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VOL. 46, NO. 10

• Friday, March 8, 2002

Southeastern Massachusetts' Largest Weekly • $14 Per Year

FALL RIVER, MASS.

Vocations 'booklet available, holy hour planned By

MIKE GORDON ANCHOR STAFF

FALL RIVER - Father Craig Pregana, director of the Diocesan Vocation Office, recently announced that a "Holy Hour for Vocations" booklet is now available. , Compiled by the Diocesan Vocation Council and Father Pregana, the booklet contains· communal prayer which may be used by parish vocation teams as well as private prayers for parishioners who are looking to structure prayer time around vocations. It has prayers for a holy hour split into seven sections of read!ngs and they may be used with music where appropriate. "We're very happy with the booklet," said Father Pregana, adding· that a lot of work went into it. ''The council and I are very pleased and we hope it encourages prayer for vocations to priestly and religious life. It's an essential part of parish life and of our ministry as priests." He went on to say that during Lent and especially on Holy Thursday we celebrate the institution of the priesthood at the Last Supper. Many parishes have holy hours that evening and the booklet will help them offer prayers for vocations. "Holy Thursday is when our Lord instituted the priesthood," said Father Pregana. The "Holy Hour for Vocations" booklet and praying for more people to answer God's call is important because "the Gospel tells us to. Our future priests and religious come from our parishes," said Father Pregana. "Pray for vocations." When asked what young people considering a vocation should do, Father Pregana said they should definitely talk to someone about it and pray. "Pray and do something about it." The booklet includes a section entitled "Litany for Vocations," and parishioners will find seven prayers for vocations in the back of the publication as well as selected Scripture passages relating to the call. On April 21 at the conclusion of the Continental Congress for North America, focusing this year on vocations, a holy hour will be held at St. Mary's Cathedral at 3 p.m. Cosponsored by the

SCOUTS HONOR - Boy and Girl Scouts from parishes throughout the Fall River diocese recited the Scouting Oath during a Religious Emblem Ceremony Sunday at St. Mary's Cathedral in Fall River. (Anchor photo)

Scouts and leaders cited at Religious Emblem Ceremony By DEACON JAMES N. DUNBAR FALL RIVER - Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts and their adult leaders from the across the Fall River diocese were presented with a variety of awards by Bishop Sean P. O'Malley, OFM Cap., at the annual Religious Emblem Ceremony Sunday afternoon in St. Mary's Cathedral. The awards, presented during Mass celebrated by

Bishop O'Malley, were hosted by the Catholic Committee on Scouting. Father Stephen B. Salvador, director ofScouting and a member of the committee, introduced the awardees, noting that they comprised one of the largest groups ever to receive diocesan awards. The Boy Scout promise was led by Andrew Mendes Turn to page 13 - Scouting

National clergy convention led by Fall River diocesan priest By MIKE GORDON ANCHOR STAFF

ORLANDO, Aa - Participants at the 29th annual Convention of the

National Organization for Continuing Education for Roman Catholic Clergy came away from the gathering with new ideas and a renewed

FATHER MARK A. Hession, right, presents the 2002 President's Distinguished Service Award to Bishop Robert Fealey Morneau, the Auxiliary Bishop of Green Bay at the 2002 Convention of the National Organization for Continuing Education for Roman Catholic Clergy.

sense of faith formation. 'These directors of faith formation will impact thousands ofpriests throughout the nation," said Father Mark R. Hession, who convened with them as their president for the first time since being elected at the 200 I convention. "It was an amazing opportunity for me," said Father Hession about leading the group and being able to continue his own formation. "It was a very successful convention." He serves as the director of continuing education and formation of clergy here in the diocese and as pastor of Our Lady of Victory Church, Centerville. He has been involved with the NOCERCC for some time, serving as its vice president from 1998-2001. More than 200 people attended the convention, themed'TheImpact of the Technological Culture on the ChurCh and the Priesthood." Plenary sessions focused on the internal connection between communication and theology and the necessity to reconcile the two realities.

Turn to page 13 - Vocations

Holy":l-1our for Vocations Dioc:ese of Fall River

·r~,·tb tile Loi'J of the l.anrest to "end more Iabore.... ~or the haNC.ort.· M.>tthcw.M6

Turn to page 13 - Convention

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brother he leaves four other brothers, Christopher N., Timothy E, and Peter 1. Gallant of Fall River, and David M. Gallant of Bristol, R.I.; a sister, Elizabeth Green-Gallant of Cambridge; and nieces and nephews. He was also the brother of the late James H. Gallant. His funeral Mass was celebrated March 2 in Holy Trinity Church, Fall River. Burial was in St. Patrick's Cemetery, Fall River. The "Cherry Place" Home of Waring-Sullivan, 178 Winter Street, Fall River, was in charge of arrangements.

.Sister Mary Elizabeth RGS HARWICH - Good Shepherd ment center in Boston where she Sister MaJy Elizabeth, the former served in various posts caring for Mary Eleanor Marczukowska, 99, 100 young women receiving eduwho served as a religious sister for cation and clinical services. 73 years. died JanuaJy 17. at CranWhen the community transferred berry Pointe Rehabilitation and to Marlborough in 1964, Sister Skilled Care Center. Elizabeth was assigned to the care Born in Plock, Poland, the of the sick and elderly sisters in the daughter of the late Alexander and infilmaly. Although only five-fe~t the late Natalie (Makowucka) tall, she never stopped working. Marczukowska, she came to the Sister Elizabeth retired to CranUnited'States as a child. She attended berry Pointe in 1991. schools in Burlington, N.J. She leaves a sister, Natalie From Our Lady of Czestochowa Marczukowska of Dorchester. Her funeral Mass was celebrated Parish in South Boston she entered the Good Shepherd Novitiate in in the Good Shepherd Center Chapel Peekskill. N.Y., on August 12, 1928 in Marlborough. Interment was in to begin her formal training for a Mt. Benedict Cemetery, West career caring for teen-age girls with ~oxbury. . problems.~ "'; If " ....,. T~e ..~ulJiv~n, I:'itzg(frald and . After p'rqf~s~ii}g:h:ej-~fi!it vows:on :.. ~oOins • " .Funeral. " . Home, July 3, 1931, she was missioned to Marlborough, was' in charge of ar' .. the Good Sheph~rd residential treat- rangements. ;

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Anchor enhances color pages

.Community forum keys on prevention,of youth violenc~ FALL RIVER - Parents, educators, human services pro-

resolution of the images. This is just another of the changes meant to enhance the quality of the publication.

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FALL RIVER -The 50th In its peak years in the lat~ coordinates public relations for . Acies Ceremony of the Legion of 1950s and early 1960s there were the Legion. Currently there are a total of Mary of the Fall River diocese approximately 28 individual praewill beheld Sunday at 2:30 p.m., sidia in parishes across the dio- nine praesidia active in the dioin St. Mary's Cathedral. , cese with hundreds of members cese, seven comprised of adults Bishop Sean P. O'Malley, and thousands of auxiliary mem- and two others that involve youth OFM Cap., will preside at the bers, said Alice Beaulieu, who groups, Beaulieu reported. ceremonies in which the legionaries honor the Blessed Mother and renew their commitment to spiritual undertakings. Sacred Hearts Father Matthew Sullivan, spiritual director of the Legion's Fall River Curia, will be the speaker. . Following the service a reserved seats buffet will be held at Holy Rosary Parish Hall. Father Barry Wall,. pastor of Holy Rosary Parish, is the diocesan director of the Legion of Mary. The Legion of Mary was' founded in 1921 in Dublin, Ireland, by the late Frank Duff, its initial purpose was to have its members visit .the hospitalized poor in that city. Today, the Legion remains dedicated to the spiritual works of mercy, to religious education and outreach support to families and children, as well as to personal growth in holiness. The Legion began in the Fall River diocese in 1952 when the ACIES CEREMONY - Legionaries of the Fall River late Bishop James L. Connolly' Comitium of the Legion of Mary make their individual commitinvited Legion members from ments toLegion ideals at the 19th annual Acies ceremony on Boston to establish the organizaMarch 25, 1971 in St. Mary's Cathedral. (Anchorfile photo) tion here .

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Beginning with this issue. The Anchor color pages will be printed on sturdier stock, there ,by improving the color a'nd

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Robert J. Gallant Jr.

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Legion of Mary to observe' 50 years in Fall River diocese

THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River- Fri., March 8, 2002

FALL RIVER - Robert J. Gallant Jr., 51, of County Street, brother of Father Jon-PaL11 Gallant, pastor of Holy Redeemer Parish, Chatham, died suddenly February 27. Born in Fall River, the son of Robert J. Gallant and Cornelia (O'Neil) Gallant of this city, he was a lifelong resident. He was a 1968 graduate of the former Msgr. Prevost High School; attended Stonehill College and earned a qachelor's degree from' Leslie College. . Besides his parents and priest

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March 17

1600 Bay Street

Fall River, MA 02724 508-673-2322

Is 65:17-21; Ps 30:2,4-6,1112a,13b; In 4:43-54 . Ez 47:1-9,12; Ps 46:2-3,5-6,8-9; Jn5:1-16 Is 49:8-15; Ps 145:8-9,13c14,17-18;Jn 5:17-30 Ex 32:7-14; Ps 106:19-23; In 5:31-47 Wis 2: 1a, 12-22; Ps 34: 17-21,23; In 7: 1-2, 10,2530 Jar 11:18-20; Ps 7:2-3,9b-12; In 7:40-53 Ez 37: 12-14; Ps 130:1-8; Rom 8:8-11;Jn 11:145 or 11 :37,17,20-27,33b-

45 " " ANCHOR I1I1 " 1I1II11111 " IIIPeriodical " IIII THE (USPS-545.Q20) POstage Paid at Fall River, Mass. Published weekly except for the fif1it two weeks in July arxl the week after Chrisunas at 887 Highland Avenue. Fall River. Mass. 02720 by the Catholic Press ofthe Diocese ofFall River. Subscription price by mail. postpaid $14.00 per year. POSTMASTERS serxl address changes to The Anchor. P.O. Box 7, Fall Rivei'. MA 02722.

!fru :Jfea[tfi Care fM ituura6fe canar patien;ts wfiO canrwt affora to pay fM nursing care e£sewlUre. lnaivUfuafiwf .care ana attention in an atmospftere of petue aru£ wanntn" wlUre Cove, uru£erstanaing ana compassion prev~i£. 'Beautifu{ setting overCool(jng :Jv{t. :Jlope 'Bay.

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viders and law enforcement professionals are invited to participate in "A Community Forum on the Prevention of Youth Vio-. lence," set for March 23; 9 a.m. to 12:30 p;m., at B.M.C. Durfee High School, 360 Elsbree Street. . ' Sponsored by The May 'Institute and the Center for Children and Families at SaintAnne's Hospital, in conjunction with B.M.C. Durfee High School, the interactive program has been designed to bring the Fall River commuc nity together in learning about the best practices in preventing school violence.

The keynote speaker will be Dr. Robert Putnam, vice president of consultation and school sup'port and direCtor of Positive Schools, for The May Institute. He will offer an overview of the problem, with emphasis on the' latest. research,. warning signs, successful school-based and community-based interventions and strategies that, can be develqped by parents, professionals, and community leaders. The presentation will be followed by discussion groups facilitated by licensed psychologists from The May Institute and Saint Anne's Hospital.

In" Your Prayers Please pray for the following priests during. the coming week March 12 1961, Rev. Aurelien L. Moreau, Pastor, Sl. Mathieu, Fall River 1989, Rev. Adrien E. Bernier, Pastor, Sl. Mathieu, Fall River 1991 ,·Rev. George I. Saad, Retired Pastor, Our Lady of Purgatory, New Bedford . March 16 1957, Rev. Francis 1. Maloney. S.T.L.. Pastor, Sl. Mary, North Attleboro


THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River - Fri., March 8, 2002

DONORS - Richard Lafrance and Rita P. Lafrance, left, chat with Beckie Silva, patient care manager of the Intensive Care Unit; Lucille Binder, RN, an Intensive Care Unit staff nurse; Dominican Sister Joanna Fernandes, chairman of Saint Anne's Hospital's board of trustees; and Michael Metzler, hospital president. The Lafrances presented a $1 00,000 gift toward the new unit.

