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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1 Spring 2009

THE AACA MAGAZINE

These fine archaic points were all found by Steve Valentine in Lawrence County, Ohio. Carter Cave, Flint Ridge, Kanawha Black, and Bisher Chert are some of the lithic materials represented.


AACA MAGAZINE Authentic Artifacts Collectors Association, Inc.

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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Table of Contents From The Editor Pg 1-2 President's Message Pg 3 Reflections by Ken Schmidt Pg 3 Meet AACA Director Kim Radke Pg 4

Favorite Flint by J. Selmer Pg 5-6 Megafauna by Steve Stangland Pg 7-9 Perfect Ending to a Great Day in Ohio by Steve Valentine Pg 10-11

The Find of a Lifetime by D. Wegiel Pg 12-13

Spring 2009


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

IMPORTANT MESSAGES FROM THE EDITOR Credit Where Credit Is Due Thanks for visiting our first issue of the 2009 AACA Online Magazine. The previous issue was my first as the new editor and it received many nice compliments from the membership. Too many of these compliments, however, were directed at the new editor. I want to point out that there is an assistant who plays a major role in the production of the magazine. Once I have edited all of the articles sent in by contributors, he takes all of this material, formats it for the internet, and makes the material visually attractive for you, the reader. This talented and highly deserving individual is Director Rob Dills. This magazine would not be possible without Rob Dills. Kudos to Rob!!

In Situs Needed Thanks to all of you who have contributed in situ pictures. We no longer have a backlog of them, so will need more for the summer issue. Spring is here and many of you have shed your heavy garments and have headed for the fields and streams in pursuit of “little treasures.” We are anxious to publish some of these spring and summer finds! We do ask, however, that they be above average in quality and that you include some brief information on the “who, what, where, when.” Send submissions to sstangland@cox.net. “Unique” In Situs Also Needed The AACA Magazine is willing to publish interesting in situ pictures of animals that you catch on camera while artifact hunting. The magnificence of nature that surrounds us while hunting is a major contributor to our enjoyment in forest and field. There is no reason that we cannot include some of these magic moments in our magazine. The last issue, for example, included a beautiful in situ arrowhead-hunting dog! The present issue includes an in-situ Southern Pacific Rattler crawling between two ancient bedrock mortars! Examples that might catch the Editor’s attention would be frogs, turtles, lizards, snakes, birds, foxes, coyotes, insects, and the list could go on and on! Spring, with its rebirth of all life forms, is a perfect time for the collector to take a few extra seconds to capture some interesting critters on the camera. Sharing some of these magic moments with fellow collectors could prove to be special! If enough submissions were received, we could even create a special section for them! Send submissions to sstangland@cox.net.

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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

Attention History Buffs – Special Summer Issue Needs The 2009 summer issue of the AACA Magazine will feature SPANISH EXPLORATIONS IN THE NEW WORLD WITH EMPHASIS ON CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS. Why are we doing this? Because knowing a little history that lies at the base of any collector’s hobby is a good thing! It makes the collector a more knowledgeable individual and contributes to a better personal appreciation of the hobby. We already have in hand a comprehensive article on Christopher Columbus and his four voyages to the “New World.” Also in hand is an article on the Taino Indians that Columbus encountered in the West Indies. If you enjoy history or have an interest in Native American history, we need your articles! Suggestions for articles that we might publish for this special issue are as follows: Hernan Cortes and his encounters with the Aztecs Francisco Pizarro and the Inca Cabeza de Vaca and his wanderings The search for the “Seven Cities of Gold” Francisco de Coronado’s expeditions into the Southwest and Kansas Columbus “related” articles Other ? Article Requirements: Not too lengthy Must be accompanied by at least one picture Must include at least a simple bibliography in order to credit your sources of information. Columbus meets the locals upon his arrival in the "West Indies"

As appropriate, writers need to credit certain types of information by footnoting or crediting their sources. This, of course, would only be necessary when a contributor has utilized other sources for his/her information (books, magazine articles, publications, etc.). The Editor doesn’t want to go "overboard" with this and doesn't want it to become cumbersome for writers. The crediting can be easy and simple. A suggested sentence might look like the following: “Information in this article has been gleaned from a variety of different sources, books and publications, including the following: .....x...., .....x......, and .....x......" Send submissions to sstangland@cox.net

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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

