his love. Happy Digging! Ask Dr. Dig

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The next apostle on our "Journey of the Twelve" is James the Less. Once again we face the challenge of studying an apostle about whom little is known except his name. Even that is a point of enigma. He is referred to as James the Less to indicate he is not James, the brother of John. However, once again we will see the message proclaimed is greater than the man himself. The apostles preached, proclaimed and defended to the death Jesus Christ and his Gospel. The Bible tells us little about James, the son of Alphaeus, but from tradition and historical records we can see the disciple as a faithful soldier of Christ. James was also the brother of the better-known Matthew, the tax collector turned Apostle. Through careful study and inference' in Scripture, many scholars accept that James and Matthew were brothers who violently disagreed over politics and religion. James more than likely never accepted his brother's employment as a Roman government worker. Ma~ew supported the Roman Empire by taking money from his own people through taxation. As a result he brought shame upon his family and heritage as a Levi. In contrast, most scholars agree James chose to be identified with the Zealots, a fanatical patriotic Jewish group whose single purpose was to overthrow the rule of Rome by every means

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