Saint Anne's Hospital fetes, finish of r~cent expansions FALL RIVER Just a month shy of the first anni versary of the opening of its new, 28,000-sqliare-foot building, Saint Anne's Hospital is celebrating the completion of phase two of its master facility initiative with the opening of its new, expanded Day Surgery Center and the announcement of new, major capital campaign gifts totaling $500,000. The hospital this week announced a $100,000 gift from the Lafrance family of Westport, that will benefit the new Intensive Care Unit. The Lafrance family is well known in southeastern New England as the owners of White's

of Westport, Bittersweet Farm, serve the community, and their and t,he Hampton Inn of most recent gift illustrates their Westport. commitment to helping us proThe gift from the Roland, vide the best facilities for Aime and Rita Lafrance Fam- Greater Fall River." To date, Saint Anne's capiily and Richard and Muriel Lafrance supports the ICU, tal campaign has achieved which opened in March, 2001, nearly 80 percent of its goal of as an integral part of the $5 million. In addition to the hospital's $16.5 million master gift from the Lafrance family, facility initiative. recent' major contributors in "The Lafr'ance family's gift support of the campaign inis an important contribution, clude: '$50,000 - Fall River not only to Saint Anne's capi- 'Five Cents Savings Bank, Saint taI' campaign, but also our vi- Anne's Credit Union, Citizen'ssion of providing the best in Union S&vings Bank, Slade's healthcare," said Saint Anne's Ferry Bank, Harold and VirPresident Michael W. Metzler. ginia Lash, and an anonymous "The family has long sup- donor; $25,000 from Normand ported Saint Anne's mission to and Jeanne Lecomte, Dr. and

New Bedford Deanery to host Lenten Mission NORTH DARTMOUTH - The New Bedford Deanery is hosting a Lenten Mission to take place at St. Julie Billimt Church, 494 Slocum Road, from March 18 through March 21, presented by Holy Cross Father Thomas Feeley of Family Rosm)' in NOIth Easton. The theme of the mission is "Mysteries of the Rosary - lessons for Living." The rosm)' has evolved in Chlistian communities over many centuries. and for millions of people throughout the world, it is a beautiful contemplative prayer based on sacred SClipture. It has been called , "a catechism on stling," for the mystelies offer a summal)' of Christian faith. Each mystel), gives an intimate look into the minds and hearts of Jesus and Mal)' at the most signiticant times of their lives. By examining the,ir altitudes, the faithful can discover ideals to guide them in thejoyful and sOIlDwful moments of their lives. Father Feeley was born and raised in New Bedford. He made his profession of faith in the Con-

gregation of the Holy Cross in 1948. He has preached retreats to religious' communities in Ireland, England, the Holy Land, Canada and the United States. Father Feeley authored a book on moral philosophy, "Moral Integrity," and his "Friends in the Lord," was recently published by Pauline Press. His web pages, "Minute Meditations," "Reflections on Ourselves," and "Reflections on Our Faith" appear weekly on the Holy Cl'OSS Family Ministries Website at www.hcfm.org. The mission schedule follows: The conferences will be given after the noon Mass at St. Julie's and repeated at 7 p.m. each evening. The evening conference will end with rosary and Benediction on March 18 and 19. - March 18, "The Joyful Mystelies: Openness to God"; . - March 19, "The SOITowful Mystelies: The Meaning of Sacliflee and the Value of Suffering"; - March 20, "The Glorious' Mystelies: What Eye Has Not Seen Nor Em' Hem'd." (The evening con-

ference on March 20 will be given as the homily during a Maronite Rite Mass,); - March 21, "The Need for Repentance and the Sacrament of Reconciliation." The, evening conference on March 21 will be fol e lowed by the sacrament of reconciliation. Pliests from various parishes and some visiting pliests will be available to hear confessions.

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nually. Also, Emergenc'y Services' "express care" also recently relocated to newly renovated, enlarged quarters in the former ground floor ICU area. It has enhanced the :'express" capabilities for the treatment of minor illnesses or injuries to stay, in keeping with the hospital's Emergency Services growth of more than I0 percent per year for the past several years.

Mrs. Richard Mello and the Mello Family; $20,000 - Bank of Fall River; $15,000 - Compass Bank and The Feitelberg Company. The ICU is the area's newest critical care facility whose stateof-the-art design has doubled the unit's size -and patient capability. It offers importat;lt features, including a centrally located nurses' station which is named for the Lafrance family; private bathroom facilities, dialysis capabilities, special lighting, cardiac monitors, isolation rooms for those with infectious diseases, and two dedicated waiting areas, one open, one private, Since completion of phase one of the hospital's initiative, two more' projects have been completed. The Hudner Oncology Center's new, 7,000-square-foot Wilson W. Curtis Medical Oncology Wing opened in September to increase the center's capabilities for treating more than 1,900 patients, reflecting more than 76,000 patient visits an-

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THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River - Fri., March 8, 2002

the living word

themoorin~ A gray world The United States Census Bureau recently released a report entitled, "An' Aging World." Some of the statistics contained in the study are quite outstanding and will indeed have a tremendous impact on our social order. The study indicated that global aging is occurring at astonishing rates. It is estimated that more than 800,000 people around the world celebrate their 65th birthday, each month of the year. As a result we are living on a planet whose population is in a constant process of aging. Much can be attributed to improved health care for the elderly: More and more developed countries spend a great deal of their national budgets in caring for the aging by supplying everything from special housing to Meals On Wheels. Retirement resort communities are a major industry. Travel and leisure businesses are thriving because seniors no longer sit at hoine. The lifestyle of our graying world is ever evolving. Another given .factor which is often overlooked is the gradual decline in fertility. As birthrates tumble and seniors became more long-lived, age imbalance becomes more obvious. For example, Italy and Spain now have one of the lowest birth rates in Europe. However, Italy now ranks first on the list of nations with the highest percentage of citizens (18.. 1 percent) over 65., Spain is right behind with a 16.9 percent increase. ' While developed nations lead in this trend it is interesting to note that developing nations are also being affected by this reality. It is forecast that the city-state of Singapore will experience nearly a 400 percent increase in the over-65 bracket by 2030. Similar rates are predicted for Malaysia and the Philippines. , Longevity of life definitely is swaying the pendulum to the senior's side. The study showed that Japan leads the world in this category by an average life expectancy of 80.7 years. Singapore's average is 80.1, Australia 79.8, Canada 79.4, and the United States 77.1. One sad note is that in developing countries disability rates among the elderly are rising even as they fall in richer nations. It is obvious that the priority governments place on taking care of their elderly varies widely - from nation to nation. This can be seen in the statistics of elderly pensions. In Italy, pensions equal IS percent of the gross national product; 7 -4, percent in th~ United States; and 0.4 percent in Mexico. , But care for, the' elderly cannot be measured solely in pensions. More and more in'iddle-aged children have their lives determined by care for aged parents who simply cannOt survive on limited funds and insurance. Some are forced to care for parents with agonizing difficulties. Decisions of care and concern often become disruptive and invasive. In a world where employment is global, some people simply 'cannot be at hand to help., Uprooting people from their environment is also a critical decision-making process. In a' crass materialistic society where the breakdown of family values is also ever on the increase, respect for the aged is on the decline. Divorces and separations have ruptured and shattered families. Everyone goes their. own way to do their own thing and so many, especially the elderly, get tossed aside. Seldol11 do we ever hear of the need for filial obedience and respect. in this regard it would be well for all of us to recall those wonderful words from the i Book of Sirach: "0 son, help your father in his old age and do not J grieve him as long as he lives; even if he is lacking in understanding, show forbearance; in all your strength do not despise him. , Whoever forsakes his father is like a blasphemer; and whoever gers his mother is cursed by the Lord." These are indeed strong admonitions. However, they are wonderful guidelines for these times when so many in families simply choose to ignore one another, hoping that nursing homes will carry all the burdens that come with old age.

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The Executive Editor

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE DIOCESE OF FALL RIVER Published weekly by the Catholic Press of the Diocese of Fall River 887 Highland Avenue P.O. BOX 7 Fall River, MA 02720 Fall River, MA 02722-0007 Telephone 508-675-7151 FAX 508-675-7048 E-mail: TheAnchor@Anchornews.org Send address changes to P.O. Box, call or use E-mail address EXECUTIVE EDITOR Rev. Msgr. John F. Moore EDITOR David B. Jolivet

NEWS EDITOR James N. Dunbar

OFFICE MANAGER Barbara M. Reis

NANCY KOLLMAN, RIGHT, DIRECTOR OF NURSING AT THE GOOD SHEPHERD.COMMUNITY IN SAUK RAPIDS, MINN., INTRODUCES ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY STUDENT BRIAN WAVINAK TO RESIDENT CLARA FRANKE IN THE ALZHEIMER'S UNIT. W AVINAK SPENT THE NIGHT AT THE FACILITY TO LEARN ABOUT GERIATRIC ISSUES AND CARE AS PART OF HIS COLLEGE COURSE WORK. (CNS PHOTO

BY DIANNE TOWALSKI, Sr.

CLOUD VISITOR)

"MOSES SAID, 'WE SHALL GO WITH OUR YOUNG AND OUR OLD; WITH OUR S?NS AND OUR DAUGHTERS, WITH OUR FLOCKS AND OUR HERDS WE SHALL GO, FOR WE MUST HOLD A FEAST TO TH~ LORD'" (EXODUS

10:9).

Recreation witho'ut an SUV or the latest in sweat suits By FATHER EUGENE HEMRICK CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

When the receptionist at the Rayburn Office Building in Washington told me that the Senate and the friend I'd come to visit were oil recess, I chuckled. The idea of recess brought back happy memqries of grade-school days when it meant playing on the school playground. Often I returned, to class with a hole in the' knee of my trousers, having fallen on the hard cement. I thought nothing of it because I was hav,ing too much fun.T9day I wonder how many young children - or for that matter, adults - really enjoy recreation, even though they may possess the latest in sports equipment, recreational rooms, computers, video games and recreational vehicles. As wonderful as these may be, I feel that most of us don't enjoy recreation as fully as generations before us did. But why? One reason is that recreation has taken on a new meaning. The word "recreation" means to create anew. It is not thoughtlessly doing whatever comes to mind.

Rather, it is the joy of being refreshed by doing something new, novel and out of the ordinary. When our fathers or grandfathers played baseball, it was not unusual for them to have to design a ballfield before a game began. This meant foraging through the neighborhood in search of cardboard boxes to transform into bases and stones to hold them in place.. It was not unusual to have cracked bats that needed to be masterfully screwed together and wound with tape. Old baseballs that had lost their covers were forever being taped. In the winter, hockey was played on frozen streets in the neighborhood. Since a real hockey stick was a: luxury, most children made their own, which meant finding an old broom stick and affixing a curved piece of garden hose to it. ' For our mothers and grandmothers, recreation often meant finding a good piece of chalk or soft' stone to use to draw and number the squares for hopscotch. Sometimes drawing a multicolored hopscotch pattern on the sidewalk took as much time as the game itself.

One reason some earli.er generations had to be creative about recreation was that they were products of the Depression or World War II, which forced people to conserve and be enterprising with the little they had. Today this generation will tell you that as difficult as those times were, they also were filled with fun. . We can never return to the socalled "good old days," but we can learn a thing or two from them on how to enjoy recreation in a post-modern world. First, having more and having the latest in equipment doesn't always guarantee more fun. Sometimes taking something that is old and tattered, and creating it into something new, is the greatest recreation we can enjoy. . Second, recreation is often enjoyed more when we esteem our own ingenuity over what is presented to us by the commercial world. What makes our ingenuity.especially praiseworthy in our eyes is that it means we, not others, dictate' the terms of our recreation. School is out now; time for recess.


Enough is neverenough· Despite a sincere lack of inter- championship hat, T-shirts, est on my part at this stage, ma- sweatshirt, stocking cap, license jor league baseball is now in full plate guard and magazines to keep swing. Usually my thoughts turn me going. And the beauty of this to the Red Sox, wondering how they will break my hearlthis year. And, the 2002 season has so many potential disasters that await me. , But, it's only been a month since the Patriots won the world By Dave Jolivet championship (aaahhhh). Pats fans have had but a few weeks to bask in the afterglow of past season, in addition to a world Super Bowl XXXVI. It's still championship (I never tire of saywinter for crying out loud! ing that), is that my wife, Denise, Even though the boys of sum- and seven-year-old daughter, mer have invaded my euphoric Emilie, have come along for the state, I will not let go of the New ride. They too, have their share England Patriots of 2001 - and of .Patriots' apparel, and I frankly, it's not that difficult a couldn't be any prouder of them. task. Denise caught the bug midway I have my Super Bowl XXXVI through the season. She under-

My View from the Stands

stands baseball and ice hockey pretty well, and gets excited come playoff time if the home teams are' involved. Actually, such an attitude does save her from countless hours of frustration and disappointment during the regular season. But before this seas.on, Denise was immune to the foot---....... ball bug. It's not like she was a 't bandwagon jumper, because she started to gain interest when the Patriots' chances of a post-season appearance were slim. I thirikshe sensed something different about this team - that it was truly a team. Anyway, she got on board just in time for the ride of a lifetime. Denise even attended the snowbowl game against Oakland with me, despite the fact that she is a ~un worshiper.

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DCCW to host Lenten experience in Swa·nsea SWANSEA - The Fall River District Council of Catholic Women are hosting a Lenten ex'perience on March 21 at St. Michael's Church, 270 Ocean Grove Avenue, at 7 p.m .. The Passion of Christ will be presented in a unique manner, accompanied by music, prayer and adoration. This memorable event is open to all men, women and children in the diocese. . . The council will provide limited bus transportation from the CVS Plaza parking lot on President Avenue (former Almacs Supermarket) in Fall River. The bus' will leave the parking lot by 6 p.m.

CLAUDETIE ARMSTRONG, left, past DCCW president, serving as Church Commission Chairman, District I, and current District I president, Mary Andrews, plan for a Lenten experience to be held at St. Michael's Church, Swansea.

Reservations must be made by March 15, by calling Claudette Armstrong at 508672-1658, or by E-mailing angellady21 @attbi.com.

THEANCHOR-DioceseofFall River-Fri., March 8, 2002 Just this week, we sat together to watch the newly-released New England Patriots championship video colorfully displaying all the highlights from Day One of the season to the culmination of a 40year journey. As we hit somewhere around game five or six of the season, she asked, "Even though we know the outcome of each game, do your palms still get sweaty while watching this?" Yes, yes, yes! She does understand! Together we cheered each jarring hit, relished each touchdown, and laughed at each Patriots' foe' that taunted us along the way. With wide eyes and pounding hearts, we both got goose bumps as Adam Vinaqeri (Denise's newfound sweetheart) kicked the championship-clinching field goal as time ran out in the Super Dome. Emilie was just the right age to become a fan, and she picked the perfect season to do it. It reminds me of when I started following the Boston Bruins back in 1969. My first season with them was a championship season as well. And hoW it warms my heart so to observe her wanting to wear her Super Bowl XXXVI championship sweatshirt to bed..

OUR LADY'S RELIGIOUS STORE Mon. -Sat. 10:00-5:30PM

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This Patriots season was just perfect and I don't want to let it go. And I don't have to. I recently read a columnist from ESPN who, as a lifelong Patriots fan said, "When your team wins a championship, it's your civic duty to purchase as much paraphernalia as possible." Who am I not to do my civic duty? There are those who'll think I've finally gone over the edge, especially when my new Patriots bed sheets and pillowcases come in. But it won't be Denise. She's the one who ordered them.