Hello AACA Collectors! A big WELCOME to our new members that have joined since our last AACA Magazine was published. Membership has steadily grown and the Association now has the largest online enrollment of any website in artifact collecting! Members, please be aware that you will need to log in to the AACA site to fully realize the resources available only to members. Much of the site is visible to the public, but sections such as the Members Forum and others are only for registered members that sign in. Anyone needing assistance with logging on may email president@theaaca.com for help. Please mark your calendars for the Expo held in Ft. Mitchell Kentucky on July 17-19, 2009. This will be the seventh Expo in this location, and it has expanded every year into what may be the finest show of ancient relics in the country. Members that want to participate or even volunteer to work at the Expo, can email president@theaaca.com or contact any AACA Director. We will see you in Kentucky in July. Be sure to bring all of those spring finds from this hunting season! Cliff Jackson Reflections on the AACA from Director Ken Schmidt A long time ago, when the AACA was in its infancy, I stumbled upon the AACA website. Feller named Jim Bennett, along with Eric Wagner, Steve Lewis, Peter Allen, and Steve Lyons, and some folks I didn’t know had started up an association and were asking for volunteers to serve as directors. Why not? I sent in my resume’ and was voted in as a board member. Little did I know what that would entail. Over the next ten years, we worked to get this association running. No credit to any individual, since it was a team effort. As a board, we assigned people to manage projects, enlisted attorneys to get us our legal status and all sorts of insurance, and Jim started the first Expo. We’ve had so many directors I lost count, and have elected more than a few officers. We’ve revised bylaws, discussed issues, unfortunately have had to remove members, but have gained more than a few. Thanks to Matt Rowe we started the members’ forum, and David Heath contributed a lot of time to enhance the website. We now have regional chapters springing up like mushrooms, and the members are contributing more than ever. The newsletter became a success under the direction of Kim Radke and is now in the capable hands of Steve Stangland and assistant Rob Dills; we combined the position of Secretary/Treasurer and selected Malcolm McLaughlin to assume that position. Cliff Jackson is our president, as were a number of other distinguished members before him. We always select a president willing to jump over a precipice. When a director steps down for whatever reason, we start looking for another. The association is always moving forward, never in stasis. I realize we always need new people on the board, and welcome anyone who can help replace us as we fade out. This is YOUR Association as members. PG 2


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

MEET AN AACA DIRECTOR Kim Radke - AACA Director

I was born in Chicago in 1962 and have resided in the great state of Illinois all my life. Go Bears! I have been married for 23 years and have three children. I work part-time as a cook/ bartender and I live in a small rural community where tractors driving down the highway are a commonplace occurrence. My hobbies include Native American artifacts, gardening, cooking, photography, reading and taking long walks down a country road while listening to my favorite tunes. I am currently a Moderator on a Civil War forum and am lucky to have met so many terrific people via the internet. I have had a fascination with ancient man since grade school and every spring I spend numerous hours walking plowed fields, looking for any artifact left behind from long ago. Since I started surface hunting 15 years ago, my collection of personal finds has grown and with the help of the internet, I have been able to acquire artifacts from around the country. I have a personal fondness for relics from the Northwest region of the United States and would like to expand my collection of slate artifacts. I was elected to The AACA Board of Directors in April 2006 and soon after, took on the job as Editor of the quarterly Newsletter. I am proud to say that I was a part of the team that assisted eBay in restructuring the Native American categories, making it a better site for collectors. It has been my pleasure to be a part of The AACA and an honor to have been the first woman nominated and elected to the Board.

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Favorite Flint – Narbona Pass Agate By John Selmer

