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Thursday June 28, 2018

readers have their say... Find out the WORD on the Street. Question: Does strike action (or threat of it) by nurses, teachers and public servants concern you?

Andrew Sweet, Island Bay Probably concerned about the effect. There’s a lot of awareness about pay parity. People are talking about what they are paid more nowadays.

Brenna McGuinness, Island Bay I think good on them. It takes a lot to take a stand and it’s easier with others. They’re putting on a united front; standing in solidarity.

Mark Gannaway, Seaview It’s not good. Nurses striking leaves people vulnerable. National got things done whereas Ardern’s [government] is concerned about where the extra money is coming from.

Jeanette Troon, Island Bay I’m concerned that they are underpaid for the valuable service they provide. Why not have a class-action strike? It has more impact.

Holly Kennedy, Newtown It does, but I support nurses, and teachers to a degree. People wouldn’t go on strike if they weren’t unhappy. Things have been left to slide for too long.

Brendan Hohepa, Porirua It concerns everyone. My wife is involved with nursing. When National was in government there was privatisation and it never worked. The strikes redress the imbalance.

LETTERS to the editor WHAT IS THIS MAN TRYING TO SAY TO US? WHAT IS HIS ULTIMATE MESSAGE?

Pope Night 7pm Wednesday 4 July ST ANTHONY’S GASCOIGNE ROOM 66 Falkirk Ave, Seatoun All Welcome!

HOLY TRINITY PARISH

Lack of common sense by bus company I feel for Beryl Skipper (Letters, 21/6) and the embarrassment of being on a bus and short of change. Pensioners often do not have the change in their purse between pension payments. Thank you to the people who helped her out and stopped her from being callously evicted from the bus. Once we could have boarded the bus outside the limited Gold

Card hours which does not allow for our late appointments in the city, but still have the pensioner rate until 4pm, but of course the greed of privatisation meant that was wiped not long after the Gold cradle came in. I see the people have been ignored by the bus company again, and work is being carried out to install new bus shelters down Russell Ter-

race, the street that is very narrow and much less populated than the previous Rintoul Street route. With both routes being numbered 29 how are you to know which bus to catch? You could end up behind the zoo instead of Mt Albert Road. As usual, a lack of common sense by those on high wages. Heather Bevan Island Bay

Karaka Bay sea wall rebuild nears completion

What the sea wall at Karaka Bay currently looks like. PHOTO: Richard MacLean

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Mount Cook School

The reconstruction of the seawall opposite Miramar’s Karaka Bay is 90 percent complete, with work expected to be finished by the end of June, says Wellington City Council spokesperson Richard MacLean. He says the road was washed away during a storm in June 2013. Concrete blocks were placed within

a week as a temporary seawall, so the road could still be used. In July 2017, locals noticed that the blocks had moved because of waves eroding the underlying structure. Contractors were organised by the council to anchor the blocks into the ground and build a reinforced concrete facing on the front of it. Richard says they decided to re-

use the 50 existing concrete blocks “rather than carting them off to the landfill”. Costs for the reconstruction will total $460,000, including a subsidy from NZTA, says Richard. Miramar resident Marion Hughes noticed the rebuild on her regular walks through the area, saying it was “probably much needed due to wear and tear.”

Cook Strait News 28-06-18  

Cook Strait News 28-06-18

Cook Strait News 28-06-18  

Cook Strait News 28-06-18