Dave Jolivet is aformer sports editor/writer and the current editor of The Anchor. Comments are welcome at Dave.lolivet@Anchomews.orr:.

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RUTH AND BETIY Murray, chairpersons of Community Concerns for the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women, District I, St. George Parish, Westport, sort the many items donated to Catholic Social Services for the various women's shelters of the diocese. Members were asked to donate personal items. The pair expressed their thanks to all who donated.

for those who want to follow Christ

MARCH 11-14, 2002 Very Reverend Joseph Barranger, a.p. MONDAY, MARCH 11: YOU ARE WITNESSES! YES, THAT MEANS YOU! . St. Joseph Church, North Main Street TUESDAY, MARCH 12: WITNESSING FROM THE CROSS: WHAT CAN WE DO WITH SUFFERING? Holy Rosary Church, Beattie Street WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13: CATHOLIC VALUES: A ROADMAP FOR DAILY LIVING Cathedral ofBt. Mary of the Assumption, Spring & Second Sts. THURSDAY, MARCH 14: "WHAT, ME HOLY?":THE UNIVERSAL CALL TO HOLINESS SS. Peter & Paul Parish at Holy Cross Church, Pulaski Street

Daily Mass at 7 p.m. • Reconciliation: Thes. - Thurs. 6 p.m. Information: Call your parish or Sl. Michael Parish at 508.672.6713


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THE ANCHOR - Diocese ofFall River - Fri., March 8, 2002

ATTLEBORO - Several Grief in Russia. For information, call 508Education Programs will be held at 994-5035 or 508-428-4527. the La Salette Shrine as follows: March 14 at 6:30 p.m. "If Only"; NEW BEDFORD - The CourMarch 18 at 1O:30'a.m. "When De- age Group will meet Saturday at 7 pression Finds You"; and March 21 ,p.m. in the rectory of Holy Name of at 6:30 p.m. "Spirituality and Grief." the Sacred Heart ofJesus Parish. CourThey will be held in the Pastoral age is a support group for Catholic Counseling Center's Romero Room. men and women who are confrontFor more information call 508-226- ing same sex attraction issues and 8220. ' who are striving to lead chaste lives. The La Salette Shrine will offer a For more information call Msgr. ThoCommunal Penance Service Sunday mas Harrington at 508-992-3184. at 2 p.m. Father Victor Chaupetta will lead it and it will offer the opNEW BEDFORD - The Sisters . portunity for people to receive the of Charity of New Bedford have a sacrament of reconciliation. For significant inventory of records inmore information call 508-222- cluding classical music, English and 5410. "French songs, religious music and other similar recordings that are in FALL RIVER - Members of excess of their current needs. All are Pax Christi-Fall River will take part in excellent condition. If you are inin a prayer vigil to coincide with terested please call them at 508-996. the national Catholic peace'move- 6751. ment of Pax Christi USA, on March 10 at 7 p.m. at St. Mary's Cathedral. NEW BEDFORD - The New It will remember victims of last Bedford Catholic Women's e;tub will September's terrorist attacks. For meet for Mass March 13 at 7 p.m. at more information call Estelle Roach St. Lawrence Church. It will be folat 508-673-6023. lowed by a business meeting at the Century House. Father John M. FALL RIVER - The Legion of Sullivan will be guest speaker. For Mary will celebrate its 50th year of more information call 508-995-93 19. operation in the diocese with its Acies Consecration Sunday at 2:30 NORTH DARTMOUTH - A p.m. at St. Mary's Cathedral. A buf-' Separated-Divorced Group will fet at the Holy Rosary Church hall meet March II from 7-9 p.m. at the will:follow. For more information Diocesan Family Life Center, 500 ~all Alice Beaulieu at 508-995-2354. Slocum Road, to commemorate it's ."~~=~~~-'~~-~~~~, ~ -~ ·17thyear.FALL RIVER - The Fall River TAUNTON - The Taunton DisClover Club: "Friendly Sons of St. Patrick," will hold its annual Com- trict Council of Catholic Women is munion breakfast Sunday following sponsoring a Spanish Bilingual the 9 a.m. Mass at St. Thomas More Lenten Night of Recollection on Parish, Somerset. It's annual banquet March 14 from 6)0-8:30 p.m. at St. in honor of St. Patrick's Day will be Mary's Church, 14 St. Mary's Square. , held March 15 at McGovern's Res- Holy Cross Father John Phalen will taurant. For more information call preside and refreshments will follow 508-674-5431. at the polan Center. r..

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WEST HARWICH...:.... The St.,' FALL 'RIVER - Well known Christian recording artist'David Francis bf Peace Fraternity, Secular' Parkes will perform a benefit con- ' Franciscan Order, will meet Sunday cert at Bishop Connolly High for the noon Mass at Holy Trinity, School, 373 Elsbree Street on March Church: Refreshments and discus/ II at 7:30 p.m. The proceeds will sian about the life of St. Francis will assist the Franciscan Friars and Sis- follow. For more information call 1. ters of the Immaculate ministering 508-362-5238.

Renew'al retreat set at· St. Louis de France SWANSEA - In preparation for a year of jubilee, St. Louis de France Parish is offering a threeday spiritual renewal retreat' March I 1-13 themed "How Do I See Jesus." Father Justin G. Kusibab, OFM Conv., from Chicago,' III., will serve as spiritual director for the retreat and he will be homilist at ,Masses this weekend. The program includes Mass at 7 p.m. and the sacrament of reconciliation will be available. Father Kusibab holds master's degrees in divinity, arts and pastoral studies and also holds an ad-

vanced certifiCate in 'spiritual direction. He has worked for many years doing retreats at parishes throughout the Midwest. ' The retreat coincides with the 74th anniversary of St. Louis de France and begins a full year o( jubilation in preparation for its golden anniversary on March 13, 2003. Many events have already been planned by the annivers"ary committee including an Easter egg hunt for children on March 31. For more information contact pastor Roger D. LeDuc at 508-674-1103.

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Adult Catholic children Q. We have five children. All directly. You've done your best to rarnents. I understand that regret and went 12 years to Catholic schools give them a good religious educa- share it with you. and never missed Mass'while they tion and training. It's now their life But God has a unique relationwere growing up. We went and their responsibility. The most ship with every human being, and through some rough times be- you can do is to support them with that relationship is conditioned, on cause of their (ather's alcohol , your prayer and example, and help our side, by countless factors. Even problems, but now at least that is them, in every way they are open the same circumstances (same par_ _ _ ents, same education) affect stopped. . Now one misses Mass each child differently. constantly and receives According to their diCommunion when he verse personalities and emodoes go. Another is a detional makeup, children revout Methodist. Another act with greater or lesser goes to Mass and the sacadaptability to traumatic cirBy Father raments regularly. The cumstances in their environfourth attends church John J. Dietzen ment. The alcohol problem only on Christmas and you mention would be one; Easter. Our fifth goes but others too, which may fairly regularly, but doesn't mind to, .to be, good spouses and parents not be as visible, inevitably affect missing. " now for their families. children's spiritual and religious All of them have good families This is the hard part for parents strengths and.outlook in future years. and raise their children well, but in situations like yours. After years Obviously, it is impossible to practicing their faith isn't impor- of caring for the large and small untangle all those strands of their tant. We usually get along well aches and hurts of their children, lives and yours, nor would it do any together, big holiday celebrations parents' come to feel as if there good to try. and so on. I keep wondering why should be a solution to everything, It seems clear to me from your God is letting them lose their souls. something that will make things description of what is happening in What is your opinion ofthis mess? "we.!I" again, the way they want your family today that God's grace (Kentucky) them fQr their children. is working in their lives and pro"A. My first reaction is, and I don't It's a major step to peace of heart ducing much good. Maybe you need mean this at all flippantly, join the to acknowledge this just isn't true to be satisfied with that for now. crowd. I hardly know a family to- and never has been. Some things are What yO,!J have done for them day which, at least to some degree, possible, as I said, but there is mucil out oflove will never be lost, though doesn't have a similar story' to tell. you will never be able to control, the results of your caring may not That may be no great consolation, nor should you. They're adults, and be evident in the way or at tlie time ' but at least it starts to put your expe- the burden is on them. you would like. Have confidence in Second, it is wrong to assume the ways God's grace has worked rience in perspective. Ifi understand cOiTectly, it seems they will "lose their souls." There is through you, and try to continue you're asking two questions: What no way you can possibly know how loving them and be present for them in the ways I said. ' is the spiritual condition of your they stand before God. Questions may be sent to FachiJdren 7And what can you do abou.t You regret that they are missing something very important to you, ther Dietzen at Box 325, P~o­ their religious lifestyles? To address the second first, the the advantages of a full Catholic life ria, IL 61651, or E-mail: answer is "not very much," at least of prayer, the Eucharist and the sac- jjdietzen@aoI.com.

Questions and Answers

The lif,e of a soldier Headlines these days frequently recount a happen-' climb over the unbroken wire. Stuck on the sharp barbs, ing involving soldiers. On one recent morning, side- they would jerk around like flies in a gigantic spider's by-Side headlines read: "IsraCli Soldiers Refusing to web, until enemy bullets riddled them." Serve in West Bank, Gaza" and "Shooting by PeaceThis is only one story of the often tragic fate of solkeepers Investigated." diers. . Both stories recounted tragic incidents involving killI have interviewed many veterans of the Vietnam ings of innocent civilians. War. Almost without excep, The Israeli soldiers, citing tion, as these returned soldiers 'spoke of what they acts of random brutality saw, t~eir eyes would fill toward Palestinian civilians, with tears for their buddies, were declaring they would who were killed, maimed no IQnger serve 'in the West and struck with battleBank and Gaza Strip. The caused illnesses, but also for peacekeepers, I3ritish paratheVietnamese people in the By Antoinette Bosco troopers in Kabul,Afghanivillages destroyed. I met a stan, fired at a car that had Gulf War veteran, Major been started up loudly 'at Michael Donnelly. He was one in the morning, believing what they heard was a burst of gunfire against them. in a wheelchair, stricken with amyotrophic lateral scleIn fact, the occupants of the car were a woman in labor rosis, the paralyzing and degenerating condition known ' and four members of her family leaving home for the as LouGehrig's Disease. He was one of more than 110,000 Gulf War veterhospital. Her brother-in-law was killed. Our hearts go out to all who are brutalized by war, ans who returned with devastating illnesses of unknown especially the soldiers. They are the ones who must go origin, left to suffer in isolation, many without medical to the front lines, take the first blows and lay their lives or disability benefits. His story, written with his sister on the lines, following orders. And I believe only those Denise Donnelly, "Falcon's Cry, A Desert Storm Memwho have been there in uniform can really know the oir" (Praeger), gave evidence that Gulf War veterans were more than twice as likely to get this illness as solconfusion and the agony caused 'by -war. Civilians and soldiers - are both the victims of war. . diers serving elsewhere. It was influential in finally getting a(l acknowledgI recently completed a new edition of a book on World War I that my late son Peter wrote. I remember ment from the Veterans Affairs and Defense Departthe pain he felt as he researched the horrific story of ments in December 2001that this illness is indeed linked that war in which soldier casualties mounted daily by to the 1991 Persian Gulf War. Now these veterans sufthe thollsands. Imagine, if you can, a one-day battle fering from ALS, and their survivors, can at least rethat left 60,000 dead and wounded - all of them sol- ceive just compensation for their service-related illness. Leaders declare war, but it is the·soldiers who must diers. The battle took place in "No-Man's Land," the area between trenches harboring soldiers of opposing carry it out, putting themselves between us and the declared enemy, knowing always that the battlefields hold sides. As Peter wrote, "No-Man's Land was stitched with an unknown fate for them. We must honor them and barbed wire entanglements. Some men would try to pray for them.

The'Bottom Line


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Longing for God: Mother Teresa's letters reveal isolation, doubt By CINDY WOODEN CAll-lOUC NEWS SERVICE

life, even if she did not feel his presence, the priest said. "Everyone wants to share, to talk about things, to be encouraged by others," he said, but Mother Teresa,

of Charity Fathers. Members of Mother Teresa's order often heard VATICAN CITY -As Missionher refer to Sept. 10, 1946, as "Inaries of Charity Father Brian spiration Day," when on a train in Kolodiejchuk pores over the letters India she experienced a call to live of Mother Teresa of Calcutta and work with the poor. and the reports of her spiritual Mother Teresa had dedirectors, he is increasingly scribed the call as "an order, a struck by the enormous diffiduty, an absolute certainty" culty of all she accomplished. that she must leave the Sisters The priest, who is in charge of Loreto and move into the of preparing material for slums of Calcutta to devote Mother Teresa's beatification, herselfcompletely to the poor. is not surprised by the effort it "We thought that in some took to open houses for the way, which she never exdying, the sick and the homeplained, she experienced Jesus' less. call," Father Kolodiejchuk The surprising aspect is said. how much she did despite feelBut now, from reading her ing for years that God had correspondence with her spiriabandoned her, he said. tual director, he said, it is clear Her letters to her spiritual she experienced what theolodirectors over the years are gians call' an "interior imagifilled with references to "intenative locution" - she disrior darkness," to feeling untinctly heard a voice in her loved by God and even to the head tell her what to do. "And it continued for some temptation to doubt that God IJ:L-S"'~:'"='=::~=::~~.~~~=~ exists. months," he said. She wrote to her spiritual MOTHER TERESA holds the hand of "The call was so direct that director in a 1959-60 spiritual an ailing man at the Missionaries of Char- she knew it was the right thing diary, "In my soul, I feel just ity home in Calcutta in this undated file despite this darkness she exthe terrible pain of loss, ofGod photo. (CNS file photo) perienced for many years, at not wanting me, of God not least until the I 970s," the priest being God, of God not really exist- "hurting on the inside, kept smil- said. ing." ing, kept working, kept being joyAt one point, a former archbishop In another letter she wrote that ful." ofCalcutta wanted to share some of she wanted to love God "like he has In a 1961 letter to the Missionar- her letters with a struggling founder not been loved," and yet she felt her ies of Charity, she wrote, "Without of another religious congregation, love was not reciprocaled. suffering our work would just be Father Kolodiejchuk said. In the context of Mother Teresa's social work. All the desolation of Mother Teresa begged him not life, the thoughts are not heresy, but poor people must be redeemed and to and asked that all her letters be signs of holiness, Father we must share in it." destroyed. Kolodiejchuk said in a late-FebruFather Kolodiejchuk, a 45-yearFather Kolodiejchuk said she told ary interview. old Canadian ordained in the Ukrai- the archbishop, "When people know Mother Teresa was convinced nian-Byzantine rite, was among the about the beginning, they will think God existed and had a plan for her first members of the Missionaries more about me and less about Jesus."