What’s your favorite flint material? If you’re like me, you have many and it is hard to decide which one is your “real” favorite. Some of my preferred flint materials, in no particular order, include Flint Ridge, Carter Cave, Coshocton, jasper, Hornstone, petrified wood, Knife River, Fort Payne, Dover, Coastal Plains, Upper Mercer, Sonora, Columbia River agates, Hartville Uplift, Burlington, coral, Alibates, obsidian, Yeso, Georgetown, chalcedony, Hixton, Edwards Plateau, Crowley's Ridge, novaculite, Boone, and the list goes on. I guess you could say that I like everything, but if I had to name just one, it would have to be Narbona (or Washington) Pass Agate. I’ve also seen this material referred to as Chuska Chert in the literature. Narbona Pass (formerly Washington Pass) is an 8,150 foot natural gap in the Chuska Mountains. The Chuska Mountains are an elongate range on the Colorado Plateau and within the Navajo Nation. The range is about 50 by 10 miles; it trends north-northwest and is crossed by the state line between Arizona and New Mexico. Prior to the infamous Navajo "Long Walk,” eleven bands of Navajos lived in the Chuska Mountains; among them was the legendary Navajo Chief Narbona. Originally, Lieutenant James K. Simpson named the gap Washington Pass in honor of Colonel John M. Washington. However, the pass has been renamed recently in honor of Chief Narbona, who was killed under orders of Colonel Washington in 1849. Students at Diné College helped change the name to Narbona Pass. Diné College is located in Tsaile, Arizona and was chartered by the Navajo Nation to bring more higher education opportunities to the Navajo.

Narbona Pass Agate knife in the collection of John Selmer

Points made from Narbona Pass Agate are found throughout the Four Corners area. I've seen points from all ages made out of Narbona Pass Agate, from Paleo through Pueblo II. Interestingly, I've never seen any later Pueblo III or IV pieces made out of the material. Narbona Pass Agate is seen in red, pink, orange, butterscotch, blue, black, brown, yellow, white and clear. Regardless of color, it is usually translucent.

The material must have been prized by Native Americans because all of the Narbona Pass Agate points that I've seen have fine workmanship. PG 4


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

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The Cody Paleo Knife in this article is made of translucent Narbona Pass Agate and is one of the top pieces in my collection. It practically glows when you hold it up to the light. It is 4 7/16 inches long and was found in Western Colorado. The base is well ground and, as you can see, the blade on one edge has been resharpened in an excurvate manner and on the other edge as incurvate. The piece was previously in the collections of Jack Bates and Don Meador. It has a Dwain Rogers Certificate of Authentication (COA) and has been pictured in Robert M. Overstreet’s Indian Arrowheads Identification and Price Guide 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, and 9th editions. It has also been pictured in James R. Bennett's Identifying Altered Ancient Flint Artifacts and in Bennett’s Authenticating Ancient Indian Artifacts.

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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

Megafauna of Galleta Meadows By Steve Stangland

Something very interesting is happening in a little desert community about 90 miles east of San Diego. The town is being surrounded by Ice Age megafauna- mammoths, mastodons, giant ground sloths, and saber tooth cats! Why is this being reported in the AACA Magazine? Because Paleoindian arrived on this continent during the last great Ice Age and had to deal with some of these beasts. Some of them were actually on his diet…. and he was on some of their diets! About 15 years ago, a well-to-do land owner in the area, Dennis Avery, purchased “mega” parcels of land surrounding Borrego Springs with the intention of preserving the land as open space. Beginning in April of 2008, he enlisted a metal sculptor, Ricardo Breceda, to design metal sculptures of various megafauna that are placed in surrounding areas that have been named “Galleta Meadows.” The sculptures are not limited to the animals that lived contemporaneous with Paleoindian. There are also such beasts as the gomphothere (a mammoth-like animal seen above in the first picture), and even giant camels!

These two Harlan Ground Sloths have been exposed to the elements long enough to pick up the earthy looking color that comes from the rusting of the metal skin. Yes, ground sloths were around when Paleoindian first arrived on the North American continent! PG 6


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

Sculptor Breceda makes the animals with sheet metal and can pound out and weld one into its final form in about a week. However, there is enough demand for his services that he has a trained crew of seven to assist him.

Fortunately for Paleoindian and the rest of humankind, the two characters above were long gone when homo sapien first appeared on Planet Earth. These pictures are being shown to demonstrate the appearance and condition of the metal skin when brand new. The pictures were taken on October 26, 2008 when I spotted the two sculptures tied into a truck, ready for delivery and installation (somewhere other than Galleta Meadows). By now, these two T-Rex “skins” should look like the above pictured sloths.

No, this is not a T-Rex. It is another giant ground sloth. It too has been in the meadow long enough to pick up a nice colorful and rusty patina. The scientific community has a pretty good idea of what extinct animals looked like in terms of their musculature, but not necessarily their “skin” or body cover. Sometimes that is left to the imagination of the sculptor!