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Crying rooms for bawl-room dancing A recent column on the appro- dancing,''' reported another. pliate responses parents, priests and Interestingly, canon law says parishes might take when faced with very little about how to best shush umuly or upset youngsters during or segregate a howling little perMass has led to some interesting son (and this could include a very feedback - and that's not counting the reader pushing a slight rewrite of the Old Testament story about 1lJL Solomon and divvying up a baby. 11 Interestingly, however, a C JL frequent theme was gratiBy Dan Morris tude that crying rooms were not put forward with L..-----------t~ any enthusiasm. These seem to be an idea that has come and gone. short aunt of mine who howls ev"They looked like a scene from ery time a homily deals with fund'Dead Man Walking' where a group raising). I have it on reliable authority that of very sad people were waiting to watch an execution," pointed out one it is not true at all that authors of the U.S. bishops' brand new document reader. A priest friend claims the Church on Church art and architecture disnow discourages crying rooms be- cussed trap-door designs for pews cause the federal Centers for Dis- in parishes with large numbers of ease Control and Prevention was young families. This rumor was more likely to threatening to step in. One mother said crying rooms have started with the liturgy folks. were not unlike glass-enclosed , One reader was kind enough to "cloisters" for mothers (usually) with remember that we here at the Roadkill Theological Roundtable crying infants. "I used to call it 'bawl-n,>am had discussed in the past the effi-

cacy ofissuing high-powered squirt guns to ushers. The idea met with less than universal excitement. Still, the pendulum of opinion might swing if we considered outfitting ushers with snappy berets featuring a diocese's coat of arms along with stylish camouflage fatigues and high-topped battle boots. Top this with AK47-style squirt guns. It could even generate a rush of volunteers to be ushers. Armed security ushers might not only hush a few toddlers doing the Tasmanian devil dance in the pews, but increase the weekly collection. The elite Usher Guard Force could even be deployed in the parking lot prior to liturgy as a kind of advance warning system. Parents could point to them and say to their children, "I would be awfully, awfully well behaved in Mass today if I were you." In my day, all I could threaten my four with was "the look." Comments are welcome. Email Uncle Dan at cnsuncle@yahoo.com.

7

THE ANCHOR- Diocese of Fall River- Fri., March 8, 2002 Does Father Kolodiejchuk worry that he is betraying her wishes by publicizing the information? "I think her perspective is very different now," Father Kolodiejchuk answered. Several of the letters and diary entries were published last year in the "Journal ofTheological Reflection" of the Jesuit-run Vidyajyoti School of Theology in New Delhi. The investigations into her faith life are not idle prying, the priest said. Beatification and canonization are recognitions not of a person's life work - which is obviously praiseworthy in Mother Teresa's case - but of holiness. While some people may be surprised or even shocked by Mother Teresa's spiritual struggles, he said he hopes it also will help them come to "a fuller and deeper appreciation of holiness, which Mother Teresa lived in a way both simple and profound: she took what Jesus gave with a smile and stayed faithful even in the smallest things." The feeling that God is far away or even nonexistent is a common spiritual experience, he said. "Maybe we won't have the same

intensity of experiences, but most of what she did was very ordinary - itjust became extraordinary when it was all put together," Father Kolodiejchuk said. Mother Teresa died in Calcutta in September 1997. In 1999, Pope John Paul II waived the rule requiring a five-year wait before a beatification process can begin. Although he works on the cause from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily, Father Kolodiejchuk said he believes it will be "several months" before the Vatican formally recognizes that Mother Teresa heroically lived the Christian virtues and declares her venerable. He said work also is underway on preparing a report on the potential miracle needed for beatification: the 1998 cure of an Indian woman . who had a huge, unidentified growth in her abdomen. "People do say, 'Do it faster,''' the priest said. But the official process takes time, he said. "It is designed to discern the sense of the people of God and the verification of the miracle is God's confirmation of that."

DIRECTOR OF PASTORAL MUSIC St. Joseph Parish, Fairhaven, seeks part time (20 hours! week) Director of Pastoral Music. Responsibilities include directing adult and youth choirs, cantor training, weekend Masses, Funerals, Weddings. Qualified candidate must have keyboard/vocal skills. Full time position possible in conjunction with teaching music at parish school. Send resume and salary requirements to: Music Sear<::h, St. , Joseph Rectory, 41-43 Walnut Street, Fairhaven, MA 02711.9." I

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La Salette Retreat Cente;' 947 Park Street Attleboro, MA 02703·5115 508·222·8530 March 10 March 15-17 March 22-24 March 28-31 April 5-7

Afternoon Recollection - Fr. Cassista The Desert in the Scriptures Single's Retreat Portuguese Retreat - Fr. Man~el Pereira Holy Week Retreat .Married Couples Retreat

For more information, please call or write Retreat Secretary

_-----------r--::::::::---,... The offbeat wor d of U n e Dan

Historical Exhibit March 18-27, 2002 at Stonehill College, N. Easton Monday-Friday 10-8 Saturday and Sunday 10-4 Cushing Martin Building For info call: 508-565-1131 Free admission. Book exhibit. Co-sponsored by: Royal Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs: Catholic-Jewish Dialogue Committee of Stonehill College; Museum of Danish Resistance


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THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River - Fri., March 8, 2002

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Trying times prepare skater fOI; success· in life, Olympics "" .

By MARIA

RUIZ SCAPERLANDA ,CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

self, to make that jump and to say, 'I can do it,' then I want to go back and show the kids what's SALT LAKE CITY\~ Speed skater Derek possible. I want to tell them they can have Parra found himselfpart of a lifetime's worth of dreams because dreams do come true. I'm liv'golden imagery during the 2002 Wintt(r Olym- ing proof of that." pics. ,,' ' Parra was born in.San Bernardino, Calif., and In the opening ceremonies, Parra'proudly held grew up in a neighborhood th~t was "not super the tattered flag that flew over, the Worl9 Trade' tough, just a normal (one)." Center. Heinad~ the, sign of thecros's ashe' " .He began roller-skating in "cheap, rental , :stepped up)O the line' before every, race,,' , .\': skates" at a local skating rink and over ,time he , Acc~'inpimied by the' 02 song, "Elevation," gained confidence as a skater.. .' . Parra"took'his coach Bart Schouten on his vicHe took accelerated classes' in· high school, ,t~ry lap, then looked up at the stands to say, "I and graduated at age 17. Hoping to' skate pro- ' love you,", to his wife, Tiffany. Parra wrapped fessionally, he moved to Florida. himself in the Stars and Stripes that belonged to As an in-line skater he was 'a three-time nahis late grandfather for the victory lap after his tional 'champion and two-time overall world gold-medal race. champion,as well as a two-time world record And then there was the image of Parra, the holder who earned 18 individual gold medals. 31-year-old from Southern California, breaking Then, six years ago he switched over to ice into tears at the Olympics Medals Plaza after in the hopes of competing in the Olympics. He receiving the gold medal for the men's 1,500- made the U.S. long-track team but someone conmeter race. tested his spot on it. He responded by moving Yet, as meaningful as the 2002 Winter Olym- to a Wisconsin town "in the middle of nowhere," pics were for him, nothing is as important to and training on his own. Parra as his Catholic faith. "I lived in a trailer with no electricity. I'd train "My faith affects my whole life," Parra said during the day and at night I'd read by candlein a recent interview. "I've always believed that light," he remembered. "I started reading the I'm here for a reason, for a purpose. And my Bible and asking myself, 'Why am I here? faith has been my foundation." What's my purpose in life?' When you're by When faced with difficult times in his life, "I yourself and you're searching, faith is that somereminded myself that God allows things to hap- thing inside you that brings you back." pen for'a reason," he remarked. Primary in his mind, he said, is being a hus"I've always felt that I was on this path. I just band and a father to his newborn baby girl, Mia don't believe in coincidences," he added. "There Elizabeth, born two days before the Olympic triwere times when I had no money and all of a als began. sudden a job opportunity would come up. Or As for life after the Olympics, Parra said it times when I had nothing and something hap- will all be up to his wife, Tiffany: pened and simply inspired me, keeping me go"She's been following me around for years, ing." putting her life on hold while I finished my caAt five-feet four-inches and 140 pounds, Parra, reer," he said. "My wife needs to be No. 1 now." was the shortest male skater on the U.S. team, as well as the first F""'"'~~""""""'""":':"';"'-:;~:7"'""--__-~""" Mexican-American athlete to participate in the Winter Olympics. On the first day of Olympic competition, he earned a silver medal in the 5,000-meter race, which he said was "quite sur:' prise." He followed that performance by winning a gold medal h' Id d "

THOUSANDS OF Croatians cheer for multiple Olympic medal winner Janica Kostelic in Zagreb recently. The Catholic skier won Croatia's only medals in the Salt Lake 2002 Winter Games. (CNS photo by Josip Stilinovic)

.' .',: :"Croatian bishop congratulates Olympic gold medalist in Zagreb By JOSIP STILINOVIC CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

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cal success achieved at the Olympic Games in Salt Lake ZAGREB, Croatia - Auxil- City," Bishop Kosic said. iary Bishop Vlado Kosic of Tile bishop said that, through Zagreb was among 200,000 her-achievements, Kostelic beCroatians who welcomed home caJTIi'li".symbol to unite all three-time Olympic gold med- C'oaiiali's~', ' alist skieUal).ica Kostelic dur~ , ';,:~:"y'otir.{hjfr~,work and persis- al~:g ~~;r~na~ ~wi~r ther~~~~O ing a 'receil,tcelebration irf·fl:,tence :l.'e~4i~'d.;in therighte~us 'meters. Zagreb's.· , . ' .... . ,.k,} / l' reward, .of main square: '. : :-:;-"' ". ! S U c 'C' e' s s , But for Parra, the person he • ' , ' • " . ; ,; • & . is away from athletics is his Kostehc, a "Your h,a,fi,dwork an,'dp,er- WhICh lor ev, .', ery young gre'atest accomplishment. Catholic w h o ' " .makes the,:' sis(ence resulted inthe'righ- person repreHe credited his success to the sign' of' the,teOU5 'reward o( stJ,ccess, sents an ex- people who offered continuous cross before which·-'ore.very young per- ample and support, including his co-workevery race, son represents an example c h a II eng e ers at the Home Depot, where he also won a and challenge how, with how, with is part of the Olympic Job Opsilver medal, God's help and even with- God's help portunities Program. capping a and even "I've always tried to live my com e b a c k out ideal circumstances, the without ideal life as the best person I can be," from major most can be achieved," the c i r cum - said the soft-spoken Parra. "I knee surgery. bishop said. stances, the challenge myself to be a better most can be, person. When I die, what's goShe received 'achieved," ingtomatteristhelifethatIled a hero's welcome in her hometown, arriv- the bishop said. and the way I lived it, not ing in a carriage drawn by He also congratulated whether I won a gold medal." white horses. Kostelic's brother, Ivica, who But he's not adverse to using She won gold medals in the placed ninth in the men's giant his position and celebrity for women's combined event, the slalom. Ivica Kostelic played good. slalom and giant slalom and the guitar during the celebratook silver in the super giant tion for his sister, and the whole "I think if you're in a posislalom. The, four were Croatia's Croatian ski team danced on tion as an athlete where people only medals in the Winter stage. look up to you, you owe it to Games. The event was broadcast live your community to be a role "Cordially I congratulate to more then four million model," he said., "So if I can you on this exceptional histori- Croatians. cause a child to believe in him-

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DEREK PARRA takes a victory lap after he won the gold medal in the men's 1,500-meter speed skating event at the Salt Lake 2002 Winter Olympic Games. The U.S. gold medalist later told a reporter that his Catholic faith is the "foundation" for everything that happens in his life. (CNS photo from Reuters)


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Trial mistakes seen reason to fight death penalty By JERRY FILTEAU CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

BLESSED JOSEMARIA Escriva de Balaguer is pictured in Venezuela in 1975. Pope John Paul" has announced that he will declare the founder of Opus Dei a saint October 6. (eNS photo courtesy Opus Dei)

Pope, cardinals formally approve canonization of nine new saints By CINDY WOODEN

Vrrgin Mary. He died in 1548. Blessed Escriva was born in Spain in 1902 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1925. During a retreat in 1928 he experienced God urging him to found Opus Dei, a spiritual movement that would help lay people pursue holiness through their daily work and responsibilities. Blessed Escriva died in Rome in 1975 and was beatified by Pope John Paul in 1992. Blessed Padre Pio is known throughout the world particularly

May 19 are: - Blessed Alonso de Orozco, a VATICAN CITY - Pope John Spaniard born in 1500. He entered Paul II and cardinals gathered at the the Augustinian order in 1523 and Vatican fonnally approved the caneventually became preacher of the onization ofnine new saints, includSpanish royal court, preaching to ing Mexico's Juan Diego, Father King Charles V and King Philip II. He died in 1591 and was beatiJosemaria Escriva de Balaguer, fied in 1882. founder of Opus Dei, and Italian Capuchin Padre Pio. - Blessed Ignazio da Santhia, During a recent ceremony at the another famed Italian Capuchin Vatican, the pope announced the confessor. Born Lorenzo Maurizio canonization dates for the three Belvisotti in northern Italy in 1686, men as well as for six other priests he was ordained a diocesan priest and religious. in 1710, but entered the Capuchins Blessed Juan Diego will in 1716. Both as novice masbe canonized July 30 in ter and as a simple sacristan Mexico City, the pope anand confessor in Turin, his nounced. The pope, who will be in Toronto fame for holiness grew. He The pope, who will be in July 23-28 for World Youth Day, will died in 1770. Toronto July 23-28 for World - Blessed Umile da fly to Mexico for Blessed Juan Youth Day, will fly to Mexico Bisignano, a Franciscan who for Blessed Juan Diego's can- Diego's canonization, then on to was born Luca Antonio onization, then on to Guate- .Guatemala for the July 31 canoni- Pirozzo in Calabria fu 1582. mala for the July 31 canoni- zation ofBlessed Pedro de San Jose He entered the Franciscans at zation of Blessed Pedro de de Betancur, the Vatican announced. the age of27 andwas known for his ability to "Scrutinize San Jose de Betancur, the Vatican announced. hearts:'prophesy and invoke Pope John Paul also anmiracles and for the gift of nounced that Blessed Padre Pio as one who intercedes with ckxt on "infused knowledge:'expertise in various subjects although he was ilwould be canonized June 16 and behalf of the sick and sUffering.. that the ceremony for the declaraBeatifying the Italian Capuchin literate. He died in '1637 and was tion ofSt. Josemaria Escriva would in 1999, Pope John Paul praised beatified in 1882. . him for the long hours he spent - Blessed Paulina do Coracao be October 6. The five others will be canon- hearing confessions, for his chari- Agonizante de Jesus, who was born ized together May 19 at the Vatican. table work for the poor and the sick, Amabile Visintainer in ~orthern The canonization of Blessed and for his ascetic practices under- Italy in 1865. As a child, her family moved to Brazil where in 1895 Juan Diego, the indigenous man to taken in imitation of Christ. The pope also praised Blessed she founded the Little Sisters of the whom Our Lady of Guadalupe appeared in 1531, was stalled for sev- Padre Pio's obedience and steadfast Immaculate Conception. She died eral years amid questions about faith in the face of Vatican-ordered in 1942. Blessed Benedetta whether he truly existed or was a suspension of his public ministry and investigations into his mental Cambiagio Frassinello, the Italian legendary figure. A Vatican-appointed panel ofhis- health after he developed the "stig- founder of the Benedictine Sisters torians concluded that he did, in fact, mata" - bleeding wounds like of Providence. Born in 1791, she grew up wanting to enter a contemexist and their opinion was accepted those of the crucified Christ. The priest died in 1968 at the plative order but obeyed her parby the Vatican after their report was ents' desire that she marry. age of8\. studied by other historians. After two years of marriage, she In Guatemala, the pope will canBlessed Juan Diego, they said, was born around the year 1474 and onize Blessed Pedro de Betancur, and her husband agreed to live as was baptized around 1524 by the the 17th-century founder of the brother and sister, a promise solfirst Franciscans to minister in mod- Bethlemite Brothers and Sisters. He emnly witnessed by the bishop of often is referred to as the "St. Pavia in 1818. Seven years later, em-day Mexico. According to the postulator of Francis of the Americas" for his they each decided to enter a relihis cause, Father Eduardo Chavez, embrace of poverty and his work gious order. Eventually, she Blessed Juan Diego committed on behalf of the poor and sick of founded the Benedictine Sisters of Providence to care for and educate himself completely to God and to Guatemala. The five who will be canonized poor children. She died in 1858. spreading devotion to the Blessed CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

WASHINGTON - Most of the people who have been sentenced to death in the United States did not get a fair trial, death penalty opponent Richard Dieter told a group of Catholic social action leaders gathered in Washington recently. "The system is broken," he said. Dieter, a lawyer and executive director of the Death Penalty In-. fonnation Center, backed up his assertions with a statistical study of all capital sentence cases in the United States from the restoration of the death penalty in 1973 through 1995. "In more than two-thirds of the cases mistakes were made in the (original) trial that were so serious the person should not have been convicted," he said.; Of the 68 percent of capital convictions that an appellate court reversed because of errors in the original trial, 82 percent of the defendants did not get the death penalty when they were tried again, the study reported. The study, conducted by Columbia University law professor James S. Liebman at the request of the Judiciary Committee of the U.S. Senate, said the high rate of errors discovered "leaves grave doubt whether we do catch them all." "After state courts threw out 47 percent of death sentences due to serious flaws, a later fed-

eral review found 'serious error' - error undermining the reliability of the outcome - in 40 percent of the remaining sentences," it said. Noting that Pope John Paul II and the U.S. Catholic bishops have called for the abolition ofthe death penalty in the United States, Dieter said, ''We aren't at the point (in the United States) where people are saying, 'Abolish the death penalty, it's immoral.' But we are at the point where people are saying, 'It's broken.''' He said many people become concerned when they learn that 99 people who had been convicted and sentenced to death in the United States subsequently were exonerated of the crime for which they were convicted. He said recent reversals of several convictions on the basis of DNA evidence have highlighted the problem of wrongful convictions. He said awareness of the problems surrounding capital punishment seems to be growing. In 1994, 80 percent of Americans supported the death penalty, but the most recent polls indicate that support has declined to 65 percent, he said. "It used to be very difficult for a political leader to come down against the death penalty at all," he said. Now, he added, it is becoming acceptable for politicians to say they don't want it used against children, or against those who are retarded.

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EJe Editor's Note: This is the first in a monthly column on TV by the CNS media editor.

CBS and, to a lesser extent, NBC have argued that the prized demographic may grow older as the baby-boom generation By MARK PATTISON ages. News broadcasts - mornCATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE _ ing, evening, and 'Sunday WASHINGTON - Do you newsmakerprograms-tend to feel sometimes that you don't tout a 25- to 54-year-old derelate as well to television now mographic. Whether that spills as you used to? Depending on over into prime-time programhow ,old you are, you may be ming, and whether networks right. can convince advertisers to reThe commercial networks, adjust their demographic broadcast and cable alike, are tables', remains to be seen. in, business to make money. So what appears on the netThat's no surprise. How do they works' schedules is designed to make money? By selling com- attract younger-adult eyeballs, mercial time to sponsors. who presumably would watch Again, probably no great sur- the commercials (if they're not pri se here. using the reThe r e ' s mote conplenty of But networks vel}' infre- trol to commercials quently charge commercial switch chanon TV, but time by how many people nels). This that's anexare watch'mg, b ut by how could other story. plain why But net- many people of a particular shows like ' NBC's "Fear works very age are watching. infrequently Factor" and other socharge commercial time by how many' called "reality" series are on the people are watching, but by air. how lJ)i1nYIlP~9plerof !\:particu=J ;>'..Jdf...you.haddouQts'<l.bo~t who lar age are watching" ..)';? ~." ,~·i}\~.iet'~'orkS' to' h';ive CBS,. for a long 'time now, , viewing thein, here's a quick has had the oldest demograph- rundown. ics of the broadcast networks. - CBS: Everybody, but you Demographics, a word bandied young folks are especially welabout an awful lot on the TV come. : landscape, refers to the charac- NBC: The coveted 18-to~' teristics of a population - age, 49 demographic. sex, religion, income and the - ABC: The same as NBC, like - for sociological analy- but more desperate since sis o~, jn TV's case,. market re- youriger viewers have deserted . search., But your faith, or onetime',ratingschamp "Who anybody's else's, usually has Wants to Be a Millionaire." little to do with the eq'uation. -Fox: In the network's inIn most cases, ,the preferred fancy, itcoveted:18- to 34-year- ' demographic is the 18- to 49- olds, but nQw is happy with the year-old age group. This group 18-to-49 group. is cherished because ad agen- WB: It's taken Fox's cies believe they are the most place as the self-proclaimed receptive to commercial mes- home for 18- to 34-year-olds, sages. but with a nod toward families Even if CBS' shows are as evidenced by "7th Heaven," highly rated - ratings, remem- "Gilmore Girls" and "Raising ber, are a measure of the total Dad." audience - they can't get as - UPN: also 18- to 34-yearmuch money for an ad because olds, and eager to have men in they attract an older audience. front of the tube, which exBefore it was canceled after last plains "WWF Smackdown!" season, "Diagnosis Murder" had and the ongoing "Star Trek" the oldest average audience age franchise. of any show on any broadcast So if you don't see yourself in'any of these demographic network. CBS has been trying to de- groups, your only hope may be velop a younger audience, and that a cable channel targets a found success the last two years narrower slice of the demowith "Survivor" and "CSI: graphic pie - yours - and to Crime Scene Investigation." pray you like what they have But, despite its current lead in to offer. the 2001-02 ratings race, it trails Pattison is media editor for NBC in what has become a cov- Catholic News Service. "TV eted 18-to-49 demographic. Eye" appears monthly.

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CHRIS KLEIN and Mel Gibson star in the dramatic film "We Were Soldiers." For a brief review of this film, see CNS Movie Capsules below. (CNS photo from Paramount Pictures)

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NEW YORK (CNS) - Following are capsule reviews of movies recently reviewed by the U.S. Conference ofCatholic Bishops' Office for Film and Broadcasting. "40 Days and 40 Nights" (Miramax) Crude romantic;comedy about a young bachelor '(Josh Hartnett) who swears off sex for Lent after his girlfriend (Vinessa Shaw) breaks up with him, but complications ensue as soon as he meets the girl (Shannyn Sossamon) of his dreams. Snickering at the Catholic Church's teaching on premarital sex, director Michael Lehmann's one-joke film exploits the holy season of Lent as a cynical pretext for abstinence. Misuse of the sacrament of penance, sexual encounters, recurring nudity, intermittent rough language and profanity. The U.S. Conference of

Catholic Bishops classification is Director Claire Denis' repulsive 0 - morally offensive. The Mo- film interweaves two stories about ,tion Picture Association of cannibalistic sex using a minimum America rating is R - restricted. of dialogue and a maximum of "Harrison's Flowers" grisly visuals which result in a (Universal Focus) . drawn-out, muddled narrative. Intense drama set in 1991 dur- Several explicit sex scenes and a ing the Serbian-Croatian conflict few instanc'es of crass language. where the determined wife (Andie The U.S. Conference of Catholic MacDowell) of a photojournalist Bishops classification is 0 - mor(David Strathairn) presumed dead ally offensive. Not rated by the travels to the war-tom area to bring Motion Picture Association of back the husband she believes is America. still alive. Using the backdrop of "We Were Soldiers" fierce political strife, director Elie ' (Paramount) Chouraqui depicts ethnic cleansPowerful Vietnam War drama ing in agonizing terms but the cen- . about the first battle between tral story of a wife whose fear is American troops, led by fatherly overshadowed by love fails to Lt. Col. Harold G. Moore (Mel resonate as powerfully as it should. Gibson), and the Viet Cong enemy. Pervasi ve and, harrowing war vio- Despite slim characterizations and, lencewith gruesome images, some a few cliches, writer-director drug use and recurring rough lan- Randall Wallace's harrowing true guage. The U.S. Conference of story depicts war with raw, graphic Catholic Bishops classification is imagery that underscores the A-IV - adults, with reservations. wrenching loss of human life as it The MotIon PiciureAssociation of touches briefly upon the formiAmerica rating is R - restricted. dable struggle to reconcile Chris"Trouble Every Day" (Lot 47) tianity and warfare. Constant war Sick sexual thriller about an violence with many bloody, chillAmerican (Vincent Gallo) honey- ing images and some rough lanmooning in Paris searching for a guage with profanity. The U.S. renegade French doctor (Alex Conference of Catholic Bishops Descas) who may have a cure for classification is A-IV - adults, a disturbing sexual deviancy af- with reservations. The Motion Picfecting the American and the ture Association of America ratdoctor's wife (Beatrice Dalle). ing is R - restricted.

CNSvideoreviews NEW YORK (CNS) - The following are home videocassette reviews from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Office for Film and Broadcasting. ''Don't Say a Word" (2001) Faulty thriller in which a New York psychiatrist (Michael Douglas) races against time to extract a mysterious code from a nearly catatonic young woman (Brittany Murphy) that wi11lead the ruthless kidnappers of his eight-year-old daughter (Skye McCole Bartusiak) to a valuable hidden gem. Though the frantic pace in director' Gary Fleder's film heightens suspense, narrative inconsistencies and shaky characterizations produce a frustrating package. Intermittent violence with a few gruesome images, a fleeting sexual reference and sporadic rough language. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops classification is A-IV '- adults, with reservations. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R - restricted. (Fox Home Video) "The Musketeer" (2001) Failed adaptation of Alexandre Dumas' classic focuses on the young swordsman D' Artagnan (Justin Chambers) as he attempts to save the 17th-century French throne from the schemes of Cardinal Richelieu

(Stephen Rea) and his brutish agent Febre (Tim Roth). Director Peter Hyams' watered-down story pathetically limps along, interrupted occasionally by an imaginati vely choreographed fighting sequence. Several scenes of mean action-violence and some sexual innuendo. The U.S. Conference ofCatholic Bi~hops classification is A-III - adults. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is PG-13 - parents are strongly cautioned. Some material maybe inappropriate for children under 13. (Uni versa\) ''Session 9" (2001) . Frightening thriller in which an asbestos removal crew (including David Caruso and Peter Mullan) working in an abandoned insane asylum uncovers the building's mysterious past while one of the workers loses his mind. Director Brad Anderson builds tension with deft editing as suspicion is cast on each character, yet one-note characterizations diminish the effect. Brief but strong violence with some gory images, fleeting drug use and recurring rough language with profanity. The U.S. Conference ofCatholic Bishops classification is A-N - adults, with reservations. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R - restricted. (USA)


Bush outlines proposals for w,elfare reform at D.C. parish ~

The President proposes programs to support marriage and encourage sexual abstinence.