PG 7


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Ancient Tortoise

Sabertooth Cat For people who have more interest in this subject, you may visit one or two interesting websites with more information. The website www.galletameadows.com includes a video and pictures of most of the numerous animals in the meadows. The website www.ricardobreceda.com offers information on the sculptor and how he makes these large, impressive sheet metal sculptures. Special note: In February of 2009 I made another trip to Borrego Springs and found numerous new “characters� in Galleta Meadows. Below are the two that I found the most impressive! An interesting observation here is that the horse, in what is now North America, had gone extinct by the time Paleoindian arrived. However, he still had to deal with a few Sabertooths that were still running around!

PG 8


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

Perfect Ending to a Great Day in Ohio by Steve Valentine

This day started out like any other day that spring of 1982. I had just been laid off from my job and after a few futile weeks of looking for a job to no avail I decided to spend my time hunting artifacts every day to take my mind off of my lack of employment. I would get up around 9:00 a.m., get myself a quick bite to eat, and then it was off to a field of my choice to see what I could find! Some really strong thunderstorms had moved through the area the evening before and I watched the strongest ones move through to the south of my house, so I headed that way. I had more or less already decided on where I was going to hunt that morning and that was what we referred to as the Dow Site since it was a set of four small fields that blanketed both sides of the fence surrounding the entrance to the Dow Chemical Plant in Lawrence County, Ohio. I stopped by a buddy’s house on the way to see if he wanted to go with me and tried for around 45 minutes to convince him to go. He said he had too much to do that day and that he would be in the dog house with his wife if he went, so I went on by myself. Being 23, unmarried, and living at home with my parents at the time, I didn't have that problem and didn't have to answer to anyone which lent itself to many long all-day hunts, and this one would be no different. I finally arrived at the field right around 10:30 that morning and saw that the corn was up about knee high in most spots and in a few spots it was up close to mid-thigh. I started finding points almost as soon as I entered the first field and within an hour I had a couple of Fishspears, a Brewerton, a nice Madison, and a few scrapers. I knew then it was going to be a good day! I spent about three hours in the first field and found numerous points and tools, so many that before I headed to the next field I had to go back to my car to empty the bag that I carried to put my finds in. I got myself a quick drink from the pop I had left in my car and headed out to the next field. This field didn't produce nearly as well as the first and from past experiences hunting it, I wasn't all that surprised. It didn't have nearly as pronounced a ridge as the other fields and the low-lying areas usually lay in water, leaving a lot of mud and grime in the field. I did manage to find one decent Archaic side notch point and a nice little Brewerton, plus a few scrapers. I spent only about two hours there and it was going on 4:00 p.m. by the time I decided to head to the next field. This spot was usually very productive and we had nicknamed it “Hafted Scraper Field” since it never failed that most of the whole pieces you found were nicely made hafted scrapers. I hadn't walked more than twenty feet into the field when I spied my first piece and, of course, it was a really nice hafted scraper. Within an hour I had found three more nice hafted scrapers, a decent side notched point, two more Brewertons, another Fishspear Point, and the usual array of scrapers and broken pieces. It was getting close to 6:00 p.m. by the time I finished this field and I decided to go get a quick bite to eat at the local McDonald's and then head back to finish off the last field. PG 9


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It was around 6:45 p.m. by the time I finally got to the site and headed out to the last field. I had saved the best one for last. This field had always produced some very nice pieces for me and I hoped today wouldn't be any different. I started finding things almost as soon as I stepped into the field and the flint was just lying out everywhere. By 8:00 p.m. or so I had found another six points and quite a few scrapers and I hadn't yet even made it to the best spot in the field. I hit the last big ridge in the field, which was usually the best spot, and was rewarded with another batch of nice points and scrapers, as well as a nice knife blade. It was getting close to 9:00 p.m. by now and I was dog tired since I had logged in quite a few miles that day and had been hunting close to ten hours. I decided to walk out on the low end of the field that normally didn't produce much, but you would occasionally find a point or two there and is was right on the way back to the car. I had reached the end of the field and was walking along the edge when I passed by a corn row to my left and I got this odd feeling that I should go up the row. I can't explain the feeling, but it was like a voice in my head saying "Check that row!" At first I ignored it and took a couple of steps past the row when the feeling hit me again that I should really check out that row, so I thought… “What the heck; it couldn't hurt to make one pass up the row.” It was getting close to dusk now and the corn in this part of the field was almost waist high by now, so you had to part it with your hands to see the ground. I took about 15 steps up the row and as I parted the corn there lay one of the nicest points I had ever found to that point of my artifact collecting. It was lying completely exposed and just glistening from the rain the night before. I couldn't believe my eyes and had to do a double take to make sure it was really there. I reached down and picked it up and wiped the mud off the back side to see that it was a Lost Lake (though I didn't know that at the time) made from Carter Cave Flint with a bluish/white line extending from the tang to one side on the blade edge on both sides of the point. It also had a quartz inclusion on one side. It was by far the finest artifact I had ever picked up and indeed the perfect ending to a great day!