WASHINGTON - President Bush, speaking in the gymnasium of a District of Columbia Catholic Church, outlined welfare proposals that include stricter work requirements as well as programs to support marriage and encourage sexual abstinence. He also said he favored giving states new flexibility in providing benefits and permitting more immigrants to receive food stamps. In remarks to a community development group that was meeting at the'St. Luke's Catholic Church gymnasium in Washington, Bush said the initiai results of a massive revision of welfare laws in 1996 are encouraging, "but we're not content." "We ended welfare as we've known it, yet it is not a post-povelty" AmeJica," Bush said. "Chi Id poverty is still too high. Too many families are strained and fragile and broken. Too many AmeJicans still have not found work and the purpose it brings." The 1996 law must be reauthoJized before it expires next year, Just what shape the reauthorized' program will take is a matter of increasing interest in Washington

New Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches is issued By CATliOLIC NEWS SERVICE

By CATliOLIC NEWS SERVICE

PRESIDENT GEORGE W. Bush, speaking in the gym of St. Luke's Catholic Church in Washington, outlines welfare proposals including stricter work requirements for p'eople receiving benefits and programs to support marriage. (eNS photo by Leslie Kossoff), and to the nation's chaJitable service organizations that work with people affected by the changes. Bush said a top priority for reauthorization is stricter requirements for work from people who receive benefits under the program now known as Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, or TANF. Because of a quirk in the 1996 law, Bush said, only five percent of TANF recipients ,are required to work to be eligible for benefits. He proposed requiring that 70 percent of TANF recipients work or" be in school or a training program for at least 40 hours a week. He said teen mothers could meet their requirement by attending

school, for iristance. "At the heart of all these proposals is a single commitment to return an ethic of work to an important place in all American lives," Bush said. He also said encouraging marJiage should be a pJioJity of the, reauthorization. "Statistics tell us that children from two-parent families are less likely to end up in poverty, drop oiJt of school, become addicted to drugs, have a child out of wedlock, suffer abuse or become a violent cJiminal and end up in prison," Bush said. "Building and preserving families are not always possible, I recognize that. But they should always be our goal."

Religious brothers look to halt shrinking number of vocations WILMINGTON, Del. (CNS) -. When the superintendent of Catholic schools in t~e Wilmington diocese visits classrooms, he often asks, "Who knows what a (religious) brother is?" "One hand in a classroom might go up," Xaverian Brother James Malone told The Dialog, Wilmington's diocesan newspaper. "Nobody knows about us. We haven't done a good job of marketing ourselves." Therein lie the challenges for brothers in the 21 st century: how to raise their profile, make known their worldwide contJibutions to the Church, and recruit new members to bolster their dwindling numbers. The number of brothers in the United States has decreased 55 percent in the past 35 years - from 12,271 in 1965 to about 5,500 today, according to the Center for App!ied Research in the Apostolate at Georgetown University. (The center repOits the number of sisters has fallen by the same percentage in that time span -to the cUI1'entlevel of 78,000 -though there were more sisters to begin with). ' , Congregations of religious brothers say they find it difficult to recruit new members because, to some degree, they are competing with dioceses searching for future pIiests. For Xavelians, Brother Jim said, vocations today come in missionmy areas like Aflica, where brothers help their neighbors learn the faith and how to train for a vmiety of occupations. Brothers m'C baqly needed in such underdeveloped at'Cas, he added, but that leaves many AmeIicans less familiar with these 1'Cligious men and prone to see them only as greeting card figures, jolly fruitcake bakers with tonsUl'Cs and long robes. , . Brothers want to change the image many have of them and let people know that their vocation is rewlU'ding and has a tlexibility of ministly rarely found in the pliesthood. So why does a man choose to become a brother

instead of a priest? As a Capuchin, Brother Kevin O'Loughlin has the option of becoming a priest, but he has had no desire to do so in his 20 years with the congregation, he said. "As a young kid I attended Franciscan schools and pmishes. I knew I was called to Franciscan religious life," he says. "I always wanted to work with the sick," and devoting his whole life to that ministry, he said, would be difficult as a priest. Today, Brother Kevin runs House of Joseph II, a diocesan Ministry of Caring resicjence for people with HIV and AIDS. Father Richat'd DeLillio, director of development for the Oblates of S1. Fratlcis de Sales in Wilmington and a former vocations director, said that in general, men who become brothers want a religious life defined by the thl'Ce basic vows - povelty, chastity and obedience - and by a nonsacramental ministly of prayer, service and community life. In most cases they do not want the time-consuming and demanding aspects of pmish administration that might distract from their calling, he said. Brothers aI'C men who take vows but, unlike priests and deacons, are not ordained and moe not preparing for the pliesthood. The issue of attracting more men to a religious vocation was addl'Cssed in Baltimore in August 200 I. In his address Marianist Brother Stephen Glodek, immediate past president of the Conference of Major SupeIiors of Men, said the traditional philosophy of religious congl'Cgations might best b~ desclibed by the phrase "If you build it, they will come," from the movie "Field of Dreams." - But, he said, many young people today have not come. "We must go out," he said. "We must bIing the message of Jesus and the goodness of our communities to where the people moe."

11

THEANCHOR-DioceseofFall River-Fri., March 8,2002

church archives and church Websites. It has statistical tables with the latest available data on membership, congregation and clergy. For some churches bodies it also has data on member contributions and church finances.

NEW YORK - A new Yearbook of American and Canadian Churches, prepared for the National Council of Churches, has been published by Abingdon Press. The 416-page yearbook for 2002 lists national headquarters, officers and periodicals of some 300 Christian churches in the United States and Canada. It also provides information on national cooperative religious organizations in both countries, local and regional ecumenical bodies, seminaries, religion-related research organizations,

To order the 2002 yearbook, write to - E-mail: yearbook@ncccusa.org, phone: (888) 870-3325, FAX: (212) 870-2817 or mail to: Yearbook Orders, National Council of Churches, Room 880,475 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10115.

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12 .THE ANCHOR- Diocese of Fall River -

Fri., March 8, 2002

Pakistani路 Catholics pray for slain reporter FAISALABAD, Pakistan (CNS) -Catholic churches in several parts of Pakistan held special prayer services for an abducted American journalist recently murdered by his Islamic extremist captors. . As news of the death of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl spread, parishes in the Lahore Archdiocese, Multan and Faisalabad dioceses and other areas held special prayers and Masses, reported UCA News, an Asian church news agency, based in Thailand. Father Khalid Rashid Asi, chairman of the National Catholic Press Association, said Pearl's death strengthened Pakistani Catholics' resolve to fight religious extremism and telTolism in their country. The priest said the Pakistani govel1lment has "come down hard" OD religious extremism in the country. "It is now time for us all to strengthen the hand of the govel1lment to fight the evils prevailing," he said. "The death of Pearl only points to the intensity of the crime. There is no easy way forward, but let us pledge to be peaceful and struggle

together now that the govel1lment has declared equal voting rights for all," he said. , Father Patrick Yousaf, a parish priest working with rural workers, told UCA News that Pearl's death "shows how extremist thinking is still prevalent in Pakistan." He called on people to help "the government fight this evil." Tmiq Farooq, 'a Muslim human rights activist, 'said Pearl's death could provide additional impetus for Christian-Muslim collaboration. "Pakistanis have been fighting telToIism in one form or another for a long time. The challenge for ChIistians and Muslims of this country is to jointly wage a struggle against evil elements in society," he said. . Pearl was abducted in the southern seaport of Karachi January 23; media sources confirmed his death February 22. A videotape containing footage of Pearl being killed reportedly was sent to the U.S. Embassy in Pakistan, Pakistani police have an-ested several suspects in connection with the killing,

Vatican confirms papal July visit to Canada, Mexico, Guatemala VATICAN CITY (CNS) The Vatican contirmed that Pope John Paul II will visit Canada, Mexico and Guatemala in July on an I I-day trip that in~<:Iudes World Youth Day festivities in Toronto. The Vatican announcement re'cently came after the pope offi.cially approved dates for canonization and beatification ceremo-' nies during his stays in Mexico City and Guatemala City. In distance traveled andnumber of days, it will be one of the

pontiff's longest trips in several years. Despite recent rumors, the Vatican does not foresee a stop in the United States during the trip. The pope's schedule calls for him to visit Toronto July 23-28. He is expected to rest for two days at an undisclosed location outside Toronto, make his first World Youth Day appearance July 25, and preside over a vigil with young people July 27 and a closing Mass July 28.

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Archeologist: El Dorado existed; but Jesuit historian doubts c_aim , Bv JOHN NORTON

the trip. But Polia assumes he did and theorizes that the lack of follow-up documentation in the ROME - Sparking new speculation about the Jesuits' archives demonstrates that the order's leadfabled golden city of El Dorado, an Italian arche- ers at the time wanted to keep the kingdom's locaologist claimed a centuries-old document in the Je- tion, secret. Father Morales said the document appears to have suits' Rome archives,proves that the South American kingdom existed and was even evangelized by been written by'an Italian Jesuit in Rome around 1650, decades after Father Lopez' death in 1585, Jesuit missionaries. Mario Polia, who teaches' at Catholic University and evidently was aimed at preserving the account in Lima, Peru, wrote in February in the Italian of the miracle. Father Morales said Father Lopez' never menmagazine Archeo that the document also indicates tioned Paititi in his anthat the Jesuits obtained nual reports to Rome, exclusive papal permis- '1""~ which are included in a sion to evangelize the " ' " collection of Jesuit hiskingdom 'and appar~. torical material pubently kept its location lished in recent dea carefully guarded secades. cret to prevent Spanish He said the first refconquistadors from , \. erence to Paititi in the plundering its famed Jesuit'archives is found gold . in a Dec. 28, 1585, A Jesuit historian, document written by however, called the Father Lopez's immearcheologist's interprediate successor, Father .tation flawed.' , Diego Samaniego, to Father Martin Mothe head of the Jesuits. rales, a specialist on The letter is contained LatinAmerica at the Jein a bound volume that suits' Historical Instisits ona shelf 15 feet tute in Rome, said the from where Polia undated and unsigned found the other docudocument PoLia cited ment in the Jesuits' undemonstrates at most derground, climatethat the "myth" of EI controlled archive. Dorado was important Contrary to the docufor ,Europeans in the ment highlighted by 16th and 17th centuries. Polia, which places EI The document "preDorado somewhere near sents absolu"tely noth.,. J Peru's border with Braing new, at least for hiszil, Father Samaniego's torians," Father MoTHIS HISTORIC document kept in the Jesuit letter descIibes the kingrales told Catholic News Service in mid- archives in Rome tells a missionary tale related dom as rumored to be February. "For me, this to the fabled golden city of EI Dorado. An Italian somewhere in the Santa is a good example of archeologist claims the undated and unsigned Cruz region of modernwhat one should not do document proves the ~xistence of the lost city. day Bolivia. ' Father Morales said with history." But a Jesuit historian calls the interpretation other documents placed The yellowing, flawed. (eNS photo by John Norton) Paititi in countries,like three-page document Colombia and Pararelates how a crucifix . that brietly came to life convinced the king and guay. He theorized thatJcsuit missionaries and Spancourt of Paititi, the Inca name for EI Dorado, to ish explorers "needed" the legend of EI Dorado to (ravel to Cuzco, Peru, to be baptized by 16th-cen- encourage them to keep pushing further into the tury Jesuit Father Andrea Lopez. The text says the interior of Latin America, where there was little king invited the missionary to Paititi, described as immediate reward for their efforts. ','The important thing about a mythical place," 10 days journey, away, and promised to erect a goldthe priest said with a.smile, "is that you never disbrick church. The text never says if Father Lopez actually ,made cover it." CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

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ROME (CNS) - The Do- of the Dominican Historical Inminican order has opehed an un- stitute, said the order planned to precedented historical investiga- publish by early next year the tion into the participation of its nearly 30 papers .given at the meeting as well as a transcript of members in the Inquisition. .' The first part of the study, held the discussions. recently by the Dominican His- , Future conferences in the seri'es torical Institute at, the order's include an jnvestigation in 2004 of University of St. Thomas in the Spanish Inquisition, in 2006 of Rome, focused on the role of Do- the Roman Inquisition and in 2008 minicans in the medieval Inqui- of smaller inquisitions in Europe, sition, when church tribunals to especially against witchcraft. Among religious orders, Dotry heretics first were formed. . A\;>out 50 international special- minicans played the most promiists on the period attended the nent roles in the inquisitions, closed-door me~ting, which or- which spanned the 13th to the ganizers said was inspired in ,19th centuries. "The Holy See availed itself part by Pope John Paul II's jubilee appeal to the Church to make prindpally of Dominicans bea "purification of memory." cause they were the best theologiFather Arturo Bernal, director cally prepared clergy of the time,"

said Dominican Father Michael Tavuzzi, a profes'sor at the University of St. Thomas who delivereda paper at the conference. Father Tavuzzi said the Dominicans intended the s<;:l:ies of conferences to be "a serious, dispassionate investigation" into the inquisitions, which he said took vastly different forms geographically and historically. The participants were internationally recognized specialists invited solely on th,e basis of their historical expertise, not their beliefs, he said. "The result has been excel)ent," Father Tavuzzi told Catholic News Service. ''The atmosphere has been extremely pleasant and serene, and the quality of the papers presented high."


Scouting

THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River- Fri., March 8, 2002

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and the Girl Scout Promise was led by Karen Monahan. The Girl Scout Law was read by Kathleen Monahan. In his homily, Bishop O'Malley praised the Scouts as, "young men and women who are living their Catholic faith" and who by pruticipating in the various religious medal programs, "are allowing themselves in a very practical way to live out the grace of discipleship they received in baptism." The bishop advised the young people and their leaders and families that like the Samaritan women at the well in the Gospel story, "we should allow ourselves during this Lenten season to be surprised to rediscover the Lord in our lives, and thereby to discover our true calling in the. waters of baptism ... that we have a mission, to announce the Good News, to share those living waters with others." Scout leaders receiving adultreligious emblems were: - The St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Emblem in Girl Scouting: Mrs. Mary Giersti of St. Mary's Parish, Fairhaven; - The Bronze Pelican Emblem in Boy Scouting: Lawrence J. Almeida of Holy Name of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish, New Bedford; Manuel Mello ofOur Lady oftheAngels' Parish, Fall River; and Alfred Moniz of St. Michael's Parish, Swansea; - The St. George Emblem in Girl Scouting, the highest Catholic Scouting Emblem: Mrs. Doreen A. Soru'es of Notre Dame Palish, Fall River; and Corey Fet,.eira of St. Julie Billiart Parish, Dmtmouth. Recipients of Girl Scout Emblems included, "I Live My Faith": Taunton Area Troop 23, Ashley Chaves and Alexis Whitman ofAnnunciation of the Lord Pmish; Alyssa Freitas of St. Jacques'; and Emily Savisky of Holy Rosary;' Troop 479, Kierston Pistoor of Holy Rosary; and Troop 1206, Melissa Salamone of Holy Family. Cape Cod and the Islands Troop 930. Sarah Anne Quirk

Convention "Participants, which included priests, religious and lay people got a lot out of it," said Father Hession. He added that the convention had a strong spiritual aspect with time allotted throughout the day for prayer and Mass. Jesuit Father John M. Staudenmaier deli vered the keynote address entitled "Speed of Light Messages, Speed of Blood Contemplation: How to Find a Good Balance." Other speakers included Bishop John F. Kinney of St. Cloud, Minn., and professors Jesuit Father Paul A. Souku and Sister Angela

Vocations Vocations Oftice and the Diocesan Council of Catholic Women, it will highlight World Day of Prayer for Vocations. "Many parishes have already responded for the booklets," said

and Jennifer Quirk of St. Joan of Arc Parish, Orleans. Fall River Area Troop 1083, Caroline Quinn of Holy Name, Fall River; Troop 1092, Rose Furtado of St. John of God, Somerset; Stephanie Pereira of St. Louis de France, Swansea; and Kassandra Simcock of St. Thomas More, Somerset; Troop 1148, Jenel/e Bel/any and Megan Tessier of Notre Dame, Fall.River; Troop 1514, Kristin LaChance of St. Anne's, Fall River. New Bedford Area Troop 30. Jennifer Collins, Sarah Forgue, Ashley and Vanessa Gelinas, Hollie Maitais, Lea Noonan, Bryanne Pepin, Nicole Silveira, and Sara Spach of St. Mary's; Penny Cruz of St. John Neumann, East Freetown; Elizabeth Koczera ofOur Lady of Perpetual Help, New Bedford; Kathryn Quintin of St. Mary's, North Dartmouth; and Oanaki TOITes of Immaculate Conception, New Bedford. Recipients ofMarian Emblems were: Fall River Area Troop 1243, Rhea Cabral, Violet Morrel and Erica Santos, all of St. Joseph's. New Bedford.Area Troop I, Jessica Furtado of St. Joseph-St. Theresa; Troop 20, Charlotte Carvalho of St. John the Baptist. ~ecipients of the Spirit Alive Emblems were: Taunton Area Troop 494, Karen and Kathleen Monahan of Holy Family, East Taunton; Justine Hill of St. Mary's, Taunton; and Rebecca Trucchi ofSt. Ann's, Raynham; Troop 890, Kayla Neslund of St. John the Evangelist, Attleboro. Recipients of Boy Scout Emblems included, Ad Altare Dei Awards: Troop 37, George Bianchi Jr. of St. Mary's, Seekonk; Henri George Brousseau ofSt. Joseph's, Attleboro; Robert Burke of St. John's. Attleboro; and Michael Brown of St. Mary's, North Attleboro; Troop 15. Jonathan and Matthew Cm'dosi of St. Stephen's, Attleboro.

Cape Cod and the Is'lands Council Troop 52, Jack Crowell, Nathan A. Trapp, and Greg Tolrin of Christ the King, Mashpee; Matthew T.

Kohler of Our Lady of the Assumption, Osterville; and Vytas Mitchell of Our Lady of Victory, Centerville; Troop 54, William McDonough, Michael Harmon, David Beatly, David Capra, Brendan McNamara, Jamie.Bianco and Mike Nelson of Our Lady of Victory, Centerville; Matthew Ryan and Jmed Holden of Christ the King, Mashpee; and Justin Lilak of St. Francis Xavier, Hyannis; Troop 83, Christopher C. Stewart, Patrick V. Downing, Gregory 1. Plante, Samuel R. Erickson, Mark 1. Realbuto, and Nicholas 1. Monis of St. Joan of Are, Orleans; and John C. Ferro of Our Lady of Lourdes, Wellfleet. Nru,.agansett Council Troop 5, Andrew Mendes of Holy Name of the Sacred Hem of Jesus. New Bedford; and Christopher Rogissm of St. James, New Bedford; Troop 24, Gregory Bairos, Tyler Enos, and Jared Franklin of St. Joseph-St. Theresa, New Bedford; and William Santos of St. Kilian, New Bedford; Troop 26, Michael Berube of St. Louis de France, Swansea; David Mmelly of St. Michael's, Swansea; and Marcus Cabral of Holy Ghost, Tiverton, R.I.; Troop 303, Chris DaFonseca of St. Dominic's, Swansea; and Lee Fontaine of St. Michael's, Swansea. Recipients ofthe Pope Pius XU Emblem: Cape Cod and the Islands Coun'cil Troop 44, Robert E. Bilodeau of Chtist the King, Mashpee; Troop 52, Jared O. Gregoire and Mathew DeVere of Our Lady of Victory, Centerville; Troop 54, John P. Antrim, Thomas Furey, Patrick McNamara, and Keith Stranger, Our Lady of Victory, Centerville; Troop 83, Kyle G. Edwards of St. Joan of Arc, Orleans. Nm,.agansett Council Troop 15, Robelt Boutin of Notre Dame, Fall River; Troop 26, Alexander Borden and Gregory Lopes of St. Dominic's, Swansea;

Green Bay during the convention. He was recognized for his excellence in' the service of the Gospel and Church exemplifying the goals and mission of the group as well as his dedication and contributions to the life and ministry of ptiests. Father Louis John Cameli was honored with the John XXIII Award for his outstanding leadership in supporting the life and ministry of priest. "It was a very impOltantconvention," concluded Father Hession. The 2003 NOCERCC convention will be held in Houston, Texas.

Continuedfmlll page one

Father Pregana. You can leam more about vocations at the Website: hllp://www.falhivervocations.org. Copies of the booklet are available to parishes and any-' one who wishes to have a copy

Fairhaven; Troop 303, Jacob Dube, Andrew and Ryan Partridge of St. John of God, Somerset; and Kevin Carney of St. Dominic's, Swansea.

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Ann Zukowski of the Mission Helpers of the Sacred Hemt. A. number of workshops were offered allowing attendees to explore the convention theme in depth and from different perspectives. "We talked about how religious education and faith formation are impacted by our technology and how we need to be the best communicators we can be. Pruticipants had a lot to take home," said Father Hession. Father Hession presented the 2002 President's Distinguished Service Award to Bishop Robelt Fealey Momeau, the Auxiliary Bishop of

Paul Martelly, Austin Moniz and Garret Moniz of St. Michael's, Swansea; and Jacob Cabral of Holy Ghost, Tiverton, R.I.; Troop 55, Luke Farrell of St. Joseph's,

and may contact the vocation office at 508-675-1311, ext. 240. For information about the April 21 holy hour contact Dot Curry at 508-675-1311, ext. 221.

Retreats for Sisters and Priests Sacred Hearts Retreat Center. Wareham. Massachusetts Come apart and be r:enewed in'your vocation. We are located on 128 acres right on the Atlantic. Retreat for Sisters "We have come to know and believe in the love God has for us." (1 In.4:16) Director: Fr. Richard McNally ss.cc. July 7-14 and August 18-25

Retreat for Priests "Come by yourselves to an out of the way place and rest a while .. :' (Mark 6:31) and the Lord will comfort you Director: Fr. Thomas McElroy ss.cc. September 15-20

For more information contact: Sacred Hearts Retreat Center 226 Great Neck Road Wareham, MA 02571 Ph: 508-295-0100 FAX: 508-291-2624 E-mail: retreats@sscc.org

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Student to explore justice.system TAUNTON Coyle and to examine how court cases often Cassidy High School senior An- change the.legal system. drew 1. Nystrom will attend the Na"I'm very excited about it said tional Youth Leadership Forum on Nystrom. "My uncle is a police -officer and I've alLaw in Washington, D.C. March 12-17. .ways dreamed about He was selected by being a police ofdemonstrating acaficer." He said the demic achievement opportunity to learn and an interest in law about law first hand wi II be a "great and justice. Nystrom joins more than 350 learning experioutstanding high ence." Nystrom will school students from across the United have the opportunity States at the forum. to visit local law The curriculum firms and area • for the program is courthouses includbased on a c t u a l , ' . , ing the District of events and allows '--"-lII~~.....:.lalO '. -Columbia Court ,of participants to learn ANDREW J. NYSTROM Appeals and visit from the examples some of our nation's set by attorneys of law and court most prestigious law schools inofficials representing .municipal eluding Howard University courts and the U.S. Supreme Court. School of Law and the George Students will have th~ opportunity Washington School of Law.

ACUSHNET SELECTMAN President David Wojnar is surrounded by students at St. Francis Xavier School, A'cushnet, during a recent visit to the school. He was on hand to discuss his role in city politics and about his choice to become involved in government. Standing with Wojnar is school Principal Susan M. Boulay.

~ FOUR STUDENTS . from St. Margaret's Regional School,' Buzzards Bay, were winners in a recent essay \ 'contest sponsored by the Wareha'm Elks Lodge No. 1548. The topic was "What the American Flag Means to Me," and each winner received a $50 Patriot Savings Bond. From left are: Shane Faherty, Kailey Brennan, Elk's Americanism Chairman William McNeil, Mike / Reynolds, Nadia Shutkofski, and Principal Mary Ann La Fluer,

FIRST-GRADERS at St. Joseph-St. Therese School, New Bedford, helped out the St. Vincent de Paul Society recently'" ',' by collecting toiletries 'for its food pantry. It was part of the school's Good Deeds Project. • BISHOP SEAN P. O'Malley, OFM Cap., and Principal Anthony Nunes of Bishop Connolly High School welcome exchange students from the Azores. They were visiting as part of the Azores and Cape Verde Partnership Program and in April a group of teachers and students from the Fall River school will visit Dr. Manuel Arriaga High School in Horta Faial.


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THE ANCHOR - Diocese of Fall River - Fri., March 8, 2002

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when you feel stuck, Catholic school's hockey What to do By It's just a moment, ning to move beyond a present situateam donates equipment this time will pass. tion requires a new vision of how you I'm not afraid of anything Sung by U2 Copyright (c) 2000 want your life to be. As apastoral counin this world for Alaskan youths by Interscope Recon;ls selor, I often ask those I work with to There's nothing you can throw at CHARLIE MARTIN • CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

STUCK IN A MOMENT

ST. CLOUD, Minn. (CNS) - When the Fish River froze in mid-October, Chris Brown did what any red-blooded hockey player w,ould do: He laced up his blades and skated up and down the river, which passes through White Mountain, Alaska. "Before the snow comes, you can skate for quite a while on the river," said Brown, who teaches at White Mountain School. But the alumnus of Cathedral Catho,lic High School in St. Cloud and St. Olaf Col1ege in Northfield soon noticed one thing: Many of the native Alaskans couldn't afford skates, much less hockey equipment. That situation soon will change. Thanks to a donation of approximately 1,500 pounds of used hockey equipment from the boys' hockey team at Brown's Cathedral High alma mater, the children of White Mountain soon wil1 be learning how to skate, stickhandle and shoot a puck. Their mentor win be Brown, a former high school and conegiate defenseman whose dream was to teach in Alaska. After he took his spin on the Fish River, he caned his mother, Jane, in St. Cloud. "Only a few kids had skates," he said in an interview with the St. Cloud Visitor, newspaper of the St. Cloud diocese. "I thought it would be cool if mom could scrape up a few pairs of skates for them. She caned back a few weeks later and said the hockey parents had real1y taken the project up."