PG 10


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The Find of a Lifetime by Dan Wegiel

A little background: I'm a 62 year-old on SS disability and a proud former marine and Vietnam veteran who has a heart condition, having had a quadruple coronary bypass in 1991. On Thanksgiving in 2007 I had an ICD (pacemaker/defibrillator) implanted to help control my arrhythmia. I'm also an amateur artifact hunter but have been hunting them for many years and have what I consider a nice little collection of personal finds. Anyone that hunts artifacts has dreamed of finding that perfect four-inch fluted Clovis, cache of blades or complete bannerstone. Few have done so, but the dream still exists. I'm very fortunate to be able to hunt an Indiana field near the Kankakee River that has produced relics from Paleo to the present. I have a personal friend in his late 80's that hunted this same field over 60 years ago! On June 19, 2008, while walking corn rows on the high ground I looked down to see what appeared to be a washer from farm machinery, which isn't uncommon. But for some unknown reason I picked it up and put it in my pocket. About three or four rows later I saw what I thought was another washer, but it was a weird green color. Since I had been in the field for a couple hours already I was getting a little tired and didn't feel like bending over to pick up what I thought was debris from a neighboring farm. I just nudged it with my toe and it didn't move, so I nudged a little harder - no movement! So then I gave it a pretty good kick but it still didn't move. I had found a pretty nice scraper earlier so took it out of my pocket and started to dig the stubborn piece out. Now remember, I'm an amateur and not very learned on ancient artifacts, but who would have expected this? Well I finally got it out. It was all incrusted in dirt, but to me looked like a friggin' oar lock from the side view. I wondered how in the world did this get here on the highest ground in the middle of nowhere? I was a little disappointed. I started taking more dirt off and could tell that the top looked like it had a hole (similar to that washer) but still had no idea what it was. After rubbing some more, on one end I saw another smaller hole and then it hit me - IT WAS A PIPE!!!! Excitement struck me like I've never had, but I had to try and calm myself down so my defibrillator didn't shock me into “kingdom come.” Wow, a pipe! That put a little bounce back in my step, so I kept hunting for another hour or so and did manage to find a couple more nice pieces. I kept the pipe clutched in my left hand the entire time, periodically looking at it and knowing I had a smile from ear to ear, but fearing that I must be dying! Why else would I find this beautiful and rare relic? Now the bounce was starting to fade because I had myself convinced that I probably wouldn't make it out of the field and they would find me with the pipe clutched in my stiff, cold left hand! Well, I made it to the truck and drove to my best friend’s house. He had been a collector for over 50 years and when I showed it to him he almost fell to his knees and said "You don't even know what you have, do you? It’s a pipe, can't you tell?” He added “It’s not just a pipe, it’s a Hopewell Culture Platform Pipe and is very rare and very valuable.” Here we go again - I had to try and stay calm, but it wasn't easy. I started shaking and my knees got weaker the more he talked. Anyway, I've shown it to several collectors/dealers and it seems they get almost as excited as I. Just remember, no matter how tired you are, if it doesn't look like it belongs, take the time to bend over and check it out. It may turn out to be your "find of a lifetime.” PG 11


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

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Made of Ohio Pipestone, this platform pipe was Found by Dan Wegiel PG 12


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

Spring 2009

IN SITU SECTION Editor’s Note: Thanks again to those of you that sent in your in situ finds. Some of these were sent in for the previous issue, but did not make it, not for lack of quality, but because there were so many submissions. Well, you need wait no longer- here they are, with a few new submissions! We hope that you enjoy them! A “NEVER GIVE UP!” STORY Frank Beckwith of Texas sent in an interesting account of his discovery of a nice point that he found in Austin, Texas in 2008. Here is what he has to say: “I have been digging for just about two years and here’s how the point was found. This is a well known site that has been dug for around 70 years. I really don't think it will be there much longer. It is gonna’ be built on very soon. Ya’ can't stop progress, right!? I had found nothing but flakes all day. On a whim about ten minutes before leaving I tried a new spot. There are not a lot of undug spots left. Most of the artifacts just fall out. I had to move almost three feet of overburden just to get to a little two-foot wide spot that was undug. When I pulled up a large clump of dirt, the flint gods smiled upon me! The photo is just about how the point looked was when I first saw it. (I just blew the dirt off). That is why this insitu is so sweet for me. I am not sure of the material or type - Darl perhaps? Well that’s the long and the short of it! What a day!” Frank

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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

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A “SCORCHER” If you saw this lying a few inches below the surface of the water, would it stop your heart?! Found in a waterway on January 10, this is one of the first complete points of 2009 found by Lewis Smith of Greenville, Texas. A Steiner point made of high grade Ogalalla chert, it measures 1 3/8 inches and was found in Hunt County, Texas, around the South Sabine River drainage. Count the serrations - there are eight on one side and six on the other! “Indiana” Lewis, the finder, has this to say about his find: “We got out and walked along a few minutes. Pretty soon we were seeing flakes everywhere, and then I froze and shouted "HOLY COW!!!"

The point below, found by John Dillon in a Southern California mountain valley, looks very promising with its very unique base!

Ah, shucks! Another “heart breaker”!

PG 214


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

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This 1 1/16 inch point, found in January of 2008 by David Stangland, is possibly a reworked point from a longer dart point or knife form that was broken and then re-fashioned with a new base into an arrow point. This high quality material is rarely seen the area of Southern California where it was found.

The point below, measuring 1 他 inches and made of silicified sandstone, was found on September 18, 2008, in western Kansas by Joe Persinger. He found it in a farm field overlooking a dry creek bed.

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Below is a find made by Steve Valentine. According to Steve, these are commonly found on Fort Ancient sites in Ohio and come in various sizes. Here are Steve’s observations about this artifact: “This is a deer antler arrowpoint. These were made by hollowing out the base for hafting and by either sharpening the tip or just leaving it as it was. This one has a little bit of sharpening on one side, but that's all. It may be that they either didn't finish it or it could possibly be a flaking tool.” What - deer antler arrowpoint or flaking tool Where - Feurt Mound and Village Site, Portsmouth, Ohio When – March of 2008 Size - 2 3/4 inches long

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THE “POINT” OF THE IN SITU TO THE LEFT IS STAY AWAY FROM THESE GUYS! This is a late September of 2008 “personal find” of your editor; most likely a two-year-old Southern Pacific Rattle Snake. Granitic outcroppings and bedrock in Southern California are perfect places to find mortar holes and old sites. However, the sun heats up these places and they attract dangerous critters like the one you see to the left! Lying in very shallow water, the beautiful Perdiz point below was found in Aransas County, Texas, about three years ago by Steve May

Here is another point found by Steve May in Aransas County, Texas - a 1 ¼ inch Fresno made of Edwards Plateau PG 17


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Here is a great find made by Adam Agusti on February 8, 2008, in Vermillion County, Indiana. At first glance, this looks like a point with wicked notching and a “blood tip.” However, Adam clarifies as follows: “This point looked like a Kirk cluster point in situ because mud had collected in a small channel in the flint. It turned out to be a nice side notch point. It's fairly unusual around here to find a point under standing water in a field. It’s a 1 ¾ inch Robinson made of heat treated chert, possibly Burlington, or some unidentified glacial material.”

This interesting point is made from a rare form of striped Flint Ridge Nethers. It was found by Rob Dills on March 25, 2008, in Wayne County, Ohio.

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Below is a nice find by Terry Tucker. In March of 2008 Terry found this pipe in a dozed area of a field in Springfield, Kentucky. The farm where it was found used to be an old plantation with slave quarters.

Here are two excellent pieces found by Ricky Arthur in S.E. Utah

PG 19


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Volume Number 7 Issue Number 1

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This 1 3/16 inch Elko Split Stem arrow point is made of quartz and was found by your Editor at the 4000 foot elevation in Southern California on November 28, 2008

PG 20

AACA Magazine Volume 7 Issue 1 Spring 2009  

A magazine about Indian artifacts for collectors.

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