White Mountain School has about 60 students, Brown said. The vil1age, located about 50 miles east of Nome and just south of the Arctic Circle, has about 200 residents. "The only real jobs come from the school, the one store in town or the city office," Brown said, adding that many residents hunt and fish to survive. There are no mal1s or theaters for entertainment. "The kids have a lack of things to do," he said. "The only thing theY have is the school gym. We have open gym nights.~' The area's volunteer fire department has said it win flood an area and, possibly build a rink with lights when the equipment arrive~. The equipment's transport is stil1 being arranged. Jane Brown, whose husband, Ron, is a longtime assistant coach for the Cathedral High School' Crusaders boys hockey team, went to a winter sports meeting and asked the team to donate any used equipment it had. , , "Never did I think there would be this much," she said of the response. When Cathedral's Blue Line Club, a booster group for the hockey program, heard about the request, it joined in, too. John Hal1, the club's president, gathered the equipment and stored it for the move north. "We want to see them learn how to skate and play," said Bil1 Curtis, a member of the club. "It's great that Chris (Brown) will take his spare time to teach them."

me that Ihaven't already heard . I'm just trying to find a decent melody A song that Ican sing in my own company Inever thought you were a fool, but darling look at you. ' You gotta stand up straight, carry your own weight. These tears are going nowhere, baby. Refrain: You've got to get yourse~ together You've got stuck in a moment, and now you can't get out of it Don't say that later will be better Now you're stuck in a moment, and you can't get out of it I will not forsake the colors that you bring The nights you filled with fireworks They left you with nothing Iam still enchanted by the light you brought to me Ilisten through your ears, through your eyes Ican see And you are such a fool to worry like you do I know ~'s tough, and you can never get enough Of what you don't really need now. My, oh my. (Repeat refrain.) I was unconscious, ha~ asleep The water is warm till you discover how deep Iwasn't jumping, for me it was a fall It's a long way down . to nothing at all (Repeat refrain.) And if the night runs over, and if the day won't last, And if your way should falter along this stony pass,

What do you do when you're reany st~ck in life? That's the question I conSidered after listening to U2's

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"Stuck in a Moment" off their "U2-7" disc. The group, featured at the Super Bowl in New Orleans, is one of my favorites in today's pop rock because of their commitment to organizations such asAmnesty International and the Chernobyl Children's Project. The song describes a person trying to help someone deal with a difficult challenge. He sings, "You've got to get yourself together. You've got stuck in a moment, and now you can't get out of it:' Getting "stuck" happens to all of us sometimes. How do we handle it? What can we do to get "unstuck?" No one approach works for every situation, but the following questions might help you analyze what you are experiencing: I. What do you wish would change? I understand that what you wish for and what is actually possible could be different. However, begin-

imagine how their lives could unfold with new awareness and energy. 2. Do you see the difference between "fonn" and "essence?" Let's say you are stuck in a ?ating relationship that seems to be g?mg nowhere. W~at you really want IS a healthy, canng relationship. That's the essence. The current "fonn" is the partnership as it is. Don't get stuck in the "fonn" when the "essence" is what you desire. 3. What risks are you willing to take? Change often involves risks. Yet, this is precisely the way to bring new energy into your life. When we are stuck, sometimes we can only take small steps. Such choices build a path toward creative change. 4. Are you giving too much attention to worry? As the song suggests, worry is natural but rarely helpful. In-' stead, put your focus on new actions and choices. Acknowledge the feelings of worry, but start implementing your new plan. 5. Can you surrender the problem to God? Not everything in our lives can be understood immediately. Many times we need to ask God to lead us beyond a painful situation. After doing so, pay attention to the surpnsing ways that God may bring his guidance to you, for instance, the words of a friend, a book that you suddenly become drawn to or even the lyrics of a song on the radio. Be open. No prayer for guidance goes unanswered. Life often asks trust of us. In the song's words, ''And if your way should falter along this stony pass, it's just a moment, this time will pass." Be willing to discover what new movement and life satisfaction God wants to bring to you. Your comments are always welcome. Please address: chmartin@swindiana.net

When your parents divorce By CHRISTOPHER CARSTENS CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

I see a lot of kids after their parents get divorced. Having divorced parents is hardly unusual these days, even in Catholic families. Many teens are glad to have the fighting over. After passing through the first difficult year of transition, most teens successfuIly go on with their lives. It is impoltant for teens to avoid taking sides. Especially in the first year after the separation, parents emotionaIly are dliven to seek reassurance from their kids, and that often means asking you to agree that the breakup was the other parent's fault. Picking sides is not your job and is almost always a mistake. There may be some exceptions to that rule, but not many. Lot" of kIds say that staying at one parent's place is wondeI1'ul, and the other situation is dreadful. "Dad is no fun," they say, "and all he cares about is rules and homework." Or, "Ever since mom started going out with

Edwin, she never thinks about anything else." Teens may complain that one parent yells all the time, won't let the kids have time with their friends or is old-fashioned. Those are things all teens say about their parents, and it is mostly unrelated to the divorce. Living with both parents, one might weIl take a stricter tone, while the other is more relaxed and easygoing. One might be the yeIler, the other might want to negotiate. The fact that your parents don't live together makes the differences more obvious. If everybody was still in the same house, one parent might soften the other, but that isn't happening after they split. Going back and fOlth from one house to the other, it's normal to staIt wondeling what life would be like if you could stay all the. time with the paIocnt who is easier to deal with.

GeneraIly, that SOlt Of wishful thinking leads nowhere, for several reasons. The courts generaIly resist changing custody agreements. Judges are realistic, practical people, and they know that if people can make changes easily, they will clog up the courts asking for them. Once judges make a of decision, they want it to stiCk.Remember" this is a choice that the judges and your parents will be making, not you. The court may listen to your opinion, but it won't let you decide. Second, what seems like the biggest, most important issue today may tum out to be no big deal in a few months. I've seen teens fight for more time with dad because he lived closer to their boyfriend or girlfriend. By the time the case even goes to court, you may be dating somebody else.

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If you are with one parent a few nights a month, that parent probably will seem relaxed and easygoing. That might change if that parent was suddenly responsible to make you do your homework and keep up with an your chores. One girl put it clearly, "All these years I wanted to be with my dad, and now he's acting just like mom." There are exceptions. If there is actual physical abuse, of you or any kid in your house, you should tell somebody. If somebody is getting sexually creepy with you - that might be either an adult who lives in the house or a step-sibling - you should not keep it a secret. But the vast majority of the time, the smartest plan is accepting the court's decision and doing your best to maintain a good relationship with both your parents. Your comments are welcome. Please address: Christopher Carstens, c/o CatholiC News Service, 3211 Fourth St. N.E., Washington, D.C. 20017.

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Diocese of Fall River - Fri., March 8, 2002

Canadians bring World YopthDay cross to

ground zero in New York NEW YORK (CNS) -Canadi- said the visitors had come to "a modans preparing for World Youth Day em Calvary" bringing a "sign of recin Toronto this summer brought the onciliation." There, the youths were witnessevent's special cross and the~~yers " to ground zero in NewYork recently. ing to the world that ''there is another " WitJ:t ,special pennission seCured way;' Father Rosica said. While composed primarily of by New Yolk archdiocesan officials, two busloads of the Canadian visi- youths from 25 Canadian dioceses tors and a trailer contairiirig the cr:oss and from nine countries, the delega, were led by, police to th~ spot where tion included representatives of the the towers ofthe World Trade Center police, fire and emergency services that will be assisting with World stobdi.uitil September 11. ' ,,The viSitors went up the steps to Youth Day. They came to paytribstand on'thewoodenplatf6im first utes to their counterparts who served 'built as a: viewing'spot for families of heroically, often at the cost of their 'the people killed in'the attacks.:' , lives, at the World Trade Center. The visitors had arrived about , As the group softly sang "Jesus, remember me'when you come into noon the previous day after a 12-hour your kffigdom.', siX Canadian youths bus trip from Toronto, and then atcarried the World Youth Day cross tended a Mass and prayer vigil at St. Patrick's Cathedral. Auxiliary Bishop up to the platform. ' Anthony. ,'G. Standing beMeagher:' of fore the cross Toronto, who and looking out heads the Canaonto the empty dian bishops' space and hole committee for in the ground World Youth where New Day and traveled York's t;lllest with the group, buildings once was celebrant stood, the visiand homilist for tors joined in a the Mass. liturgy that beAfter the gan: "Behold Mass, the cross the cross of was brought GhriSt: die pmce down to the conof suffering and gregation for death that has veneration durbecome the sign ing a prayer vigil ofour reconcilithat was part of ation with the the preparation Father." J 0 se ph AN"'UNIDENTI'FI'Ei'O\voman for the visit to .' , ground zero the Panepinto, director of the waves the 2002 World Youth Day next morning. After spendCatholic Youth flag over the exc~y~tion sit~, Organization for where the yvorld Tr~9.e Center.i ing the night at the New York once stood In New Yor!5 recently. Mount Manresa Archdiocese, (CNS photo by Chris Sheridan)' Jesuit Retreat said it was diffiHouse on cult to get pennission for so many to Staten Island, the visitorS returned visit but it came after he streSsed to to Manhattan for Mass at Our Saviour Church before going to ground police the importance of the cross. Simple, made of wood, the 13- zero. Archbishop Renato R. Martino, foot cross was entrusted to the world's youths byPope John Paul II in 1984, Vatican nuncio to the United Nations, 'and' has served as the symbol of was celebrant and homilist for the World Youth Day since the event be- Mass. gan that year. ''What you will see today when Last year, Italian youths, who were you visit ground zero is the consecustodians of the cross for the 2000 quence of sin, a crater of dirt and event in Rome, turned it over to Ca- ashes, ofhuman destruction and sornadian youths, and it has since been row, a vestige of sin that is so evil taken to all parts of Canada. After the that words could never suffice to exNew York visit, the cross was to go plain it;' he said. to Tmunins, Ontario. A walking pilBuses took the group directly grimage April3Q-June 9 will take it from the church to the World Trade on its final journey from Montreal to Center site, where the young people, Toronto. in French and in English, prayed for Basilian Father Thomas Rosica, "all those throughout the world who director of this year's World Youth endure senseless suffering and death;' Day, said he secured Vatican pennis- and particularly ''for the people ofthe sion to bring the cross to the World World Trade Center, the Pentagon Trade Center site, and had talked with and the plane that crashed in Pennthe pope about the plans in a meet- sylvania." ing two weeks earlier. By noon, theirpurpose fulfilled in Against the backgroundofground a 24-hour offering of prayer, the pilzero's vast emptiness arid the noise grims from Canada reverently put the of the men and machinery still en- cross back in its trailer and boarded gaged in the cleanup, Father Rosica their buses to return home.

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AN AFGHAN child drew this picture of refugee's ,journey through the' mountains of Afghanistan. It is one of 28 drawings by children from the 'Shamshatoo refugee camp in Pakistan on display atthe Capital Children's Museum in Washington through June. The children's scenes were collected by Catholic Relief Services workers who assist in running the camp. (CNS photo from Catholic;: Relief Services) '

Panelists assess what changed after 9-11 and what it means for the Church By JERRY FILTEAU CATHOLIC NEWS SERVICE

WASHINGTON - "Everything did not change, but just about everything was touched" by the terrorist attacks of September 11, said panelist Robert Royal in a 90-minute session with about 500 U.S. Catholic social ministry leaders on challenges facing the church and world after September 11. One question panelists discussed was the status of pacifism after the terrorist attacks and whether nonviolence was a public-policy option. Royal, head of the Faith & Reason Institute in Washington, was one of three panelists addressing the annual Catholic Social Ministry Gathering at a plenary session on the final day of the group's February 24-27 meeting in Washington. Father J. Bryan Hehir, head of Catholic Chari,ties USA and moderator of the panel, said the terrorist acts "altered the map of world politics," but issues of poverty, justice and globalization that were there.before September 11 are still there. 'The "intense debate" on humanitarian military intervention as a just-war issue, fueled over the last decade by crises in places like. Rwanda, Burundi, Sierra Leone and Kosovo, is still going on, he said. ' September 11 had "enormous implications" for j\,lstic~ a!ld peace concerns;he added: He said the annual U.S. budget "is always a moral document" because its allocations express "what we value." The terrorist attacks have put the budget process "back to a Cold War context" of increased military spending, he said. ''There are justifications for some increases, but not for every increase." , . Father Hehir argued that if, as many analysts say, the United States is now on the cusp of phase two in the war on terrorism, such a point ought to be "precisely a time to step back and assess" the direction of U.S. policy. Panelists along with Royal were Margaret O'Brien Steinfels, editor of Commonweal magazine, and Ray Suarez, senior correspondent on the PBS "NewsHour." Royal argued that one change since September 11 was the discrediting of "what I would call a sentimental view of war and peace issues," that war is never a solution. "I think it goes without saying, wars do solve things. World War II solved a real problem," he said. Domestically, he said the outpouring of charity toward the victims of the September 11 attacks has presented the Church with "a tremendous opportu-

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nity" to tap a spirit of generosity, including,a· new spirit of volunteerism as well. . Steinfels said one aspect of September 11 that has received much attention but too little analysis' was how the police, firefighters and other rescue,' workers responded to the World Trade Center attacks. ''They are regarded as heroes, and rightly so," she said. "But they also did, in groups and in common, what they were trained and expected to do.... This cuts against the autonomous and self-directing ethos of American culture; and I think, in part. that was what their heroism consists in." On the war against terrorism, Steinfels said she believed it was justified, "but the next moves by the . United States in Afghanistan and elsewhere will be critically important" for ongoing moral analysis. She argued that Catholics are challenged to ask themselves, "What does it mean to be a Catholic citizen of the superpower, not just the most powerful nation in the world but probably the most powerful nation in history?" Too often, she said, the typical Catholic response comes down to patriotism or protest and "too few of us Catholics" try to understand the complexities of policy choices and the perspectives from which those of other nations and cultures view America. Suarez contrasted the robust economy and budget surpluses that were the framework of the public policy debates at the start of 2001 with the rising unemployment, federal deficits and "severe contractions being contemplated in state capitols" that frame such discussions today. He questioned Royal's assertion that Americans are more generous after September 11 than they were before, saying it is easier to get their support for the 3,000 families of the attack victims than it is to "get them to even think about the 30 million poor" in the country. The loud applause from the audience for a question about nonviolent resistance as an alternative to the just-war approach indicated a pacifist leaning in at least a substantial portion of those participating in the meeting. Steinfels praised the "important witness" of nonviolence but added, "I don't think any state can take nonviolent resistance as a matter of public policy." Royal said that "paradoxically," a lack of military response to the terrorist attacks would probably "invite more terrorism."


03.08.02